asp net core 2.0 mvc pdf : C# merge pdf files Library software class asp.net winforms web page ajax McGraw.Hill.CSharp.4.0.The.Complete.Reference.Apr.20104-part1198

14
Part I: The C# Language
/*
This is a simple C# program.
Call this program Example.cs.
*/
using System;
class Example {
// A C# program begins with a call to Main().
static void Main() {
Console.WriteLine("A simple C# program.");
}
}
The primary development environment for C# is Microsoft’s Visual Studio. To compile 
all of the programs in this book, including those that use the new C# 4.0 features, you will 
need to use a version of Visual Studio 2010 (or later) that supports C#. 
Using Visual Studio, there are two general approaches that you can take to creating, 
compiling, and running a C# program. First, you can use the Visual Studio IDE. Second, 
you can use the command-line compiler, csc.exe. Both methods are described here.
Using csc.exe, the C# Command-Line Compiler
Although the Visual Studio IDE is what you will probably be using for your commercial 
projects, some readers will find the C# command-line compiler more convenient, especially 
for compiling and running the sample programs shown in this book. The reason is that you 
don’t have to create a project for the program. You can simply create the program and then 
compile it and run it—all from the command line. Therefore, if you know how to use the 
Command Prompt window and its command-line interface, using the command-line 
compiler will be faster and easier than using the IDE.
C
AUTION
C
AUTION
If you are not familiar with the Command Prompt window, then it is probably better to 
use the Visual Studio IDE. Although the Command Prompt is not difficult to master, trying to 
learn both the Command Prompt and C# at the same time will be a challenging experience.
To create and run programs using the C# command-line compiler, follow these three steps:
1. Enter the program using a text editor.
2. Compile the program using csc.exe.
3. Run the program.
C# merge pdf files - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
combine pdf online; acrobat combine pdf
C# merge pdf files - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
acrobat split pdf into multiple files; add pdf files together
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 2: An Overview of C# 
15
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
Entering the Program
The source code for programs shown in this book is available at www.mhprofessional.com.
However, if you want to enter the programs by hand, you are free to do so. In this case, you 
must enter the program into your computer using a text editor, such as Notepad. Remember, 
you must create text-only files, not formatted word-processor files, because the format 
information in a word processor file will confuse the C# compiler. When entering the 
program, call the file Example.cs.
Compiling the Program
To compile the program, execute the C# compiler, csc.exe, specifying the name of the source 
file on the command line, as shown here:
C:\>csc Example.cs
Thecsc compiler creates a file called Example.exethat contains the MSIL version of the 
program. Although MSIL is not executable code, it is still contained in an exe file. The 
executeExample.exe. Be aware, however, that if you try to execute Example.exe (or any 
otherexe
installed, the program will not execute because the CLR will be missing.
N
OTE
N
OTE
Prior to running csc.exe you will need to open a Command Prompt window that is 
configured for Visual Studio. The easiest way to do this is to select Visual Studio Command 
Prompt under Visual Studio Tools in the Start menu. Alternatively, you can start an 
unconfigured Command Prompt window and then run the batch file vsvars32.bat, which 
is provided by Visual Studio. 
Running the Program
To actually run the program, just type its name on the command line, as shown here:
C:\>Example
When the program is run, the following output is displayed:
A simple C# program.
Using the Visual Studio IDE
Visual Studio is Microsoft’s integrated programming environment (IDE). It lets you edit, compile, 
run, and debug a C# program, all without leaving its well-thought-out environment. Visual 
Studio offers convenience and helps manage your programs. It is most effective for larger 
Online Merge PDF files. Best free online merge PDF tool.
Thus, C#.NET PDF document merge library control can be counted as an efficient .NET doc solution for keeping PDF document files organized. Download Free Trial.
asp.net merge pdf files; break pdf into multiple files
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
outputFiles); Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files in C#. You can use the following C# demo to split PDF document to four files.
reader create pdf multiple files; merge pdf files
16
Part I: The C# Language
projects, but it can be used to great success with smaller programs, such as those that 
constitute the examples in this book.
The steps required to edit, compile, and run a C# program using the Visual Studio 
2010 IDE are shown here. These steps assume the IDE provided by Visual Studio 2010 
Professional. Slight differences may exist with other versions of Visual Studio.
1. Create a new, empty C# project by selecting File | New | Project. Then, select 
Windows in the Installed Templates list. Next, select Empty Project:
Then, press OK to create the project.
N
OTE
N
OTE
The name of your project and its location may differ from that shown here.
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
How to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to HTML5 Files in C#.NET Class. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
pdf combine pages; how to combine pdf files
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
toolkit, C# developers can easily and quickly convert a large-size multi-page PDF document to a group of high-quality separate JPEG image files within .NET
scan multiple pages into one pdf; pdf mail merge
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 2: An Overview of C# 
17
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
2. Once the new project is created, the Visual Studio IDE will look like this:
If for some reason you do not see the Solution Explorer window, activate it by 
selecting Solution Explorer from the View menu.
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
file using C#. Instantly convert all PDF document pages to SVG image files in C#.NET class application. Perform high-fidelity PDF
add pdf pages together; pdf combine files online
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
content of target PDF document can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping original layout. C#.NET class source code for converting each PDF document page
pdf merge documents; pdf combine
18
Part I: The C# Language
3. At this point, the project is empty and you will need to add a C# source file to it. Do 
this by right-clicking on the project’s name (which is Project1 in this example) in the 
Solution Explorer and then selecting Add. You will see the following:
4. Next, select New Item. This causes the Add New Item dialog to be displayed. Select 
Code in the Installed Templates list. Next, select Code File and then change the 
name to Example.cs, as shown here:
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
C#.NET extract image from multiple page adobe PDF file Extract various types of image from PDF file, like JPG, JPEG and other high quality image files from PDF
batch pdf merger; break a pdf into multiple files
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
image files. Enable extracting PDF text to another PDF file, TXT and SVG formats. Support extracting OCR text from PDF by working with XImage.OCR SDK. Best C#.NET
add pdf files together online; pdf merger
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 2: An Overview of C# 
19
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
5. Next, add the file to the project by pressing Add. Your screen will now look like this:
20
Part I: The C# Language
6. Next, type the example program into the Example.cs window. (You can download 
the source code to the programs in this book from www.mhprofessional.com so 
you won’t have to type in each example manually.) When done, your screen will 
look like this:
7. Compile the program by selecting Build Solution from the Build menu.
8. Run the program by selecting Start Without Debugging from the Debug menu. 
When you run the program, you will see the window shown here.
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 2: An Overview of C# 
21
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
As the preceding instructions show, compiling short sample programs using the IDE 
involves a number of steps. However, you don’t need to create a new project for each 
example program in this book. Instead, you can use the same C# project. Just delete the 
current source file and add the new file. Then recompile and run. This approach greatly 
simplifies the process. Understand, however, that for real-world applications, each program 
will use its own project.
N
OTE
N
OTE
Although the preceding instructions are sufficient to compile and run the programs in this 
book, if you will be using the Visual Studio IDE for your main work environment, you should 
become familiar with all of its capabilities and features. It is a very powerful development 
environment that helps make large projects manageable. The IDE also provides a way of 
organizing the files and resources associated with a project. It is worth the time and effort 
that you spend to become proficient at running Visual Studio.
The First Sample Program, Line by Line
AlthoughExample.cs is quite short, it includes several key features that are common to all 
C# programs. Let’s closely examine each part of the program, beginning with its name.
The name of a C# program is arbitrary. Unlike some computer languages (most notably, 
Java) in which the name of a program file is very important, this is not the case for C#. You 
were told to call the sample program Example.cs so that the instructions for compiling and 
running the program would apply, but as far as C# is concerned, you could have called the 
file by another name. For example, the preceding sample program could have been called 
Sample.cs,Test.cs, or even X.cs.
By convention, C# programs use the .cs file extension, and this is a convention that you 
should follow. Also, many programmers call a file by the name of the principal class defined 
within the file. This is why the filename Example.cs was chosen. Since the names of C# 
programs are arbitrary, names won’t be specified for most of the sample programs in this 
book. Just use names of your own choosing.
The program begins with the following lines:
/*
This is a simple C# program.
Call this program Example.cs.
*/
This is a comment. Like most other programming languages, C# lets you enter a remark into 
a program’s source file. The contents of a comment are ignored by the compiler. Instead, a 
comment describes or explains the operation of the program to anyone who is reading its 
source code. In this case, the comment describes the program and reminds you to call the 
source file Example.cs. Of course, in real applications, comments generally explain how 
some part of the program works or what a specific feature does.
C# supports three styles of comments. The one shown at the top of the program is called 
amultiline comment. This type of comment must begin with /* and end with */. Anything 
between these two comment symbols is ignored by the compiler. As the name suggests, a 
multiline comment can be several lines long.
The next line in the program is
using System;
22
Part I: The C# Language
This line indicates that the program is using the System namespace. In C#, a namespace
defines a declarative region. Although we will examine namespaces in detail later in this 
book, a brief description is useful now. Through the use of namespaces, it is possible to keep 
one set of names separate from another. In essence, names declared in one namespace will 
not conflict with names declared in a different namespace. The namespace used by the 
program is System, which is the namespace reserved for items associated with the .NET 
Framework class library, which is the library used by C#. The using keyword simply states 
that the program is using the names in the given namespace. (As a point of interest, it is also 
possible to create your own namespaces, which is especially helpful for large projects.)
The next line of code in the program is shown here:
class Example {
This line uses the keyword class to declare that a new class is being defined. As mentioned, 
the class is C#’s basic unit of encapsulation. Example is the name of the class. The class 
definition begins with the opening curly brace ({) and ends with the closing curly brace (}).
The elements between the two braces are members of the class. For the moment, don’t 
ogram activity 
occurs within one.
The next line in the program is the single-line comment, shown here:
// A C# program begins with a call to Main().
This is the second type of comment supported by C#. A single-line comment begins with 
a// and ends at the end of the line. Although styles vary, it is not uncommon for programmers 
to use multiline comments for longer remarks and single-line comments for brief, line-by-
line descriptions. (The third type of comment supported by C# aids in the creation of 
documentation and is described in the Appendix.)
The next line of code is shown here:
static void Main() {
This line begins the Main( ) method. As mentioned earlier, in C#, a subroutine is called a 
method. As the comment preceding it suggests, this is the line at which the program will 
begin executing. All C# applications begin execution by calling Main( ). The complete 
meaning of each part of this line cannot be given now, since it involves a detailed 
understanding of several other C# features. However, since many of the examples in 
e.
The line begins with the keyword static. A method that is modified by static can be 
called before an object of its class has been created. This is necessary because Main( ) is 
called at program startup. The keyword void indicates that Main( ) does not return a value. 
As you will see, methods can also return values. The empty parentheses that follow Main
indicate that no information is passed to Main( ). Although it is possible to pass information 
intoMain( ), none is passed in this example. The last character on the line is the {. This 
signals the start of Main( )’s body. All of the code that comprises a method will occur 
between the method’s opening curly brace and its closing curly brace.
The next line of code is shown here. Notice that it occurs inside Main( ).
Console.WriteLine("A simple C# program.");
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 2: An Overview of C# 
23
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
This line outputs the string “A simple C# program.” followed by a new line on the screen. 
Output is actually accomplished by the built-in method WriteLine( ). In this case, WriteLine( )
argument. In addition to strings, WriteLine( ) can be used to display other types of information. 
The line begins with Console, which is the name of a predefined class that supports console 
I/O. By connecting Console with WriteLine( ), you are telling the compiler that WriteLine( )
is a member of the Console class. The fact that C# uses an object to define console output is 
further evidence of its object-oriented nature.
Notice that the WriteLine( ) statement ends with a semicolon, as does the using System
statement earlier in the program. In general, statements in C# end with a semicolon. The 
exception to this rule are blocks, which begin with a { and end with a }. This is why those 
lines in the program don’t end with a semicolon. Blocks provide a mechanism for grouping 
statements and are discussed later in this chapter.
The first } in the program ends Main( ), and the last } ends the Example class definition.
One last point: C# is case-sensitive. Forgetting this can cause serious problems. For 
example, if you accidentally type main instead of Main, or writeline instead of WriteLine,
the preceding program will be incorrect. Furthermore, although the C# compiler will compile 
classes that do not contain a Main( ) method, it has no way to execute them. So, had you 
mistypedMain, you would see an error message that states that Example.exe does not have 
an entry point defined.
Handling Syntax Errors
If you are new to programming, it is important to learn how to interpret and respond to errors 
that may occur when you try to compile a program. Most compilation errors are caused by 
typing mistakes. As all programmers soon find out, accidentally typing something incorrectly 
is quite easy. Fortunately, if you type something wrong, the compiler will report a syntax error
message when it tries to compile your program. This message gives you the line number at 
which the error is found and a description of the error itself.
Although the syntax errors reported by the compiler are, obviously, helpful, they 
sometimes 
source code no matter what you have written. For this reason, the error that is reported 
may not always reflect the actual cause of the problem. In the preceding program, for 
example, an accidental omission of the opening curly brace after the Main( ) method 
generates the following sequence of errors when compiled by the csc command-line 
compiler. (Similar errors are generated when compiling using the IDE.)
Example.CS(12,21): error CS1002: ; expected
interface member declaration
Example.CS(15,1): error CS1022: Type or namespace definition, or
end-of-file expected
Clearly, the first error message is completely wrong, because what is missing is not a 
semicolon, but a curly brace. The second two messages are equally confusing.
The point of this discussion is that when your program contains a syntax error, don’t 
necessarily take the compiler’s messages at face value. They may be misleading. You may need 
to “second guess” an error message in order to find the problem. Also, look at the last few lines 
of code immediately preceding the one in which the error was reported. Sometimes an error 
will not be reported until several lines after the point at which the error really occurred.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested