asp net core 2.0 mvc pdf : Build pdf from multiple files software Library dll winforms .net html web forms McGraw.Hill.CSharp.4.0.The.Complete.Reference.Apr.20105-part1210

24
Part I: The C# Language
A Small Variation
Although all of the programs in this book will use it, the line
using System;
at the start of the first example program is not technically needed. It is, however, a valuable 
convenience. The reason it’s not necessary is that in C# you can always fully qualify a name 
with the namespace to which it belongs. For example, the line
Console.WriteLine("A simple C# program.");
can be rewritten as
System.Console.WriteLine("A simple C# program.");
Thus, the first example could be recoded as shown here:
// This version does not include "using System;".
class Example {
// A C# program begins with a call to Main().
static void Main() {
// Here, Console.WriteLine is fully qualified.
System.Console.WriteLine("A simple C# program.");
}
}
Since it is quite tedious to always specify the System namespace whenever a member 
of that namespace is used, most C# programmers include using System at the top of their 
programs, as will all of the programs in this book. It is important to understand, however, 
that you can explicitly qualify a name with its namespace if needed.
A Second Simple Program
Perhaps no other construct is as important to a programming language as the variable. A 
variable
because its value can be changed during the execution of a program. In other words, the 
content of a variable is changeable, not fixed.
The following program creates two variables called x and y.
// This program demonstrates variables.
using System;
class Example2 {
static void Main() {
int x; // this declares a variable
int y; // this declares another variable
x = 100; // this assigns 100 to x
Console.WriteLine("x contains " + x);
Build pdf from multiple files - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
build pdf from multiple files; break pdf into multiple files
Build pdf from multiple files - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
combine pdf online; pdf combine pages
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 2: An Overview of C# 
25
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
y = x / 2;
Console.Write("y contains x / 2: ");
Console.WriteLine(y);
}
}
When you run this program, you will see the following output:
x contains 100
y contains x / 2: 50
This program introduces several new concepts. First, the statement
int x; // this declares a variable
declares a variable called x of type integer. In C#, all variables must be declared before they 
are used. Further
is called the type of the variable. In this case, x can hold integer values. These are whole 
numbers. In C#, to declare a variable to be of type integer, precede its name with the 
keyword int. Thus, the preceding statement declares a variable called x of type int.
The next line declares a second variable called y.
int y; // this declares another variable
different.
In general, to declare a variable, you will use a statement like this:
type var-name;
Here, type specifies the type of variable being declared, and var-nameis the name of the 
variable. In addition to int, C# supports several other data types.
The following line of code assigns x the value 100:
x = 100; // this assigns 100 to x
into the variable on its left.
The next line of code outputs the value of x preceded by the string “x contains ”.
Console.WriteLine("x contains " + x);
In this statement, the plus sign causes the value of x to be displayed after the string that 
precedes it. This approach can be generalized. Using the + operator, you can chain together 
as many items as you want within a single WriteLine( ) statement.
The next line of code assigns ythe value of x divided by 2:
y = x / 2;
This line divides the value in x by 2 and then stores that result in y. Thus, after the line 
executes,y will contain the value 50. The value of x will be unchanged. Like most other 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Component for combining multiple image formats into one or multiple PDF file in C#.NET. This example shows how to build a PDF document with three image files
c# merge pdf files; pdf merger
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Turn multiple image formats into one or multiple PDF file. NET example shows how to build a PDF document with three image files (BMP, JPEG and PNG).
add pdf together one file; combine pdfs online
26
Part I: The C# Language
shown here:
+
Addition
Subtraction
*
Multiplication
/
Division
Here are the next two lines in the program:
Console.Write("y contains x / 2: ");
Console.WriteLine(y);
Two new things are occurring here. First, the built-in method Write( ) is used to display the 
string “y contains x / 2: ”. This string is not followed by a new line. This means that when 
the next output is generated, it will start on the same line. The Write( ) method is just like 
WriteLine( )
toWriteLine( ), notice that y is used by itself. Both Write( ) and WriteLine( ) can be used to 
output values of any of C#’s built-in types.
One more point about declaring variables before we move on: It is possible to declare 
two or mor
commas. For example, x and y could have been declared like this:
int x, y; // both declared using one statement
N
OTE
N
OTE
C# includes a feature called an implicitly typed variable. Implicitly typed variables are 
variables whose type is automatically determined by the compiler. Implicitly typed variables 
are discussed in Chapter 3.
Another Data Type
In the preceding program, a variable of type int was used. However, an int variable can 
equired. For 
example, an int variable can hold the value 18, but not the value 18.3. Fortunately, int is 
only one of several data types defined by C#. To allow numbers with fractional components, 
C# defines two floating-point types: float and double, which represent single- and double-
precision values, respectively. Of the two, double is the most commonly used.
To declare a variable of type double, use a statement similar to that shown here:
double result;
Here, result is the name of the variable, which is of type double. Because result has a 
To better understand the difference between int and double, try the following program:
/*
This program illustrates the differences
between int and double.
*/
C# Create PDF from CSV to convert csv files to PDF in C#.net, ASP.
file to one PDF or splitting to multiple PDF documents. dlls, Right click the project -> Properties -> Build -> Platform target how to convert CSV to PDF document
reader combine pdf pages; c# merge pdf pages
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
conversions from PDF document to multiple image forms dlls, Right click the project -> Properties -> Build -> Platform target C# Sample Code for PDF to Png in C#
pdf merge documents; break pdf file into multiple files
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 2: An Overview of C# 
27
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
using System;
class Example3 {
static void Main() {
int ivar;     // this declares an int variable
double dvar;  // this declares a floating-point variable
ivar = 100;   // assign ivar the value 100
dvar = 100.0; // assign dvar the value 100.0
Console.WriteLine("Original value of ivar: " + ivar);
Console.WriteLine("Original value of dvar: " + dvar);
Console.WriteLine(); // print a blank line
// Now, divide both by 3.
ivar = ivar / 3;
dvar = dvar / 3.0;
Console.WriteLine("ivar after division: " + ivar);
Console.WriteLine("dvar after division: " + dvar);
}
}
The output from this program is shown here:
Original value of ivar: 100
Original value of dvar: 100
ivar after division: 33
dvar after division: 33.3333333333333
As you can see, when ivar (an int variable) is divided by 3, a whole-number division is 
, when 
dvar
(adouble variable) is divided by 3, the fractional component is preserved.
As the program shows, when you want to specify a floating-point value in a program, 
you must include a decimal point. If you don’t, it will be interpreted as an integer. For 
example, in C#, the value 100 is an integer, but the value 100.0 is a floating-point value.
There is one other new thing to notice in the program. To print a blank line, simply 
callWriteLine( ) without any arguments.
The floating-point data types are often used when working with real-world quantities 
where fractional components are commonly needed. For example, this program computes 
the area of a circle. It uses the value 3.1416 for pi.
// Compute the area of a circle.
using System;
class Circle {
static void Main() {
double radius;
double area;
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
image with single page or multiple pages is Right click the project -> Properties -> Build -> Platform target a quick evaluation of our XDoc.PDF file conversion
add pdf files together online; add pdf together
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
control able to batch convert multiple OpenOffice documents to Right click the project -> Properties -> Build -> Platform target Code to Convert ODT to PDF in C#
c# merge pdf; acrobat combine pdf
28
Part I: The C# Language
radius = 10.0;
area = radius * radius * 3.1416;
Console.WriteLine("Area is " + area);
}
}
The output from the program is shown here:
Area is 314.16
Clearly, the computation of a circle’s area could not be achieved satisfactorily without the 
use of floating-point data.
Two Control Statements
Inside a method, execution proceeds from one statement to the next, top to bottom. It 
is possible to alter this flow through the use of the various program control statements 
supported by C#. Although we will look closely at control statements later, two are briefly 
introduced here because we will be using them to write sample programs.
The if Statement
You can selectively execute part of a program through the use of C#’s conditional statement: 
theif. The if
example, it is syntactically identical to the if statements in C, C++, and Java. Its simplest 
form is shown here:
if(condition) statement;
Here, condition is a Boolean (that is, true or false) expression. If condition is true, then the 
statement is executed. If condition is false, then the statement is bypassed. Here is an 
example:
if(10 < 11) Console.WriteLine("10 is less than 11");
In this case, since 10 is less than 11, the conditional expression is true, and WriteLine( ) will 
execute. However, consider the following:
if(10 < 9) Console.WriteLine("this won’t be displayed");
In this case, 10 is not less than 9. Thus, the call to WriteLine( ) will not take place.
C# defines a full complement of relational operators that can be used in a conditional 
expression. They are shown here:
Operator
Meaning
<
Less than
<=
Less than or equal to
>
Greater than
>=
Greater than or equal to
= =
Equal to
!=
Not equal 
C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
plain text to PDF text with multiple fonts, sizes Right click the project -> Properties -> Build -> Platform target can convert text file to PDF document using
merge pdf online; best pdf merger
VB.NET TIFF: Use VB.NET Class to Create TIFF File Mobile Viewer in
able to view and process their TIFF files in iPhone mobile application, but also make multiple annotations on & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
acrobat merge pdf files; batch pdf merger online
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 2: An Overview of C# 
29
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
Here is a program that illustrates the if statement:
// Demonstrate the if.
using System;
class IfDemo {
static void Main() {
int a, b, c;
a = 2;
b = 3;
if(a < b) Console.WriteLine("a is less than b");
// This won’t display anything.
if(a == b) Console.WriteLine("you won’t see this");
Console.WriteLine();
c = a - b; // c contains -1
Console.WriteLine("c contains -1");
if(c >= 0) Console.WriteLine("c is non-negative");
if(c < 0) Console.WriteLine("c is negative");
Console.WriteLine();
c = b - a; // c now contains 1
Console.WriteLine("c contains 1");
if(c >= 0) Console.WriteLine("c is non-negative");
if(c < 0) Console.WriteLine("c is negative");
}
}
The output generated by this program is shown here:
a is less than b
c contains -1
c is negative
c contains 1
c is non-negative
Notice one other thing in this program. The line
int a, b, c;
declares three variables, a,b, and c, by use of a comma-separated list. As mentioned earlier, 
when you need two or more variables of the same type, they can be declared in one statement. 
Just separate the variable names with commas.
The for Loop
You can repeatedly execute a sequence of code by creating a loop. C# supplies a powerful 
assortment of loop constructs. The one we will look at here is the for loop. Like the if
C# Create PDF from RTF to convert csv files to PDF in C#.net, ASP.
library which able to batch convert multiple RTF files Right click the project -> Properties -> Build -> Platform target way of converting RTF to PDF document.
reader create pdf multiple files; break a pdf into multiple files
30
Part I: The C# Language
statement, the C# for loop is similar to its counterpart in C, C++, and Java. The simplest 
form of the for loop is shown here:
for(initialization; condition; iteration) statement;
In its most common form, the initialization portion of the loop sets a loop control variable 
to an initial value. The condition is a Boolean expression that tests the loop control variable. If 
the outcome of that test is true, the for loop continues to iterate. If it is false, the loop terminates. 
Theiterationexpression determines how the loop control variable is changed each time the 
loop iterates. Here is a short program that illustrates the for loop:
// Demonstrate the for loop.
using System;
class ForDemo {
static void Main() {
int count;
for(count = 0; count < 5; count = count+1)
Console.WriteLine("This is count: " + count);
Console.WriteLine("Done!");
}
}
The output generated by the program is shown here:
This is count: 0
This is count: 1
This is count: 2
This is count: 3
This is count: 4
Done!
In this example, count is the loop control variable. It is set to zero in the initialization portion 
of the for
count < 5
is performed. If the outcome of this test is true, the WriteLine( ) statement is executed. Next, 
the iteration portion of the loop is executed, which adds 1 to count. This process continues 
untilcount reaches 5. At this point, the conditional test becomes false, causing the loop to 
terminate. Execution picks up at the bottom of the loop.
As a point of interest, in professionally written C# programs you will almost never see 
the iteration portion of the loop written as shown in the preceding program. That is, you 
will seldom see statements like this:
count = count + 1;
The reason is that C# includes a special increment operator that performs this operation. 
The increment operator is ++ (that is, two consecutive plus signs). The increment operator 
increases its operand by one. By use of the increment operator, the preceding statement can 
be written like this:
count++;
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 2: An Overview of C# 
31
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
Thus, the for in the preceding program will usually be written like this:
for(count = 0; count < 5; count++)
You might want to try this. As you will see, the loop still runs exactly the same as it did before.
C# also provides a decrement operator, which is specified as – –. This operator decreases 
its operand by one.
Using Code Blocks
Another key element of C# is the codeblock. A code block is a grouping of statements. This is 
code has been cr
can. For example, a block can be a target for if and for statements. Consider this if statement:
if(w < h) {
v = w * h;
w = 0;
}
Here, if w is less than h, then both statements inside the block will be executed. Thus, the two 
other also executing. The key point here is that whenever you need to logically link two or 
more statements, you do so by creating a block. Code blocks allow many algorithms to be 
implemented with greater clarity and efficiency.
Here is a program that uses a code block to prevent a division by zero: 
// Demonstrate a block of code.
using System;
class BlockDemo {
static void Main() {
int i, j, d;
i = 5;
j = 10;
// The target of this if is a block.
if(i != 0) {
Console.WriteLine("i does not equal zero");
d = j / i;
Console.WriteLine("j / i is " + d);
}
}
}
The output generated by this program is shown here:
i does not equal zero
j / i is 2
32
Part I: The C# Language
In this case, the target of the if statement is a block of code and not just a single statement. 
If the condition controlling the if is true (as it is in this case), the three statements inside the 
block will be executed. Try setting i to zero and observe the result.
Here is another example. It uses a code block to compute the sum and the product of the 
numbers from 1 to 10.
// Compute the sum and product of the numbers from 1 to 10.
using System;
class ProdSum {
static void Main() {
int prod;
int sum;
int i;
sum = 0;
prod = 1;
for(i=1; i <= 10; i++) {
sum = sum + i;
prod = prod * i;
}
Console.WriteLine("Sum is " + sum);
Console.WriteLine("Product is " + prod);
}
}
The output is shown here:
Sum is 55
Product is 3628800
Here, the block enables one loop to compute both the sum and the product. Without the use 
of the block, two separate for loops would have been required.
One last point: Code blocks do not introduce any runtime inefficiencies. In other words, 
the{ and } do not consume any extra time during the execution of a program. In fact, because 
generally results in increased speed and efficiency.
Semicolons, Positioning, and Indentation
In C#, the semicolon signals the end of a statement. That is, each individual statement must 
end with a semicolon.
As you know, a block is a set of logically connected statements that are surrounded by 
opening and closing braces. A block is not terminated with a semicolon. Since a block is a 
gr
the end of the block is indicated by the closing brace.
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 2: An Overview of C# 
33
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
C# does not r
terminates a statement. For this reason, it does not matter where on a line you put a 
statement. For example, to C#,
x = y;
y = y + 1;
Console.WriteLine(x + " " + y);
is the same as
x = y;  y = y + 1;  Console.WriteLine(x + " " + y);
Furthermor
example, the following is perfectly acceptable:
Console.WriteLine("This is a long line of output" +
x + y + z +
"more output");
Breaking long lines in this fashion is often used to make programs more readable. It can also 
help prevent excessively long lines from wrapping.
You may have noticed in the previous examples that certain statements were indented. 
C# is a free-form language, meaning that it does not matter where you place statements 
relative to each other on a line. However, over the years, a common and accepted 
indentation style has developed that allows for very readable programs. This book 
follows that style, and it is recommended that you do so as well. Using this style, you 
brace. There ar
be covered later.
The C# Keywords
At its foundation, a computer language is defined by its keywords because they determine 
the features built into the language. C# defines two general types of keywords: reserved and 
contextual. The reserved keywords cannot be used as names for variables, classes, or methods. 
They can be used only as keywords. This is why they are called reserved. The terms reserved 
words or reserved identifiers are also sometimes used. There are currently 77 reserved keywords 
defined by version 4.0 of the C# language. They are shown in Table 2-1.
C# 4.0 defines 18 contextual keywords that have a special meaning in certain contexts. In 
those contexts, they act as keywords. Outside those contexts, they can be used as names for 
other program elements, such as variable names. Thus, they are not technically reserved. As 
a general rule, however, you should consider the contextual keywords reserved and avoid 
using them for any other purpose. Using a contextual keyword as a name for some other 
program element can be confusing and is considered bad practice by many programmers. 
The contextual keywords are shown in Table 2-2.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested