asp net core 2.0 mvc pdf : Add pdf files together application control tool html azure asp.net online McGraw.Hill.CSharp.4.0.The.Complete.Reference.Apr.20106-part1221

34
Part I: The C# Language
Identifiers
-defined 
item. Identifiers can be one or more characters long. Identifiers may start with any letter 
of the alphabet or an underscore. Next may be a letter, a digit, or an underscore. The 
underscore can be used to enhance the readability of a variable name, as in line_count.
However, identifers containing two consecutive underscores, such as max_ _value, are 
reserved for use by the compiler. Uppercase and lowercase are different; that is, to C#, 
myvar and MyVar are separate names. Here are some examples of acceptable identifiers:
Test
x
y2
MaxLoad
up
_top
my_var
sample23
abstract
as
base
bool
break
byte
case
catch
char
checked
class
const
continue
decimal
default
delegate
do
double
else
enum
event
explicit
extern
false
finally
fixed
float
for
foreach
goto
if
implicit
in
int
interface
internal
is
lock
long
namespace
new
null
object
operator
out
override
params
private
protected
public
readonly
ref
return
sbyte
sealed
short
sizeof
stackalloc
static
string
struct
switch
this
throw
true
try
typeof
uint
ulong
unchecked
unsafe
ushort
using
virtual
volatile
void
while
T
ABLE
2-1 The C# Reserved Keywords
add
dynamic
from
get
global
group
into
join
let
orderby
partial
remove
select
set
value
var
where
yield
T
ABLE
2-2 The C# Contextual Keywords
Add pdf files together - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
combine pdf; pdf merge
Add pdf files together - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
acrobat merge pdf; append pdf files reader
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 2: An Overview of C# 
35
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
Remember, you can’t start an identifier with a digit. Thus, 12x is invalid, for example. Good 
programming practice dictates that you choose identifiers that reflect the meaning or usage 
of the items being named.
Although you cannot use any of the reserved C# keywords as identifiers, C# does allow 
you to precede a keyword with an @, allowing it to be a legal identifier. For example, @for
is a valid identifier. In this case, the identifier is actually for and the @ is ignored. Here is a 
program that illustrates the use of an @ identifier:
// Demonstrate an @ identifier.
using System;
class IdTest {
static void Main() {
int @if; // use if as an identifier
for(@if = 0; @if < 10; @if++)
Console.WriteLine("@if is " + @if);
}
}
The output shown here proves the @if is properly interpreted as an identifier:
@if is 0
@if is 1
@if is 2
@if is 3
@if is 4
@if is 5
@if is 6
@if is 7
@if is 8
@if is 9
Frankly, using @-qualified keywords for identifiers is not recommended, except for 
special purposes. Also, the @ can precede any identifier, but this is considered bad practice.
The .NET Framework Class Library
The sample programs shown in this chapter make use of two built-in methods: WriteLine( )
andWrite( ). As mentioned, these methods are members of the Console class, which is part 
of the System namespace, which is defined by the .NET Framework’s class library. As 
explained earlier in this chapter, the C# environment relies on the .NET Framework class 
library to pr
Thus, the C# envir
.NET standard classes. As you will see, the class library provides much of the functionality 
that is part of any C# program. Indeed, part of becoming a C# programmer is learning to 
use these standard classes. Throughout Part I, various elements of the .NET library classes 
and methods are described. Part II examines portions of the .NET library in detail.
C# Word - Merge Word Documents in C#.NET
empowers C# programmers to easily merge and append Word files with mature input Word documents can be merged and appended together according to Add references:
break pdf into multiple files; build pdf from multiple files
C# PowerPoint - Merge PowerPoint Documents in C#.NET
together according to its loading sequence, and then saved and output as a single PowerPoint with user-defined location. C# DLLs: Merge PowerPoint Files. Add
pdf merge comments; add pdf together
This page intentionally left blank 
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping text by a method loses the original PDF document layout and all the paragraphs are joining together, our C#
add pdf files together online; combine pdf online
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
Imaging.MSWordDocx.dll", which, when used together with other online tutorial on how to add & insert controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and components
add pdf together one file; best pdf merger
3
Data Types, Literals, and Variables
T
his chapter examines three fundamental elements of C#: data types, literals, and 
variables. In general, the types of data that a language provides define the kinds of 
problems to which the language can be applied. As you might expect, C# offers a rich 
You can 
cr
the language of C# are called literals.
Why Data Types Are Important
Data types are especially important in C# because it is a strongly typed language. This 
means that, as a general rule, all operations are type-checked by the compiler for type 
compatibility. Illegal operations will not be compiled. Thus, strong type-checking helps 
prevent errors and enhances reliability. To enable strong type-checking, all variables, 
expressions, and values have a type. There is no concept of a “typeless” variable, for 
example. Furthermore, a value’s type determines what operations are allowed on it. 
An operation allowed on one type might not be allowed on another.
N
OTE
N
OTE
C# 4.0 adds a new data type called dynamic, which causes type checking to be deferred until 
runtime, rather than occurring at compile time. Thus, the dynamic type is an exception to C#’s 
normal compile-time type checking. The dynamic type is discussed in Chapter 17.
C#’s Value Types
C# contains two general categories of built-in data types: value types and referencetypes. The 
differ
holds an actual value, such 3.1416 or 212. For a reference type, a variable holds a reference 
to the value. The most commonly used reference type is the class, and a discussion of classes 
and reference types is deferred until later in this book. The value types are described here.
At the core of C# are the 13 value types shown in Table 3-1. Collectively, these are 
referred to as the simple types. They are called simple types because they consist of a single 
value. (In other words, they are not a composite of two or more values.) They form the 
foundation of C#’s type system, providing the basic, low-level data elements upon which 
a program operates. The simple types are also sometimes referred to as primitive types.
37
CHAPTER
C# Excel - Merge Excel Documents in C#.NET
and appended together according to its loading sequence, and then saved and output as a single Excel with user-defined location. C# DLLs: Merge Excel Files. Add
c# merge pdf files; pdf merger
C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
Support converting other files to Tiff, like Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, and images. Enable to add XImage.OCR for .NET into C# Tiff imaging application
pdf merge documents; pdf combine pages
38
Part I: The C# Language
requirements, C# is uncompromising on this account. For example, an int is the same in all 
execution environments. There is no need to rewrite code to fit a specific platform. Although 
environments, it is necessary in order to achieve portability.
N
OTE
N
OTE
In addition to the simple types, C# defines three other categories of value types. These are 
enumerations, structures, and nullable types, all of which are described later in this book.
Integers
C# defines nine integer types: char,byte,sbyte,short,ushort,int,uint,long, and ulong.
However, the char type is primarily used for representing characters, and it is discussed 
later in this chapter. The remaining eight integer types are used for numeric calculations. 
Their bit-width and ranges are shown here:
Type
Width in Bits
Range
byte
8
0 to 255
sbyte
8
–128 to 127
short
16
–32,768 to 32,767
ushort
16
0 to 65,535
int
32
–2,147,483,648 to 2,147,483,647
uint
32
0 to 4,294,967,295
long
64
–9,223,372,036,854,775,808 to 9,223,372,036,854,775,807
ulong
64
0 to 18,446,744,073,709,551,615
Type
Meaning
bool
Represents true/false values
byte
8-bit unsigned integer
char
Character
decimal
Numeric type for financial calculations
double
Double-precision floating point
float
Single-precision floating point
int
Integer
long
Long integer
sbyte
8-bit signed integer 
short
Short integer
uint
An unsigned integer
ulong
An unsigned long integer
ushort
An unsigned short integer
T
ABLE
3-1 The C# Value Types
C# Image: C# Code to Encode & Decode JBIG2 Images in RasterEdge .
Easy to add C# JBIG2 codec controls to your image and codec into PDF documents for a better PDF compression; text to the new project folder, together with .NET
best pdf combiner; reader create pdf multiple files
VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.
and find text content in multiple page adobe PDF files in .NET Our VB.NET PDF Document Add-On enables you to search for text in target PDF document by using
acrobat reader merge pdf files; acrobat combine pdf
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 3: Data Types, Literals, and Variables 
39
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
types. The difference between signed and unsigned integers is in the way the high-order 
bit of the integer is interpreted. If a signed integer is specified, then the C# compiler will 
generate code that assumes the high-order bit of an integer is to be used as a sign flag. If the 
numbers are almost always represented using the two’s complement approach. In this 
method, all bits in the negative number are reversed, and then 1 is added to this number.
Signed integers are important for a great many algorithms, but they have only half the 
absolute magnitude of their unsigned relatives. For example, as a short, here is 32,767:
0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1  1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
For a signed value, if the high-order bit were set to 1, the number would then be interpreted 
as –1 (assuming the two’s complement format). However, if you declared this to be a 
ushort, then when the high-order bit was set to 1, the number would become 65,535.
Probably the most commonly used integer type is int. Variables of type int are often 
employed to contr
need an integer that has a range greater than int, you have many options. If the value you want 
to store is unsigned, you can use uint. For large signed values, use long. For large unsigned 
values, use ulong. For example, here is a program that computes the distance from the Earth to 
the sun, in inches. Because this value is so large, the program uses a long variable to hold it.
// Compute the distance from the Earth to the sun, in inches.
using System;
class Inches {
static void Main() {
long inches;
long miles;
miles = 93000000; // 93,000,000 miles to the sun
// 5,280 feet in a mile, 12 inches in a foot.
inches = miles * 5280 * 12;
Console.WriteLine("Distance to the sun: " +
inches + " inches.");
}
}
Here is the output from the program:
Distance to the sun: 5892480000000 inches.
Clearly, the result could not have been held in an int or uint variable.
The smallest integer types are byte and sbyte. The byte type is an unsigned value 
between 0 and 255. Variables of type byte are especially useful when working with raw 
binary data, such as a byte stream produced by some device. For small signed integers, 
usesbyte. Here is an example that uses a variable of type byte to control a for loop that 
produces the summation of the number 100.
40
Part I: The C# Language
// Use byte.
using System;
class Use_byte {
static void Main() {
byte x;
int sum;
sum = 0;
for(x = 1; x <= 100; x++)
sum = sum + x;
Console.WriteLine("Summation of 100 is " + sum);
}
}
The output from the program is shown here:
Summation of 100 is 5050
Since the for loop runs only from 0 to 100, which is well within the range of a byte, there is 
no need to use a larger type variable to control it.
When you need an integer that is larger than a byte or sbyte, but smaller than an int or 
uint, use short or ushort.
Floating-Point Types
The floating-point types can represent numbers that have fractional components. There are 
two kinds of floating-point types, float and double, which represent single- and double-
precision numbers, respectively. The type float is 32 bits wide and has an approximate 
range of 1.5E–45 to 3.4E+38. The double type is 64 bits wide and has an approximate range 
of 5E–324 to 1.7E+308.
Of the two, double is the most commonly used. One reason for this is that many of the 
double
values. For example, the Sqrt( ) method (which is defined by the library class System.Math)
returns a double value that is the square root of its double argument. Here, Sqrt() is used to 
compute the radius of a circle given the circle’s area:
// Find the radius of a circle given its area.
using System;
class FindRadius {
static void Main() {
Double r;
Double area;
area = 10.0;
r = Math.Sqrt(area / 3.1416);
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 3: Data Types, Literals, and Variables 
41
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
Console.WriteLine("Radius is " + r);
}
}
The output from the program is shown here:
Radius is 1.78412203012729
One other point about the preceding example. As mentioned, Sqrt() is a member of the 
Math class. Notice how Sqrt() is called; it is preceded by the name Math. This is similar to 
the way Console precedes WriteLine(). Although not all standard methods are called by 
specifying their class name first, several are, as the next example shows.
The following program demonstrates several of C#’s trigonometric functions, which are 
also part of C#’s math library. They also operate on double data. The program displays the 
sine, cosine, and tangent for the angles (measured in radians) from 0.1 to 1.0.
//  Demonstrate Math.Sin(), Math.Cos(), and Math.Tan().
using System;
class Trigonometry {
static void Main() {
Double theta; // angle in radians
for(theta = 0.1; theta <= 1.0; theta = theta + 0.1) {
Console.WriteLine("Sine of " + theta + "  is " +
Math.Sin(theta));
Console.WriteLine("Cosine of " + theta + "  is " +
Math.Cos(theta));
Console.WriteLine("Tangent of " + theta + "  is " +
Math.Tan(theta));
Console.WriteLine();
}
}
}
Here is a portion of the program’s output:
Sine of 0.1  is 0.0998334166468282
Cosine of 0.1  is 0.995004165278026
Tangent of 0.1  is 0.100334672085451
Sine of 0.2  is 0.198669330795061
Cosine of 0.2  is 0.980066577841242
Tangent of 0.2  is 0.202710035508673
Sine of 0.3  is 0.29552020666134
Cosine of 0.3  is 0.955336489125606
Tangent of 0.3  is 0.309336249609623
To compute the sine, cosine, and tangent, the standard library methods Math.Sin(),
Math.Cos(), and Math.Tan() are used. Like Math.Sqrt(), the trigonometric methods 
are called with a double argument, and they return a double result. The angles must be 
specified in radians.
42
Part I: The C# Language
The decimal Type
Perhaps the most interesting C# numeric type is decimal, which is intended for use in 
monetary calculations. The decimal type utilizes 128 bits to represent values within the 
range 1E–28 to 7.9E+28. As you may know, normal floating-point arithmetic is subject to a 
variety of rounding errors when it is applied to decimal values. The decimal type eliminates 
these errors and can accurately represent up to 28 decimal places (or 29 places in some 
cases). This ability to represent decimal values without rounding errors makes it especially 
useful for computations that involve money.
Here is a program that uses a decimal type in a financial calculation. The program 
centage.
// Use the decimal type to compute a discount.
using System;
class UseDecimal {
static void Main() {
decimal price;
decimal discount;
decimal discounted_price;
// Compute discounted price.
price = 19.95m;
discount = 0.15m; // discount rate is 15%
discounted_price = price - ( price * discount);
Console.WriteLine("Discounted price: $" + discounted_price);
}
}
The output from this program is shown here:
Discounted price: $16.9575
In the program, notice that the decimal constants are followed by the m suffix. This 
is necessary because without the suffix, these values would be interpreted as standard 
floating-point constants, which are not compatible with the decimal data type. You can 
assign an integer value, such as 10, to a decimal variable without the use of the m suffix, 
though. (A detailed discussion of numeric constants is found later in this chapter.)
Here is another example that uses the decimal type. It computes the future value of an 
investment that has a fixed rate of return over a period of years.
/*
Use the decimal type to compute the future value
of an investment.
*/
using System;
class FutVal {
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 3: Data Types, Literals, and Variables 
43
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
static void Main() {
decimal amount;
decimal rate_of_return;
int years, i;
amount = 1000.0M;
rate_of_return = 0.07M;
years = 10;
Console.WriteLine("Original investment: $" + amount);
Console.WriteLine("Rate of return: " + rate_of_return);
Console.WriteLine("Over " + years + " years");
for(i = 0; i < years; i++)
amount = amount + (amount * rate_of_return);
Console.WriteLine("Future value is $" + amount);
}
}
Here is the output:
Original investment: $1000
Rate of return: 0.07
Over 10 years
Future value is $1967.151357289565322490000
Notice that the result is accurate to several decimal places—more than you would probably 
e appealing 
fashion.
Characters
In C#, characters are not 8-bit quantities like they are in many other computer languages, 
such as C++. Instead, C# uses a 16-bit character type called Unicode. Unicode defines a 
character set that is large enough to represent all of the characters found in all human 
languages. Although many languages, such as English, French, and German, use relatively 
small alphabets, some languages, such as Chinese, use very large character sets that cannot 
be represented using just 8 bits. To address this situation, in C#, char is an unsigned 16-bit 
type having a range of 0 to 65,535. The standard 8-bit ASCII character set is a subset of 
Unicode and ranges from 0 to 127. Thus, the ASCII characters are still valid C# characters.
A
quotes. For example, this assigns X to the variable ch:
char ch;
ch = 'X';
You can output a char value using a WriteLine() statement. For example, this line outputs 
the value in ch:
Console.WriteLine("This is ch: " + ch);
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested