asp net core 2.0 mvc pdf : Merge pdf files application control tool html azure .net online McGraw.Hill.CSharp.4.0.The.Complete.Reference.Apr.201063-part1225

604
Part I: The C# Language
The output is shown here:
Reciprocal of 8 is 0.125
Alpha Beta Gamma after reversing case is aLPHA bETA gAMMA
Result of val.AbsDivideBy(-2): 4
In the pr
MyExtMeths. As explained, an extension method must be declared within a static class. 
Furthermore, this class must be in scope in order for the extension methods that it contains 
to be used. (This is why you needed to include the System.Linq namespace to use the LINQ-
re 
differ
method. Therefore, when the expression
val.AbsDivideBy(-2)
executes,val is passed to the n parameter of AbsDivideBy( ) and –2 is passed to the 
d parameter.
As a point of interest, because the methods Reciprocal( ) and AbsDivideBy( ) are 
defined for double, it is legal to invoke them on a double literal, as shown here:
8.0.Reciprocal()
8.0.AbsDivideBy(-1)
Furthermore, RevCase( ) can be invoked like this:
"AbCDe".RevCase()
Here, the reversed-case version of a string literal is returned.
PLINQ
ovides 
support for parallel programming. This feature enables a query to automatically take 
advantage of multiple processors. PLINQ and other features related to parallel 
programming are described in Chapter 24.
Merge pdf files - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
c# pdf merge; reader combine pdf
Merge pdf files - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
asp.net merge pdf files; pdf merge comments
20
Unsafe Code, Pointers, 
Nullable Types, Dynamic Types, 
and Miscellaneous Topics
T
his chapter covers a feature of C# whose name usually takes programmers by surprise: 
unsafe code. Unsafe code often involves the use of pointers. Together, unsafe code and 
pointers enable C# to be used to create applications that one might normally associate 
with C++: high-performance, systems code. Moreover, the inclusion of unsafe code and 
pointers gives C# capabilities that are lacking in Java.
Also covered in this chapter are nullable types, partial class and partial method 
definitions, fixed-size buffers, and the new dynamic type. The chapter concludes by 
discussing the few keywords that have not been covered by the preceding chapters.
Unsafe Code
C# allows you to write what is called “unsafe” code. Although this statement might seem 
shocking, it r
not execute under the full management of the common language runtime (CLR). As explained 
in Chapter 1, C# is normally used to create managed code. It is possible, however, to write 
code that does not execute under the full control of the CLR. This unmanaged code is not 
subject to the same contr
unsafe does not mean that the code is inherently flawed. It simply means that it is possible 
for the code to perform actions that are not subject to the supervision of the managed context.
Given that unsafe code might cause problems, you might ask why anyone would want 
to create such code. The answer is that managed code prevents the use of pointers. If you are 
familiar with C or C++, then you know that pointers are variables that hold the addresses 
of other objects. Thus, pointers are a bit like references in C#. The main difference is that a 
pointer can point anywhere in memory; a reference always refers to an object of its type. 
Because a pointer can point anywhere in memory, it is possible to misuse a pointer. It is also 
605
CHAPTER
Online Merge PDF files. Best free online merge PDF tool.
Online Merge PDF, Multiple PDF files into one. Download Free Trial. Easy converting! We try to make it as easy as possible to merge your PDF files.
.net merge pdf files; add multiple pdf files into one online
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Also able to combine generated split PDF document files with other PDF files to form a new PDF file. Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files in C#.
attach pdf to mail merge; pdf mail merge
606
Part I: The C# Language
easy to introduce a coding error when using pointers. This is why C# does not support 
pointers when creating managed code. Pointers are, however, both useful and necessary for 
some types of preate 
and use pointers. However, all pointer operations must be marked as unsafe since they 
execute outside the managed context.
use pointers in C/C++, then you can use them in C#. But remember, the essence of C# is the 
cr
special class of problems. It is not for normal C# programming. In fact, to compile unmanaged 
code, you must use the /unsafe compiler option.
Since pointers are at the core of unsafe code, we will begin there.
Pointer Basics
A pointer is a variable that holds the address of some other object, such as another variable. 
For example, if x contains the address of y, then x is said to “point to” y. When a pointer 
ough the pointer. 
Operations through pointers are often referred to as indirection.
Declaring a Pointer
Pointer variables must be declared as such. The general form of a pointer variable 
declaration is
type*var-name;
Here, type is the pointer’s referenttype, which must be a nonreference type. Thus, you cannot 
declare a pointer to a class object. A pointer’s referent type is also sometimes called its base
type. Notice the placement of the *. It follows the type name. var-name is the name of the 
pointer variable.
Here is an example. To declare ip to be a pointer to an int, use this declaration:
int* ip;
For a float pointer, use
float* fp;
In general, in a declaration statement, following a type name with an * creates a pointer type.
The type of data that a pointer will point to is determined by its referent type. Thus, in 
the preceding examples, ip can be used to point to an int, and fp can be used to point to a 
float. Understand, however, that there is nothing that actually prevents a pointer from 
pointing elsewhere. This is why pointers are potentially unsafe.
If you come from a C/C++ background, then you need to be aware of an important 
difference between the way C# and C/C++ declare pointers. When you declare a pointer 
type in C/C++, the *
C/C++, this statement
int* p, q;
declares an int pointer called p and an int called q. It is equivalent to the following two 
declarations:
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Merge and Append TIFF Files
string[] tifFiles = new string[] { @"C:\demo1.tif", @"C:\demo2.tif" }; // Merge these Tiff files to a single Tiff file and save it to output.tif.
scan multiple pages into one pdf; best pdf merger
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
' Convert PDF file to HTML5 files DocumentConverter.ConvertToHtml5("..\1.pdf", "..output\", RelativeType.SVG). Copyright © <2000-2016> by <RasterEdge.com>.
add pdf together; combine pdf
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 20: Unsafe Code, Pointers, Nullable Types, Dynamic Types, and Miscellaneous Topics
607
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
int* p;
int q;
However, in C#, the *is distributive and the declaration
int* p, q;
cr
int* p;
int* q;
This is an important difference to keep in mind when porting C/C++ code to C#.
The * and & Pointer Operators
Two operators are used with pointers: * and &. The & is a unary operator that returns the 
memory address of its operand. (Recall that a unary operator requires only one operand.) 
For example,
int* ip;
int num = 10;
ip = &num;
puts into ip the memory address of the variable num. This address is the location of the 
variable in the computer’s internal memory. It has nothing to do with the value of num.
Thus,ipdoes not contain the value 10 (num’s initial value). It contains the address at which 
num is stored. The operation of & can be remembered as returning “the address of” the 
variable it precedes. Therefore, the preceding assignment statement could be verbalized 
as “ip receives the address of num.”
The second operator is *, and it is the complement of &. It is a unary operator that 
evaluates to the value of the variable located at the address specified by its operand. That 
is, it refers to the value of the variable pointed to by a pointer. Continuing with the same 
example, if ip contains the memory address of the variable num, then
int val = *ip;
will place into val the value 10, which is the value of num, which is pointed to by ip. The 
operation of * can be remembered as “at address.” In this case, then, the statement could be 
read as “val receives the value at address ip.”
The*
the value pointed to by the pointer. For example,
*ip = 100;
This statement assigns 100 to the variable pointed to by ip, which is num in this case. Thus, 
this statement can be read as “at address ip, put the value 100.”
Using unsafe
Any code that uses pointers must be marked as unsafe by using the unsafe keyword. You 
can mark types (such as classes and structures), members (such as methods and operators), 
C# Word - Merge Word Documents in C#.NET
File: Merge Word Files. |. Home ›› XDoc.Word ›› C# Word: Merge Word Files. Combine and Merge Multiple Word Files into One Using C#.
c# combine pdf; attach pdf to mail merge in word
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
How to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to HTML5 Files in C#.NET Class. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
best pdf combiner; c# merge pdf
608
Part I: The C# Language
or individual blocks of code as unsafe. For example, here is a program that uses pointers 
insideMain( ), which is marked unsafe:
// Demonstrate pointers and unsafe.
using System;
class UnsafeCode {
// Mark Main as unsafe.
unsafe static void Main() {
int count = 99;
int* p; // create an int pointer
p = &count; // put address of count into p
Console.WriteLine("Initial value of count is " + *p);
*p = 10; // assign 10 to count via p
Console.WriteLine("New value of count is " + *p);
}
}
The output of this program is shown here:
Initial value of count is 99
New value of count is 10
Using fixed
Thefixed modifier is often used when working with pointers. It prevents a managed 
variable from being moved by the garbage collector. This is needed when a pointer refers to 
the garbage collector, if the object is moved, the pointer will point to the wrong object. Here 
is the general form of fixed:
fi xed (type*p = &fi xedObj) {
// use fi xed object
}
Here, p is a pointer that is being assigned the address of an object. The object will remain at 
its current memory location until the block of code has executed. You can also use a single 
statement for the target of a fixed statement. The fixed keyword can be used only in an 
unsafe context. You can declare more than one fixed pointer at a time using a comma-
separated list.
Here is an example of fixed:
// Demonstrate fixed.
using System;
class Test {
public int num;
public Test(int i) { num = i; }
}
C# PowerPoint - Merge PowerPoint Documents in C#.NET
File: Merge PowerPoint Files. |. Home ›› XDoc.PowerPoint ›› C# PowerPoint: Merge PowerPoint Files. C# DLLs: Merge PowerPoint Files.
pdf combine files online; combine pdf online
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
splitter control provides VB.NET developers an easy to use solution that they can split target multi-page PDF document file to one-page PDF files or they can
reader merge pdf; merge pdf files
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 20: Unsafe Code, Pointers, Nullable Types, Dynamic Types, and Miscellaneous Topics
609
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
class FixedCode {
// Mark Main as unsafe.
unsafe static void Main() {
Test o = new Test(19);
Console.WriteLine("Initial value of o.num is " + *p);
*p = 10; // assign 10 to o.num via p
Console.WriteLine("New value of o.num is " + *p);
}
}
}
The output from this program is shown here:
Initial value of o.num is 19
New value of o.num is 10
Here, fixed prevents o from being moved. Because p points to o.num, if o were moved, then 
p would point to an invalid location.
Accessing Structure Members Through a Pointer
A pointer can point to an object of a structure type as long as the structure does not contain 
reference types. When you access a member of a structure through a pointer, you must use 
the arrow operator, which is –>, rather than the dot (.) operator. For example, given this 
structure,
struct MyStruct {
public int a;
public int b;
public int Sum() { return a + b; }
}
you would access its members through a pointer, like this:
MyStruct o = new MyStruct();
MyStruct* p; // declare a pointer
p = &o;
p->a = 10; // use the -> operator
p->b = 20; // use the -> operator
Console.WriteLine("Sum is " + p->Sum());
Pointer Arithmetic
There are only four arithmetic operators that can be used on pointers: ++,– –,+, and . To 
p1 be an 
int pointer with a current value of 2,000 (that is, it contains the address 2,000). After this 
expression,
p1++;
610
Part I: The C# Language
the contents of p1 will be 2,004, not 2,001! The reason is that each time p1 is incremented, it 
will point to the nextint. Since int in C# is 4 bytes long, incrementing p1 increases its value 
by 4. The reverse is true of decrements. Each decrement decreases p1’s value by 4. For 
example,
p1--;
will cause p1 to have the value 1,996, assuming it previously was 2,000.
Generalizing from the preceding example, each time that a pointer is incremented, 
it will point to the memory location of the next element of its referent type. Each time it is 
decremented, it will point to the location of the previous element of its referent type.
Pointer arithmetic is not limited to only increment and decrement operations. You can 
also add or subtract integers to or from pointers. The expression
p1 = p1 + 9;
makesp1 point to the ninth element of p1’s referent type, beyond the one it is currently 
pointing to.
Although you cannot add pointers, you can subtract one pointer from another (provided 
they are both of the same referent type). The remainder will be the number of elements of 
the referent type that separate the two pointers.
Other than addition and subtraction of a pointer and an integer, or the subtraction of 
you cannot add or subtract float or double values to or from pointers. Also, you cannot 
use pointer arithmetic with void* pointers.
To see the effects of pointer arithmetic, execute the next short program. It prints the 
actual physical addresses to which an integer pointer (ip) and a floating-point pointer (fp)
are pointing. Observe how each changes, relative to its referent type, each time the loop is 
repeated.
// Demonstrate the effects of pointer arithmetic.
using System;
class PtrArithDemo {
unsafe static void Main() {
int x;
int i;
double d;
int* ip = &i;
double* fp = &d;
Console.WriteLine("int     double\n");
for(x=0; x < 10; x++) {
Console.WriteLine((uint) (ip) + " " + (uint) (fp));
ip++;
fp++;
}
}
}
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 20: Unsafe Code, Pointers, Nullable Types, Dynamic Types, and Miscellaneous Topics
611
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
Sample output is shown here. Your output may differ, but the intervals will be the same.
int     double
1243464 1243468
1243468 1243476
1243472 1243484
1243476 1243492
1243480 1243500
1243484 1243508
1243488 1243516
1243492 1243524
1243496 1243532
1243500 1243540
As the output shows, pointer arithmetic is performed relative to the referent type of the 
pointer. Since an int is 4 bytes and a double is 8 bytes, the addresses change in increments 
of these values.
Pointer Comparisons
Pointers can be compared using the relational operators, such as = =,<, and >. However, for 
some relationship to each other. For example, if p1 and p2 are pointers that point to two 
separate and unrelated variables, then any comparison between p1 and p2 is generally 
meaningless. However, if p1 and p2 point to variables that are related to each other, such 
as elements of the same array, then p1 and p2 can be meaningfully compared.
Pointers and Arrays
In C#, pointers and arrays are related. For example, within a fixed statement, the name of 
initializer. Consider the following program:
/* An array name without an index yields a pointer to the
start of the array. */
using System;
class PtrArray {
unsafe static void Main() {
int[] nums = new int[10];
fixed(int* p = &nums[0], p2 = nums) {
if(p == p2)
Console.WriteLine("p and p2 point to same address.");
}
}
}
The output is shown here:
p and p2 point to same address.
612
Part I: The C# Language
As the output shows, the expression
&nums[0]
is the same as
nums
Since the second form is shorter, most programmers use it when a pointer to the start of an 
array is needed.
Indexing a Pointer
When a pointer refers to an array, the pointer can be indexed as if it were an array. This 
syntax provides an alternative to pointer arithmetic that can be more convenient in some 
situations. Here is an example:
// Index a pointer as if it were an array.
using System;
class PtrIndexDemo {
unsafe static void Main() {
int[] nums = new int[10];
// Index a pointer.
Console.WriteLine("Index pointer like array.");
fixed (int* p = nums) {
for(int i=0; i < 10; i++)
p[i] = i; // index pointer like array
for(int i=0; i < 10; i++)
Console.WriteLine("p[{0}]: {1} ", i, p[i]);
}
// Use pointer arithmetic.
Console.WriteLine("\nUse pointer arithmetic.");
fixed (int* p = nums) {
for(int i=0; i < 10; i++)
*(p+i) = i; // use pointer arithmetic
for(int i=0; i < 10; i++)
Console.WriteLine("*(p+{0}): {1} ", i, *(p+i));
}
}
}
The output is shown here:
Index pointer like array.
p[0]: 0
p[1]: 1
p[2]: 2
p[3]: 3
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 20: Unsafe Code, Pointers, Nullable Types, Dynamic Types, and Miscellaneous Topics
613
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
p[4]: 4
p[5]: 5
p[6]: 6
p[7]: 7
p[8]: 8
p[9]: 9
Use pointer arithmetic.
*(p+0): 0
*(p+1): 1
*(p+2): 2
*(p+3): 3
*(p+4): 4
*(p+5): 5
*(p+6): 6
*(p+7): 7
*(p+8): 8
*(p+9): 9
As the program illustrates, a pointer expression with this general form
*(ptr + i)
can be rewritten using array-indexing syntax like this:
ptr[i]
There ar
of the array to which the pointer refers. Second, a pointer does not have a Length property. 
So, using the pointer, there is no way of knowing how long the array is.
Pointers and Strings
Although strings ar
a string through a pointer. To do so, you will assign a pointer to the start of the string to a 
char* pointer using a fixed statement like this:
fi xed(char* p = str) { // ...
After the fixed statement executes, p will point to the start of the array of characters that 
make up the string. This array is null-terminated, which means that it ends with a zero. You 
can use this fact to test for the end of the array. Null-terminated character arrays are the way 
that strings are implemented in C/C++. Thus, obtaining a char* pointer to a string allows 
you to operate on strings in much the same way as does C/C++.
Here is a program that demonstrates accessing a string through a char* pointer:
// Use fixed to get a pointer to the start of a string.
using System;
class FixedString {
unsafe static void Main() {
string str = "this is a test";
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested