asp net core 2.0 mvc pdf : Add pdf together Library software class asp.net windows html ajax McGraw.Hill.CSharp.4.0.The.Complete.Reference.Apr.201064-part1226

614
Part I: The C# Language
// Point p to start of str.
fixed(char* p = str) {
// Display the contents of str via p.
for(int i=0; p[i] != 0; i++)
Console.Write(p[i]);
}
Console.WriteLine();
}
}
The output is shown here:
this is a test
Multiple Indirection
You can have a pointer point to another pointer that points to the target value. This situation 
is called multiple indirection, or pointers to pointers. Pointers to pointers can be confusing. 
Figure 20-1 helps clarify the concept of multiple indirection. As you can see, the value of a 
normal pointer is the address of the variable that contains the value desired. In the case of a 
pointer to a pointer, the first pointer contains the address of the second pointer, which points 
to the variable that contains the value desired.
Multiple indirection can be carried on to whatever extent desired, but more than a 
pointer to a pointer is rarely needed. In fact, excessive indirection is difficult to follow and 
prone to conceptual errors.
A variable that is a pointer to a pointer must be declared as such. You do this by placing 
compiler that q is a pointer to a pointer of type int:
int** q;
You should understand that q is not a pointer to an integer, but rather a pointer to an int
pointer.
F
IGURE
20-1 Single and multiple indirection
Add pdf together - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
acrobat merge pdf files; how to combine pdf files
Add pdf together - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
add multiple pdf files into one online; pdf merge comments
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 20: Unsafe Code, Pointers, Nullable Types, Dynamic Types, and Miscellaneous Topics
615
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
To access the target value indirectly pointed to by a pointer to a pointer, you must apply 
the asterisk operator twice, as in this example:
using System;
class MultipleIndirect {
unsafe static void Main() {
int x;   // holds an int value
int* p;  // holds an int pointer
int** q; // holds a pointer to an int pointer
x = 10;
p = &x; // put address of x into p
q = &p; // put address of p into q
Console.WriteLine(**q); // display the value of x
}
}
The output is the value of x, which is 10. In the program, p is declared as a pointer to an int
andq as a pointer to an int pointer.
One last point: Do not confuse multiple indirection with high-level data structures, such 
as linked lists. These are two fundamentally different concepts.
Arrays of Pointers
int pointer array of 
size 3 is
int * [] ptrs = new int * [3];
To assign the address of an int variable called myvar to the third element of the pointer 
array, write
ptrs[2] = &myvar;
To find the value of myvar, write
*ptrs[2]
sizeof
in bytes, of one of C#’s value types. To obtain this information, use the sizeof operator. It 
has this general form:
sizeof(type)
Here, type is the type whose size is being obtained. In general, sizeof is intended primarily 
unmanaged code.
C# PowerPoint - Merge PowerPoint Documents in C#.NET
together according to its loading sequence, and then saved and output as a single PowerPoint with user-defined location. C# DLLs: Merge PowerPoint Files. Add
pdf combine files online; adding pdf pages together
C# Word - Merge Word Documents in C#.NET
and appended together according to its loading sequence, and then saved and output as a single Word with user-defined location. C# DLLs: Merge Word File. Add
batch pdf merger online; attach pdf to mail merge in word
616
Part I: The C# Language
stackalloc
You can allocate memory from the stack by using stackalloc. It can be used only when 
initializing local variables and has this general form:
type* p = stackalloc type[size]
Here, p is a pointer that receives the address of the memory that is large enough to hold size
number of objects of type. Also, type must be a nonreference type. If there is not room on the 
stack to allocate the memory, a System.StackOverflowException is thrown. Finally, stackalloc
can be used only in an unsafe context.
Normally, memory for objects is allocated from the heap, which is a region of free memory. 
Allocating memory from the stack is the exception. Variables allocated on the stack are not 
garbage-collected. Rather, they exist only while the method in which they are declared is 
executing. When the method is left, the memory is freed. One advantage to using stackalloc is 
.
Here is an example that uses stackalloc:
// Demonstrate stackalloc.
using System;
class UseStackAlloc {
unsafe static void Main() {
int* ptrs = stackalloc int[3];
ptrs[0] = 1;
ptrs[1] = 2;
ptrs[2] = 3;
for(int i=0; i < 3; i++)
Console.WriteLine(ptrs[i]);
}
}
The output is shown here:
1
2
3
Creating Fixed-Size Buffers
There is a second use of the fixed keyword that enables you to create fixed-sized, single-
dimensional arrays. In the C# documentation, these are referred to as fixed-size buffers. A fixed-
size buffer is always a member of a struct. The purpose of a fixed-size buffer is to allow the 
creation of a struct in which the array elements that make up the buffer are contained within 
thestruct. Normally, when you include an array member in a struct, only a reference to the 
array is actually held within the struct. By using a fixed-size buffer, you cause the entire array 
to be contained within the struct. This results in a structure that can be used in situations in 
which the size of a struct is important, such as in mixed-language programming, interfacing 
to data not created by a C# program, or whenever a nonmanaged struct containing an array is 
required. Fixed-size buffers can be used only within an unsafe context.
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
MSWordDocx.dll", which, when used together with other online tutorial on how to add & insert one powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
scan multiple pages into one pdf; asp.net merge pdf files
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
some other PDF tools convert PDF to text by a method loses the original PDF document layout and all the paragraphs are joining together, our C# PDF to text
best pdf combiner; add pdf together
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 20: Unsafe Code, Pointers, Nullable Types, Dynamic Types, and Miscellaneous Topics
617
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
To create a fixed-size buffer, use this form of fixed:
fi xed typebuf-name[size];
Here, type is the data type of the array; buf-name is the name of the fixed-size buffer; and size is 
the number of elements in the buffer. Fixed-size buffers can be specified only within a struct.
To understand why a fixed-size buffer might be useful, consider a situation in which 
you want to pass bank account information to an account management program that is 
written in C++. Furthermore, assume that each account record uses the following organization:
Name
An 8-bit, ASCII character string, 80 bytes long
Balance
A double, 8 bytes long
ID
A long, 8 bytes long
In C++, each structure, itself, contains the Name array. This differs from C#, which would 
normally just store a reference to the array. Thus, representing this data in a C# struct
requires the use of a fixed-size buffer, as shown here:
// Use a fixed-size buffer.
unsafe struct FixedBankRecord {
public fixed byte Name[80]; // create a fixed-size buffer
public double Balance;
public long ID;
}
By using a fixed-size buffer for Name, each instance of FixedBankRecord will contain all 
80 bytes of the Name array, which is the way that a C++ struct would be organized. Thus, 
the overall size of FixedBankRecord is 96, which is the sum of its members. Here is a 
program that demonstrates this fact:
// Demonstrate a fixed-size buffer.
using System;
// Create a fixed-size buffer.
unsafe struct FixedBankRecord {
public fixed byte Name[80]; // create a fixed-size buffer
public double Balance;
public long ID;
}
class FixedSizeBuffer {
// Mark Main as unsafe.
unsafe static void Main() {
Console.WriteLine("Size of FixedBankRecord is " +
sizeof(FixedBankRecord));
}
}
The output is shown here:
Size of FixedBankRecord is 96
VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.
Our VB.NET PDF Document Add-On enables you to search for text in target PDF document by For example, you can locate the searched text together with methods
pdf mail merge; combine pdf files
C# Image: How to Draw Text on Images within Rasteredge .NET Image
txt" to the new project folder, together with .NET short but useful C# code example to add text and powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
reader create pdf multiple files; acrobat combine pdf
618
Part I: The C# Language
Although the size of FixedBankRecord is the exact sum of its members, this may not 
be the case for all structs that have fixed-size buffers. C# is free to pad the overall length of 
structure so that it aligns on an even boundary (such as a word boundary) for efficiency 
reasons. Therefore, the overall length of a struct might be a few bytes greater than the sum 
of its fields, even when fixed-size buffers are used. In most cases, an equivalent C++ struct
would also use the same padding. However, be aware that a difference in this regard may 
be possible.
One last point: In the program, notice how the fixed-size buffer for Name is created:
public fixed byte Name[80]; // create a fixed-size buffer
fers from normal C# 
FixedBankRecord
object.
Nullable Types
Beginning with version 2.0, C# has included a feature that provides an elegant solution to 
what is both a common and irritating problem. The feature is the nullable type. The problem is 
how to recognize and handle fields that do not contain values (in other words, unassigned 
fields). To understand the problem, consider a simple customer database that keeps a record 
of the customer’s name, address, customer ID, invoice number, and current balance. In such a 
situation, it is possible to create a customer entry in which one or more of those fields would 
be unassigned. For example, a customer may simply request a catalog. In this case, no invoice 
number would be needed and the field would be unused.
In the past, handling the possibility of unused fields required the use of either placeholder 
values could work only if there was a value that would otherwise be invalid, which won’t 
be the case in all situations. Adding an extra field to indicate if a field is in use works in all 
cases, but having to manually create and manage such a field is an annoyance. The nullable 
type solves both problems.
Nullable Basics
A nullable type is a special version of a value type that is represented by a structure. In 
e the 
valuenull
type. It simply adds the ability to represent a value that indicates that a variable of that type 
is unassigned. Nullable types are objects of System.Nullable<T>, where T must be a non-
nullable value type.
R
EMEMBER
R
EMEMBER
Only value types have nullable equivalents.
A nullable type can be specified two different ways. First, you can explicitly declare 
objects of type Nullable<T>, which is defined in the System namespace. For example, this 
creates intandbool nullable types:
System.Nullable<int> count;
System.Nullable<bool> done;
C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
files to Tiff, like Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, and images. Enable to add XImage.OCR for .NET into C# C#.NET application by using barcode reader SDK together.
append pdf; pdf merger
C# Excel - Merge Excel Documents in C#.NET
and appended together according to its loading sequence, and then saved and output as a single Excel with user-defined location. C# DLLs: Merge Excel Files. Add
merge pdf online; pdf merger online
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 20: Unsafe Code, Pointers, Nullable Types, Dynamic Types, and Miscellaneous Topics
619
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
The second way to declare a nullable type is much shorter and is more commonly used. 
Simply follow the type name with a ?. For example, the following shows the more common 
way to declare a nullable int and bool type:
int? count;
bool? done;
When using nullable types, you will often see a nullable object created like this:
int? count = null;
This explicitly initializes count to null. This satisfies the constraint that a variable must be 
given a value before it is used. In this case, the value simply means undefined.
Y
from the underlying type to the nullable type is predefined. For example, this assigns the 
value 100 to count.
count = 100;
There are two ways to determine if a variable of a nullable type is null or contains a 
value. First, you can test its value against null. For example, using count declared by the 
preceding statement, the following determines if it has a value:
if(count != null) // has a value
Ifcount is not null, then it contains a value.
HasValue
read-only property defined by Nullable<T>. It is shown here:
bool HasValue
HasValue will return true if the instance on which it is called contains a value. It will return 
false otherwise. Using the HasValue property, here is the second way to determine if the 
nullable object count has a value:
if(count.HasValue) // has a value
Value read-only property defined by Nullable<T>, which is shown here:
T Value
It r
from a variable that is null, a System.InvalidOperationException will be thrown. It is also 
The following program puts together the pieces and demonstrates the basic mechanism 
that handles a nullable type:
// Demonstrate a nullable type.
using System;
class NullableDemo {
static void Main() {
620
Part I: The C# Language
int? count = null;
if(count.HasValue)
Console.WriteLine("count has this value: " + count.Value);
else
Console.WriteLine("count has no value");
count = 100;
if(count.HasValue)
Console.WriteLine("count has this value: " + count.Value);
else
Console.WriteLine("count has no value");
}
}
The output is shown here:
count has no value
count has this value: 100
Nullable Objects in Expressions
A nullable object can be used in expressions that are valid for its underlying type. Furthermore, 
ession. This 
works because of the predefined conversion that exists from the underlying type to the 
nullable type. When non-nullable and nullable types are mixed in an operation, the outcome 
is a nullable value.
The following program illustrates the use of nullable types in expressions:
// Use nullable objects in expressions.
using System;
class NullableDemo {
static void Main() {
int? count = null;
int? result = null;
int incr = 10; // notice that incr is a non-nullable type
// result contains null, because count is null.
result = count + incr;
if(result.HasValue)
Console.WriteLine("result has this value: " + result.Value);
else
Console.WriteLine("result has no value");
// Now, count is given a value and result will contain a value.
count = 100;
result = count + incr;
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 20: Unsafe Code, Pointers, Nullable Types, Dynamic Types, and Miscellaneous Topics
621
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
if(result.HasValue)
Console.WriteLine("result has this value: " + result.Value);
else
Console.WriteLine("result has no value");
}
}
The output is shown here:
result has no value
result has this value: 110
The ?? Operator
System.InvalidOperationException will be thrown if the nullable object contains a null
value. This can occur, for example, when you use a cast to assign the value of a nullable 
object to a variable of its underlying type. You can avoid the possibility of this exception 
being thrown by using the ?? operator, which is called the null coalescing operator. It lets 
null. It also 
eliminates the need for the cast.
The?? operator has this general form:
nullable-object ?? default-value
Ifnullable-objectcontains a value, then the value of the ?? is that value. Otherwise, the value 
of the ?? operation is default-value.
For example, in the following code balance is null. This causes currentBalance to be 
assigned the value 0.0 and no exception will be thrown.
double? balance = null;
double currentBalance;
currentBalance = balance ?? 0.0;
In the next sequence, balance is given the value 123.75:
double? balance = 123.75;
double currentBalance;
currentBalance = balance ?? 0.0;
Now, currentBalance will contain the value of balance, which is 123.75.
One other point: The right-hand expression of the ?? is evaluated only if the left-hand 
expression does not contain a value. The following program demonstrates this fact:
// Using ??
using System;
class NullableDemo2 {
622
Part I: The C# Language
// Return a zero balance.
static double GetZeroBal() {
Console.WriteLine("In GetZeroBal().");
return 0.0;
}
static void Main() {
double? balance = 123.75;
double currentBalance;
// Here, GetZeroBal( ) is not called because balance
// contains a value.
currentBalance = balance ?? GetZeroBal();
Console.WriteLine(currentBalance);
}
}
In this program, the method GetZeroBal( ) is not called because balance contains a value. 
As explained, when the left-hand expression of ?? contains a value, the right-hand expression 
is not evaluated.
Nullable Objects and the Relational and Logical Operators
Nullable objects can be used in relational expressions in just the same way as their 
corresponding non-nullable types. However, there is one additional rule that applies. 
When two nullable objects are compared using the <,>,<=, or >= operators, the result 
is false if either of the objects is null. For example, consider this sequence:
byte? lower = 16;
byte? upper = null;
// Here, lower is defined, but upper isn’t.
if(lower < upper) // false
Here, the result of the test for less than is false. However, somewhat counterintuitively, so is 
the inverse comparison:
if(lower > upper) // .. also false!
null, the result of 
that comparison is always false; null does not participate in an ordering relationship.
You can test whether a nullable object contains null, however, by using the == or !=
operator. For example, this is a valid test that will result in a true outcome:
if(upper == null) // ...
When a logical expression involves two bool? objects, the outcome of that expression 
will be one of three values: true,false, or null(undefined). Here are the entries that are 
added to the truth table for the & and | operators that apply to bool?.
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 20: Unsafe Code, Pointers, Nullable Types, Dynamic Types, and Miscellaneous Topics
623
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
P
Q
P | Q
P & Q
true
null
true
null
false
null
null
false
null
true
true
null
null
false
null
false
null
null
null
null
One other point: When the ! operator is applied to a bool? value that is null, the 
outcome is null.
Partial Types
Beginning with C# 2.0, a class, structure, or interface definition can be broken into two or 
more pieces, with each piece residing in a separate file. This is accomplished through the 
use of the partial contextual keyword. When your program is compiled, the pieces are 
united.
When used to create a partial type, the partial modifier has this general form:
partialtypetypename { // ...
Here, typename is the name of the class, structure, or interface that is being split into pieces. 
Each part of a partial type must be modified by partial.
Here is an example that divides a simple XY coordinate class into three separate files. 
The first file is shown here:
partial class XY {
public XY(int a, int b) {
X = a;
Y = b;
}
}
The second file is shown next:
partial class XY {
public int X { get; set; }
}
The third file is
partial class XY {
public int Y { get; set; }
}
The following file demonstrates the use of XY:
// Demonstrate partial class definitions.
using System;
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested