asp net core 2.0 mvc pdf : Split pdf into multiple files control SDK platform web page winforms html web browser McGraw.Hill.CSharp.4.0.The.Complete.Reference.Apr.20107-part1232

44
Part I: The C# Language
Althoughchar is defined by C# as an integer type, it cannot be freely mixed with integers 
in all cases. This is because there are no automatic type conversions from integer to char.
For example, the following fragment is invalid:
char ch;
ch = 88; // error, won't work
The reason the pr
automatically convert to a char. If you attempt to compile this code, you will see an error 
message. To make the assignment legal, you would need to employ a cast, which is 
described later in this chapter.
The bool Type
Thebool type represents true/false values. C# defines the values true and false using the 
reserved words true and false. Thus, a variable or expression of type bool will be one of 
these two values. Furthermore, there is no conversion defined between bool and integer 
values. For example, 1 does not convert to true, and 0 does not convert to false.
Here is a program that demonstrates the bool type:
// Demonstrate bool values.
using System;
class BoolDemo {
static void Main() {
bool b;
b = false;
Console.WriteLine("b is " + b);
b = true;
Console.WriteLine("b is " + b);
// A bool value can control the if statement.
if(b) Console.WriteLine("This is executed.");
b = false;
if(b) Console.WriteLine("This is not executed.");
// Outcome of a relational operator is a bool value.
Console.WriteLine("10 > 9 is " + (10 > 9));
}
}
The output generated by this program is shown here:
b is False
b is True
This is executed.
10 > 9 is True
Split pdf into multiple files - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
break a pdf into multiple files; attach pdf to mail merge in word
Split pdf into multiple files - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
pdf combine; apple merge pdf
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 3: Data Types, Literals, and Variables 
45
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
There are three interesting things to notice about this program. First, as you can see, 
when a bool value is output by WriteLine(), “True” or “False” is displayed. Second, the 
value of a bool variable is sufficient, by itself, to control the if statement. There is no need 
to write an if statement like this:
if(b == true) ...
Third, the outcome of a relational operator, such as <, is a bool value. This is why the 
expression 10 > 9 displays the value “True.” Further, the extra set of parentheses around 
10 > 9 is necessary because the + operator has a higher precedence than the >.
Some Output Options
Up to this point, when data has been output using a WriteLine( ) statement, it has been 
displayed using the default format. However, the .NET Framework defines a sophisticated 
formatting mechanism that gives you detailed control over how data is displayed. Although 
formatted I/O is covered in detail later in this book, it is useful to introduce some formatting 
when output via a WriteLine( ) statement. Doing so enables you to produce more appealing 
output. Keep in mind that the formatting mechanism supports many more features than 
described here.
sign, as shown here:
Console.WriteLine("You ordered " + 2 + " items at $" + 3 + " each.");
contr
can’t contr
Console.WriteLine("Here is 10/3: " + 10.0/3.0);
It generates this output:
Here is 10/3: 3.33333333333333
be inappr
display two decimal places.
To control how numeric data is formatted, you will need to use a second form of 
WriteLine( ), shown here, which allows you to embed formatting information:
WriteLine(“formatstring”,arg0,arg1, ... , argN);
In this version, the arguments to WriteLine( ) are separated by commas and not + signs. The 
formatstring contains two items: regular, printing characters that are displayed as-is, and 
format specifiers. Format specifiers take this general form:
{argnum,width:fmt}
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
outputFiles); Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files in C#. You can use the following C# demo to split PDF document to four files.
best pdf merger; attach pdf to mail merge
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF file into two or multiple files in ASP.NET webpage online. Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files Demo Code in VB.NET.
add pdf files together; pdf merge comments
46
Part I: The C# Language
Here, argnum specifies the number of the argument (starting from zero) to display. The 
minimum width of the field is specified by width, and the format is specified by fmt. The 
width and fmt are optional.
During execution, when a format specifier is encountered in the format string, the 
corresponding argument, as specified by argnum, is substituted and displayed. Thus, the 
e its matching 
data will be displayed. Both width and fmt are optional. Therefore, in its simplest form, a 
format specifier simply indicates which argument to display. For example, {0} indicates 
arg0,{1} specifies arg1, and so on.
Let’s begin with a simple example. The statement
Console.WriteLine("February has {0} or {1} days.", 28, 29);
produces the following output:
February has 28 or 29 days.
As you can see, the value 28 is substituted for {0}, and 29 is substituted for {1}. Thus, the 
format specifiers identify the location at which the subsequent arguments, in this case 28 
and 29, are displayed within the string. Furthermore, notice that the additional values are 
separated by commas, not + signs.
Here is a variation of the preceding statement that specifies minimum field widths:
Console.WriteLine("February has {0,10} or {1,5} days.", 28, 29);
It produces the following output:
February has         28 or    29 days.
Remember, a minimum field width is just that: the minimum width. Output can exceed 
that width if needed.
Of course, the arguments associated with a format command need not be constants. For 
example, this program displays a table of squares and cubes. It uses format commands to 
output the values.
// Use format commands.
using System;
class DisplayOptions {
static void Main() {
int i;
Console.WriteLine("Value\tSquared\tCubed");
for(i = 1; i < 10; i++)
Console.WriteLine("{0}\t{1}\t{2}", i, i*i, i*i*i);
}
}
The output is shown here:
Online Split PDF file. Best free online split PDF tool.
Easy split! We try to make it as easy as possible to split your PDF files into Multiple ones. You can receive the PDF files by simply
acrobat reader merge pdf files; scan multiple pages into one pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
the ability to inserting a new PDF page into existing PDF PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how to split PDF document in
pdf merger online; pdf merge
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 3: Data Types, Literals, and Variables 
47
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
Value   Squared Cubed
1       1       1
2       4       8
3       9       27
4       16      64
5       25      125
6       36      216
7       49      343
8       64      512
9       81      729
In the pr
course, the purpose of using format specifiers is to control the way the data looks. The types 
of data most commonly formatted are floating-point and decimal values. One of the easiest 
ways to specify a format is to describe a template that WriteLine( ) will use. To do this, 
show an example of the format that you want, using #s to mark the digit positions. You can 
also specify the decimal point and commas. For example, here is a better way to display 10 
divided by 3:
Console.WriteLine("Here is 10/3: {0:#.##}", 10.0/3.0);
The output from this statement is shown here:
Here is 10/3: 3.33
In this example, the template is #.##, which tells WriteLine( ) to display two decimal places. 
It is important to understand, however, that WriteLine( ) will display more than one digit 
to the left of the decimal point, if necessary, so as not to misrepresent the value.
Here is another example. This statement
Console.WriteLine("{0:###,###.##}", 123456.56);
generates this output:
123,456.56
If you want to display monetary values, use the C format specifier. For example:
decimal balance;
balance = 12323.09m;
Console.WriteLine("Current balance is {0:C}", balance);
The output from this sequence is shown here (in U.S. dollar format):
Current balance is $12,323.09
TheC format can be used to improve the output from the price discount program 
shown earlier:
// Use the C format specifier to output dollars and cents.
using System;
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. Turn multiple pages PDF into multiple jpg files in VB.NET class.
add pdf pages together; .net merge pdf files
VB.NET TWAIN: Scanning Multiple Pages into PDF & TIFF File Using
This VB.NET TWAIN pages scanning control add-on is developed to offer programmers an efficient solution to scan multiple pages into one PDF or TIFF
how to combine pdf files; acrobat merge pdf
48
Part I: The C# Language
class UseDecimal {
static void Main() {
decimal price;
decimal discount;
decimal discounted_price;
// Compute discounted price.
price = 19.95m;
discount = 0.15m; // discount rate is 15%
discounted_price = price - ( price * discount);
Console.WriteLine("Discounted price: {0:C}", discounted_price);
}
}
Here is the way the output now looks:
Discounted price: $16.96
Literals
In C#, literals refer to fixed values that are represented in their human-readable form. 
eceding sample 
programs. Now the time has come to explain them formally.
C# literals can be of any simple type. The way each literal is represented depends upon 
its type. As explained earlier, character literals are enclosed between single quotes. For 
example, ‘a’ and ‘%’ are both character literals.
Integer literals are specified as numbers without fractional components. For example, 
10 and –100 are integer literals. Floating-point literals require the use of the decimal point 
followed by the number’s fractional component. For example, 11.123 is a floating-point literal. 
Since C# is a strongly typed language, literals, too, have a type. Naturally, this raises the 
12, 123987, or 0.23? Fortunately, C# specifies some easy-to-follow rules that answer these 
questions.
it, beginning with int. Thus, an integer literal is either of type int,uint,long, or ulong,
depending upon its value. Second, floating-point literals are of type double.
by including a suffix. To specify a long literal, append an l or an L. For example, 12 is an 
int, but 12L is a long. To specify an unsigned integer value, append a u or U. Thus, 100 is 
anint, but 100U is a uint. To specify an unsigned, long integer, use ul or UL. For example, 
984375UL is of type ulong.
To specify a float literal, append an F or f to the constant. For example, 10.19F is of type 
float. Although redundant, you can specify a double literal by appending a D or d. (As just 
mentioned, floating-point literals are double by default.)
To specify a decimal literal, follow its value with an m or M. For example, 9.95M is a 
decimal literal.
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
C#.NET PDF Splitter to Split PDF File. In this section, we aims to tell you how to divide source PDF file into two smaller PDF documents at the page
reader combine pdf pages; all jpg to one pdf converter
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Simply integrate into VB.NET project, supporting conversions to or from multiple supported images formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete
add pdf files together online; combine pdf
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 3: Data Types, Literals, and Variables 
49
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
Although integer literals create an int,uint, long,or ulong value by default, they can 
still be assigned to variables of type byte, sbyte, short, or ushort as long as the value being 
assigned can be represented by the target type.
Hexadecimal Literals
As you probably know, in programming it is sometimes easier to use a number system based 
on 16 instead of 10. The base 16 number system is called hexadecimal and uses the digits 0 
through 9 plus the letters A through F, which stand for 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15. For example, 
the hexadecimal number 10 is 16 in decimal. Because of the frequency with which hexadecimal 
numbers arA 
hexadecimal literal must begin with 0x (a 0 followed by an x). Here are some examples:
count = 0xFF; // 255 in decimal
incr = 0x1a;  // 26 in decimal
Character Escape Sequences
characters, such as the carriage return, pose a special problem when a text editor is used. 
meaning in C#, so you cannot use them directly. For these reasons, C# provides special 
escape sequences, sometimes referred to as backslash character constants, shown in Table 3-2. 
These sequences are used in place of the characters they represent.
For example, this assigns ch the tab character:
ch = '\t';
The next example assigns a single quote to ch:
ch = '\'';
Escape Sequence
Description
\a
Alert (bell)
\b
Backspace
\f
Form feed
\n
New line (linefeed)
\r
Carriage return
\t
Horizontal tab
\v
Vertical tab
\0
Null
\'
Single quote
\"
Double quote
\\
Backslash
T
ABLE
3-2 Character Escape Sequences
50
Part I: The C# Language
String Literals
C# supports one other type of literal: the string. A string literal is a set of characters enclosed 
by double quotes. For example,
"this is a test"
is a string. You have seen examples of strings in many of the WriteLine( ) statements in the 
preceding sample programs.
e of the 
escape sequences just described. For example, consider the following program. It uses 
the\n and \t escape sequences.
// Demonstrate escape sequences in strings.
using System;
class StrDemo {
static void Main() {
Console.WriteLine("Line One\nLine Two\nLine Three");
Console.WriteLine("One\tTwo\tThree");
Console.WriteLine("Four\tFive\tSix");
// Embed quotes.
Console.WriteLine("\"Why?\", he asked.");
}
}
The output is shown here:
Line One
Line Two
Line Three
One     Two     Three
Four    Five    Six
"Why?", he asked.
Notice how the \n escape sequence is used to generate a new line. You don’t need to use 
multipleWriteLine( ) statements to get multiline output. Just embed \n within a longer 
string at the points where you want the new lines to occur. Also note how a quotation mark 
is generated inside a string.
verbatim
stringliteral. A verbatim string literal begins with an @, which is followed by a quoted string. 
The contents of the quoted string are accepted without modification and can span two or 
mor
escape sequences. The only exception is that to obtain a double quote (), you must use two 
double quotes in a row (“”). Here is a program that demonstrates verbatim string literals:
// Demonstrate verbatim string literals.
using System;
class Verbatim {
static void Main() {
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 3: Data Types, Literals, and Variables 
51
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
Console.WriteLine(@"This is a verbatim
string literal
that spans several lines.
");
Console.WriteLine(@"Here is some tabbed output:
1       2       3       4
5       6       7       8
");
Console.WriteLine(@"Programmers say, ""I like C#.""");
}
}
The output from this program is shown here:
This is a verbatim
string literal
that spans several lines.
Here is some tabbed output:
1       2       3       4
5       6       7       8
Programmers say, "I like C#."
The important point to notice about the preceding program is that the verbatim string 
literals are displayed precisely as they are entered into the program.
ogram 
exactly as it will appear on the screen. However, in the case of multiline strings, the 
wrapping will obscure the indentation of your program. For this reason, the programs in 
e still a 
wonderful benefit for many formatting situations.
One last point: Don’t confuse strings with characters. A character literal, such as 'X', 
represents a single letter of type char. A string containing only one letter, such as "X", is still
a string.
A Closer Look at Variables
Variables are declared using this form of statement:
type var-name;
where type is the data type of the variable and var-name is its name. You can declare a variable 
variable’s capabilities are determined by its type. For example, a variable of type bool cannot 
be used to store floating-point values. Furthermore, the type of a variable cannot change 
during its lifetime. An int variable cannot turn into a charvariable, for example.
All variables in C# must be declared prior to their use. As a general rule, this is 
necessary because the compiler must know what type of data a variable contains before it 
can pr
perform strict type-checking.
C# defines several different kinds of variables. The kind that we have been using are 
calledlocal variables because they are declared within a method.
52
Part I: The C# Language
Initializing a Variable
One way to give a variable a value is through an assignment statement, as you have already 
seen. Another way is by giving it an initial value when it is declared. To do this, follow the 
initialization is shown here:
typevar-name = value;
Here, value is the value that is given to the variable when it is created. The value must be 
compatible with the specified type.
Here are some examples:
int count = 10; // give count an initial value of 10
char ch = 'X';  // initialize ch with the letter X
float f = 1.2F; // f is initialized with 1.2
When declaring two or more variables of the same type using a comma-separated list, 
you can give one or more of those variables an initial value. For example:
int a, b = 8, c = 19, d; // b and c have initializations
In this case, only b and c are initialized.
Dynamic Initialization
Although the preceding examples have used only constants as initializers, C# allows 
variables to be initialized dynamically, using any expression valid at the point at which 
the variable is declared. For example, here is a short program that computes the hypotenuse 
of a right triangle given the lengths of its two opposing sides.
// Demonstrate dynamic initialization.
using System;
class DynInit {
static void Main() {
// Length of sides.
double s1 = 4.0;
double s2 = 5.0;
// Dynamically initialize hypot.
double hypot = Math.Sqrt( (s1 * s1) + (s2 * s2) );
Console.Write("Hypotenuse of triangle with sides " +
s1 + " by " + s2 + " is ");
Console.WriteLine("{0:#.###}.", hypot);
}
}
Here is the output:
Hypotenuse of triangle with sides 4 by 5 is 6.403.
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 3: Data Types, Literals, and Variables 
53
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
Here, three local variables—s1,s2, and hypot—are declared. The first two, s1 and s2, are 
initialized by constants. However, hypot is initialized dynamically to the length of the 
hypotenuse. Notice that the initialization involves calling Math.Sqrt( ). As explained, you can 
use any expr
Math.Sqrt( )
hypot. The key point here is that the initialization expression can use any element valid 
Implicitly Typed Variables
As explained, in C# all variables must be declared. Normally, a declaration includes the 
type of the variable, such as int or bool, followed by the name of the variable. However, 
variable based on the value used to initialize it. This is called an implicitly typed variable.
An implicitly typed variable is declared using the keyword var, and it must be initialized. 
e is an 
example:
var e = 2.7183;
Becausee is initialized with a floating-point literal (whose type is double by default), the 
type of e is double. Had e been declared like this:
var e = 2.7183F;
thene would have the type float, instead.
The following program demonstrates implicitly typed variables. It reworks the program 
shown in the preceding section so that all variables are implicitly typed.
//  Demonstrate implicitly typed variables.
using System;
class ImplicitlyTypedVar {
static void Main() {
// These are now implicitly typed variables. They
// are of type double because their initializing
// expressions are of type double.
var s1 = 4.0;
var s2 = 5.0;
// Now, hypot is implicitly typed.  Its type is double
// because the return type of Sqrt() is double.
var hypot = Math.Sqrt( (s1 * s1) + (s2 * s2) );
Console.Write("Hypotenuse of triangle with sides " +
s1 + " by " + s2 + " is ");
Console.WriteLine("{0:#.###}.", hypot);
// The following statement will not compile because
// s1 is a double and cannot be assigned a decimal value.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested