asp.net mvc 4 and the web api pdf free download : Adding pdf pages together SDK Library API .net wpf asp.net sharepoint McGraw.Hill.CSharp.4.0.The.Complete.Reference.Apr.201091-part1256

884
Part II: Exploring the C# Library
The output is shown here:
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
In general, when you need to cycle through a collection, a foreach loop is more 
convenient to use than an enumerator. However, an enumerator gives you a little extra 
control by allowing you to reset the enumerator at will.
Using IDictionaryEnumerator
When using a non-generic IDictionary, such as Hashtable, you will use an 
IDictionaryEnumerator instead of an IEnumerator when cycling through the collection. 
TheIDictionaryEnumerator inherits IEnumerator and adds three properties. The first is
DictionaryEntry Entry { get; }
Entry obtains the next key/value pair from the enumerator in the form of a DictionaryEntry
structure. Recall that DictionaryEntry defines two properties, called Key and Value, which 
can be used to access the key or value contained within the entry. The other two properties 
defined by IDictionaryEnumerator are shown here:
object Key { get; }
object Value { get; }
These allow you to access the key or value directly.
AnIDictionaryEnumerator is used just like a regular enumerator, except that you will 
obtain the current value through the Entry,Key, or Value properties rather than Current.
Thus, after obtaining an IDictionaryEnumerator, you must call MoveNext( ) to obtain the 
first element. Continue to call MoveNext( ) to obtain the rest of the elements in the 
collection.MoveNext( ) returns false when there are no more elements.
Here is an example that enumerates the elements in a Hashtable through an 
IDictionaryEnumerator:
// Demonstrate IDictionaryEnumerator.
using System;
using System.Collections;
class IDicEnumDemo {
static void Main() {
// Create a hash table.
Hashtable ht = new Hashtable();
// Add elements to the table.
ht.Add("Tom", "555–3456");
ht.Add("Mary", "555–9876");
ht.Add("Todd", "555–3452");
ht.Add("Ken", "555–7756");
// Demonstrate enumerator.
IDictionaryEnumerator etr = ht.GetEnumerator();
Console.WriteLine("Display info using Entry.");
Adding pdf pages together - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
build pdf from multiple files; pdf merge files
Adding pdf pages together - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
pdf combine two pages into one; append pdf
P
A
R
T
I
I
Chapter 25: Collections, Enumerators, and Iterators  
885
while(etr.MoveNext())
Console.WriteLine(etr.Entry.Key + ": " +
etr.Entry.Value);
Console.WriteLine();
Console.WriteLine("Display info using Key and Value directly.");
etr.Reset();
while(etr.MoveNext())
Console.WriteLine(etr.Key + ": " +
etr.Value);
}
}
The output is shown here:
Display info using Entry.
Ken: 555–7756
Mary: 555–9876
Tom: 555–3456
Todd: 555–3452
Display info using Key and Value directly.
Ken: 555–7756
Mary: 555–9876
Tom: 555–3456
Todd: 555–3452
Implementing IEnumerable and IEnumerator
As mentioned earlier, normally it is easier (and better) to use a foreach loop to cycle through 
a collection than it is to explicitly use IEnumerator methods. However, understanding the 
operation of this interface is important for another reason: If you want to create a class that 
contains objects that can be enumerated via a foreach loop, then that class must implement 
IEnumerator. It must also implement IEnumerable. In other words, to enable an object of 
a class that you create to be used in a foreach loop, you must implement IEnumerator and 
IEnumerable, using either their generic or non-generic form. Fortunately, because these 
interfaces are so small, they are easy to implement.
Here is an example that implements the non-generic versions of IEnumerable and 
IEnumerator so that the contents of the array encapsulated within MyClass can be 
enumerated:
// Implement IEnumerable and IEnumerator.
using System;
using System.Collections;
class MyClass : IEnumerator, IEnumerable {
char[] chrs = { 'A', 'B', 'C', 'D' };
int idx = -1;
// Implement IEnumerable.
C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
7. How to extract Tiff pages. Tiff Compression in C#. 1. Support embedding, removing, adding and updating ICCProfile. 2. Render text to text, PDF, or Word file.
reader merge pdf; c# merge pdf
C# Image: How to Draw Text on Images within Rasteredge .NET Image
txt" to the new project folder, together with .NET to make this image text adding application work powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
add pdf together one file; pdf combine
886
Part II: Exploring the C# Library
public IEnumerator GetEnumerator() {
return this;
}
// The following methods implement IEnumerator.
// Return the current object.
public object Current {
get {
return chrs[idx];
}
}
// Advance to the next object.
public bool MoveNext() {
if(idx == chrs.Length-1) {
Reset(); // reset enumerator at the end
return false;
}
idx++;
return true;
}
// Reset the enumerator to the start.
public void Reset() { idx = -1; }
}
class EnumeratorImplDemo {
static void Main() {
MyClass mc = new MyClass();
// Display the contents of mc.
foreach(char ch in mc)
Console.Write(ch + " ");
Console.WriteLine();
// Display the contents of mc, again.
foreach(char ch in mc)
Console.Write(ch + " ");
Console.WriteLine();
}
}
Here is the output:
A B C D
A B C D
In the program, first examine MyClass. It encapsulates a small char array that contains 
the characters A through D. An index into this array is stored in idx, which is initialized 
to –1. MyClass then implements both IEnumerator and IEnumerable.GetEnumerator( )
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
example code to create graphics watermark on multiple PDF pages within the users with the most flexible and mature PDF watermark adding API solutions
merge pdf files; attach pdf to mail merge
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Codes to Add Antique Effect to Image with .
When the two libraries are combined together, you can Basic .NET example codings for adding vintage effect & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add multiple pdf files into one online; add pdf files together reader
P
A
R
T
I
I
Chapter 25: Collections, Enumerators, and Iterators  
887
returns a reference to the enumerator, which in this case is the current object. The Current
property returns the next character in the array, which is the object at idx. The MoveNext( )
method advances idx to the next location. It returns false if the end of the collection has 
been reached and true otherwise. Reset( ) sets idx to –1. Recall that an enumerator is 
undefined until after the first call to MoveNext( ). Thus, in a foreach loop, MoveNext( ) is 
automatically called before Current. This is why idx must initially be –1; it is advanced to 
zero when the foreach loop begins. A generic implementation would work in a similar 
fashion.
InsideMain( ), an object of type MyClass called mc is created and the contents of the 
object are twice displayed by use of a foreach loop.
Using Iterators
As the preceding example shows, it is not difficult to implement IEnumerator and 
IEnumerable. However, it can be made even easier through the use of an iterator. An 
iterator is a method, operator, or accessor that returns the members of a set of objects, one 
member at a time, from start to finish. For example, assuming some array that has five 
elements, then an iterator for that array will return those five elements, one at a time. 
be used in a foreach loop.
Let’s begin with an example of a simple iterator. The following program is a modified 
version of the preceding program that uses an iterator rather than explicitly implementing 
IEnumeratorand IEnumerable.
// A simple example of an iterator.
using System;
using System.Collections;
class MyClass {
char[] chrs = { 'A', 'B', 'C', 'D' };
// This iterator returns the characters
// in the chrs array.
public IEnumerator GetEnumerator() {
foreach(char ch in chrs)
yield return ch;
}
}
class ItrDemo {
static void Main() {
MyClass mc = new MyClass();
foreach(char ch in mc)
Console.Write(ch + " ");
Console.WriteLine();
}
}
VB.NET Image: How to Deploy & Configure .NET Image SDK
dlls into your ASP.NET web project by adding reference directly; Copy your evaluation license key at the same folder of your web project, together with above
acrobat merge pdf; batch pdf merger
C# Image: C# Code to Encode & Decode JBIG2 Images in RasterEdge .
codec into PDF documents for a better PDF compression; jbig2.dll to the C# project by adding project reference text to the new project folder, together with .NET
reader create pdf multiple files; best pdf combiner
888
Part II: Exploring the C# Library
The output is shown here:
A B C D
As you can see, the contents of mc.chrs was enumerated.
Let’s examine this program carefully. First, notice that MyClass does not specify 
IEnumerator as an implemented interface. When creating an iterator, the compiler 
GetEnumerator( ) method, which is shown again here for your convenience:
// This iterator returns the characters
// in the chrs array.
public IEnumerator GetEnumerator() {
foreach(char ch in chrs)
yield return ch;
}
This is the iterator for MyClass. Notice that it implicitly implements the GetEnumerator( )
method defined by IEnumerable. Now, look at the body of the method. It contains a 
foreach loop that returns the elements in chrs. It does this through the use of a yieldreturn
statement. The yieldreturn statement returns the next object in the collection, which in this 
case is the next character in chrs. This feature enables mc (a MyClass object) to be used 
within the foreach loop inside Main( ).
The term yield is a contextualkeyword in the C# language. This means that it has special 
meaning only inside an iterator block. Outside of an iterator, yield can be used like any 
other identifier.
an array or other type of collection. It simply must return the next element in a group of 
elements. This means the elements can be dynamically constructed using an algorithm. For 
example, here is a version of the previous program that returns all uppercase letters in the 
alphabet. Instead of using an array, it generates the letters using a for loop.
// Iterated values can be dynamically constructed.
using System;
using System.Collections;
class MyClass {
char ch = 'A';
// This iterator returns the letters of the alphabet.
public IEnumerator GetEnumerator() {
for(int i=0; i < 26; i++)
yield return (char) (ch + i);
}
}
class ItrDemo2 {
static void Main() {
MyClass mc = new MyClass();
VB.NET Image: VB.NET ISSN Barcode Reader & Scanner; Decode Barcode
into any VB.NET developing applications by adding reference from source PDF file, RasterEdge.Imaging.PDF.dll will and used in VB.NET class application together.
c# merge pdf files into one; batch merge pdf
VB.NET TIFF: .NET TIFF Printer Control; Print TIFF Using VB.NET
Therefore, by adding above mentioned two libraries into VB function to print multiple TIFF pages by defining & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
split pdf into multiple files; add pdf files together online
P
A
R
T
I
I
Chapter 25: Collections, Enumerators, and Iterators  
889
foreach(char ch in mc)
Console.Write(ch + " ");
Console.WriteLine();
}
}
The output is shown here:
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Stopping an Iterator
You can stop an iterator early by using this form of the yield statement:
yield break;
reached, which effectively stops the iterator.
The following program modifies the preceding program so that it displays only the first 
ten letters in the alphabet.
// Use yield break.
using System;
using System.Collections;
class MyClass {
char ch = 'A';
// This iterator returns the first 10
// letters of the alphabet.
public IEnumerator GetEnumerator() {
for(int i=0; i < 26; i++) {
if(i == 10) yield break; // stop iterator early
yield return (char) (ch + i);
}
}
}
class ItrDemo3 {
static void Main() {
MyClass mc = new MyClass();
foreach(char ch in mc)
Console.Write(ch + " ");
Console.WriteLine();
}
}
The output is shown here:
A B C D E F G H I J
VB.NET Word: .NET Project for Merging Two or More Microsoft Word
Enable VB.NET developers to split pages of a Word Studio using VB language and adding references to powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
combine pdf online; break a pdf into multiple files
C# Image: C# Tutorial to Scale Images in C# by Using Rasteredge .
txt" to the new project folder, together with C# Imaging SDK DLLs; Integrate imaging processing assemblies to the project by adding reference; RasterEdge
acrobat split pdf into multiple files; scan multiple pages into one pdf
890
Part II: Exploring the C# Library
Using Multiple yield Directives
You can have more than one yield statement in an iterator. However, each yield must return 
the next element in the collection. For example, consider this program:
// Multiple yield statements are allowed.
using System;
using System.Collections;
class MyClass {
// This iterator returns the letters
// A, B, C, D, and E.
public IEnumerator GetEnumerator() {
yield return 'A';
yield return 'B';
yield return 'C';
yield return 'D';
yield return 'E';
}
}
class ItrDemo5 {
static void Main() {
MyClass mc = new MyClass();
foreach(char ch in mc)
Console.Write(ch + " ");
Console.WriteLine();
}
}
The output is shown here:
A B C D E
InsideGetEnumerator( ), five yield statements occur. The important thing to 
understand is that they are executed one at a time, in order, each time another element in 
the collection is obtained. Thus, each time through the foreach loop in Main( ), one 
character is returned.
Creating a Named Iterator
Although the preceding examples have shown the easiest way to implement an iterator, 
there is an alternative: the named iterator. In this approach, you create a method, operator, 
or accessor that returns a reference to an IEnumerable object. Your code will use this object 
to supply the iterator. A named iterator is a method with the following general form:
public IEnumerable itr-name(param-list) {
// ...
yield return obj;
}
P
A
R
T
I
I
Chapter 25: Collections, Enumerators, and Iterators  
891
Here, itr-nameis the name of the method, param-listspecifies zero or more parameters that 
will be passed to the iterator method, and obj is the next object returned by the iterator. Once 
you have created a named iterator, you can use it anywhere that an iterator is needed. For 
example, you can use the named iterator to control a foreach loop.
Named iterators are very useful in some circumstances because they allow you to pass 
arguments to the iterator that control what elements are obtained. For example, you might 
of iterator can also be overloaded, further adding to its flexibility. The following program 
// Use named iterators.
using System;
using System.Collections;
class MyClass {
char ch = 'A';
// This iterator returns the letters
// of the alphabet, beginning at A and
// stopping at the specified stopping point.
public IEnumerable MyItr(int end) {
for(int i=0; i < end; i++)
yield return (char) (ch + i);
}
// This iterator returns the specified
// range of letters.
public IEnumerable MyItr(int begin, int end) {
for(int i=begin; i < end; i++)
yield return (char) (ch + i);
}
}
class ItrDemo4 {
static void Main() {
MyClass mc = new MyClass();
Console.WriteLine("Iterate the first 7 letters:");
foreach(char ch in mc.MyItr(7))
Console.Write(ch + " ");
Console.WriteLine("\n");
Console.WriteLine("Iterate letters from F to L:");
foreach(char ch in mc.MyItr(5, 12))
Console.Write(ch + " ");
Console.WriteLine();
}
}
892
Part II: Exploring the C# Library
The output is shown here:
Iterate the first 7 letters:
A B C D E F G
Iterate letters from F to L:
F G H I J K L
Creating a Generic Iterator
The pr
to create generic iterators. Doing so is quite easy: Simply return an object of the generic 
IEnumerator<T> or IEnumerable<T> type. Here is an example that creates a generic iterator:
// A simple example of a generic iterator.
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
class MyClass<T> {
T[] array;
public MyClass(T[] a) {
array = a;
}
// This iterator returns the characters
// in the chrs array.
public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator() {
foreach(T obj in array)
yield return obj;
}
}
class GenericItrDemo {
static void Main() {
int[] nums = { 4, 3, 6, 4, 7, 9 };
MyClass<int> mc = new MyClass<int>(nums);
foreach(int x in mc)
Console.Write(x + " ");
Console.WriteLine();
bool[] bVals = { true, true, false, true };
MyClass<bool> mc2 = new MyClass<bool>(bVals);
foreach(bool b in mc2)
Console.Write(b + " ");
Console.WriteLine();
}
}
P
A
R
T
I
I
Chapter 25: Collections, Enumerators, and Iterators  
893
The output is shown here:
4 3 6 4 7 9
True True False True
MyClass
through its constructor. The type of the array is specified as a type argument to MyClass.
TheGetEnumerator( ) method operates on data of type T and returns an IEnumerator<T>
enumerator. Thus, the iterator defined by MyClass can enumerate any type of data.
Collection Initializers
C# includes a feature called the collectioninitializer, which makes it easier to initialize certain 
collections. Instead of having to explicitly call Add( ), you can specify a list of initializers 
when a collection is created. When this is done, the compiler automatically calls Add( ) for 
e is an example. 
It creates a List<char> that is initialized with the characters C, A, E, B, D, and F.
List<char> lst = new List<char>() { 'C', 'A', 'E', 'B', 'D', 'F' };
After this statement executes, lst.Count will equal 6, because there are six initializers, and 
thisforeach loop
foreach(ch in lst)
Console.Write(ch + " ");
will display
C A E B D F
When using a collection such as LinkedList<TKey, TValue> that stores key/value pairs, 
you will need to supply pairs of initializers, as shown here:
SortedList<int, string> lst =
The compiler passes each group of values as arguments to Add( ). Thus, the first pair of 
initializers is translated into a call to Add(1, “One”) by the compiler.
Because the compiler automatically calls Add( ) to add initializers to a collection, 
collection initializers can be used only with collections that support a publicimplementation 
ofAdd( ). Therefore, collection initializers cannot be used with the Stack,Stack<T>,Queue,
orQueue<T> collections because they don’t support Add( ). You also can’t use a collection 
initializer with a collection such as LinkedList<T>, which provides Add( ) as an explicit 
interface implementation.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested