asp.net mvc 4 and the web api pdf free download : Add pdf files together control SDK system web page .net wpf console medialabmanual10-part1326

97
<!--ml.subs
ml.sub "question wording" = <ml.wording> 
ml.sub "varname" = <ml.varname> 
ml.sub "mypic.jpg" = <ml.bg> 
-->
See Also
Custom Items, Overview
Repeating Custom Items
Single Vs. Multiple Variables
Samples
9.4
Samples
Some Custom Sample Code
Examples of custom items and various code snippets can be found throughout the forums
at www.empirisoft.com/support
The following examples of HTML form code are taken from www.w3schools.com/html/
html_forms.asp
Text Fields
Text fields are used when you want the user to type letters, numbers, etc. in a form.
<form>
First name: <input type="text" name="firstname"><br>
Last name: <input type="text" name="lastname">
</form>
How it looks in a browser:
Note that the form itself is not visible. Also note that in most browsers, the width of the
text field is 20 characters by default. 
Radio Buttons
Radio Buttons are used when you want the user to select one of a limited number of
choices.
<form>
<input type="radio" name="sex" value="male"> Male <br>
<input type="radio" name="sex" value="female"> Female
</form>
88
91
92
97
Add pdf files together - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
apple merge pdf; batch pdf merger
Add pdf files together - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
acrobat combine pdf files; c# merge pdf pages
MediaLab v2014
98
How it looks in a browser:
Note that only one option can be chosen. 
Checkboxes 
Checkboxes are used when you want the user to select one or more options of a limited
number of choices.
<form>
<input type="checkbox" name="bike">I have a bike <br>
<input type="checkbox" name="car">I have a car
</form>
How it looks in a browser:
The Submit Button
When the user clicks on the "Submit" button, the content of the form is sent to another
file. The form's action attribute defines the name of the file to send the content to. The
file defined in the action attribute usually does something with the received input.
<form method="post">
Username: <input type="text" name="user">
<input type="submit" value="submit">
</form>
How it looks in a browser:
If you type some characters in the text field above, and click the "Submit" button, you will
make the text data available to MediaLab for the variable User. 
Source: www.w3schools.com/html/html_forms.asp
Back to Custom Items Overview
88
C# Word - Merge Word Documents in C#.NET
empowers C# programmers to easily merge and append Word files with mature input Word documents can be merged and appended together according to Add references:
asp.net merge pdf files; pdf merge files
C# PowerPoint - Merge PowerPoint Documents in C#.NET
together according to its loading sequence, and then saved and output as a single PowerPoint with user-defined location. C# DLLs: Merge PowerPoint Files. Add
build pdf from multiple files; combine pdf online
99
Responses.xls: Calculated Values, Complex Skips & Reports
Overview
This section will show you how to accomplish three advanced functions with MediaLab:
Calculate scores and other variables while a session is running. Present these
calculated values on screen as stimuli or feedback, use them in skip patterns, or in
post-session reports.
Execute complex skip patterns. Base skips on any prior response, or even combinations
of prior responses and calculated variables.
Create and optionally print summary reports immediately following the experimental
session. Create graphs, scale scores, or anything else you want based on raw and/or
summarized data.
Sample
Before we look into the technical details of accomplishing these advanced functions, let's
run a quick sample that demonstrates all three. Note that to take advantage of the
functions described in this section, you will need to have Microsoft Excel installed on your
system—both to design and to run the sessions. Also, because these are considered
advanced features, we're going to presume you have some basic familiarity with
MediaLab.
From the samples folder, run Condition 1 of the following experiment:
C:\MediaLab\Samples\Sample5 advanced features\advanced.exp
After the first few questions, this should appear to look just like the standard self-esteem
questionnaire sample from the introductory tutorial.
What is very different from the standard tutorial is the summary screen which follows the
self-esteem scale. Somehow, we have been able to calculate your overall self-esteem
score and present that value back to you. We have also been able to tell you what that
score means—i.e., whether you are high or low in self-esteem—complete with matching
emoticon—i.e., :) or :(.
We have also been able to calculate your average response time and tell you if you've
been fast or slow. On the following screen we continue by asking a question about your
membership in a racial minority or majority—based on how you responded to the race
question earlier in the questionnaire.
What happens next will depend on how you scored on the self-esteem test. You can try
this a couple times to see for yourself. If you scored moderately (2, 3, or 4), then you will
be at the end of the session. If you scored very high (greater than 4) then you will be at
a screen representing where a social desirability scale might be administered. If you
scored very low (less than 2) then you will be at a screen representing where a
depression inventory might be administered.
When you're done, go to the experiment's data folder. In here, you'll find a folder called
"reports". Inside the reports folder is a file called 1.xls (this will be different if you used
another subject ID). Open this file by double-clicking on it. First you'll see many of the
responses you gave to the questionnaire. Click on the tab at the bottom left that says
"sheet 2". Here you'll find a custom report for the session that displays your name, age
and self-esteem score. It presents a graphic that is based on your self-esteem score and
also displays a graph of the individual response times for each question. This report is
completely customizable and can be created automatically for each subject—with any raw
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping text by a method loses the original PDF document layout and all the paragraphs are joining together, our C#
add pdf together one file; split pdf into multiple files
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
Imaging.MSWordDocx.dll", which, when used together with other online tutorial on how to add & insert controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and components
pdf merge documents; add pdf files together reader
MediaLab v2014
100
or summary data you like, and formatted in any way you like.
How is it all done?
Let's close the report file and go back to the experiment folder. Open the file 
responses.xls—this is the secret. If you have a standard Excel file called responses.xls in
your experiment folder then MediaLab knows you want to use some or all of these
advanced functions. The question now—what do we put in this Excel file called 
responses.xls?
Variable, Value and Skipto
Notice that there are three columns on the opening worksheet—variable, value, and
skipto.
The Variable Column
In the variable column there are two types of variables—experiment variables and
calculated variables. If you take a look in our questionnaire self-esteem.que you'll see
that many of the variables listed there are also listed here in the variable column of 
responses.xls—name, age, rse1, rse2, etc. These are experiment variables—i.e., variables
taken from any of our questionnaire files in the experiment. This also includes reaction
times such as trse1, trse2, trse3 and so on. If it would normally appear in your regular
MediaLab data files, then it can be used as an experiment variable in the responses.xls
file.
But what about variables like minmaj, rse (positive scored), rse (positive scored), and
rse? These are not variables from the experiment. That's because they are calculated
variables we are creating them here in the responses.xls file. You can create any and as
many new calculated variables as you like and you can call them whatever you like. The
only rule for a calculated variable is that it has a name that isn't used in your experiment.
The Value Column
This brings us to the value column. For experiment variables, this is really simple—you
don't need to do anything. As a subject progresses through your experiment, MediaLab
will automatically fill these values in with whatever value is recorded for that variable in
the regular data files. After every question in your experiment, MediaLab checks the
variable column of the responses.xls file to see if it can fill in any values with the newly
acquired data. Thus, experiment variables are automatically updated by MediaLab when
the data become available.
What happens next is the really fun part–Excel automatically updates all of your
calculated variables taking into account the current values of your experiment variables!
Let's look at the example of rse (positive scored) . Double-click the mouse on the value
column for this calculated variable. You'll see that this cell actually contains the formula:
=AVERAGE(B4,B5,B7,B9,B10)
This is an Excel calculation formula. We're telling Excel that we want the value here to
equal the average of the cells listed in parentheses. If you look at what's in those cells,
you'll see that it's the subject's responses to rse1rse2rse4rse6, and rse7. These
happen to be the positively scored self-esteem items such as "I feel that I have a number
of good qualities."
Now let's look at rse (negative scored) . You'll see that this cell contains:
=7-AVERAGE(B6,B8,B11,B12,B13)
C# Excel - Merge Excel Documents in C#.NET
and appended together according to its loading sequence, and then saved and output as a single Excel with user-defined location. C# DLLs: Merge Excel Files. Add
add pdf files together online; break a pdf into multiple files
C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
Support converting other files to Tiff, like Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, and images. Enable to add XImage.OCR for .NET into C# Tiff imaging application
pdf merger; best pdf combiner
101
Here we're averaging the reverse scored items (e.g., "I am inclined to feel that I am a
failure.") and then subtracting that value from 7 to recode it such that higher numbers
reflect higher self-esteem.
Finally, look at rse :
=AVERAGE(B27,B28)
We see that the final calculated self-esteem score is an average of the two sub-scores
above. Now we have a calculated variable rse that is the subject's overall self-esteem
score.
10.1
Calculated Scores
Presenting Calculated Scores in MediaLab
Now that we have calculated a number of variables from the current session, we can
present these values back to the subject. Take a look at item #15 in the self-esteem
questionnaire:
You have <rselabel> self esteem <face>
You scored <rse> out of a possible 6.
Your average response time was <rsert>ms (<rsertspeed>).
We are presenting six calculated variables here—all from the responses.xls file. On the
second line of the above question wording we see where we are using the calculated
self-esteem score. We do this by placing the name of the calculated variable in angular
brackets like this: 
<rse>
. That's all there is to it—using this method, you can insert the
value any calculated variable into the question wording of any MediaLab item.
Following the same idea, we calculated and presented whether the subject was high or
low in self-esteem by using the calculation for <rselabel> as follows:
=IF(B29>3,"high","low")
Using Excel's language for conditional logic, here we're saying that if the subject's
calculated self-esteem is greater than 3, then they're "high" and that otherwise, they're
"low". Calculating and presenting the subject's average response time, whether it is
considered "slow" or "fast" are additional examples of the same idea—calculating new
variables from gathered data and using those values in the same session.
Save Calculated Variables to Your Data Files
You can save calculated values along with your other MediaLab data. Create simple
placeholder variables in your questionnaire by using the Custom item type with no
filename
. When such an item is encountered, MediaLab will check to see if the variable
name exists in your responses.xls file. If it does, then MediaLab will record the value for
that variable in your regular data files. In other words, by using the same variable name
for the placeholder and calculated variables, MediaLab will know which values to grab
from responses.xls and store in your regular data files. Note that MediaLab will be
grabbing the current value of the calculated variable if and whenever it comes across the
placeholder item during the session--i.e., location of the placeholder within your session
could be an important factor. 
C# Image: C# Code to Encode & Decode JBIG2 Images in RasterEdge .
Easy to add C# JBIG2 codec controls to your image and codec into PDF documents for a better PDF compression; text to the new project folder, together with .NET
c# merge pdf; c# merge pdf files
VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.
and find text content in multiple page adobe PDF files in .NET Our VB.NET PDF Document Add-On enables you to search for text in target PDF document by using
add pdf files together; pdf combine
MediaLab v2014
102
See Also: Advanced Features Overview
10.2
Complex Skips
Just as calculated variables can be used as information we can present back to subjects,
they can also be used to help us with skip logic. For any experiment variable you have
entered in the reponses.xls file, you can specify or calculate a variable to skip to when
that item is completed. If the current MediaLab item is listed in the variable column of the 
responses.xls file, then MediaLab will check the skipto column when the item is finished to
see where it should go next. If there is no skipto value then no skip will occur.
Let's take the fill-in-the-blank age question for example. Currently, there is no skipto
value. What would happen if we typed "debrief" into the skipto column for that item?
When the age item came up in the MediaLab session, MediaLab would see that age is
listed in the responses.xls file. It would see the skipto value of debrief and send the
subject to the last item in the questionnaire because it is named debrief. If you have used
MediaLab's skipto function in the past, this is pretty standard stuff.
Where it gets interesting is in the fact that you can now use the responses.xls file to
calculate skipto values. Instead of placing a static value in the skipto column, we can
compute a variable based on what's been happening in the experiment. Let's say that
we want to use the subject's self-esteem score to determine what happens next. If they
scored extremely high, we want to administer a scale which measures socially desirable
responding. If they scored extremely low then we want to administer a depression
inventory. If they scored in the normal range, we'll skip them to the end of the session.
Take a look at how we do this by checking out the formula in C26, that is the skipto value
of the essay item, ess1:
=IF(B29<2,"dep",IF(B29>4,"sdes","debrief"))
In this formula, you can see three items from the questionnaire file—depsdes, and
debrief. These are our three skipto candidates. The conditional logic of Excel is applied to
say: "If self-esteem is < 2 then dep otherwise if self-esteem is > 4 then sdes, otherwise
debrief."
See Also: Advanced Features Overview
10.3
Post-Session Reports
At the end of every session, MediaLab automatically saves a copy of Responses.xls in the
data\reports folder. The copy is named using the current subject ID and will have all of
the subject's responses to the experiment variables saved in the value column. There are
two reasons for this. One is that this allows you to open the subject's report and check
your calculations. You will be able to view the results of all of calculated variables and
skipto values based on the subject's actual responses. It's a handy way to check your
work.
The second reason for this is the option to create post-session reports for each subject.
In the sample provided, you can click on the "sheet2" tab in the lower left corner of
Responses.xls. You will see a template for a post-session report. This is a completely
free-format. It uses Excel formatting to create text and figures with references to
experiment and calculated variables on the main worksheet. As the session unfolds and
99
99
103
values are updated on the main sheet—so are the fields and figures in the report. When
the session is over, the report is saved for easy access to these summary data. Take a
look at "sheet2" of data\reports\1.xls as an example.
Notice that on the main page of responses.xls there are two lines that read:
print.sheet1  no
print.sheet2  no
You can add these optional lines to any responses.xls file. If listed with "yes" in the value
column, they instruct MediaLab to send the listed worksheet(s) directly to your default
printer. This is handy, for example, if you want a report on "sheet2" to print automatically
so that you might discuss the results with the participant.
See Also: Advanced Features Overview
10.4
Tips
Extra Notes & Rules to Know
When creating a responses.xls file and saving it for the first time, the File name is just
the word "responses" (without the quotation marks) and the type of file must be .xls. 
Any use of a responses.xls must follow this convention and must be saved in the same
folder as the MediaLab files that use it.   
As a guiding principle remember that MediaLab never looks at your formulas—only the
results! How the results of calculated variables occur is completely between you and
Excel. Remember that it's your recipe–MediaLab just supplies the ingredients and eats
the meal.
You can include as many or as few experimental variables as you like; you don't need
to list every variable from your questionnaire files in the responses.xls file. Feel free to
include only those that you need for your calculations.
A complete discussion of Excel's logic and math functions is way out of the scope if this
tutorial. If you've never done calculations in Excel this might seem a bit intimidating at
first, but it's really not too bad (honest!). The trick is getting an understanding of how
to nest multiple conditions within a single calculation. Grab a pot of coffee and go
through Excel's help on this for an hour or so and you'll get it.
To access the relevant help on constructing calculations and conditional statements,
press F1 in Excel. Using the Answer Wizard or the Index, look up terms like If, And, Or,
Logical Functions, Functions Listed by Category.
When including experiment variables in the responses.xls file, you can include ANY
variable from ANY questionnaire in your experiment—everything goes into the 
responses.xls file, which is placed in your experiment folder.
Variable names used for experiment variables need to match the variable names used
in the MediaLab data files. This is important to remember for items that record multiple
values. For example, let's say you have a multiple response question called MR1 that
has five response options. Normally, there won't be a variable in your data file called
MR1. Since there are five responses written, they will be called MR1_01, MR1_02,
MR1_03 and so forth. This applies also to thought listing items and ranking items. If in
doubt, you can always check one of your data files to see how the variable names are
written.
99
MediaLab v2014
104
When creating conditional statements or calculations based on the value of experiment
variables, it will always be the value written to the final data file that MediaLab will
enter in the value column of Responses.xls.
Essay content can not be accessed as a variable.
responses.xls files should not have any empty rows on the main page
MediaLab executes skips by skipping over items until the desired item is found. This
means that if you tell MediaLab to skip to a variable that doesn't exist then the session
will end.
Using a responses.xls file will have no impact on your primary data files—i.e., calculated
variables are just for use during the experiment and are saved only in the post-session
report (i.e., in the reports folder see above).
In addition to saving a copy of the responses.xls file under the subject's ID in the data
\reports folder, MediaLab will also save a copy as !currentsession.xls in the same
folder. This is a temporary file reflecting the responses of the most recent participant in
the experiment.
Currently the MediaLab GoBack function is disabled if calculated skips are involved..
See Also: Advanced Features Overview
QuickInfo
Here are a few miscellaneous tips that don't easily fit elsewhere in this guide. 
Specifying File Paths
Sizing Images and Movies
Miscellaneous Features
Using Responses from MediaLab as Stimuli in DirectRT
Adjusting Speaker Volume Automatically During Session 
Secondary Tasks - Requiring Participants to Respond to Probes
Sending and Receiving Serial Data
Trouble Shooting Tips
11.1
Specifying File Paths
When you tell MediaLab to present a file (e.g., an image, a sound, a movie, a
questionnaire, etc.), you need to specify where that file is located. There are two ways to
do this—using absolute or relative paths.
Absolute Paths
If the file you are presenting exists anywhere outside of the experiment folder then you
will have to specify an absolute file path. An absolute file path is the exact location of the
99
104
105
106
106
107
107
107
109
105
file (e.g., c:\mypictures\myimage.bmp).  You can find the absolute pathway of a file by
right-clicking it and selecting Properties.  Next to the word "Location:" in the General tab
of the window that opens, you will find the absolute pathway with everything except the
file name at the end.  Simply copy the entire pathway next to the word "Location:" paste
it where you need it, and be sure to add "\your file name here" (without the quotation
marks) to the end of the pathway you copied.   
Remember, if the file is not in the same directory as the experiment or it's not in a
subfolder in the experiment file folder, then you must specify the complete path of the
file. Make sure that any absolute file paths you use will still be valid if you copy your
experiment to another computer.
Relative Paths
If the file is located in the same folder as your experiment file, then you can simply enter
just  the name of the file (e.g., myimage.bmp). If the file is located in a subfolder that is
located in the same folder as your experiment files, then you can enter the name of the
subfolder followed by the name of the file (e.g., images\myimage.bmp). You can use a
relative path for ANY file located anywhere within your main experiment folder.
The advantage of placing the file in the experiment directory (or a subfolder) is that the
experiment folder can then be moved to a different place and you won't have to worry
about checking path names (e.g., c:\..., d:\..., etc.). You could copy your experiment folder
to any location on any drive and all of the relative paths would still be valid.
Hint
You can specify relative or absolute file paths to be the default when selecting files in the
Experiment Editor. You can set your preferred default in the Options menu
. It is
recommended to set this option to Use Relative Paths. This is because the only time an
absolute path is necessary is when the desired file is not located somewhere within the
experiment folder. However, even if you are using relative paths, the editor will enter an
absolute path if this is the case.
11.2
Sizing Images and Movies
MediaLab tries to use a resolution-independent scale so that your experiments will look
the same no matter what resolution of the computer on which you run them. Some
differences can not be avoided however. To see what the scale is on your particular
system, choose "Show Location Points" from the Help menu in MediaLab. To see how the
resolution independence works, take a look at the scale now. Then resize the MediaLab
window and try it again. You should notice that the scale doesn't change. Try setting a
different display resolution on your computer (Control Panel -> Display, Settings). Look at
the scale again—it should be about the same no matter how you change your display.
One factor that does to to influence the scale is whether you use "small fonts" or "large
fonts" in your system settings. Small fonts produce a slightly larger range for both height
and width. If you want the experiment to look the same on all computers you should
check to make sure they are all running small fonts or that they are all running large
fonts.
Typically, the width parameter
will range from 1 to about 700. The height parameter
will range from 1 to about 500. These values apply to the top and left parameters
as well.
Note that the scale applies to most everything in MediaLab when the top, left, height,
and width parameters are used. The exception is movies. Movies do not follow the
MediaLab scale because they are presented with the Windows MediaPlayer.
Consequently, if you specify a width of 300 (for example) it will appear smaller on a larger
15
63
63
60
MediaLab v2014
106
screen resolution. How you can combat this is to use the special width parameters
provided especially for movies. For example, (w-1) will play the movie at full screen, (w-2)
will play it half screen, (w-3) at a quarter and there are others. 
Note also that although the scale applies to images, that this is only true if you explictly
define the size of the image (using the height and width parameters). Otherwise the
image will appear as it's default size. For example a 300 pixel wide image will appear
smaller when you use higher screen resolutions. However if you explicitly define the size
using the height and width parameters then it will appear according to the MediaLab
scaling system. You can find more information about this in the following sections of the
manual:
Parameters (Questionnaire Files)
Parameters (Experiment Files)
The most common resolutions are 640x480, 800x600, and 1024x768. The first number
tells you the number of pixels that are displayed across your screen, and the second
number tells you the number that are displayed down your screen. You can determine
and/or set the resolution of your display by right clicking on your desktop and selecting 
Properties > Display. MediaLab tries to use a resolution-independent scale so that your
experiments will look the same no matter what resolution you run in. Some differences
can not be avoided however. To see what the scale is on your particular system, choose 
Show Location Points from the Help menu in MediaLab.
By right clicking on your desktop and choosing Settings you can see if your system is set
to use large or small fonts. In 640x480 mode, only small fonts are available. At greater
resolutions, you may optionally choose large fonts. This impacts on window sizes as well.
Larger fonts result in larger windows. In our testing, MediaLab has worked well in most
resolutions with both large and small fonts.
11.3
Miscellaneous Features
These features are documented here despite the fact that not as commonly used as the
others discussed in this manual. Sometimes when people get customizations to MediaLab
done, they are very useful to a lot of other users and so they get worked into the
manual. Other times, well… they'll probably gather some dust. But just in case somebody
else might be able to benefit from them, here they are:
Using Responses from MediaLab as Stimuli in DirectRT
At some point you may want to use a subject's answer to a scale response
or fill-in-
the-blank
item as a stimulus in DirectRT. For example, in MediaLab you could ask a
series of fill-in-the-blank items asking subjects to enter foods that they like. Or you might
ask them to indicate their race using a scale response. Then in a DirectRT session, you
might want to display these responses as stimuli (e.g., as primes or targets in a priming
study). For fill-in-the-blanks and scale responses, you can specify a file name ending with
.txt  in the File Name
field to have MediaLab save the response in the file you specify.
This will cause MediaLab to save the subject's response preceded with a "~" symbol so
that DirectRT will recognize that it is text for display purposes. Then, in DirectRT, you can
specify that this text be displayed as a stimulus by using the "&" symbol (which tells
DirectRT to read a single line stimulus from a text file). So if you have a MediaLab
question that asks subjects their race called "race" you could enter something like "c:
\race prime study\stim\race.txt" in the File Name field. Then, in your DirectRT input file, you
could refer to "&race" as a stimulus. When DirectRT finds this, it will open the race.txt file
that MediaLab created, and will present the subject's response as the stimulus. See the
DirectRT documentation regarding "Input Files" and "Stim" types for more detail.
63
57
31
50
44
41
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested