asp.net mvc 5 and the web api pdf : Acrobat merge pdf application software tool html windows asp.net online Milan%20EJHP%20abstract%20book17-part1606

Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
232
process. -Weekly presentation of interim results from the 
individual accreditations elements. -Presentation of the fi nal 
results at staff-meetings.
Results In the intervention period 672 patients (82%) had 
their medication evaluated. This resulted in 1297 interven-
tions in 413 patients (3,2/patient). The Department of Surgery 
passed the standards set by the DDKM. Safe medication of the 
patients was observed during the period, and the pharmacists 
gave several recommendations for future collaboration and for 
further increasing safety.
Conclusions The clinical pharmacist can, through education 
of the staff, various tools, intense focus and dialogue, guide 
surgeons to better focus on medicine prescription and thereby 
ensure accreditation according to DDKM. By a proactive atti-
tude the clinical pharmacist can contribute to increased patient 
safety.
Competing interests None.
CPC035
THE USE OF MITOMYCIN C IN OPHTHALMIC 
PATHOLOGIES
R. Rodriguez-Carrero, O.A. Vergniory, I. Zapico, P. Puente 1Hospital San Agustin, 
Hospital Pharmacy, Aviles, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.384
Background Mitomycin C (MMC) is a drug used in some oph-
thalmic conditions due to its effi cacy, which is supported by 
the literature. However this is an off-label use, not approved 
by the European Medicines Agency (EMA).
Purpose To assess the use of MMC in ophthalmic patholo-
gies, describing the pharmacist’s involvement in the treatment 
process.
Materials and methods Retrospective observational study 
of patients with ophthalmic pathologies treated with MMC 
during 2009 and 2010 in a regional hospital. Data was gathered 
by reviewing clinical histories and the validation of the treat-
ments by the pharmacist.
Results Thirty-one patients were treated, 6 were excluded 
due to lack of information. Of the 25 patients included, 14 
(56%) were women. The mean age was 65. Eighty-eight per-
cent (n=22) of the patients presented dacryocystitis and 12% 
(n=3) neovascular glaucoma. The pharmacist would process 
the authorisation for the off-label treatment, and MMC would 
then be reconstituted in vertical fl ow cabins at a concentration 
of 0.2 mg/ml; this optimised the use of vials of MMC while 
providing a sterile preparation. The treatment consisted of a 
single intraocular dose of 0.2 mg MMC. Treatment was effec-
tive in 13 patients (52%), partially effective in 6 (24%) and not 
effective in 6 (24%). Twelve patients (48%) suffered recurrence, 
58% of them during the fi rst six months after treatment.
Conclusions Treatment with MMC in the off-label indication 
studied was total or partially effective in the majority of the 
patients, confi rming the data in the existing literature. More 
than half the recurrences took place during the six fi rst months 
after administration. Collaboration between the ophthalmol-
ogy and the pharmacy departments in devising a system to 
speed up patient access to MMC treatment has been a success.
Competing interests None.
CPC036
THE ACTIVITY OF PHARMACOVIGILANCE AT 
SPEDALI CIVILI OF BRESCIA: THE FIRST DATA OF 
‘FARMAMICO’ PROJECT
D. Paganotti, D. Bettoni, R. Fazio, L. Cavalli, M. Petullà, F. Brognoli, G. Martini 1Spedali 
Civili di Brescia, Farmacia Interna, Brescia, Italy; 2Spedali Civili di Brescia, Ematologia, 
Brescia, Italy; 3Spedali Civili di Brescia, Centro per l’Anticoagulazione, Brescia, Italy
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.385
Background Oral anticoagulant therapy is at high risk of 
interactions, potentially serious, because of the nature of the 
drugs and the older patients, with chronic diseases and treated 
with multiple medications.
Purpose to evaluate the adverse events, the outcome, the 
suspected and concomitant medical products; to analyse the 
interactions, already known or not yet reported in literature, 
with drugs, phytotherapies, homeopathic.
Materials and methods The project involves 7 hospitals for 
an amount of 11,000 patients treated. The authors analysed 
the reports collected by Spedali Civili of Brescia, the coordi-
nator centre, for the period 01/11/2009 – 30/09/2011. Patients 
with a suspected ADR (Adverse Drug Reaction) answered to a 
questionnaire during the visit or by phone; the collected data 
were put into a provided database, and also into the National 
Network.
Results 266 reports were recorded. The 86% concerned 
patients between 60 and 89 years, male for 59.8%. The most 
frequent ADRs are changes of INR, increased in 21.8% (INR 
> 6 in 1.5 %) decreased in 15%. 71 patients (26.7%) devel-
oped major haemorrhage. 56% of the reported cases are not 
serious, while 40.2% required hospitalisation and / or length-
ening of hospitalisation, 194 patients (72.9%) resolved com-
pletely the ADR, 45 (16.9%) improved, for 16 the reaction 
was unchanged or worsened and 6 died. The most frequent 
indication for which anticoagulant was prescribed was atrial 
fi brillation. 16 patients took 10 concomitant medications; in 9 
cases supplements, or herbal products could be correlated to 
adverse reaction. The medium hospitalisation length after an 
ADR was 7.5 days.
Conclusions despite warfarin and acenocoumarol are used 
for a long time, they are still responsible for serious adverse 
reactions. It’s important to report the ADRs, especially those 
with new drugs and non-conventional drugs in order to iden-
tify the fatal interactions to avoid.
Competing interests None.
CPC037
PHARMACEUTICAL INTERVENTIONS AT A 
DANISH EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT: INCIDENCE, 
IMPORTANCE AND SPECIAL TARGET GROUPS FOR 
PHARMACEUTICAL INTERVENTION
I. Olsen, A. Thisted 1Sygehus Lillebælt, Apoteket, Kolding, Denmark
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.386
Background A common reason for emergency admissions is 
medication related adverse events.
Purpose To evaluate whether the addition of a specialist in 
clinical pharmacy in the Emergency Department (ED) would 
be benefi cial for the quality of care, and identify which patients 
should be focused on.
Materials and methods The pharmacist reviewed the 
patient fi les in the ED. A tentative diagnosis and a plan for 
treatment should be established. In case of a pharmacist sug-
gesting any kind of medical intervention, a notice in the fi le 
was made describing the problem and a suggestion for a solu-
tion. After the study period 2 specialists in internal medicine, 
clinical pharmacology and geriatric disease reviewed a sample 
of the patient’s fi les. An evaluation of the importance of the 
pharmacist notice was put into 4 categories: 1. Minimal (4%) 
2. Moderate, risk of increased examination or treatment inten-
sity (49%) 3. Signifi cant, risk of signifi cant increased examina-
tion or treatment intensity (44%) 4. Disastrous, risk of death 
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   232
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   232
3/9/2012   12:26:52 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:52 PM
Acrobat merge pdf - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
asp.net merge pdf files; c# merge pdf files into one
Acrobat merge pdf - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
pdf mail merge plug in; combine pdf files
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
233
or permanent damage (3%) Statistics included univariate and 
multivariate analysis of all variables registered. A p-value of 
<0,05 was chosen as signifi cant.
Results During the study period (130 working days) a total 
of 1696 patient fi les were reviewed. The number of phar-
macists’ notices amounted to 420. Among these a random 
sample of 324 notices were studied. In the multivariate 
analysis only age above 70 years remained of signifi cant 
importance for identifying patients with a serious interven-
tion. Furthermore there was a higher risk of serious inter-
ventions for patients with one drug as opposed to 2-9 drugs. 
Conclusions The authors found that there is a high incidence 
of serious pharmaceutical intervention in the ED not discov-
ered by the physicians. These are especially prevalent among 
the older patients, regardless of the number of prescriptions. 
It is remarkable that risk situations occur even with one drug 
prescription.
Competing interests None.
CPC038
USE OF ELTROMBOPAG IN PRIMARY IMMUNE 
THROMBOCYTOPENIA: REPORT OF FOUR CASES
J. Ruiz, V. Saavedra, A. Torralba 1Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro 
Majadahonda, Pharmacy, Majadahonda (Madrid), Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.387
Background Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is a 
disorder that is characterised by immune-mediated platelet 
destruction and impaired platelet production.
Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of eltrombopag, the 
fi rst oral thrombopoietin receptor agonist in the treatment of 
ITP.
Materials and methods The authors report the cases of four 
patients (patients 1-4) with ITP refractory to fi rst-line treat-
ment (glucocorticoids and immunoglobulin) who were treated 
with eltrombopag to achieve platelet counts of at least 50x109/l 
(threshold count, TC). Data were obtained from clinical histo-
ries and laboratory tests. Parameters evaluated: previous treat-
ments, platelet counts before eltrombopag, platelet response 
(achievement of TC), length of treatment to achieve TC and 
period of study.
Results The four patients (2 men and 2 women, mean age 
67±19) had been refractory to fi rst-line treatment. Patient 
4 had also been refractory to splenectomy, rituximab, dap-
sone and azathioprine, and had been treated with romi-
plostim, which was not well tolerated. Patient 1 started 
treatment with 11x109/l platelets, patient 2 with 34 x109/l, 
patient 3 with 19 x109/l and patient 4 with 9 x109/l. After a 
period of 6 weeks (patient 1), 3 weeks (patients 2 and 3) and 
1 day (patient 4) of treatment with 50 mg of eltrombopag 
once daily (combined with 2 doses of 40 g of immunoglobu-
lin at the beginning of the treatment in patient 4) they all 
achieved platelet counts above the TC and have maintained 
them. The total period of study was 28 weeks (patient 
1),  15 weeks (patients 2 and 3) and 10 weeks (patient 4). 
No adverse effects were reported. All the patients are still 
receiving eltrombopag.
Conclusions Our results agree with those of clinical stud-
ies that show that eltrombopag could be an effective and safe 
treatment for ITP patients who are refractory to other treat-
ments. Nevertheless, further studies should be carried out to 
evaluate long term safety and effi cacy.
Competing interests None.
CPC039
LOCAL INJECTION OF INFLIXIMAB FOR THE 
TREATMENT OF PERIANAL FISTULAS IN CROHN¥S 
DISEASE
A. Lopez-de-Torre Querejazu, A. De Juan Arroyo, J.L. Cabriada Nuño, J. Peral 
Aguirregoitia, B. Corcostegui Santiago, O. Ibarra Barrueta, M.J. Martínez-
Bengoechea, E. Ibarra García, I. Palacios Zabalza, M. Bustos Martínez 1Hospital 
de Galdakao-Usansolo, Pharmacy Service, Galdakao, Spain; 2Hospital de Galdakao-
Usansolo, Gastroenterology Service, Galdakao, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.388
Background The formation of perianal fi stulas is a serious 
complication that affects up to 30% of patients with Cohn’s 
disease (CD). It has been suggested that intrafi stula injection of 
infl iximab could have some potential healing benefi t becom-
ing an adjuvant therapy or an alternative when intravenous 
infusion is contraindicated.
Purpose The authors describe the preparation, posology, 
effectiveness and tolerance of infl iximab syringes.
Materials and methods Our patients were a 27-year-old 
woman and a 30-year-old man diagnosed with CD with 
luminal disease control with certolizumab and adalimumab 
respectively but multiple perianal draining fi stulas without 
abscesses. Both had been previously treated with infl iximab 
but one of them had experienced an infusion reaction and the 
another one had relapsed. The gastroenterology physician 
asked our department to prepare infl iximab syringes to inject 
into each fi stula.
Results The syringes were prepared in the pharmacy service 
under aseptic conditions. To prepare several syringes The authors 
diluted a 100 mg infl iximab phial with 10 mL of water for injec-
tion; 12 mL dextrose 5% were added to 2 mL of this dilution 
so each syringe contained 20 mg of infl iximab. The contents of 
one syringe were injected per fi stula (at the internal and external 
orifi ces and along the fi stula tract). Patients were treated under 
general anaesthesia and signed an informed consent. The local 
injections were scheduled at weeks 0, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20. Effi cacy 
was assessed before the injection of the next dose in terms of 
remission (complete cessation of fi stula drainage) and response 
(more than 50% reduction of the draining orifi ces). After the 
third dose (week 8) both patients had achieved a response, one 
without remission. No adverse effects were reported.
Conclusions Although few cases have been reported, local 
infl iximab injections may help in fi stula healing and be well 
tolerated even by patients for whom intravenous infusion is 
not suitable.
Competing interests None.
CPC040
THE USE OF SUNITINIB IN METASTATIC THYROID 
CARCINOMA: CASE REPORT OF AN OFF-LABEL 
TREATMENT
G. Bellavia, M.T. * Messina Denaro, F. Verderame, I. Uomo 1P.O. Giovanni Paolo II, 
Department of Pharmacy AG2, Sciacca, Italy; 2P.O. Giovanni Paolo II, Unit of Medical 
Oncology, Sciacca, Italy
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.389
Background Thyroid cancer typically has a good outcome 
following standard treatments, which include surgery or 
radioactive iodine or systemic chemotherapy. During the last 
two years many randomised trials have demonstrated that 
multikinase inhibitors, such as sunitinib, are active in meta-
static thyroid carcinoma.
In Italy, sunitinib is only approved for the treatment of meta-
static renal carcinoma, GIST (gastrointestinal stromal tumour) 
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   233
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   233
3/9/2012   12:26:52 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:52 PM
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Merge, split PDF files. Insert, delete PDF pages. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF.
c# pdf merge; c# merge pdf pages
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
pdf combine two pages into one; reader combine pdf
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
234
or HCC (hepatocellular carcinoma), but if there are no other 
valid therapeutic options a Sicilian regional law allows clini-
cians to prescribe an off-label treatment and hospital pharma-
cies to dispense it.
Purpose To evaluate the treatment of a multikinase inhibitor, 
sunitinib, for an off-label indication and to assess the safety 
and effi cacy of the treatment for an older patient, female, 80 
years old, with metastatic thyroid cancer not responsive to cis-
platin/epirubicin and gemcitabine.
Materials and methods The oncologist prepared a formal 
request, with the patient’s informed consent and all the phase 
II and III trials available in literature. These documents were 
also evaluated by the hospital pharmacist and then fi nally 
approved by the hospital’s medical director. After this proce-
dure the pharmacy supplied and distributed the drug to the 
patient who was being treated at home.
Results Since April 2011, the patient took sunitinib at the 
standard dose of 50 mg/day for 8 weeks and the volume of the 
lesion reduced. The clinician monitored vigilantly for hyper-
tension. Fatigue was the side effect that led to a reduction of 
dose to 25 mg/day for another 8 weeks. At present, six months 
later, the disease has regressed further.
Conclusions Our data support the use of sunitinib in meta-
static thyroid cancer, demonstrating also a low incidence of 
adverse reactions. This case report can also demonstrate the 
advantages of using off-label treatments if they are supported 
by valid clinical evidence rather than updating the regulatory 
approval of some drugs.
Competing interests None.
CPC041
PHARMACOLOGICAL VITRECTOMY WITH 
UROKINASE: DESCRIPTION OF THE METHOD AND 
REVIEW OF A CASE SERIES.
L. Hoyo Gil, S. Sánchez Suarez, A. Martín Bravo, L. Sastre Gallego, N. López 
Ferrando 1Hospital El Escorial, Pharmacy Service, San Lorenzo de El Escorial, Spain; 
2Hospital El Escorial, Ophtalmology Service, San Lorenzo de El Escorial, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.390
Background Pharmacological vitrectomy (PV) with autolo-
gous plasmin is used to detach the vitreous, with or without 
subsequent surgical vitrectomy, in several pathologies such 
as proliferative diabetic retinopathy, proliferative vitreoretin-
opathy, macular hole, posterior hyaloid contracture syndrome 
and vitreomacular traction syndrome. Autologous plasmin is 
obtained by an expensive and complicated method. An alter-
native method is the use of urokinase as an enzymatic activa-
tor of the plasmin; it is cheap and simple to make.
Purpose To describe the technique and our experience with it 
during the fi rst year of use in our hospital.
Materials and methods The steps are as follows: 1- Take 7 ml 
of blood from the patient, place in the centrifuge tube and cen-
trifuge at 4,000 rpm for 15 min. Simultaneously, a phial of uroki-
nase is heated for 15 min at 37°C. 2- Mix 1.8 ml of plasmin with 
0.2 ml of urokinase, shaking the mixture vigorously for another 
2-3 min, keeping the mixture in incubation at 37°C until use. 
3- Sterilise the solution by fi ltration through a 0.22 mm fi lter, 
immediately preceding the injection of 0.2 ml into the eye.
Results Over this year using this technique in our hospital 
17 patients have been treated with it, in 3 of them the pro-
cedure had to be repeated. An improvement in visual acuity 
was observed in 62.5% of these patients one month after the 
intervention but was not associated with an improvement in 
retinal anatomy.
Conclusions PV is a cheaper, faster and easier technique than 
the operation used prior to PV. PV is an interesting technique 
to perform in hospitals that do not have retinal surgery or in 
patients with comorbidities that contraindicate vitrectomy 
under anaesthesia.
Competing interests None.
CPC042
CUTANEOUS TOXICITY ASSOCIATED WITH 
PANITUMUMAB
P. García Llopis, G. Antonino de la Cámara, M.I. Vicente Valor, M.J. López Tinoco, L. 
Mejía Andújar, A. Sánchez Alcaraz 1Hospital Universitario de La Ribera, Pharmacy 
Department, Valencia, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.391
Background Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibi-
tors, such as panitumumab, are used for the treatment of col-
orectal carcinoma. These treatments have fewer systemic side 
effects than traditional chemotherapy, but dermatological 
adverse effects are signifi cantly more common.
Purpose To investigate the cutaneous toxicity of panitu-
mumab in patients who received this treatment during the 
period from May 2010 to September 2011.
Materials and methods Patients were identifi ed using an 
oncology pharmacy informatics tool (Farmis). Dosage, num-
ber of cycles, concomitant treatments and dermatological 
side effects were listed from the electronic medical records. 
Treatments for the dermatological reactions, such as topical 
and systemic antibiotics, antihistamines or steroids, were also 
recorded.
Results 12 patients were given panitumumab from May 2010 
to September 2011 (The authors have excluded two patients 
who only received one dose). 8 patients (83.3%) were in mono-
therapy with panitumumab. 66.7% were male and average age 
was 66 years old. Side effects on the skin were described in 
10 patients (83.3%). 8 patients (66.7%) presented an acneiform 
rash and 6 (50%) patients presented pruritus. One patient pre-
sented a severe eruption which led to dosage reduction and 
fi nally stopping the treatment. The other patients presented 
mild forms of eruption and pruritus. All the dermatologi-
cal events appeared after fi rst cycle of panitumumab, except 
in one patient (after the second cycle). 50% of patients were 
receiving systemic antihistamines and topical antibiotics, and 
3 patients (25%) required systemic antibiotics.
Conclusions Our results are similar to the fi ndings in current 
literature (cutaneous eruptions occur in 30-90% of patients 
treated with EGFR). These side effects of EGFR inhibitors stig-
matise the patient in daily life and is necessary to recognise 
and treat them.
Competing interests None.
CPC043
STOPP AND START SCREENING TOOLS AS 
SUPPLEMENTS TO THE PHARMACEUTICAL 
MEDICINES REVIEW
M.G. Joergensen 1Region Zealand Hospital Pharmacy, Logistics and Clinical 
Pharmacy, Naestved, Denmark
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.392
Background Inappropriate prescribing is a well-documented 
problem in older people. The screening tools STOPP (Screening 
Tool of Older Peoples’ Prescriptions) and START (Screening 
Tool to Alert doctors to Right Treatment) have been formulated 
to identify potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) and 
potential errors of omission (PEO) in older patients. Literature 
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   234
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   234
3/9/2012   12:26:52 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:52 PM
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
build pdf from multiple files; combine pdf
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
add pdf files together online; how to combine pdf files
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
235
has shown that pharmacists can use STOPP and START reli-
ably during their everyday practice to identify PIMs and PEOs 
in older patients.
Purpose To ensure high quality of the prescriptions for 
patients admitted to geriatric wards.
Materials and methods A clinical pharmacist used the 
STOPP and START criteria for each patient record of patients 
admitted to the geriatric ward. The screening tools were also 
presented to the physicians on the ward by the senior physi-
cian and all were given a pocket card with the criteria. The 
PIMs and PEOs were recorded as if identifi ed by the pharma-
cist or by the physician. PIMs and PEOs identifi ed by the phar-
macist were presented to the physician for further action. The 
action taken on the PIMs and PEOs identifi ed by the physician 
were also recorded.
Results In the period May to August 2011 151 patients were 
reviewed. PIMs were identifi ed in 19% of the patients and 
most were due to overuse of proton pump inhibitors and long-
term use of benzodiazepines. Seventeen percent had PEOs that 
were mostly related to the cardiovascular system; four identi-
fi ed by the pharmacist and accepted by the physician were due 
to lack of aspirin in the presence of chronic atrial fi brillation, 
where warfarin was contraindicated or due to lack of aspirin 
or clopidogrel in patients with coronary or cerebral disease.
Conclusions Using STOPP and START criteria as supple-
ments to the medicines review the clinical pharmacist ensures 
high quality in the medicines prescribed for geriatric patients, 
a population for whom it is important to take precautions 
when prescribing.
Competing interests None.
CPC044
SHARING INFORMATION ABOUT MEDICINES AMONG 
CLINICAL PHARMACISTS
G.C. Andreasen, M.V. Holck, L.H. Larsen 1Region Zealand, Hospital Pharmacy, 
Roskilde, Denmark; 2Region Zealand, Hospital Pharmacy, Næstved, Denmark
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.393
Background The Hospital Pharmacy of Zealand Region 
receives requests about medicines from physicians, nurses and 
top-up pharmaconomists (pharmacy assistants). The clinical 
pharmacist is responsible for providing answers. In 2009 the 
three former Hospital Pharmacies in Zealand Region became 
one Hospital Pharmacy. A regional electronic tool with the 
possibility of sharing knowledge among all the clinical phar-
macists and documenting the requests was required.
Purpose To create a regional electronic tool to:
share knowledge easily
document the number, type of requests and the pharma-
cist’s answers
search in previous requests and answers
Materials and methods Microsoft Outlook has a tool called 
‘Journal’. The clinical pharmacists record and categorise the 
requests and answers in a journal. Date, profession and work-
ing place of the questioner is recorded in the journal as well as 
the background references used for the answers.
Results The Microsoft Outlook ‘Journal’ is a useful regional 
tool that makes it easier to share knowledge and to document 
the number of requests received and answers provided to the 
questioner. In the fi rst six months of 2010 a total of 973 requests 
were recorded. In the fi rst six months of 2011 a total of 1213 
requests were recorded. Most of the requests dealt with drug 
storage, stability, administration of drugs, mixing drugs and 
questions regarding prescriptions for drugs not recommended 
by the Regional Drug and Therapeutics Committee.
Conclusions The use of this electronic tool to record the 
requests has relieved the daily work for the pharmacists in 
Zealand Region. The Journal has shown to be an effective and 
easy regional electronic tool for the clinical pharmacists in 
Zealand Region, to document information about the medicine, 
share knowledge about medicines and to provide answers in a 
more uniform way.
Competing interests None.
CPC045
LENALIDOMIDE: SAFETY AND CLINICAL BENEFIT†
M. Olmo, M. Martínez, A. Castelló, F. Ahmad, I. Mangues, J.A. 
Schoenenberger 1Hospital Arnau de Vilanova de Lleida, Pharmacy, Lleida, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.394
Background With the adoption of electronic medical records 
in our hospital, it became easier to conduct medicines use 
studies.
Purpose Aim of the study: To describe the safety and clinical 
benefi t that lenalidomide treatment yielded in our patients.
Materials and methods An observational and retrospective 
study was conducted including patients who received lenali-
domide for multiple myeloma (MM) (authorised indication) 
or myelodysplastic syndrome with 5q deletion (MDS5q-) (off-
label use). Patients were identifi ed from the pharmacy’s elec-
tronic register.
The variables were: demographics, diagnosis, duration of 
response, reason for stopping treatment, transfusion require-
ments (MDS), and incidence of adverse drug events.
Results A total of 20 patients entered the study (11 men 
and 9 women): 16 affected with MM and 4 with MDS. MM 
patients began at the standard dose of 25 mg/day and MDS 
at 10 mg/day. Of all, 6 (30%) required dose reduction during 
treatment (4 MM and 2 SMD), and the main reason for it was 
toxicity.
Among patients with MM, 4 (25%) stopped treatment because 
of progression, another 4 (25%) died and 1 (6%) underwent 
transplantation. Among patients with MDS, 2 patients dis-
continued: one died and another evolved to acute myeloid 
leukaemia. 13 out of 20 (65%) experienced toxicity, 5 (25%) 
haematological, 4 (20%) respiratory infection, 2 (10%) diar-
rhoea and 2 (10%) renal failure. None of the patients with 
MDS 5q- required blood transfusions during treatment. The 
mean duration of response of patients who completed treat-
ment was 13 months (range: 1-41). For patients who are still on 
treatment the mean duration is 15 months (range: 3-29).
Conclusions Lenalidomide offers good clinical results due to 
the average duration of response. Our case series has showed 
frequent and severe toxicity that has led to dose reductions or 
even patient death. Therefore, the limiting factor for lenali-
domide therapy is its toxicity and consequently close safety 
monitoring is mandatory.
Competing interests None.
CPC046
ECHINOCANDINS FOR INVASIVE FUNGAL 
INFECTIONS†
J. Hernández, L. Serrano de Lucas, M. Castaño, A. Bustinza, B. San José, Z. Baskaran, 
I. Bilbao 1Hospital Universitario de Cruces, Pharmacy, Barakaldo, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.395
Background During recent years, an increase in the incidence 
of Invasive Fungal Infections (IFI) has been observed, in par-
allel to a progressive shift of invasive species from Candida 
albicans to fungi resistant to previously-effective treatments. 
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   235
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   235
3/9/2012   12:26:52 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:52 PM
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
batch merge pdf; split pdf into multiple files
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
logo) on any desired PDF page. And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat.
pdf merger online; add two pdf files together
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
236
The use of echinocandins in this context is spreading as an 
alternative to azoles.
Purpose To determine the distribution of invasive fungal spe-
cies in the population of patients treated with echinocandins 
in our hospital and the outcomes in this context over a year.
Materials and methods All patients treated with echi-
nocandins during 2010 were evaluated. Data such as sex, age 
and length of hospital stay were taken from the electronic 
chart. Information regarding treatment with caspofungin 
and anidulafungin was taken from electronic prescription 
programs.
Results The authors identifi ed 136 patients: 97 were men, the 
median of age was 65 years (17 months to 84 years) and median 
duration of hospital stay 37 days (2-137 days). There were 160 
prescriptions: 127 for caspofungin, 33 for anidulafungin. The 
median duration of treatment was 7 days (1-37 days).
In 52 prescriptions a positive isolate for fungi was detected. 
Of them, 26.9% (14) cultures were positive for C. albicans, 
14 positive for species less susceptible to echinocandins (C. 
parapsilosis and A. fumigatus) and 29 positive for non-albicans 
susceptible species. In 5 cultures, two different species were 
found. 28.6% of patients exposed to species less susceptible to 
echinocandins died during the treatment (4 patients). Among 
the population whose positive cultures were sensitive to echi-
nocandins, there were 6 deaths (15.8%).
Conclusions The population studied confi rms the tendency 
pointed out on the literature, a shift towards species differ-
ent from C. albicans in IFI. Though the use of echinocandins 
seems to be effective and safe, attention should be paid to local 
sensitivities since less susceptible species such as C. parapsilo-
sis and A. fumigatus are spreading
Competing interests None.
CPC047
EVALUATION OF THE PROTHROMBIN TIME 
FOR MEASURING RIVAROXABAN PLASMA 
CONCENTRATIONS USING CALIBRATORS AND 
CONTROLS
M. Samama, G. Contant, T.E. Spiro, E. Perzborn, L. Le Flem, C. Guinet, Y. Gourmelin, 
J.L. Martinoli 1Biomnis Laboratories, R&D, Ivry sur Seine, France; 2Diagnostica Stago 
SA, R&D, Gennevilliers, France; 3Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals Inc, Global Clinical 
Development, Montville NJ, USA; 4Bayer HealthCare AG, Global Drug Development, 
Wuppertal, Germany
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.396
Background Rivaroxaban is widely used in clinical practice. 
Although routine coagulation monitoring is not required, 
quantitative determination of rivaroxaban might be valuable 
in certain clinical circumstances. Variation in response sensi-
tivity of prothrombin time (PT) reagents to rivaroxaban is well 
described in the literature, and the conventional international 
normalised ratio cannot be used for rivaroxaban.
Purpose This multicentre study assessed the intra and inter-
laboratory precision of measurements of rivaroxaban plasma 
concentrations using the PT assay together with rivaroxaban 
calibrators and controls.
Materials and methods Participating laboratories (Europe 
and North America) were provided with rivaroxaban calibra-
tors (0, 41, 219 and 430 ng/ml), rivaroxaban pooled human 
plasma controls (19, 160 and 643 ng/ml) and PT reagent. 
Evaluation was performed over 10 consecutive days by each 
laboratory using local PT reagents as well as the centrally 
provided PT reagent (STA Neoplastine CI Plus; Diagnostica 
Stago). A calibration curve was produced each day, and day-
to-day precision was evaluated by testing three control plasma 
samples. The control was diluted and re-tested if the level was 
above the highest concentration of the calibration curve.
Results Intralaboratory variations in PT were dependent on 
the sensitivity of the local PT reagents, regardless of the type of 
instrument used. A large inter-laboratory variation (in seconds) 
was observed with local PT reagents; the coeffi cient of varia-
tion (CV) was 13.6–29.7%. When the results were expressed 
as rivaroxaban concentration (ng/ml), the inter-reagent varia-
tions were reduced; less variation was found with both local 
reagents (CV: 5.1–15.5%) and the central reagent (CV: 2.2–7.5%). 
However, over-estimation was observed with both local and 
central reagents. The CV for the calibrator containing 41 ng/ml 
rivaroxaban was 5.8% when the central reagent was used.
Conclusions The PT assay may be useful for measuring rivar-
oxaban peak plasma concentrations (2–3 h after drug intake) 
using rivaroxaban calibrators and controls.
Competing interests None.
CPC048
EVALUATION OF GEFITINIB USE IN A GENERAL 
HOSPITAL
M. Sanchez, M. Gimeno, M.A. Allende, M. Arenere, M.A. Alcácera, F. 
Montis 1Universitary Hospital Clinico Lozano Blesa, Pharmacy, Zaragoza, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.397
Background Gefi tinib, an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is indi-
cated for the treatment of adult patients with locally advanced 
or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with activat-
ing mutations of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR).
Purpose To review gefi tinib clinical use in patients with 
NSCLC in a general hospital.
Materials and methods Observational retrospective study 
of patients who started treatment with gefi tinib from May 
2010 (inclusion of gefi tinib in our hospital formulary) to July 
2011. Data source: clinical history and pharmacy department 
records. Data collected: age, sex, smoker, histologic classifi ca-
tion of the tumour, EGFR mutation, line of treatment of gefi -
tinib and treatment duration of gefi tinib.
Results 19 patients started treatment with gefi tinib (11 female 
and 8 male), median age was 71 years (46-83). 2 patients were 
smokers, 4 ex-smokers, 1 passive smoker and 10 non-smokers (2 
unknown). 17 patients were classifi ed as adenocarcinoma and 2 
as squamous cell NSCLC, 79% of patients had grade IIIB or IV 
NSCLC. EGFR mutation was positive in 63% of patients (12), 
negative in 1 patient (off-label use) and 6 patients unknown. 
Gefi tinib was fi rst-line treatment in 42% of patients. Median 
duration of treatment was 3 months (1-14). At the end of the 
study period: 9 patients continued treatment with gefi tinib, 7 
died and 3 were lost to follow-up (probably died). Treatment 
was well tolerated in all patients.
Conclusions Gefi tinib was well tolerated. Mutation EGFR 
test is needed to achieve treatment effi cacy. In our study most 
patients being treated with gefi tinib had advanced NSCLC 
and, despite treatment with gefi tinib, a high percentage of 
patients died during treatment. This is a short study, so that it 
is necessary to continue reviewing its clinical use.
Competing interests None.
CPC049
EVALUATION OF THE ANTIFACTOR XA CHROMOGENIC 
ASSAY FOR MEASURING RIVAROXABAN PLASMA 
CONCENTRATIONS USING CALIBRATORS AND 
CONTROLS
M. Samama, G. Contant, T.E. Spiro, E. Perzborn, C. Guinet, Y. Gourmelin, L. Le 
Flem, G. Rohde, J.L. Martinoli 1Biomnis Laboratories, R&D, Ivry sur Seine, France; 
2Diagnostica Stago SA, R&D, Gennevilliers, France; 3Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals 
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   236
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   236
3/9/2012   12:26:52 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:52 PM
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
acrobat merge pdf; acrobat combine pdf
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
as a kind of compensation for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS on slide with no more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe
acrobat split pdf into multiple files; combine pdfs online
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
237
Inc, Global Clinical Development, Montville NJ, USA; 4Bayer HealthCare AG, Global 
Drug Discovery, Wuppertal, Germany
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.398
Background Rivaroxaban is an oral, direct Factor Xa inhibitor 
approved for clinical use for the prevention and treatment of 
thromboembolic disorders across several indications. Routine 
coagulation monitoring is not required, but a quantitative 
determination of rivaroxaban concentrations might be useful 
in some clinical circumstances.
Purpose This multicentre study evaluated the suitability of 
a modifi ed antifactor Xa chromogenic assay for the measure-
ment of plasma rivaroxaban concentrations (ng/ml) using 
rivaroxaban calibrators and controls, and to assess the inter-
laboratory precision of the measurement.
Materials and methods Twenty-four centres in Europe and 
North America were provided with sets of rivaroxaban calibra-
tors (0, 41, 209 and 422 ng/ml) and rivaroxaban pooled human 
plasma controls (20, 199 and 662 ng/ml; the concentrations 
were unknown to the participating laboratories). The evalua-
tion was carried out over 10 days by each laboratory using local 
antifactor Xa reagents as well as a centrally provided, modifi ed 
STA Rotachrom assay (Diagnostica Stago, Asnières-sur-Seine, 
France). A calibration curve was produced each day, and day-
to-day precision was evaluated by testing three human plasma 
controls.
Results When using the local antifactor Xa reagents, the 
measured rivaroxaban concentrations (mean±SD/actual 
value) were 17±6.4/20, 205±28.2/199 and 668±94.4 (in 
diluted samples)/662 ng/ml, and the coeffi cients of vari-
ance (CV) were 37.0%, 13.7% and 14.1%, respectively. 
When the modifi ed STA Rotachrom method was used, the 
measured±SD/actual values were 18±3.4/20, 199±21.7/199 
and 656±65.8 (in diluted samples)/662 ng/ml and the CV 
were 19.1%, 10.9% and 10.0%, respectively. Satisfactory 
inter-laboratory precision was achieved using rivaroxaban 
calibrators regardless of the type of antifactor Xa reagent 
and instrument used, except for the lowest concentration 
tested (20 ng/ml) when using the different local reagent/
instrument combinations.
Conclusions The results indicate that the antifactor Xa chro-
mogenic method is suitable for measuring a wide range of 
plasma rivaroxaban concentrations (20–660 ng/ml), covering 
the expected concentrations after therapeutic doses, by using 
rivaroxaban calibrators and controls.
Competing interests None.
CPC050
COST BENEFITS OF UK HOSPITAL PHARMACY 
INTERVENTIONS: UNLICENSED MEDICINES 
DISPENSED IN THE COMMUNITY
D. Terry, A. Sinclair, I. Patel, K. Wilson 1Birmingham Children’s Hospital NHS FT, 
Department of Pharmacy, Birmingham, United Kingdom; 2Aston University, Department 
of Pharmacy, Birmingham, United Kingdom
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.399
Background Birmingham Children’s Hospital (BCH) issues 
over 36,000 prescriptions each year that are dispensed by com-
munity pharmacists at a cost exceeding £2.2 million. Costs are 
incurred by the NHS and are rising. Some of these prescrip-
tions include unlicensed medicines (ULMs). At present pricing 
of ULMs is unregulated in the UK.
Purpose To identify drug-related cost benefi ts of hospital 
pharmacy interventions for ULMs prescribed by hospital phy-
sicians but dispensed in the community.
Materials and methods Clinical pharmacists reviewed 
and, if necessary, modifi ed hospital physician-prescribed out-
patient prescriptions prior to being dispensed by community 
pharmacists (the intervention). Preintervention drug costs (net 
ingredient costs and dispensing fees) were estimated using his-
torical data held on ePACT database and were compared with 
intervention drug costs identifi ed through payment systems.
Results During the period 8 April to 30 September 2011, 442 
prescriptions (638 items) were reviewed. These included 81 
items (13%) for ULMs. Interventions on ULMs included: 17 
(21%) drug or dose changes; 50 (62%) quantity changes and 
51 (63%) where the prescription was re-directed to be dis-
pensed under hospital control (either by a community phar-
macy partner hired by BCH, or by the BCH Pharmacy itself). 
Drug-related cost benefi ts of the interventions are estimated 
to exceed £70,000.
Conclusions This study identifi es drug-related fi nancial ben-
efi ts of hospital pharmacist interventions when ULMs are 
prescribed by hospital physicians for children at home and 
dispensed by community pharmacists. This fi nding supports 
proposed innovations in NHS processes, that providing long-
term medicines for children at home should be led by second-
ary care.
Competing interests None.
CPC051
PHARMACEUTICAL RESEARCH NURSE: EXPERIENCE 
OF THE NATIONAL TUMOUR INSTITUTE OF MILAN
G. Saibene, G. Antonacci, E. Togliardi, M. Mazzer, M. Iaquinto 1Fondazione IRCCS 
Istituto Nazionale Dei Tumori, Farmacia, Milano, Italy
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.400
Background Often, due to a heavy workload, nurses are 
unable to analyse clinical protocols and administer experi-
mental drugs without prior, detailed information regard-
ing characteristics, dilution and side effects. Precise, reliable 
administration can only be guaranteed when resulting from 
complete familiarity with the clinical protocol. Sometimes, 
pharmaceutical handling is governed by mechanical, non-
universal regulations encouraging administration errors. The 
clinical research activity taking place in the Pharmacy of the 
IRCCS Tumour Institute Foundation is complex due to the vast 
numbers of experimental protocols it handles. The pool of pro-
fessionals comprises a research nurse who manages the practi-
cal, organisational aspects of the clinical trials conducted on 
patients.
Purpose To assess the nurse’s knowledge regarding clinical 
studies through internal, investigatory procedures and instru-
ments that monitor the quality of personnel training facilitat-
ing comprehension of the research protocols.
Materials and methods Literature research: study published 
in 1994 in Cancer Nursing of the EORTC Nursing Group lists 
the nurses involved in Clinical Trials, documenting participa-
tion and specifi c needs.
Internal research directed at hospital nurses who use experi-
mental drugs more often.
Results Duration of the investigation was one month. 144 
questionnaires were issued of which: 48% were completed 
and subsequently returned. Results show a disturbing lack of 
postbase training when one considers the role of the nurse and 
her infl uence on patient care and study results.
Conclusions It is imperative that nurses administer-
ing experimental drugs fully understand the therapeutic 
effects of such substances as well as administration guide-
lines in order to protect patient safety, hence guaranteeing 
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   237
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   237
3/9/2012   12:26:52 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:52 PM
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
c# merge pdf files; pdf merge comments
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
PDF to Word Converter has accurate output, and PDF to Word Converter doesn't need the support of Adobe Acrobat & Microsoft Word.
acrobat combine pdf files; pdf combine pages
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
238
optimum execution of the study. Appointing an experienced 
and reliable nurse for the pharmaceutical, clinical studies 
encourages colleague participation and guarantees qual-
ity control of performance. Such nurses constitute key fi g-
ures for ensuring effi ciency and correct conduct in clinical 
experimentation.
Competing interests None.
CPC052
EVALUATION OF PHARMACIST CLINICAL 
INTERVENTIONS PROFILE IN A UNIVERSITY 
HOSPITAL
E. Echarri Arrieta, M. Suárez-Berea, T. Rodriguez-Jato, L. Campano, B. Rodriguez, 
M. Touris, J. Gonzalez, A. Mosquera, A. Suárez-Rodriguez, F. Martínez-
Bahamonde 1Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, 
Servicio de Farmacia, Santiago de Compostela, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.401
Background The pharmacist is incorporated step by step to 
daily clinical activities at hospital. However, there is still a lack 
of uniformity both among the tasks assumed and also the way 
of performing these tasks.
Purpose The aim of this paper is to evaluate the profi le 
for clinical pharmacy interventions at University Hospital 
environment.
Materials and methods The authors performed a prospec-
tive, open and descriptive study for twelve months (January-
December 2010) of the interventions made by pharmacists 
in a centralised model, after establishing a classifi cation of 
tasks, and their codifi cation, that the pharmacist could assume 
in relation to the clinical patient management. This relation 
was made after reviewing the methodology proposed by 
Dader Group (Granada’s pharmaceutical group), and introduc-
ing some important modifi cations. As a previous result The 
authors proposed an encoding system of pharmacist’s clinical 
tasks grouped into seven categories: proposing to withdraw a 
drug, propose to incorporate a drug, exchange, dosage recom-
mendation, confi rmation personal treatment, information and 
monitoring.
Results The authors have evaluated a total of 35.642 inpa-
tients, distributed into 12 surgical units (17.437 inpatients), 16 
medical units (14.545 inpatients), and 14 units without individ-
ualised dose distribution system (3.660 patients). There have 
been a total of 7.219 pharmacist interventions: 3.836 (medical), 
3.200 (surgical) and 183 (no unit dose). The rate interventions 
/ patient is equal in medical and surgical units (0.22) and both 
four times higher than in units without unit dose (0.05). Profi le 
evaluated interventions shows that the main intervention in 
any area is the therapeutic exchange (73%), followed by dos-
age recommendation (14.2%), withdrawal proposal (4.7%), 
monitoring (2.7%), information (2.2%), proposed incorpora-
tion (1.8%) and confi rmation of treatment (1.2%). There is no 
difference between the profi le of interventions in medical, sur-
gical or wards without unit doses. There is an important dif-
ference between the medical profi le and haematology profi le 
for pharmaceutical interventions, because this is a unit that 
has a pharmacist assigned in a decentralised model.
Conclusions The pharmaceutical intervention profi le does 
not change between surgical and medical units in our centra-
lised model. The intervention rate for wards with unit dose is 
fi ve times higher. The average intervention rate is 0.22. The 
higher average intervention rate for medical units is 0.46 , and 
for surgical units is 0.65.
Competing interests None.
CPC053
ANTIBIOTIC PRESCRIPTION TRENDS IN UTIS AT A 
HOSPITAL EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT
M.M. Galindo Rueda, M.J. Blazquez Alvarez, F. Mendoza Otero, A. De la Rubia Nieto, 
J.J. Pedreño Planes, V. Arocas Casañ 1Arrixaca Hospital, Pharmacy, Murcia, Spain; 
2Arrixaca Hospital, Primary Care, Murcia, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.402
Background Many patients visit the emergency department 
because of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Appropriate anti-
biotic prescriptions are necessary due to high resistance pat-
terns and both the clinical and fi nancial impact on the health 
system.
Purpose To describe characteristics of population diagnosed 
with UTIs attended at a tertiary hospital emergency depart-
ment as well as the antibiotic prescription at discharge.
Materials and methods Retrospective study of adult patients 
attended at a hospital emergency department with a diagnosis 
at discharge of urinary tract infectious disease from January 
to June 2011. A random sample was selected. The authors 
analysed discharge reports to fi nd: sex, age, main diagnosis, 
pregnancy, recent history of UTI and antibiotic prescription 
at discharge.
Results A total of 201 patients were included. (70.1% women, 
mean age 49.7 years). UTI was the most frequent diagnosis 
(188 patients, 93.5%) and 13 had an added urological disease. 
Antibiotics were prescribed to 91.54% of patients. Most often 
antibiotics prescribed were third generation cephalosporins 
cefi xime and ceftriaxone (27.9%), followed by fosfomycin 
(26.4%) and fl uoroquinolones (14.9%). Oral cefuroxime was 
prescribed in 10.9% patients and amoxicillin- clavulanic acid 
in 7%. The authors found out that 39 patients (19.4%) had a 
recent history of UTI. In those patients, the most frequently 
prescribed antibiotics were cephalosporins (46.1%) followed 
by fosfomycin (25.6%). Seven of the 141 women included in 
the study were pregnant. Four of them received cephalosporin, 
2 fosfomycin and one of them amoxicillyn-clavulanic acid.
Conclusions Most patients attended at the emergency 
department due to UTI received an antibiotic prescription at 
discharge. The authors found a high rate of cephalosporin pre-
scriptions. The authors should conduct a more extensive study 
including laboratory results and resistance rates in the region 
in order to assess the appropriate or inappropriate choice of 
the antibiotic therapy.
Competing interests None.
CPC054
TOXICITY AND RELATIVE DOSE INTENSITY (RDI) 
OF FOLFOX 6 CHEMOTHERAPY IN PATIENTS OF 
DIFFERING BODY MASS INDEX TREATED FOR 
COLORECTAL CANCER
S. Nic Suibhne, F. King, V. Treacy, J. Kennedy, I. Collins, A. Weidmann 1St James 
Hospital, Pharmacy, Dublin 8, Ireland (Rep.); 2St James Hospital, Oncology, Dublin 8, 
Ireland (Rep.); 3Robert Gordon University, School of Pharmacy, Aberdeen, Scotland
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.403
Background Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of 
death from cancer worldwide. It has been suggested that obe-
sity may be a promoting factor in the growth of colorectal car-
cinoma. Although adiposity has been a recognised risk factor 
its effect on treatment success and prevalence of treatment-
associated toxicities remains unclear.
Purpose To investigate the difference in relative dose inten-
sity and treatment-induced toxicity in patients of normal BMI 
compared to overweight patients.
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   238
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   238
3/9/2012   12:26:52 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:52 PM
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
239
Materials and methods A retrospective study of patients 
receiving FOLFOX 6 for colorectal cancer between January 
2006 and March 2010 at St. James’s hospital, Dublin.
Results Patients of normal BMI (18.5 kg/m2 to 25 kg/m2
had higher dose intensity at treatment initiation but received 
a lower dose intensity for the remaining cycles compared to 
overweight patients (BMI >25 kg/m2). The average relative 
dose intensity of FOLFOX was 64.78% (normal BMI group) 
and 67.05% (overweight group). The incidence of fatigue was 
signifi cantly higher in patients with a normal BMI, (p=0.016) 
but there was no signifi cant difference in the rate of hospital 
admission due to FOLFOX toxicity.
Patients with a ‘National Cancer Institute’s Common 
Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events’ (CTCAE) grade 3/4 
toxicity had their dose reduced to prevent such severe toxicity 
reoccurring. CTCAE grade 3/4 was prevalent in 41% of over-
weight, and in 65% of normal weight patients. Subsequent 
dose reductions occurred in 53% of overweight and 65% of 
the normal weight patients.
Conclusions The overweight group experienced less severe 
toxicities than the normal BMI group indicating that they may 
be capable of tolerating doses based on actual body weight 
rather than capping the BSA which is common practice. The 
low % RDI (relative dose intensity) received by both study 
groups may highlight a need to gain better control of toxici-
ties. Future studies should investigate the impact of pharma-
cist counselling on supportive medication on % RDI-related 
toxicities.
Competing interests None.
CPC055
NEUTROPENIC COMPLICATIONS ASSOCIATED 
WITH CHEMOTHERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH BREAST 
CANCER
A. Gómez, M. Garrido, V. Faus, A. Rueda, D. Pérez 1Hospital Costa del Sol, Farmacia, 
Marbella, Spain; 2Hospital Costa del Sol, Oncología, Marbella, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.404
Background Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia is the main 
dose-limiting toxicity, with high morbidity, mortality and 
associated costs. Febrile neutropenia (FN) rates vary consider-
ably between studies.
Purpose To know neutropenic complications (NC) 
incidence in our breast cancer patients treated with 
Doxorubicin-Cyclophosphamide (AC) and Doxorubicin-
Cyclophosphamide-sequential Docetaxel (AC-T) schemes; 
determine their consequences; analyse sample’s characteris-
tics and myeloid growth factors use.
Materials and methods Patients with breast cancer treated 
over 20 months were selected retrospectively. 107 patients 
treated with AC or AC-T comprised the sample. Descriptive 
variables were obtained.
Results 97% of patients were in stage I, II or III; 95.8% 
received chemotherapy for the fi rst time; 98% started treat-
ment at full dose. 35.5% (95CI 27 to 45) of patients developed 
NC and 24.3% (95CI 17 to 33.2) suffered FN. 36% of NC were 
due to fi rst AC cycle. No patient received primary prophylaxis 
with myeloid growth factors even when docetaxel was started. 
Secondary prophylaxis was administered in subsequent cycles 
after patient developed the fi rst NC (it was administered to 
91,3% of patients who developed FN and 78% of patients with 
NC without fever). Apart from two cases, no patient on sec-
ondary prophylaxis developed a NC again. Filgrastim and/or 
Peg-fi lgrastim were used. 77% of patients with FN were hos-
pitalised (mean= 5±3 days) and 7% had to be attended in the 
emergency department (ED). 25% of patients with NC without 
fever were treated in the ED. Next cycle was delayed in 31.5% 
of NC (mean= 6.6±2.8 days); dose was reduced to 79.5%±4.4% 
of the scheduled dose in 39.4%; chemotherapy was fi nished in 
7.9%. 5% of the sample received a relative dose intensity (RDI) 
<85% due to NC.
Conclusions The risk of NC in our patients is higher than 
reported in literature. According to current recommendations, 
primary prophylaxis with myeloid growth factors would be 
indicated in our patients.
Competing interests None.
CPC056
ANTIRETROVIRAL NAÔVE PATIENTS HAVE BETTER 
FIRST YEAR AND FOLLOW-UP ADHERENCE DATA IN 
OUR COHORT
O. Ibarra, U. Aguirre, J. Mayo, J. Peral, O. Mora, E. Ibarra 1Hospital de Galdakao-
Usansolo, farmacia, Galdakao, Spain; 2Hospital de Galdakao-Usansolo, Investigación, 
Galdakao, Spain; 3Hospital de Galdakao-Usansolo, Infecciosas, Galdakao, Spain; 
4Hospital de Galdakao-Usansolo, Farmacia, Galdakao, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.405
Background Adherence to antiretroviral treatment is critical 
to the success of the therapy.
Purpose The authors conducted a study to assess adherence 
in patients included into a cohort from 2001 until 2008.
Materials and methods The authors performed a retrospec-
tive cohort analysis of adherence data from each new patient 
enrolled between 2001 and 2008. Pharmacy refi ll records from 
all medication in the therapy were used to measure mean 
annual adherence. The primary outcome was optimal adher-
ence (considered as ≥ 95%). Multivariate logistic regression 
and survival analysis for repeated measurement was applied. 
Gender, age at the moment of the recruitment and being immi-
grant were also collected.
Results There were 241 HIV-positive adults eligible for analy-
sis (68.5% male; mean age: 39.1±8.3). In our cohort, 137 (56.9%) 
were antiretroviral- naïve and 104 (43.1%) antiretroviral- expe-
rienced patients. 8.3% were immigrants and the median of fol-
low-up was 4 years (1- 6). Naïve patients showed statistically 
better mean adherence in the fi rst year and also higher rate of 
patients with optimal adherence (p < 0.001 in both cases). In 
the immigrant population the rate of non-adherence was higher 
(p =0.07). Regarding the multivariate analysis, non-immigrant 
patients (OR 5.4; 95% CI 1.9 to 15.4) and starting treatment 
after 2005 (OR 2.93; 95% CI 1.4 to 6.1) showed to be predictors 
of optimal adherence. For every fi ve- year increase in age, being 
non-immigrant had 14% higher probability to be adherent (OR 
1.14; 95% CI 1.05 to 1.23). During the follow-up, being naïve 
was the unique variable to maintain optimal adherence.
Conclusions In our cohort, antiretroviral naïve and non-im-
migrant patients who started treatment after 2005 had higher 
probability to achieve optimal adherence during the fi rst year. 
But the only predictor of maintain good adherence levels was 
being naive.
Competing interests None.
CPC057
SELF-ADMINISTERED HOME PARENTERAL 
ANTIBIOTIC TREATMENT USING ELASTOMERIC 
INFUSION PUMPS IN ORTHOPAEDIC PATIENTS
H. Omestad, J. Svendsson, A. Adelfred, J. Nejatbakhsh, K. Kjaer-Petersen 1Aarhus 
University Hospital, Hospital Pharmacy Aarhus, Aarhus C, Denmark; 2Aarhus University 
Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Aarhus C, Denmark
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.406
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   239
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   239
3/9/2012   12:26:52 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:52 PM
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
240
Background Aarhus Hospital Pharmacy offers portable elas-
tomeric infusion pumps containing dicloxacillin and piperacil-
lin/tazobactam to selected patients. During 2009, The authors 
documented stability data for both antibiotics in elastomeric 
infusions pumps. The expiry date for dicloxacillin 10 mg/ml 
in normal saline (NS) is 4 days at 2-8 ºC, and 7 days at 2-8ºC 
followed by 1 day below 32ºC for piperacillin/tazobactam 12 
g and 16 g in 270 ml NS.
Purpose Infections in bone and joints are treated with intra-
venous antibiotics for weeks and they need hospitalisation. In 
order to maintain the patients’ physical and social skills and 
to minimise the need for hospitalisation, a number of selected 
orthopaedic patients were offered self administration of their 
parenteral antibiotics at home.
Materials and methods All patients were fi tted with a central 
venous catheter (CVC) and the patient or parent was trained to 
administer intravenous antibiotics during the period of wait-
ing for the organism identifi cation report. The patients were 
discharged with all equipment needed and written instruc-
tions. Due to the expiry date of the antibiotics, the patients 
returned to the hospital for new pumps.
Results From August 2009 to April 2011 twelve patients 
with median age of 37 (1-59) years self-administered their 
intravenous antibiotics, required due to osteomyelitis (n=10) 
and septic arthritis (n=3). Two patients received piperacillin/
tazobactam and the rest dicloxacillin. Totally intravenous 
antibiotics were administered for 193 days. The period of 
self-administration was 133 days, thus decreasing hospital 
stay by 69 %. One patient developed allergic erythema due to 
dicloxacillin and was hospitalised and received cefuroxime. 
All other patients fulfi lled their treatment without compli-
cations. The patients/parents felt secure and were satisfi ed 
with the treatment and preferred the treatment offered over 
hospitalisation.
Conclusions Self-administration of parenteral antibiotics at 
home for selected patients can reduce hospital stays signifi -
cantly. The patients/parents preferred the treatment offered to 
hospitalisation.
Competing interests None.
CPC058
ADHERENCE TO DISEASE-MODIFYING TREATMENTS 
IN PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS
O. Ibarra, O. Mora, E. Ardanza, A. Lopez de Torre, I. Palacios, M. Bustos 1Hospital de 
Galdakao-Usansolo, Farmacia, Galdakao, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.407
Background The current treatment of multiple sclerosis is 
based on disease-modifying treatments, including intramus-
cular and subcutaneous interferon (IFN) or subcutaneous glati-
ramer acetate.
Observational studies have shown that patient adherence to 
treatment is suboptimal and adherence is a key issue in chronic 
diseases to maximise treatment benefi ts.
Purpose The goal of this study was to evaluate the level of 
adherence to disease- modifying treatment in multiple sclero-
sis in our patients during 2011.
Materials and methods The study cohort consisted of 
patients with multiple sclerosis attended at Galdakao- Usansolo 
Hospital Outpatient Pharmacy. The authors conducted a ret-
rospective analysis of pharmacy claim data from January to 
September of 2011, and The authors calculated the medicines 
possession rate to assess adherence to treatment. Percentage 
of patients with optimal adherence (more than 95%) was the 
primary outcome measured. Patients included were older than 
18 years and had been on treatment for at least 6 months at the 
moment of analysis.
Results At the beginning of the study The authors selected 
for analysis 41 patients on treatment, 6 of whom started treat-
ment during 2011 (61% female; mean age: 40.5±10.2 years). 
Regarding the drug, 14 patients received intramuscular IFN 
β-1a, 10 subcutaneous IFN β-1a, 10 subcutaneous IFN β-1b and 
seven glatiramer acetate. 85.4% of the patients had an adher-
ence level greater than 95%, however 4.9% had suboptimal 
adherence and 9.8% discontinued the treatment during the 
monitoring period. They abandoned the treatment volun-
tarily and in one case the drug was withdrawn because the 
illness progressed. The mean adherence level in our cohort was 
89.5%±29.9.
Conclusions Although the level of adherence in our multi-
ple sclerosis patients during 2011 was high, The authors had 
almost ten percent of treatment discontinuation.
Competing interests None.
CPC059
USE AND EFFECTIVENESS OF ELTROMBOPAG IN 
A TERTIARY HOSPITAL
I. Yeste Gomez, A. Giménez Manzorro, I. Marquínez Alonso, R. Romero Jiménez, R. 
García Sánchez, A. De Lorenzo Pinto, B. Marzal Alfaro, E. Duran García, C. Rodríguez 
González, M. Sanjurjo Saez 1Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, 
Pharmacy, Madrid, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.408
Background Eltrombopag is authorised by the EMA for adult 
chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) splenec-
tomised patients who are refractory to other treatments and 
as second-line treatment for non-splenectomised patients for 
whom surgery is contraindicated. Eltrombopag was effective 
in 59% of patients in a randomised controlled trial (Bussel, 
2009).
Purpose
1) To determine whether eltrombopag is prescribed according 
to the approved indications.
2) To observe the effect on platelet levels.
Materials and methods Observational study. The authors 
included patients treated with eltrombopag from 01/01/2011 
to 31/08/2011. Variables analysed: demographics, diagnosis, 
previous treatments, duration, rescue medication, changes in 
platelet levels, and reason for suspension (where applicable).
Results Seven patients were treated with eltrombopag. 
Median age: 65 years, 4 males. Six had ITP and 1 had mul-
tifactorial essential thrombocytopenia. All patients with ITP 
had received fi rst-line treatment with corticosteroids and 
immunoglobulins and were refractory to at least 2 second-
line treatments, as follows: immunosuppressants (3 patients), 
rituximab (3), Vinca alkaloids (2), tranexamic acid (3), and 
romiplostim (2). One patient with ITP was splenectomised, 
while 5 were not (old age (3), multiple comorbidities, refusal (1 
each)). Four of the 7 patients discontinued treatment before the 
end of the study (median duration, 87 days), while 3 contin-
ued with treatment (median interval from initiation, 46 days). 
The 3 patients who continued with treatment maintained 
increased platelet levels from baseline (>50 x 103/μL). Of the 
4 who stopped treatment, 3 did not have increased platelet 
levels at any time during the study, while 1, despite reaching 
and maintaining platelet levels, discontinued treatment due to 
uncontrolled bleeding events. All non-responders required res-
cue with immunoglobulins.
Conclusions Eltrombopag was prescribed according to the 
approved indication in 6 out of 7 patients and was effective in 
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   240
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   240
3/9/2012   12:26:53 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:53 PM
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
241
half of the patients with ITP. Despite our small study popula-
tion, the percentage of responders was similar to that found 
by Bussel et al.
Competing interests None.
CPC060
OBSERVING GOOD PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR 
PROTON PUMP INHIBITORS IN GERIATRICS UNITS
B. Leroy, A. Lajoinie, M. Ducher, L. Bourguignon 1Hopital Antoine Charial HCL, 
Pharmacy, Francheville, France
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.409
Background Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are a therapeutic 
class of drugs that are effective for the reduction of gastric 
acids. Misuse has already been reported in this class of drugs.
Purpose Within the framework of the evaluation of profes-
sional practice, The authors performed an audit of the pre-
scription of PPIs in university hospitals.
Materials and methods This multicentre study included 
three geriatric hospital centres, or approximately 1000 beds, 
and was performed according to ‘one day study’ methodol-
ogy. A sample of 20% of all patients taking PPIs was randomly 
tested. All data on the patient, his/her treatment and disease 
were recovered from the patient’s fi le. The conformity of 
the treatment to offi cial guidelines, published by the French 
National Health Authority (HAS), and its traceability, were 
verifi ed.
Results 95 medical records were audited. Only 6% of the 
patients included an appropriate indication and posology. 
Indications that were not approved in reference documents 
such as gastrointestinal haemorrhage (10), hiatus hernia (4) or 
anaemia (2) were described in 21 patients (22%). No indication 
was found in 59 patients, or 62%. Finally in the 15 patients 
in which the indication was appropriate, there were errors in 
length of treatment, posology and the choice of specialities, 
resulting in non-conforming treatment.
The traceability in the medical record showed that informa-
tion was insuffi cient in 100% of the cases. Missing informa-
tion included the indication (62%) as well as prescription 
details (length of treatment 95%, posology 50%, and name of 
the speciality 47%).
Conclusions This audit shows that the main problem is trace-
ability. Because PPI treatment has a satisfactory tolerance pro-
fi le, it is not the subject of attention by doctors or subject to 
re-evaluation.
As a result of this study, a computer protocol will be used 
which is linked to prescription software including all indica-
tions validated by offi cial guidelines.
Competing interests None.
CPC061
INVESTIGATOR PERCEPTION OF TRIAL 
PRESENTATION TO THE CLINICAL RESEARCH ETHICS 
COMMITTEE
N. Vilardell, S. Redondo, N. Giménez, L. Soriano, R. Pla, S. Quintana 1Hospital 
Universitari Mútua Terrassa, Pharmacy Department. Clinical Research Ethics 
Committee, Terrassa, Spain; 2Hospital Universitari Mútua Terrassa, Clinical Research 
Ethics Committee, Terrassa, Spain; 3Hospital Universitari Mútua Terrassa, Pharmacy 
Department, Terrassa, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.410
Background There has been a Clinical Research Ethics 
Committee (CREC) in the hospital since 1993. A characteristic 
of the committee is that the main investigators (MIs) are called 
to present the project at the CREC evaluation meeting.
Purpose To analyse the MIs’ perceptions about face-to-face 
project presentation and the CREC’s handling of administra-
tive and advisory matters.
Materials and methods Descriptive study performed over 
nine months (January to September 2011) through a voluntary 
questionnaire given to MIs who attended the CREC meetings. 
Each MI was only give on questionnaire regardless of the num-
ber of projects presented during the study period.
The questionnaire contained a numeric range (1-10) with 
which to evaluate presenting the study and the satisfaction 
with the CREC considering bureaucratic, ethical, scientifi c-
methodological aspects, its legal recommendations and overall 
functioning.
Results The questionnaire was answered by 36 MIs (94.7%). 
Projects presented to the CREC meetings comprised 55.3% 
observational studies and the rest (44.7%) clinical trials. 77.8% 
of the MIs polled did not have previous experience in present-
ing studies to other CRECs. Average score obtained in the 
evaluation of face-to-face study presentation was 9.2 (SD 0.9) 
and the subjective benefi t of balancing time spent and result 
obtained was rated 8.4 (SD 1.3). Average scores for selected 
administrative points such as meeting organisation, document 
formalities and contract procedures were 8.3 (SD 1.2), 8.7 (SD 
1.0) and 8.1 (SD 1.3) respectively. The average scores obtained 
for CREC recommendations relating to ethical aspects of the 
trial treatment, the patient information sheet and informed 
consent were 8.0 (SD 1.2) and 8.3 (SD 1.2). An average of 7.9 
(SD 1.4) was recorded for the proposed changes related to sci-
entifi c/methodological aspects and 8.4 (SD 1.2) for other sug-
gestions made by CREC members. Evaluations of legal issues 
such as the insurance policy and procedures with various 
agencies and institutions were 7.4 (SD 1.9) and 6.8 (SD 2.2) 
respectively. Overall average evaluation of CREC tasks was 
8.6 (SD 1.0). The main comments made by 61% of the MIs 
were positive about presenting the project because they were 
closely involved in the subject presented. 8.3% emphasised the 
diffi culty of juggling clinical services and the CREC meeting 
timetable. 22.2% did not have any comments.
Conclusions The study showed a high opinion of defending 
projects face-to-face and expressed the effort made by MIs to 
contribute for the smooth running of CREC meetings. MIs 
evaluated the administrative and advisory performance of the 
CREC as very satisfactory.
Competing interests None.
CPC062
REGISTRATION RATES OF CLINICAL TRIAL RESULTS 
ON WEBSITE REGISTRIES
A. Lajoinie, B. Leroy, P. Maire, M. Ducher, L. Bourguignon 1Hopital Antoine Charial 
HCL, Pharmacy, Francheville, France
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.411
Background Creation of free website registries of clinical 
trial databases answers the absolute necessity of transparency 
in human research. Sponsors make a moral commitment to 
put results on the website not later than one year after the 
study’s primary completion date. Voluntary participants, the 
public and investigators now have access to the results. Up 
to now, a lot of scientifi c teams have worked on publication 
bias of clinical trial results. A few have estimated registration 
of results on trial registries available for free consultation by 
the public.
Purpose Our objective was to quantify the rate of result reg-
istration for clinical trials on an international registry attested 
by the FDA.
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   241
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   241
3/9/2012   12:26:53 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:53 PM
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested