asp.net web api 2 for mvc developers pdf : Break pdf file into multiple files control software utility azure windows web page visual studio Milan%20EJHP%20abstract%20book5-part1613

Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
112
Results 90 patients were treated with Dα, but only 52 fulfi lled 
the inclusion criteria. 59.6% were women, the median age was 
78. 76.9% were out of the recommended range. The average 
of maximum and minimum Hb recorded in this group was 
12.7±0,2 g/dl and 10.4±0,7 g/dl, respectively, with a mean dose 
of 88±12 mcg/month throughout the study period. 160 dispen-
sations were made to this group, 43.1% were associated with 
Hb out of range, carrying out changes at prescription in 26.1%. 
Patients who had changes in the prescription had a maximum 
Hb of 12, 9±0, 5 g/dl and a minimum of 8, 8±1, 1 g/dl, while 
the rest, maximum and minimum Hb was 12.8±0.3 g/dl and 
9.1±0, 6 g/dl, respectively.
Conclusions Changes in prescriptions respond to levels below 
the recommended interval, while levels outside the upper lim-
its were not modifi ed, so it seems necessary to establish a pro-
tocol to guarantee the security of the treatment. Pharmacists 
could play an important role in controlling laboratory param-
eters and Dα dosage in order to reduce the number of patients 
with Hb levels out of range.
Competing interests None.
GRP071
ANTIPSYCOTHIC DRUGS IN DEMENTIA AND 
ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE: PHARMACOVIGILANCE 
PLAN IN FLORENCE
L. Pazzagli, E. Benedetti, E. Agostino, F. Romano, A. De Angelis, F. Romagnoli, R. 
Tucci, A. Bazzechi, T. Brocca, M. Piccininni 1Pharmacovigilance Centre, Azienda 
Sanitaria, Florence, Italy; 2Pharmacy Department, Azienda Sanitaria, Florence, Italy; 
3School of Specialization in Hospital Pharmacy, Pharmacy Faculty of University, 
Florence, Italy; 4Azienda Sanitaria, Pharmacy Department, Florence, Italy; 5Azienda 
Sanitaria, Medicine Department, Florence, Italy
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.71
Background The Italian Medicine Agency (AIFA) with a spe-
cifi c directive (Dir. AIFA 28/12/2006) requires the monitoring 
of off-label prescriptions of the antipsychotic drugs in patients 
with dementia, used to control personality disorder and agita-
tion symptoms.
Purpose The aim of this study was to defi ne an informed con-
sent by patients with dementia, who are not able to consciously 
choose, and to monitor adverse drug reactions (ADRs).
Materials and methods Medical record included prescrip-
tion and treatment follow-up. Pharmaceutical data included 
prescribed drugs and adverse events. Data record included 
patient’s demographic characteristics.
Results The cooperation between medical team (Neurologists 
and Geriatricians of Florence) and Pharmacovigilance Centre, 
has generated an information paper for caregivers and /or 
patient’s family (to explain drug side effects and the reason 
for seeking consent), an informed consent and a monitor-
ing plan for each patient. Data analysis, lasted from January 
2007 to December 2010, were performed every 6 months from 
Pharmacovigilance Centre. Treated patients were 1632 (622 
men and 1010 women), aged from 50 to 103 years (average 76 
years). The most prescribed drugs were olanzapine (45.7%) 
quetiapine (38.7%) and risperidone (7.9%). Identifi ed adverse 
reactions were 7.9% (129 ADRs of 1632 patients), mainly not 
serious type and primarily dependent on olanzapine (7.69%) 
and quetiapine (5.87%). Frequent reactions were: extrapyra-
midal syndrome, joint stiffness, excessive sedation, akathisia, 
dyskinesia, confusion and ineffectiveness.
Conclusions Informed consent and information on the risks 
of antipsychotic adverse reactions are important goals to 
improve patient safety, especially for those with dementia and 
Alzheimer’s disease. This study is an innovative example in 
Italy for critical issues resolution because it leads to an inte-
grated therapeutic and diagnostic path.
Competing interests None.
GRP072
MEDICATION-RELATED PROBLEMS AFTER 
DISCHARGE FROM ACUTE CARE: A TELEPHONE 
FOLLOW-UP PILOT SURVEY
V. Marvin, L. Vaughan, A. Joshua, C. Park, J. Valentine 1Chelsea and Westminster 
Hospital, Pharmacy, London, UK; 2Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, Acute Medicine, 
London, UK; 3NHS Direct, Pharmacy, London, UK
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.72
Background Transitions of care are risky periods for develop-
ment of medication-related problems. The authors aimed to 
identify any problems experienced by patients following an 
admission to the hospital’s Acute Medical Unit and to pilot 
discharge telephony follow-up. Pharmacist from NHS Direct 
(our partner for the project) conducted follow-up interviews 
with selected patients after discharge using their inhouse sys-
tems which are set up nationally to handle calls 24 h a day 
about any health-related matters.
Purpose To describe and quantify medication-related prob-
lems in a sample of patients discharged from hospital.
Materials and methods Eligible patients were short-stay 
admissions (<3 days) to the Acute Medical Unit of the Chelsea 
and Westminster Hospital. Consented patients had their dis-
charge summary relayed to NHS Direct, who then adminis-
tered a structured telephone survey 3 weeks after discharge. 
The pharmacist categorised and attempted to remedy any 
problems identifi ed. The categories were possible side effects; 
concordance/compliance; diffi culties with packaging; misun-
derstanding/misinterpretation of directions; other. Responses 
were fed back to the project team and assessment was made of 
the potential for harm from their medicines.
Results 54 patients were initially consented; 34 were contacted 
and 7 were removed from analysis. 20 medication-related prob-
lems were identifi ed in 12 patients (44.4%): fi ve potential side 
effects; fi ve problems with taking medication and four felt that 
their medication did not suit them. NHS Direct identifi ed one 
other medication-related problem and three patients received 
counselling for other medication issues. Only one problem was 
considered potentially harmful. 19 (70.4%) found the call to be 
helpful and 25 (88.9%) would like to have a similar follow-up 
call if admitted to hospital again.
Conclusions Nearly half our cohort was reported to be expe-
riencing medication-related problems, though a low level of 
potential harm was found. Many patients initially recruited 
were not able to be contacted by phone. This suggests that 
although acceptable to those patients who were contacted, 
before the service can be offered widely methods for targeting 
need to be explored further.
Competing interests None.
GRP073
HAEMOGLOBIN LEVELS IN PATIENTS WITH ANAEMIA 
ASSOCIATED WITH CHRONIC RENAL FAILURE IN 
PREDIALYSIS, TREATED WITH SUBCUTANEOUS 
ERYTHROPOIETIN
P. Carmona Oyaga, I. Aranguren Ruiz, P. Martín Andrés, L. Gómez De Segura Iriarte, 
L. Leunda Eizmendi, A. Asensio Bermejo, P. Pascual González, J. Barral Juez, M.J. 
Gayan Lera, E. Esnaola Barrena 1Donostia University Hospital, Hospital Pharmacy, 
San Sebastián, Spain; 2Aita Menni Hospital, Hospital Pharmacy, Mondragon, Spain; 
3Central University Hospital of Asturias, Hospital Pharmacy, Oviedo, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.73
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   112
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   112
3/9/2012   12:26:35 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:35 PM
Break pdf file into multiple files - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
scan multiple pages into one pdf; append pdf files reader
Break pdf file into multiple files - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
c# merge pdf; pdf merge documents
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
113
Background It is necessary to monitor the effect of erythro-
poietin (EPO) on haemoglobin (Hb) levels to check the effi cacy 
and safety of the medicine. The desirable therapeutic range 
of Hb according to the product information is from 10 to 12 
g/dl and higher or lower levels can damage health. The toler-
ance, clinical need and urgency required in the resolution of 
the anaemia varies among patients, however, Hb ≥13 g/dl is 
associated with cardiovascular events such as thromboembo-
lism, requiring urgent care.
Purpose To determine the proportion of patients with anae-
mia linked to chronic renal failure in predialysis treated with 
EPO, with a value of Hb within or outside (lower or higher 
than) the therapeutic range.
Materials and methods A retrospective study was performed 
of 155 nephrology patients who collect erythropoietin at the 
outpatient unit of the hospital pharmacy; duration 1 month. 
All of them had anaemia associated with chronic renal failure 
in predialysis and were treated with subcutaneous erythropoi-
etin for at least 4 weeks. The outpatient dispensing program 
compiles items dispensed per patient, with dates, age, sex, 
medical record number, diagnosis, amount collected, dosage, 
department/ward and prescribing physician The last Hb value 
was obtained for the computerised medical history records 
and the proportion of patients below and above the therapeu-
tic range was estimated.
Results 139 patients, 61 women (43.9%) and 78 men (56.1%), 
between 21 and 101 years (mean 68.6). 48.9% (68) of the 
patients had an Hb within the therapeutic range (mean 11). 
22.3% (31) had Hb less than 10 g/dl (mean 9.2 and minimum 
6) while in 28.8% (40) it was greater than 12 (mean 13.2 and 
maximum 15.4).
Conclusions 71 patients (51%) had Hb outside the therapeu-
tic range. It is necessary to monitor the haemoglobin levels to 
check the safety and effi cacy of erythropoietin. It is essential 
to include all episodes and data in the computerised medical 
history.
Competing interests None.
GRP074
POTENTIAL HOSPITAL PHARMACISTS’ 
INTERVENTIONS IN ANTIBACTERIAL STEWARDSHIP
J.F. Rodrigues, A. Casado, A.M. Duarte, C. Santos, A. Duarte, F. Fernandez-
Llimos 1Hospital da Luz, Pharmacy Department, Lisboa, Portugal; 2Hospital da Luz, ICU, 
Lisboa, Portugal; 3Faculty of Pharmacy, Microbiology and Immunology Department, 
Lisboa, Portugal; 4Faculty of Pharmacy, Social Pharmacy, Lisboa, Portugal
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.74
Background Antibacterial consumption has been associated 
with an increase in the growth of resistant bacterial strains. 
Hospital Pharmacists play an important role in antimicrobial 
stewardship strategies, by improving compliance with anti-
infective prescribing recommendations.
Purpose To identify real-world situations in which pharma-
cists can intervene to improve antibacterial patterns of use in 
Hospital da Luz, Lisbon, Portugal.
Materials and methods Retrospective audit study. All courses 
of antibacterials for systemic use (therapeutic class J01), pre-
scribed in patients over 18 years-old admitted to Hospital da Luz 
during January 2011, were extracted from the electronic medical 
records and analysed. Descriptive statistics were performed.
Results A total of 913 patients were admitted to hospital 
during the study period, being 81.1% (n=740) prescribed 961 
antibacterial courses. Surgical prophylaxis represented 63.7% 
(n=612) of the courses. The following potential improvement 
areas were identifi ed:
In 4.9% (n=47) cases the reason for prescription was not 
identifi ed.
Prophylaxis duration was longer than 48 h in 2.1% and 
between 24 and 48 h in 10.8% courses. A clear distinc-
tion between antibacterials prescribed for prophylaxis and 
therapy was found, except for second-generation cepha-
losporins (78.3% vs 21.7%), quinolones (24.6% vs 75.4%), 
and imidazole derivatives (57.1% vs 42.9%).
Only 3.8% (n=12) of the 349 non-surgical prophylactic and 
therapeutic antibacterial prescriptions were discontinued 
after microbiological identifi cation and/or antibiotic sus-
ceptibility test results. Parenteral administration repre-
sented 73.9% (n=258) of these 349 courses, whereas only 
8.4% (n=20) were discontinued due to intravenous-to-oral 
switch.
Conclusions After an indepth audit process, the following 
opportunities for pharmacists’ interventions to improve the 
antibacterial pattern of use in our hospital were identifi ed: 
unclear prescription indication, inappropriate extension of 
surgical prophylaxis duration, inappropriate selection of the 
prophylactic antibacterial agent, insuffi cient microbiologi-
cal identifi cation follow-up, and scarce intravenous-to-oral 
switch.
Competing interests None.
GRP075
PHARMACEUTICAL INTERVENTION ASSESSMENT IN 
CRITICALLY ILL PATIENTS
M. Domínguez Cantero, M.V. Manzano Martín, M. Calleja Hernández, S. Pedraza 
López, M.E. Rodríguez Mateos 1H.U. Puerta Del Mar, Servicio de Farmacia, Cádiz, 
Spain; 2H.U. Virgen De Las Nieves, Servicio de Farmacia, Granada, Spain; 3H.U. Puerta 
Del Mar, Servicio Cuidados Intensivos, Cádiz, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.75
Background Patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) 
are exposed to medication errors twice as compared to other 
hospital units. Pharmaceutical care in critically ill patients 
may increase the quality of patient care by reducing medica-
tion errors.
Purpose To assess the impact of pharmaceutical interven-
tions (PI) on the health of patients admitted to an intensive 
care unit.
Materials and methods Study to evaluate PI in patients 
admitted to an ICU with electronic prescribing. Were obtained 
from medical records data on age, gender, APACHE-II score 
at admission. The authors defi ned the impact of PI such as 
the presence of negative results, positive or no change in the 
patient’s health, potentially avoided by PI and assessed by the 
rating scale proposed by Overhage et al.1 The medication error 
detected with PI undertaken provides the clinical relevance 
of the intervention, the reason for the intervention preceded 
the detection of a medication error, measured by classifying 
Overhage et al. modifi ed2
Results 25 patients were included, 19 were men, mean age 
53.88±16.69 years. 68% of patients had a APACHE-II score 
less than 10. A total of 35 PI, 1.4 interventions / patient. 71% of 
the PI made were accepted. In terms of assessing the impact of 
PI by the rating scale proposed by Overhage et al1, 8.57% were 
extremely signifi cant (PI avoids a situation that potentially gen-
erate extremely serious consequences), 40% very signifi cant 
(PI prevents actual or potential damage a vital organ), signifi -
cant 8.57%(PI leads to better patient care), 28.57% something 
signifi cant (the benefi t of the patient is neutral), 14.29% non-
signifi cant(only general information or recommendations, not 
individualised per patient). The clinical relevance of the PI 
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   113
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   113
3/9/2012   12:26:35 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:35 PM
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
SharePoint. C#.NET control for splitting PDF file into two or multiple files online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files.
add pdf files together reader; acrobat merge pdf files
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF file into two or multiple files in ASP.NET webpage online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files in .NET WinForms.
best pdf merger; add multiple pdf files into one online
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
114
measured by classifying Overhage et al modifi ed2 was: 5.71% 
could avoid death (medical error has high potential to produce 
adverse effects that threaten the patient’s life), serious 24.71% 
(dose of 4 to 10 times higher than normal in a narrow thera-
peutic index drugs, doses can lead to potentially toxic concen-
trations...), 28.57% signifi cant lower 31.43%(doses too low for 
the patient’s condition, inappropriate dosage range...), 8.57% 
absence of error (clarifi cation of the medical order, economic 
savings).
Conclusions The impact of PI evaluated was mostly signifi -
cant. Half of the PI had a signifi cant or serious clinical rele-
vance. The authors did not perform any action detrimental to 
the patient.
Competing interests None.
REFERENCES
1. Overhage M, Lukes A. Practical, reliable, comprehensive method for characterizing 
pharmacists’ clinical activities. Am J Health-Syst Pharm 1999;56:2444–50.
2. Gill SK, Weber RJ. Principles and practices of medication safety in the ICU. 
Crit Care Clin 2006;22:273–290.
GRP076
DURATION AND REASONS FOR CHANGING THE FIRST 
ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY: AN 8-YEAR FOLLOW-UP
R. Ramos-Aparicio, R. Rodriguez-Carrero, V. Ortoll-Polo, I. Zapico, P. Puente 1Hospital 
San Agustin, Hospital Pharmacy, Aviles, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.76
Background Failure of fi rst highly active antiretroviral ther-
apy (HAART) reduces both the duration and the chances of 
viral control in subsequent regimens, due to cross-resistance 
and common toxicity between and within classes of antiret-
roviral drugs.
Purpose To measure the duration of the fi rst HAART pre-
scribed in a population of HIV infected patients and to address 
factors leading to therapy changes.
Materials and methods Retrospective, observational study 
which included HIV-infected patients over 18 with no pre-
vious HAART and who started their therapy in a regional 
hospital between 1 January 2003 and 31 December 2008. 
The follow-up lasted until 31 December 2010. A descriptive 
analysis was performed and Kaplan–Meier curves were used 
to assess the duration of the fi rst HAART.
Results 58 patients started a HAART and only in 12 of them 
(20.58%) no changes had been performed by the end of the 
study period. Median time until fi rst change of HAART was 
509 days, up to 721 days if cases of treatment simplifi cation 
were excluded from the analysis. Treatment-related adverse 
events were the main cause for switching therapy (24.14%), 
followed by treatment simplifi cation (21.42%), and voluntary 
withdrawal (7%). Immunological, virological or clinical fail-
ures were linked to change in only three cases. Most frequent 
adverse reactions were dyslipidaemia (35.7%), hepatotoxic-
ity (21.4%), and digestive intolerance (14.3%). Study subjects 
received 18 different initial HAART regimes; most of them 
(n=32, 55%) started a protease inhibitor-based HAART, fol-
lowed by non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based 
regimen (n=22, 38%) and therapy with three nucleoside reverse 
transcriptase inhibitors (n=4, 7%). Conclusions Duration of 
the fi rst HAART remains short, especially considering it is 
supposed to be the longest therapy, since, currently, this treat-
ment is expected to be chronic. Adverse events are the main 
cause of withdrawal, so their prevention and mitigation should 
be one of the cornerstones of our activity as pharmacists.
Competing interests None.
GRP077
VARIATIONS BETWEEN PHARMACIST- AND 
DOCTOR-OBTAINED MEDICATION HISTORIES AND 
THEIR POTENTIAL SIGNIFICANCE
G. Gaffney 1Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital, Pharmacy, Drogheda, Ireland (Rep.)
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.77
Background NICE recommends that pharmacists be involved 
in obtaining medication histories.1 Previous studies have 
shown variations between the medication histories obtained 
by pharmacists and doctors.2 3
Purpose This study aimed to compare the medication histories 
obtained by both professionals, assess the extent of any varia-
tions found and grade their potential clinical signifi cance.
Materials and methods Unintentional variations between 
pharmacist- and doctor-obtained medication histories were 
independently assessed by a consultant and clinical pharmacist 
for their potential to cause patient harm, using the National 
Co-ordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and 
Prevention index. The relationship between variables was inves-
tigated using Mann–Whitney U and Kruskal–Wallis Tests.
Results Unintentional variations were identifi ed in the medi-
cation histories of 63% of patients. Variations included: drug 
omission (72%), different dose (17%), different frequency (7%), 
drug commission (3%) and dose omission (0.7%). 13 patients 
had >4 unintentional variations. The mean number of medi-
cines being taken was 7, while the mean number of uninten-
tional variations was 3.4. A signifi cant positive correlation was 
found between the number of medications being taken and 
the number of unintentional variations. No signifi cant differ-
ence in the number of variations per patient across either the 
different grades or specialties of doctors was found. Up to 13% 
of variations had the potential to cause patient harm.
Conclusions The study confi rms the results of other research 
which showed that a pharmacist takes more complete medica-
tion histories compared to doctors. A more multidisciplinary 
approach should be taken when admitting patients; this should 
involve a pharmacist to obtain medication histories. The emer-
gency department is the ideal setting to undertake this process 
as the maximum impact of involving a pharmacist could be 
delivered at this early stage of the patient journey.
Competing interests None.
REFERENCES
1. NICE/NPSA, 2007.
2. Cornish, 2005. Archives of Internal Medicine, 165, pp. 424–429.
3. Gleason, 2010. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 25(5), pp.441–447.
GRP078
REDUCING MEDICATION ERRORS USING THE 
PATIENT’S OWN DRUG (POD) SYSTEM AND AN 
INTEGRATED DISCHARGE PRESCRIPTION (IDP)
S. Murray 1St Vincent’s Private Hospital, Pharmacy Department, Dublin, Ireland 
(Rep.)
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.78
Background Over 50% of all medication errors and 20% of 
harmful errors occur due to poor communication of informa-
tion at the interfaces of care.
Purpose To reduce the risk of medication errors on admission 
and discharge and improve patient safety.
Materials and methods An observational study involving 
patients admitted and discharged from two surgical wards. 38 
patients taking three or more regular medications whose hos-
pital stay exceeded 48 h were selected for each group. Patients 
enrolled in the control groups received routine pharmacy 
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   114
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   114
3/9/2012   12:26:35 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:35 PM
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Offer PDF page break inserting function. a new PDF page into existing PDF document file, RasterEdge C# .NET functions, such as how to merge PDF document files
c# pdf merge; attach pdf to mail merge in word
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Offer PDF page break inserting function. you go to C# Imaging - how to insert a new empty page to PDF file DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class.
break pdf file into multiple files; pdf mail merge
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
115
service. Patients in the intervention group were enrolled in 
the POD system and received an IDP on discharge. The POD 
system involved patients bringing in and using their own 
medication throughout their stay providing a more accurate 
medication history. An international index was used for cat-
egorising the severity of all errors.
Results Medication errors on admission: 61% of patients in the 
control group versus 23% of patients in the intervention group; 
The severity of medication errors in the control group ranged 
from a minor to severe. Medication errors on discharge: 71% of 
patients in the control group versus 5% of patients in the inter-
vention group. Errors identifi ed in the control group ranged 
from minor to severe. Errors in the admission and discharge 
intervention group were rated as minor. In general: A 68% 
reduction in medication errors at admission and a 93% reduc-
tion in medication errors at discharge were achieved in this 
study. The mean difference in medication errors between the 
groups was statistically signifi cant using the unpaired t-test.
Conclusions The study demonstrated that quality improve-
ment procedures such as the POD system and IDP showed a 
signifi cant reduction in medication errors. The POD system is 
now routinely used throughout the hospital with plans for the 
IDP to be used next year.
Competing interests None.
GRP079
PRESCRIBING ERROR REPORTING AND PHARMACIST 
ORIENTED PREVENTION PROGRAM IN EMERGENCY 
DEPARTMENT
N. Mohebbi, M.R. Javadi, K. Gholami 1Shariati Hospital affiliated to Tehran University 
of Medical sciences, Pharmaceutical Care Unit, Tehran, Iran; 2Tehran University of 
Medical sciences, clinical Pharmacy, Tehran, Iran
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.79
Background Due to the nature of emergency department, 
quantity of medicine used and starting of a newly established 
emergency medicine residency program in our hospital it was 
decided to use clinical pharmacist interventions to protect 
patients from adverse drug events.
Purpose To assess clinical pharmacist intervention impact on 
reduction of medication errors.
Materials and methods Retrospective evaluation orders of 
emergency medicine residents from October 2010 to January 
2011 were done. The frequency of prescription errors deter-
mined by a clinical pharmacist based on patients medical 
records. Subsequently, weekly educational sessions on pre-
scribing for emergency medicine residents conducted by a 
clinical pharmacist. Recording errors continued for 4 months 
period prospectively and statistical analyses compared the 
results before and after interventions.
Results In a retrospective study The authors evaluated 5320 
prescription with total number of 22346 medication ordered. 
Results indicated 4941(22.1%) ordering errors. After clinical phar-
macist intervention the rate diminished signifi cantly to (5.6%) 
1276 errors in 5602 prescriptions (22743 medication orders) 
(P<0.01). Inappropriate drug choice (23%), improper dose(21%), 
inaccurate dosing interval(19%), drug interactions(16%), 
misdiagnosis(14%), choosing wrong dosage form(4%), and 
improper route of administration(3%) were errors before clini-
cal pharmacist interventions. The most frequent errors after 
intervention were inappropriate drug choice (20%), and drug 
interactions (18.5%). The rate of other kind of errors were in 
this order: misdiagnosis (18%), improper dose (18%), inaccu-
rate dosing interval (15.5%), choosing wrong dosage form (6%), 
and improper route of administration (4%). Inaccurate dosing 
interval decreased more than other prescribing errors with 
pharmacist intervention (from 939 to 198 errors).
Conclusions The results show that reduction in prescrib-
ing errors was signifi cant after pharmacist intervention. 
Monitoring of orders and drug therapy education of the physi-
cians seems to be a substantial factor in hospitals which lead 
to patient safety and rational drug use.
Competing interests None.
GRP080
DEVELOPMENT OF QUALITY OF CARE 
INTERVENTIONS FOR ADULT BENIGN PATIENTS ON 
HOME PARENTERAL NUTRITION (HPN). (SUBTITLE) 
RESULTS OF A TWO-ROUND DELPHI APPROACH
M. Dreesen, K. Van Haecht, V. Foulon, L. De Pourcq, M. Hiele, E. ESPEN – Home 
Artificial Nutrition and Chronic Intestinal Failure working group, L. Willems 1University 
Hospitals, Pharmacy department, Leuven, Belgium 2School of Public health, Center 
for Health Services and Nursing Research, Leuven, Belgium 3Catholic University, 
Pharmacy department Research centre for pharmaceutical care and pharmaco-
economics, Leuven, Belgium 4University Hospitals, Department of gastro-enterology, 
Leuven, Belgium 5European Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, Working 
group, Europe, Italy 
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.80
Background HPN patients deserve professional care as they 
have to deal with diffi cult techniques and risk potentially dan-
gerous complications.
Competing interests Ownership  Dreesen Mira Advisory board: unrestricted 
educational grant of the company Baxter.
GRP081
EXCESS DOSING AND BLEEDING EVENTS IN 
PATIENTS TREATED WITH ABCIXIMAB IN ACUTE 
CORONARY SYNDROMES
A. de Lorenzo-Pinto, B. Cuéllar-Basterrechea, H. Bueno-Zamora, J. Elízaga-Corrales, 
A. de Prado, A. Herranz-Alonso, C.G. Rodríguez-González, C. Pérez-Sanz, M. Sanjurjo-
Sáez 1Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañon, Pharmacy, Madrid, Spain; 
2Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañon, Cardiology, Madrid, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.81
Background Abciximab (ABX) is indicated as an adjunctive 
to percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with acute 
coronary syndrome (ACS). It is considered a high-alert medi-
cine with heightened risk of causing signifi cant patient harm 
when used in error. Evidence-based guidelines recommend an 
intravenous administration of a 0.25 mg/kg bolus dose fol-
lowed by continuous infusion of a weight-adjusted infusion of 
0.125 mcg/kg/min (<80 kg) to a maximum of 10 mcg/min for 
12 h (≥80 Kg).
Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate dosing 
of ABX and its association with bleeding events in patients 
with ACS.
Materials and methods A retrospective chart review was 
performed in all patients hospitalised between January and 
July 2010 at our hospital. Inclusion criteria were: patients 
>18 years of age, diagnosed with ACS and treated with ABX 
during their hospitalisation. A database was designed to 
record patient demographics (age, sex) weight, loading dose, 
maintenance dose, duration of prescribed ABX and bleeding 
events.
Results 73 patients diagnosed with ACS were treated with 
ABX. Median age was 65 (55–73) years old and 78.1% were 
male. 24.7% of patients were not weighed before ABX admin-
istration. All patients who received ABX infusion were treated 
with a fi xed, body weight-independent, dose of 10 mcg/min 
infused for 12 h (maximum dose) meaning that 28.8% of 
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   115
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   115
3/9/2012   12:26:36 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:36 PM
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
116
patients received an overdose of ABX. 66.7% of them devel-
oped a bleeding event compared with 32.8% of patients receiv-
ing the correct dose (p=0.016).
Conclusions Overdose of ABX seems to be associated with 
high risk of developing bleeding events in patients with ACS. 
Some new procedures have been brought in such as hoists 
with weighing scales and a table made available containing 
the appropriate dose and infusion rate for each weight. These 
facilities could be perfectly applicable to other hospitals. 
Further analysis should be carried out to determine the effect 
of other potential risk factors.
Competing interests None.
GRP082
DRUG INTERACTIONS: DETECTION AND 
PHARMACEUTICAL INTERVENTIONS IN AN 
OUTPATIENTS UNIT
E. Sánchez Yañez, I. Moya Carmona, J.M. Fernández-Ovies 1Hospital Clinico Virgen 
De La Victoria, Pharmacy Department, Malaga, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.82
Background In the pharmacy there is a unit where certain 
drugs are dispensed to outpatients. Pharmacists provide phar-
maceutical care to all patients starting new treatment.
Purpose 1) To identify and classify drug interactions (DIs) in all 
patients starting any treatment in the outpatient unit of our hos-
pital pharmacy. 2) To carry out pharmaceutical interventions. 3) 
To identify patients who suffer more frequently from DIs.
Materials and methods Prospective intervention study 
(January–May 2011) that included patients who started treat-
ment at the outpatient unit of the hospital pharmacy. Data 
were obtained from the medical prescription and an interview 
with the patient. To detect and classify DIs the authors used 
the software ‘Lexi-Interact-Online’ and the book ‘Stockley, 
Drug Interactions. Third Edition (2009). Data were analysed 
with SPSS-15.0.
Results Data collection comprised results from 104 patients (39 
women, 65 men). Median age 53. SD 20 years (18–92). 187 DIs 
were detected (incidence 50.96%). 10.16% of the interactions 
occurred between drugs dispensed in hospital and concomitant 
home medicines (CHMs). 89.83% of the interactions detected 
were CHM-CHM. The risk of DI was rated as ‘major’ (14.43%), 
‘moderate’ (79.14%) and ‘minor’ (6.43%). The reliability of the 
DI was ‘excellent’ (6.95%), ‘good’ (32.08%), ‘reasonable’ (57.75%) 
and ‘poor’ (3.22%). The mechanisms by which the DI developed 
were ‘pharmacokinetic’ (50.26%), ‘pharmacodynamic’ (35.82%), 
‘unknown’ (12.3%), ‘other’ (1.09%) and ‘mixed pharmacoki-
netic/pharmacodynamic’ (0.53%). 38.46% of patients were poly-
medicated (≥6 drug). In these patients DI incidence was 87.70% 
versus a single drug in which DI was 12.3%. Pharmaceutical 
interventions were: monitoring DI from the outpatient unit in 
the pharmacy (10.6%), informing doctors (45.45%), advising on 
administration (31.81%), informing/educating patients (11.36%). 
Causes of non-intervention: habitual association/DI clinically 
irrelevant (51.93%), DI benefi cial (25.12%), literature reports that 
there is no action required (12.59%), others (10.38%).
Conclusions 1) The appearance of DIs in patients starting 
treatment in the outpatient units is common. CHMs should 
also be reviewed to detect DIs. 2) Every DI must be assessed 
individually and appropriate pharmaceutical interven-
tions made. Not all DIs are harmful or clinically relevant. 3) 
Polymedicated patients are a group of special interest because 
most of the interactions occur in them.
Competing interests None.
GRP083
UTILITY OF DEFINED DAILY DOSE SYSTEM FOR 
IDENTIFICATION OF ANTIBACTERIAL POTENTIALLY 
INAPPROPRIATE PRESCRIBED DOSES
J.F. Rodrigues, A. Casado, A.M. Duarte, C. Santos, A. Duarte, F. Fernandez-
Llimos 1Hospital da Luz, Pharmacy Department, Lisboa, Portugal; 2Hospital da Luz, ICU, 
Lisboa, Portugal; 3Faculty of Pharmacy, Microbiology and Immunology Department, 
Lisboa, Portugal; 4Faculty of Pharmacy, Social Pharmacy, Lisboa, Portugal
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.83
Background Different measurements to assess antibacterial 
use in hospitals have been described, many of them based on 
the WHO Defi ned Daily Dose (DDD) assignments. Although 
WHO accepts the update of DDDs, ‘changes of DDDs should 
be kept to a minimum and avoided as far as possible’.
Purpose To assess the utility of WHO DDD assignments to: 
a) measure real-world antibacterial utilisation, and b) label pre-
scribed doses as potentially inappropriate.
Materials and methods All courses of antibacterials for sys-
temic use (therapeutic class J01) prescribed for therapeutic pur-
pose in patients over 18 years-old and admitted during January 
2011 were extracted from the electronic medical records. 
‘Treatment days’ was obtained adding one to the difference 
between the starting and the ending dates. ‘DDDs used’ per 
patient were obtained dividing the dose actually used by the 
WHO DDD assignments. The ratio ‘DDD used’/’treatment 
days’ was calculated. Outliers for this ratio were estimated by 
the IQR rule.
Results A total of 349 antibacterial courses were analysed 
comprising 1761.79 DDD, and representing 33.8 DDD/100 
beds/day. Mean ratio ‘DDD used’/’treatment days’ was 1.29 
(SD=0.76) (range 0.16 to 7.69). This ratio was below one only 
for penicillins, sulfonamides and lincosamides (doses used 
were higher than the DDD assignments). IQR for the ‘DDD 
used’/’treatment days’ ratio was above two for sulfonamides 
(IQR=2.53) and glycopeptides (IQR=2.09), identifying them as 
the two classes where WHO DDD assignments are more devi-
ated from the clinical practice in our hospital. Sixteen extreme 
(>IQR×3) and 12 mild (>IRQ×1.5) outliers were identifi ed, rep-
resenting potential inappropriate prescriptions.
Conclusions Except for sulfonamides and glycopeptides, 
WHO DDD assignments could be used as an alert-generating 
system for potentially inappropriate antibacterial prescribed 
doses in our hospital by identifying the outlier prescribed 
doses. Further analysis is required to exclude a potential sys-
tematic inappropriate dosing for these two classes.
Competing interests None.
GRP084
DETECTION OF ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS BY 
MONITORING ANALYTICAL PARAMETERS
V. Escudero Vilaplana, A. Muiño Míguez, E. Durán García, M. Gómez Antúnez, T. 
Blanco Moya, A. De Lorenzo Pinto, I. Yeste Gómez, I. Marquínez Alonso, A. Ribed 
Sánchez, M. Sanjurjo Sáez 1Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañon, 
Pharmacy, Madrid, Spain; 2Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañon, Internal 
Medicine Department, Madrid, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.84
Background Alterations in laboratory parameters can be 
associated with adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Therefore, 
monitoring parameters may enable early detection and treat-
ment of ADRs.
Purpose To assess the association between laboratory param-
eters and ADRs in Internal Medicine at a tertiary hospital.
Materials and methods Prospective observational study 
of hospitalised patients in a section of internal medicine 
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   116
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   116
3/9/2012   12:26:36 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:36 PM
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
117
department during February and March 2011. Every day, a 
pharmacist recorded drug prescriptions and the following 
parameters: Na, K, Ca, serum creatinine, glomerular fi ltration 
rate (GFR), INR, glucose, haemoglobin, platelets, ALT, AST, 
bilirubin, GGT, alkaline phosphatase, TSH, T4 and blood 
digoxin. The causal association between parameters outside 
the reference range and drugs was analysed using the modifi ed 
Karch–Lasagna scale.
Results 52 patients (65.4% men) were included; median age 
74 years; median hospital stay 7 days. A mean of 2.94 param-
eters per patient were outside the reference range. An associa-
tion with drugs was observed in 25.5% of patients. Reduction 
in GFR, 27.0% (associated with diuretics (41.7%), ACE inhibi-
tors (33.3%), angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) (16.6%) 
and antidiabetics drugs (8.3%)); hypokalaemia, 22.6% (asso-
ciated with diuretics (50.0%), fl uid without potassium (37.5%) 
and salbutamol (12.5%)); hyperkalaemia, 14.5% (associated 
with ACE inhibitors (60.0%) and ARB (40.0%)); INR out of 
range, 10.8% (associated with interactions (66.7%)); hyper-
glycaemia, 8.4% (associated with corticosteroid (66.7%) and 
antidiabetic drugs (33.3%)); low blood digoxin during admis-
sion, 5.3%; and others, 10.8%. No ADRs led to prolonged 
hospital stay. In terms of causality, ADRs were classed as 
possible (52.9%), probable (44.1%) and defi nite (2.9%).
Conclusions 25.5% of alterations in laboratory parameters 
were probably or possibly associated with drugs. The most 
common alterations were as follows: decrease in GFR asso-
ciated with the use of diuretics, ACE inhibitors and ARB; 
hypokalaemia due to diuretics; and hyperkalaemia due to 
ACE inhibitors and ARB. There were no severe ADRs, as these 
were detected early.
Competing interests None.
GRP085
DRUG-DRUG INTERACTIONS IN PATIENTS ADMITTED 
TO AN INFECTIOUS DISEASES UNIT IN A TRAUMA 
HOSPITAL
M. de Dios García, C. Salazar Valdebenito, L. Girona Brumos, P. Lalueza Broto, J.C. 
Juárez Giménez, A. Pérez-Ricart, A. Barraquer Comes 1Hospital Universitari Vall 
d’Hebron, Pharmacy, Barcelona, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.85
Background The current complexity of pharmacotherapy 
in patients with orthopaedic infections increases the risk of 
drug-drug interactions (DDI).
Purpose The aim of this study is to identify potential DDI 
(severe/moderate) and its clinical relevance in patients admit-
ted to the infectious diseases unit (IDU) in a tertiary trauma 
hospital. Materials and methods Prospective observational 
study performed from January 2011 to April 2011 (100 days) 
in patients admitted to IDU for at least 7 days. The following 
variables were recorded for each patient from the database of 
the pharmacy: sex, age and pharmacology treatment during 
hospital stay.
The laboratory product information and a Spanish DDI 
database (Medinteract NR) were used to determine poten-
tial DDI.
Results The study included 35 patients (25 men and 10 
women) with a mean of age of 53 years (range 20–82), an aver-
age hospital stay of 21.9 days (range 7–64) and 12.8 drugs per 
patient. The authors detected 151 potential DDI (21 severe, 130 
moderate) in 33 of 35 patients (mean of potential DDI of 4.6 
per patient). The most frequent of potentially hazardous asso-
ciations were: paracetamol/dexketoprofen: 14 cases; rifampi-
cin/paracetamol: 12 cases; dexketoprofen/enoxaparin: 8 cases; 
insulin/co-trimoxazole: 5 cases; daptomycin/simvastatin: 
4 cases, being that one considered a potentially severe DDI. 
The authors observed one serious DDI with clinical relevance: 
thrombocytopaenia in a patient treated with lefl unomide and 
metamizole, which was solved by stopping the treatment, and 
two cases of badly controlled pain in patients treated with 
rifampicin and paracetamol.
Conclusions The incidence of potential DDI was very high, 
but only three of them had actual effects on the patient, being 
just one severe. This is probably due to the proactive role of the 
pharmacist when is carrying out the validation of the doctor’s 
prescription using an electronic prescribing program. The inte-
gration of clinical pharmacist in IDU facilitates prevention and 
detection of DDI and its complications. It would be recom-
mended to implement computer software for early detection 
of DDI to notify to the physician these potentially hazardous 
associations at the time of prescribing.
Competing interests None.
GRP086
TRAINING OF SPANISH STERILE PREPARATIONS 
TECHNICIANS WORKING IN HOSPITAL PHARMACY: 
COMPARISON WITH THE REQUIREMENTS OF THE 
AMERICAN PHARMACOPEA (USP)
J. Alonso Herreros, J. Olmo, P.H.T.G. Pharmacothecnology Group from Spanish 
Society of Hospital Pharmacy
1Hospital Universitario Reina Sofia, Pharmacy, Murcia, Spain; 2Spanish Society of 
Hospital Pharmacy, Pharmacy, Madrid, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.86
Background The Spanish law indicates that sterile prepara-
tions technicians must have a minimum level of education. 
However, the requirements demanded by the USP are stricter 
than Spanish law, and, in some ways, stricter than GMP.
Purpose To evaluate the level of training of sterile prepara-
tions technicians in Spanish pharmacy services, and compare 
with the requirements of the USP. Second, to evaluate the level 
of implementation of other measures assumed by the USP.
Materials and methods The authors conducted a telephone 
survey with 15 multiple choice questions on the type of hospi-
tal, staff responsible for the different preparations (parenteral 
nutrition (PN), cytostatics (CIT), intravenous mixtures (IVMs), 
other sterile products (SPs) etc.). The type of training required of 
personnel to handle these products was investigated. In addition 
environmental monitoring was evaluated and operator aseptic 
technique was validated microbiologically. The hospitals sur-
veyed were selected choosing at least one hospital with over 500 
beds, and one of fewer than 500 beds from each region.
Results 31 hospitals responded to the survey (three of <100 
beds, nine of 100–200 beds, 10 of 200–500 beds, eight of 500–
1000 beds, and 1>1000 beds). In most, sterile preparation was 
performed by nurses (55% of hospitals with PN, 71% hospi-
tals with CIT, 48% hospitals with IVM and 41% of other SPs). 
The experience of staff assigned to the preparation of sterile 
products was in all cases greater than 6 months. Only eight 
hospitals (26%) had an initial training plan. Other aspects cov-
ered by the USP, such as environmental control and microbio-
logical control, were performed by 86% of hospitals surveyed. 
However the aseptic technique was only validated in three 
hospitals
Conclusions Nurses with more than 6 months experience are 
responsible for handling sterile preparations in most pharmacy 
services in Spanish hospitals. The majority of pharmacy ser-
vices performed microbiological and environmental monitor-
ing on the fi nished products. However, other aspects related 
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   117
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   117
3/9/2012   12:26:36 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:36 PM
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
118
to the quality of preparation and patient safety such as the 
accreditation of operator aseptic technique, were almost negli-
gible, which is a clear opportunity for improvement.
Competing interests None.
GRP087
CHANGE OF DOSE OF LENALIDOMIDE IN RELATION 
TO RENAL FUNCTION: FOLLOWING THE SPC
V. Ortoll-Polo, R. Rodriguez-Carrero, I. Zapico, P. Puente 1Hospital San Agustin, 
Hospital Pharmacy, Aviles, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.87
Background Lenalidomide was authorised in 2007 by EMA 
for treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) and is also used for 
myelodysplastic syndrome (MS) off label. Since lenalidomide 
is mainly excreted through the urine, renal function monitor-
ing and dose adjustments are required in renal impairment.
Purpose To evaluate modifi cations in the renal function (RF) 
in patients with MM and MS and to assess lenalidomide dose 
modifi cations in relation to changes in renal clearance as rec-
ommended in the summary of product characteristics (SPC).
Materials and methods Observational retrospective study 
of treatments started in the period between May 2008 and 
September 2010. RF was classed in four groups: normal (NRF, 
ClCr: >50 ml/min), moderate worsening (MWRF, ClCr=30–50 
ml/min), serious worsening (SWRF, ClCr<30 ml/min without 
dialysis) and terminal (TRF, ClCr <30 ml/min with dialysis). 
The lenalidomide SPC recommends dose modifi cations for the 
three latter classes.
Results Sixteen patients were found, 14 treated for MM and 
2 MS. Male/female ratio was 1:1 and median age 68.3 years 
(CI 95% 63.1 to 73.4). A total of 98 cycles were administrated, 
with a median of six cycles per patient (2–21). Renal function 
was normal in 40 patient cycles, but dose modifi cations were 
made in 36.3% due to other adverse effects. Renal function 
was moderately worse in 49 cycles; dose reduction and spac-
ing out were the most frequent adjustments made (18.4% each 
one), and no modifi cation was made in 53.1% of cycles. TRF 
appeared in eight cycles, no adjustment was made in three, 
the dose was reduced and the interval increased in two (as 
the SPC recommends) and other modifi cations were made in 
three. Dialysis was not needed in any case.
Conclusions As renal damage is often present in multiple 
myeloma patients (most of our study population), it is vital 
to monitor kidney function to adjust doses of renally-cleared 
drugs such as lenalidomide. Despite this, half of the doses that 
might have been adjusted, were not modifi ed. This would be 
a potential intervention point for the hospital pharmacist, in 
order to improve patient safety.
Competing interests None.
GRP088
A PHARMACOVIGILANCE PROJECT IN ‘SAN 
GIOVANNI DI DIO E RUGGI D’ARAGONA’ – SALERNO 
UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL (ITALY): HOSPITAL 
PHARMACIST IN DEPARTMENT INCREASES 
PHARMACOVIGILANCE ACTIVITY
N. Ciociano, F.A. Aliberti, L. Grisi, M.G. Elberti, M. Alfieri, M. Pacillo, F. Romano, G.M. 
Lombardi 1Università degli Studi di Salerno, Scuola di Specializzazione in Farmacia 
Ospedaliera, Fisciano (Salerno), Italy; 2Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria ‘S.Giovanni 
di Dio e Ruggi d’Aragona’, Farmacia Interna, Salerno, Italy
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.88
Background ‘MEREAFaPS Project’ is a pharmacovigilance 
project started in Italy in 2006 with the aim of introduce 
pharmacists in Emergency Division to collect data on adverse 
drug reactions (ADR) admissions. In April 2010, Salerno 
University Hospital joined ‘MEREAFaPS Project’: a pharmacist 
reports and supports physician to indentify ADR in Emergency 
Division.
Purpose The aim of the study is to know if the presence of 
pharmacist in a department contributes to increase quality 
and quantity of pharmacovigilance activity.
Materials and methods ADR report forms made in the fi rst 
9 months of the project (April-December 2010) were analysed. 
Some key principles of them were collected: sex; suspected 
drug which caused reaction and other drugs took in associa-
tion; description of ADR and their classifi cation in severe, non-
severe, life-threatening. They were compared with ADR data 
of 2009. Results 86 forms were analysed, each related to one 
different patient: 58 patients were woman (67%). 47% of the 
events were connected to antibiotics, as amoxicillin/clavulanic 
acid (16 cases), penicillin (13 cases), cephalosporins (11 cases); 
35% interested anti-infl ammatory as nimesulide (21% of these), 
propionic acid derivatives (21%), acetylsalicylic acid (14%), 
ketorolac (11%), steroidal anti-infl ammatory (7%). 48 patients 
didn’t take other drugs, but 38 took another one. Skin reactions 
were 49% of events, while 12% were cardiovascular events, 
12% gastrointestinal problems, and 10% were respiratory reac-
tions. ADR not severe were 72%; 28% were severe and 1 case 
life-threatening. Before the project, in 2009 there was only one 
ADR report; zero in period January–March 2010.
Conclusions It is evident that the presence of pharmacist in 
emergency division is an useful tool to increase the number 
of ADR reports: data confi rms that a pharmacist who sup-
ports medical staff to signalling ADR should be operative in 
all hospital departments. However it is necessary an additional 
analysis on drugs dosages, cases that took another drugs, and 
their correlation with ADR.
Competing interests None.
GRP089
TIGECYCLINE PRESCRIBING IN SALERNO UNIVERSITY 
HOSPITAL: SPECIAL FORMS AND MONITORING 
PREVENT INAPPROPRIATE USE
N. Ciociano, M. Pacillo, F. Romano, M. Alfieri, G.M. Lombardi, M.G. Elberti, L. 
Grisi 1Università degli Studi di Salerno, Scuola di Specializzazione in Farmacia 
Ospedaliera, Fisciano (Salerno), Italy; 2Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria ‘S.Giovanni 
di Dio e Ruggi d’Aragona’, Farmacia Interna, Salerno, Italy
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.89
Background Antibiotic resistance is an emerging and alarm-
ing problem in the European Union, considering the high clin-
ical and socio-economic costs, and confi rms the widespread 
inappropriate use of antibiotics. Tigecycline is a semisynthetic 
glycylcycline bacteriostatic that received approval for the 
treatment of skin, soft-tissue and intra-abdominal infections. 
Tigecycline operates by binding the bacterial 30S ribosomal 
subunit and it is highly active against a wide range of clinically 
important Gram-positive and Gram-negative aerobic bacteria 
and anaerobes.
Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate tigecycline 
prescribing in Salerno University Hospital by analysis of the 
special forms introduced in 2010 to limit the inappropriate use 
of this antibiotic.
Materials and methods The hospital pharmacy supplies tige-
cycline on receipt of a completed antibiotic monitoring form. 
Forms from 2010 were retrospectively assessed for appropri-
ate prescribing, adherence to permitted indications and length 
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   118
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   118
3/9/2012   12:26:36 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:36 PM
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
119
of treatment. The monitoring form contains patient details in 
one section and another part relates to diagnosis, site of the 
infection and the main reason for tigecycline use. A discus-
sion with a microbiologist or infectious diseases physician is 
required when tigecycline is not prescribed for its permitted 
indications. The 2010 data were compared with data from 
2009, when a non-specifi c antibiotic form was used.
Results A total of 220 requests were received in 2010. Intensive 
care unit (38%), infectious diseases unit (21%), general surgery 
division (10%) and emergency surgery division (20%) made the 
highest number of requests for tigecycline; 11 were incomplete. 
Many gaps (20%) were observed in the diagnosis and period of 
treatment fi elds. A pharmacist discussed the off-label use of 
tigecycline with a microbiologist in seven cases. These results, 
compared with the 2009 data, showed a general reduction of 
30% in inappropriate requests for, and use of, tigecycline.
Conclusions A tigecycline-specifi c form is an effective tool of 
clinical governance with which hospital pharmacists can con-
trol and decrease the risk of inappropriate antibiotic treatment 
and development of resistance. The reduction in inappropriate 
requests confi rms this, but the gaps in diagnosis and length 
of treatment data suggest physicians need more education on 
the correct use of the form. Moreover this monitoring form 
could contribute to containing the pharmaceutical costs and it 
should be extended to other expensive drugs used inappropri-
ately in the hospital.
Competing interests None.
GRP090
THERAPEUTIC TARGET IN PATIENTS WITH 
DEMENTIA†
M. Priegue, C. Pardo, M. Hernandez, P. Mas 1Fundacion Hospital Asil de Granollers, 
Pharmacy, Granollers, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.90
Background In order to reach reasonable therapeutic objec-
tives among geriatric patients, the proper use of the Beers and 
STOPP-START criteria should be maximised.
Purpose To evaluate optimisation of the use of medicines in 
patients prescribed antidementia drugs.
Materials and methods The study population included patients 
who had been diagnosed with dementia, which was defi ned 
as patients prescribed ATC N06D medicines. Outpatient phar-
macological hospital profi les were reviewed at the time of 
admission to identify patients who might benefi t from patient-
centred interventions. Clinical judgement was used to detect 
potentially inappropriate prescriptions among these patients.
Results Over 1 year (2010), 93 individuals (average age 
81.9±3.8 years) were evaluated and prescribed a mean of 
8.7±3.7 medicines. Antidementia medicines were documented 
as follows: 33 (35%) patients were prescribed galantamine, 31 
(32%) memantine, 16 (17%) rivastigmine and 15 (16%) done-
pezil. Eight patients were given memantine in addition to one 
of the others. In practice, patients with advanced disease are 
often prescribed additional medicines. In this study, 39 (42%) 
were prescribed neuroleptics, 45 (48%) antidepressants and 44 
(47%) anxiolytics. All three classes were used in combination 
in 6 (6%) patients, and 17 (18%) were prescribed a two-drug 
combination of either anxiolytic/antidepressant or anxiolytic/
neuroleptic. Four patients in our study were identifi ed as candi-
dates for changing the antidepressant treatment to drugs with a 
lower anticholinergic potential. Lipid-lowering medicines were 
prescribed in 32 (34%) patients. This class of drugs may not 
be warranted for patients diagnosed with dementia, as long-
term benefi t has not been fully demonstrated. Additionally, fi ve 
patients were prescribed medicines from the N06BX nootrop-
ics and C04AE ergot alkaloids ATC classifi cation; there is have 
little evidence to support the use of these drugs.
Conclusions By increasing access to therapeutic resources, 
providers can improve medicines selection and monitoring in 
patients with complex disease states. As this study demon-
strates, future focus is warranted to improve the care of patients 
with dementia by identifying therapy optimisation strategies.
Competing interests None.
GRP091
PROTOCOL FOR THE CONTROL AND RATIONALISATION 
OF THE USE OF ALBUMIN IN AVELLINO
G. Valentino, P.E. Di Blasi, S. Monaco, L. Giannelli 1A.O.S.G. Moscati, Farmacia, 
Avellino, Italy
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.91
Background Albumin is an essential plasma protein for the 
regulation of the oncotic pressure. The huge divide between 
scientifi c theory and its clinical application has repeatedly lim-
ited the control and the effort to rationalise its use. In 2009, our 
hospital board established a private operational unit of control 
(N.O.C.), which aimed to regulate prescribing. The evaluation 
of the appropriateness of the use of albumin produced results 
that highlighted its inappropriate use. The initial analysis 
showed that 80% of the prescriptions were incorrect and 30% 
mentioned an incorrect ‘indication’.
Purpose To establish a pathway rationalising the use of albu-
min in order to spread awareness of the correct use of such a 
precious substance and reduce its inappropriate use.
Materials and methods The fi rst part of our research evalu-
ated the use of albumin to the extent where the authors could 
emphasise its inappropriateness. In the second stage of our 
research The authors analysed several scientifi c publications 
and, in collaboration with N.O.C.’s clinics and members, the 
authors developed a protocol to guide the correct use of albu-
min. Consequently, The authors also produced a system for 
requesting human albumin that helps the clinician in charge 
to choose more appropriate indications.
Results Since this new model has been introduced, the use of 
albumin has decreased and its off-label use has been sharply 
reduced. In 2009, about 80% of 4000 prescriptions contained 
errors. In particular, 30% of the total prescriptions were off-
label for their indication, while 24% did not report for the val-
ues of albumin required for the calculation of the administered 
dose. However in 2010 only 10% of the requests had an off-
label indication.
Conclusions The new model produced by the hospital board 
in Azienda Ospedaliera San Giuseppe Moscati, Avellino has 
successfully abolished the off-label use of albumin and ratio-
nalised its use.
Competing interests None.
GRP092
DRUG POISONING: A REASON FOR CARE IN A 
HOSPITAL EMERGENCIES UNIT
I. Larrodé, J.M. Real, C. Garcés, Y. Alonso, J. Povar, M.R. Abad-Sazatornil 1Miguel 
Servet Hospital, Pharmacy, Zaragoza, Spain; 2Miguel Servet Hospital, Emergency, 
Zaragoza, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.92
Background Intoxication by drugs requires often quick atten-
tion in the emergency department (ED), so an antidote kit to 
combat drug intoxication would be helpful.
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   119
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   119
3/9/2012   12:26:37 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:37 PM
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
120
Purpose To analyse intoxication by drugs treated in the emer-
gency department as a preliminary step to making up an anti-
dote kit.
Materials and methods All patients treated in ED for drug 
intoxication in a Spanish hospital were included, from January 
to June 2010. Data collected were: sex, age, cause, measures, 
days of stay in ED, admission, ward, duration of admission, 
complications.
Results Data from 137 patients were analysed, 79 females 
(57.7%), median (minimum-maximum) age was 37 (92–0) 
years. 77 patients (56.2%) were intoxicated by drugs affect-
ing the central nervous system, 19 (13.9%) by analgesic/
anti-infl ammatory drugs, 11 (8.0%) by cardiovascular system 
drugs, 5 (3.6%) by systemic endocrine drugs and the drug(s) 
involved were unknown in 21 (15.3%) of cases. In 20.4% the 
intoxication was due to several drugs. 65.0% needed drug-
specifi c treatment. Gastric lavage was necessary in 29.9%. In 
addition, activated charcoal was administered in 32.1%, fl u-
mazenil in 25.5%, naloxone in 4.4% and N-acetylcysteine in 
4.4%. Other drugs used were norepinephrine, digoxin-specifi c 
antibody (Fab) fragments, a potassium chelator, antiemetics, 
blood coagulation factors and anticholinergics. The median 
stay in ED was 1 (0–2) day. 27 patients (19.7%) were admitted 
and 2 (1.5%) requested voluntary discharge. Of the inpatients, 
26.9% were to the psychiatry ward, 19.2% to the critical care 
unit, cardiology and internal medicine wards, and 15.4% to the 
paediatric ward. The stay in hospital was 6 (17–0) days. Seven 
patients had complications related to intoxication (three acute 
kidney injury, two rhabdomyolysis, two aspiration pneumo-
nia) but none of them died.
Conclusions The analysis of intoxications treated in ED 
will guide the contents of the antidote kit. It is important to 
increase the control of drugs that affect the central nervous 
system.
Competing interests None.
GRP093
IMPLEMENTATION OF A PHARMACEUTICAL CARE 
PROCESS IN PATIENTS WITH ANAEMIA AND 
CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE IN TREATMENT WITH 
ERYTHROPOIESIS STIMULATING FACTORS
M. Noguerol Cal, B.C. López Virtanen, J.A. Valdueza Beneitez, B. De la Nogal 
Fernández, S. Vázquez Troche, M. Rodríguez María, M.T. Sanz Lafuente, M. Oliveira 
Solís, A.D. López Villar, P. Cuevas Martínez 1Hospital el Bierzo, Pharmacy Hospital, 
Ponferrada, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.93
Background The authors have implemented a process of 
pharmaceutical care in the pharmacy hospital in patients with 
anaemia and chronic kidney disease in predialysis patients in 
treatment with erythropoiesis stimulating factors (ESF), due 
to ongoing safety reviews and reports published in the last 
years.
Purpose Assessing the follow-up of the pharmacy care 
process.
GRP093 Table 1
Year
2009
2010
Number of patients (Nºp.)
100
79
Nºp. insuffi cient monitoring of clinical information
31 (31%)
17 (21,5%)
Number of interventions
72
24
Accepted
86% (62)
33% (8)
Rejected
14% (10)
67%(16)
Effective treatment
20
39
GRP093 Table 2
Reasons for intervenning
Number of 
interventions/year
Recommendations
2009
2010
Hb increases more than 
2 g/dl in 4 weeks
9
1
Changing dose or frequency of 
ESF administration
Hb>12†
29
8
Hb≥13†
0
3
Discontinuing drug, for safety
Hb<11† to high doses*
34
8
Discontinuing, ineffi ciency
Beginnings treatment Hb>10† †  0
4
Not beginning
*Epoetin α doses>300 units/kg/week or darbepoetin α>1, 5 µg/kg/week.
†Hb levels (g/dl).
Materials and methods The authors have put in place two 
transverse courts for 7 months in 2009 and 2010, including 
100% of sensitive patients. The information was recorded in 
the Dispensation of Silicon (Grifols) Program. If haemoglobin 
(Hb) levels were maintained between 10 and 12 g/dl, treatment 
was considered to be effective.
Results
Conclusions A decrease in the number of patients treated 
with ESF and the need of interventions was observed. 
Accepted interventions were fewer also, probably due to an 
increase in awareness when complying with the recommenda-
tions, motivated by the follow-up. It was showed that medical 
checks were not too close, involving an insuffi cient monitoring 
of clinical data and diffi culty to establish the effectiveness of 
many treatments. This data will be reported to nephrology 
department in order to implement possible solutions.
Competing interests None.
GRP094
PREVENTION OF MEDICATION ERRORS: AN 
OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
N. El Hilali, R. Garcia-Penche, A. Escudero, I. Javier, N. Pi, E. Ramió, M. Aguas, B. 
Eguileor 1Hospital Universitari Sagrat Cor, Pharmacy, Barcelona, Spain; 2Hospital 
Universitari Sagrat Cor, Nurse Infections Dpt, Barcelona, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.94
Background Medication errors represent an important prob-
lem of patient safety and have consequences on healthcare ser-
vices. The authors used an observational national multicentre 
study to monitor the medicines use process in wards as a tool 
to control and to prevent these incidents.
Purpose To improve the medicines use process in our tertiary 
hospital.
Materials and methods The authors fi rst conducted a pre-
study to estimate the rate of medication errors in our hospital. 
In the light of this rate the authors calculated the number of 
observations required to obtain a representative sample of the 
population studied. At the same time, The authors checked 
the prescription validation process in the pharmacy as well as 
the initial process for prescribing medicines. Then during the 
months of April–September 2011, the authors performed a pro-
spective, observational, not-disguised study using the modifi ed 
Barker–McConnell method. The authors observed nurses from 
when they were preparing patient medicines until administra-
tion in the patient’s room to detect opportunities for error. The 
study included all the wards open during this period. Each drug 
administered to a patient was reported as an observation. Thus, 
The authors evaluated the complete medicines use process.
Results The authors performed 1167 observations in 297 patients 
(52.2% were women). The mean age was 72.1 (SD 15.4) (ranges 
17–98). 34.1% of patients were over the age of 80. The error rate 
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   120
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   120
3/9/2012   12:26:37 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:37 PM
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
121
was 14.8% (173 errors/1167 observations). The distribution of 
173 medication errors detected was as follows: 45.1% omission, 
19.6% time error, 8.6% wrong method or administration rate, 
6.4% drug not prescribed, 5.7% incorrect dosage (less), 5.2% no 
nurse checking, 2.3% prescription error and 7.1% others. The 
most frequently omitted group of drugs was analgesics.
Conclusions The observational method used to monitor drug 
administration by nurses revealed itself as a good system to 
study the present state of the medicines use process in the hos-
pital. It helped to identify weak points in the process which 
should be modifi ed and establish strategies for preventing 
medication errors and improving patient safety.
Competing interests None.
GRP095
ADHERENCE TO CAPECITABINE CHEMOTHERAPY
T. Gramage Caro, E. Delgado Silveira, M.A. Rodríguez Sagrado, M. Sánchez Cuervo, I. 
Cuesta López, T. Bermejo Vicedo 1Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Pharmacy, Madrid, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.95
Background Hospital pharmacy departments in Madrid have 
been required to dispense capecitabine since February 2011 and it 
represents 38% of prescriptions of oral chemotherapeutics at our 
hospital. Monitoring adherence may help to prevent treatment 
failure, avoid adverse effects and reduce the resulting costs.
Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate adherence to 
capecitabine.
Materials and methods Prospective observational study, 
conducted between July and September 2011 in the outpatient 
unit of a hospital pharmacy department. 30 patients treated 
with capecitabine, either as monotherapy or in combination 
with other chemotherapeutic agents, were randomly selected. 
Each patient was followed up for 2 to 3 months through con-
secutive interviews. Data recorded: personal details (age, 
gender, marital status, educational background, occupation), 
disease variables (tumour type, ECOG performance status, 
disease onset, concomitant illness), treatment issues (type of 
treatment, line of chemotherapy, pill burden, duration of treat-
ment, side effects) and drug adherence parameters. A patient 
was considered to be adherent to treatment if an overall per-
centage adherence ≥95% was achieved by three indirect meth-
ods (dispensing records, pill count and a validated adherence 
questionnaire (Morinsky–Green test)).
Results 30 patients were included (mean age 65.3 years, 73% 
men). 50 interviews were conducted (1.7 interviews/patient). 
Principal medical diagnosis: colon tumours (43%), rectum 
tumours (27%) and breast cancer (17%). Median pill burden 
was 9.6 tablets/day (4.8 tablets/dose). Side effects were detected 
in 26 interviews, 50% of them were hand-foot syndrome. 
Two patients required dose adjustment as a result. Overall, 28 
patients (93%) were considered to be adherent. Two patients 
(7%) reported some kind of compliance error in one of their 
interviews. Reasons for non-compliance were forgetting to 
take treatment and side effects.
Conclusions Adherence to capecitabine in clinical practice is 
high, despite a high pill burden.
Competing interests None.
GRP096
ACCUMULATION OF DRUGS IN THE HOME MEDICINES 
CABINETS OF POLYMEDICATED PATIENTS OVER 
64 YEARS OLD
M. Gallego Galisteo, B. Marmesat Rodas, F. Téllez Pérez, E. Márquez Fernández, 
J.R. Ávila Álvarez, E. Campos Dávila 1AGS Campo de Gibraltar, Farmacia, Algeciras, 
Spain; 2Hospital SAS La Línea, Medicina Interna, La Línea de la Concepción, Spain; 
3Hospital SAS La Linea, Farmacia, La Línea de la Concepción, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.96
Background The accumulation of drugs can cause errors in 
taking the medicines and an unnecessary increase in health 
expenditure.
Purpose To quantify the accumulation of drugs in the home 
medicines cabinets of polymedicated patients aged over 64 
and to assess the associated factors.
Materials and methods Cross-sectional study of polymedi-
cated patients (≥6 medicines in their usual treatment) over the 
age of 64 admitted to the internal medicine ward in the period 
from March to July 2011. The authors reviewed the electronic 
medical record prior to admission, hospital discharge reports 
and active treatment. Furthermore, The authors interviewed 
the patient, family and/or care giver to confi rm their chronic 
treatment as well as reviewing the contents of the medicines 
cabinet in a home visit. The authors considered the patient 
was accumulating medicines when The authors found either 
more than one container of at least 3 different drugs or more 
than 3 containers of the same drug.
Results Of the 52 patients enrolled in the current study, 
48.1% accumulated medicines in the home medicines cabinet. 
Of these, 28.0% accumulated between 3 and 6 drugs, 8.0% 
between 7 and 9 drugs, 36.0% between 10 and 14 drugs and 
28.0% were stockpiling over 14 drugs. In a deeper analysis of 
the factors that could affect drug accumulation, it was observed 
that 53.8% of women stockpiled medicines at home compared 
to 42.3% of men. Distribution by age of those who stockpiled 
medicines was 30% of 65–70 year-olds, 50.0% of 71–75 year-
olds, 41.7% of 76–80 year-olds, 81.8% of 81–85 year-olds and 
20.0% in the population aged over 85.
Conclusions
Almost half of the polymedicated patients together accumu-
lated over 64 medicines in their home medicines cabinets.
Females had a greater tendency to do this.
There was a trend to patients stockpiling drugs in line with 
their age. However, accumulation peaked at 81–85 years old.
Competing interests None.
GRP097
RECONCILIATION OF DISCREPANCIES FOUND IN 
HOME TREATMENT OF POLYMEDICATED PATIENTS 
OVER 64 YEARS OF AGE
M. Gallego Galisteo, B. Marmesat Rodas, F. Téllez Pérez, J.J. Ramos Báez, J.C. 
Roldán Morales, M.P. Quesada Sanz 1AGS Campo de Gibraltar, Farmacia, Algeciras, 
Spain; 2Hospital SAS La Línea, Medicina Interna, La Línea de la Concepción, Spain; 
3Hospital SAS La Línea, Farmacia, La Línea de la Concepción, Spain; 4Hospital Punta 
Europa, Farmacia, Algeciras, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.97
Background Reconciliation of discrepancies in the patient’s 
treatment may improve the quality of healthcare in a popula-
tion susceptible to drug errors.
Purpose To analyse differences detected in home treatment 
after hospital discharge for polymedicated patients (typically 
≥6 drugs in their treatment) over 64 years of age.
Materials and methods Cross-sectional study of patients 
undergoing treatment, over 64 years of age, admitted to the 
internal medicine ward in the period March to July of 2011. The 
authors reviewed the medicines documented in the electronic 
medical records prior to admission, on discharge as well as on 
the day of home visits (at least 3 weeks after discharge). During 
the visits, the patient, family and/or carer were interviewed in 
order to fi nd out the patient’s current medicines and to detect 
possible discrepancies. Discrepancies were considered to be 
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   121
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   121
3/9/2012   12:26:37 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:37 PM
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested