asp.net web api 2 for mvc developers pdf : Combine pdf online software Library dll windows asp.net wpf web forms Milan%20EJHP%20abstract%20book7-part1615

Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
132
Purpose As the service shall be extended, the need for it and 
the number of potential preparations have to be assessed.
Materials and methods Over three months all intravenous 
medicines that were prepared in 50 ml syringes by nurses on 
three intensive care units (anaesthesiology, medical, paediat-
ric ICU) were recorded. The assessment on the neonatal ICU 
was stopped since medicines there are not standardised. All 
intravenous medicines were checked for the right solvent and 
a literature search was performed on the stability of the drugs 
in plastic syringes. Nurses were asked if they would appreciate 
such a service.
Results Nearly 15,000 intravenous preparations were 
recorded. The most commonly used drugs were midazolam, 
morphine, clonidine, norepinephrine, heparin and insulin. 
The prospect of these preparations being provided by the 
pharmacy was welcomed by the ICU staff, but these numbers 
would result in 250 syringes being prepared per day (working 
Monday to Friday), which is not realistic because the staff of 
the INTRAVENOUS service will probably consist of only one 
pharmacist working a maximum of 4 h daily. To cut down the 
number of preparations a risk analysis was made. According 
to the literature most intravenous medication errors on wards 
occur with drugs being diluted. If these solutions only were 
provided by the pharmacy (55% of the recorded preparations), 
there would be 140 preparations per day. Literature research 
showed that solutions of these drugs are stable for a least a 
couple of days, so syringes could be prefi lled and stored.
Conclusions Due to the lack of staff it might be possible to 
implement CIVAS by preparing high-risk intravenous ICU 
drugs only. Pharmaco-economic considerations will follow.
Competing interests None.
GRP125
TOXIC DEATH-CASE AFTER CAPECITABINE 
ADMINISTRATION: CASE REPORT AND IMPLICATION 
OF DIHYDROPYRIMIDINE DESHYDROGENASE 
DEFICIENCY
A.R. Rubio Salvador, J.I. Chacón López-Muñiz, L.J. López Gómez, J. Medina 
Martínez, J.M. Martínez Sesmero, P. Moya Gómez, M.A. Cruz Mora 1Hospital Virgen 
de la Salud, Pharmacy, Toledo, Spain; 2Hospital Virgen de la Salud, Oncology, Toledo, 
Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.125
Background Capecitabine is an anticancer agent, pro drug 
of 5 fl uorouracil (5-FU) administered orally and with a nar-
row therapeutic index, licensed for the treatment of breast and 
gastrointestinal cancers. 5-FU is metabolised by dihydopyri-
mydine dehydrogenase (DPD). Patients with a DPD defi ciency 
can experience severe toxicity of 5-FU.
Purpose To evaluate if DPD defi ciency investigations were 
positive for patients who presented severe toxicity following 
capecitabine administration.
Materials and methods Electronic medical record review 
(chemotherapy prescription database ONCOBASS®) for toxic 
death-cases after capecitabine administration to investigate 
results for DPD defi ciency test.
Results The authors identifi ed three toxic death-cases after 
capecitabine administration. Case 1: 77-year-old man diag-
nosed in Sep 2008 with colorectal cancer with indication of 
neoadjuvant chemotherapy who presented signs of major tox-
icity (grade 4 neutropenia, grade 4 thrombocytopenia, grade 
4 mucositis and encephalopathy) two days after capecitabine 
initiation. After been tested for DPD defi ciency, the result was 
negative. Case 2: 67-year-old woman diagnosed in Sep 2006 
with bilateral breast cancer. She received adjuvant therapy for 
six courses and radiotherapy, which resulted in good response 
with a patient being without treatment until Dec 2008, when 
she presented relapse and initiated a course of chemotherapy 
based on capecitabine. After two courses, the patient suffered 
signs of severe toxicity (Grade 4 neutropenia, Grade 3 throm-
bocytopenia, Grade 3 mucositis). The test for DPD defi ciency 
showed that the patient was heterozygous for a mutant DPD 
allele. Case 3: 78-year-old woman diagnosed in Dec 2008 with 
metastatic colorectal cancer. She received the fi rst course of 
Capecitabine and oxaliplatin (XELOX) as fi rst-line treatment. 
Nine days after capecitabine initiation she presented Grade 2 
diarrhoea, Grade 3 mucositis, neutropenia and thrombocy-
topenia). Investigations showed that she had DPD defi ciency.
Conclusions DPD defi ciency was tested in all patients with 
toxic death after capecitabine administration. Pharmacists have 
an important role in prospective identifi cation of potentially 
toxic patients in order to reduce the number of patients with 
severe, life-threatening side effects to capecitabine treatment.
Competing interests None.
GRP126
WEB 2.0 IN THE HOSPITAL PHARMACY
J.F. Rangel-Mayoral, S. Martín-Clavo, P. Gemio-Zumalave, L. Romero-Soria, L. Braga-
Fuentes, L. Bravo García-Cuevas 1Hospital Infanta Cristina, Hospital Pharmacy, 
Badajoz, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.126
Background The term Web 2.0 is associated with web aplica-
tions that facilitate information sharing, user-centred design, 
interoperability and using the World Wide Web as a collabo-
ration tool. Information Technology helps to establish effec-
tive communication systems to facilitate the work in hospital 
pharmacy environments.
Purpose Describe the application of Web 2.0 for the hospi-
tal pharmacy to improve communication in a decentralised 
University Hospital.
Materials and methods The communication was diffi cult 
and often ineffective until the implementation of Web 2.0 
technologies within a hospital pharmacy, with 3 separate 
hospitals for more than 4 km. The authors established a 
strategy for improving the quality of communication using 
online tools: Google groups, Google Sites, Twitter and 
Facebook.
Results The authors performed 2 Google groups with 
restricted access for group communication: one for the 
Pharmacy Department (PDGG) and another specifi cally for 
Clinical Pharmacists (CPGG). The PDGG is used for any 
common notice and the CPGG was to discuss and report on 
technical issues (including the guard pass the day before). A 
total of 963 posts in the period October 2008 to October 2011. 
Also created two Websites with restricted access where there 
are common sections (secretary of service and quality) and 
others specifi c. Thus, in the Pharmacy Department Website, 
the sections were: welcoming new staff, teaching, standard 
operating protocols; and in the Clinical Pharmacy Website: 
Commissions and Committees, Evaluation and selection of 
drugs, Clinical Pharmacy, Drug Information, Drug Safety and 
Research. Facebook and Twitter have also been recently incor-
porated as an additional communication tool.
Conclusions The results show that the Web 2.0 is a suitable 
tool for collaborative work. This system allows the exchange 
of relevant information between the Pharmacy Service Staff 
safely and effectively.
Competing interests None.
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   132
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   132
3/9/2012   12:26:40 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:40 PM
Combine pdf online - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
best pdf combiner; add pdf files together online
Combine pdf online - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
batch pdf merger; break pdf into multiple files
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
133
GRP127
MONITORING OF PHARMACEUTICAL CARE HEPATITIS 
C PROGRAM (2007-2011)
J.M. Rodríguez Camacho, V. Vázquez Vela, M.J. Huertas Fernández, M.V. Manzano 
Martín, M.J. Martínez Bautista, L. Obel Gil 1H.U. Puerta del Mar, Farmacia, Cádiz, 
Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.127
Background Pharmaceutical care(PC) is the responsible pro-
vision of drug therapy for the purpose of achieving defi nite 
outcomes that improve a patient’s quality of life.
Purpose To analyse the results of a PC program in patients 
who are infected with the virus of hepatitis C(HCV).
Materials and Methods Period of study: April 2007-October 
2011. It was aimed to prevent, detect and resolve medication-
related problems (MRPs) in HCV patients. Phases: First visit: 
Prescription validation, medical history revision and elabora-
tion of patient medical record. The authors inform patients 
about adverse reactions, interactions and healthy lifestyle hab-
its. The authors stress the importance of treatment compliance 
in order to obtain a sustained viral response and how to mini-
mise the side effects. Subsequent visits: Personalised monitor-
ing, detection of MRPs and Pharmaceutical Intervention (PI). 
The authors establish visiting hours and evaluate the adher-
ence to the pharmacotheraphy. The adherence calculation 
is done through dispensing registers. The adherent patient 
endorses the rule 80/80/80:80% of interferon (IFN), ribavirin 
(RBV) doses and 80% of the treatment time in relation to the 
genotype.
Results 542 interviews were done in 365 patients under IFN 
and RBV treatment: oral information 67.16% and both oral and 
written 32.84%. Face to face interviews 90.22% and telephone 
ones 9.41%. 27.86% to start the treatment, 69.74% during the 
treatment, 0.55% by treatment change, 1.66% possible inter-
action and others 0.18%. Counselling reasons (227), the most 
frequent were: tiredness 15.86%, mental disorders 11,89%, 
reaction at the injection site 8.81%, gastrointestinal discom-
fort 8.81%, pseudo-fl u syndrome 8.37%, insomnia 6.61% and 
pruritus 6.61%. 536 PI were accepted, with recommendations 
about healthy lifestyle habits and some pieces of advice on 
medication administration and handling side effects. In 45 
times, patients were referred to the specialist doctor.
Conclusions The majority of the patients applied for PC dur-
ing the pharmacotheraphy follow-up, above all, by side effects 
related to medication. The interviews with the patients rein-
force the information on their pharmacotheraphy in order to 
minimise side effects and resolve MRPs. The PC program in 
HCV patients helps to improve the safe use of medications and 
avoids unnecessary visits to the specialist doctor.
Competing interests None.
GRP128
THE IMPACT OF INTRODUCING OF CLINICAL WARD 
PHARMACY SERVICES†
L. Esposito, S. Faoro, F. Paganelli 1Istituto Oncologico Veneto (IOV), Pharmacy, 
Padova, Italy
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.128
Background The Health System evolution has led to a trans-
formation of roles and tasks traditionally assigned to the 
hospital pharmacist; he/she is now required to be an integral 
part of the healthcare team, in order to support both man-
aged treatment and patient safety. The Veneto Oncological 
Institute IRCCS (IOV) of Padua has been selected as one of 
the fi ve Italian centres of excellence in oncology taking part in 
the project sponsored by the Italian Ministry of Health (July 
2010–February 2011), aimed at evaluating the contribution 
made by the continuous presence of a pharmacist in an oncol-
ogy department. The monitoring and reporting of Near Misses 
was one of the outcome indicators of the project.
Purpose The aim of the project was to verify the contribution 
made by the pharmacist in the oncology department in Near 
Miss reporting.
Materials and methods A record of prescriptions (updated 
daily) was created to monitor all the following situations that 
could cause near misses:
Sending a non-agreed statim prescription – Diffi cult to read 
prescription
Incorrect date – Wrong dosage – Diagnosis not present or 
incomplete – Non-standardised prescription form
Each situation was evaluated in terms of risk. All high-risk pre-
scriptions associated with a near miss were recorded as non-
conforming to our Quality System.
Results A special register was established, in which the differ-
ent causes of near misses are recorded.
From the creation of the register (October 2010) to 15 February 
2011, 50 near misses were recorded classifi ed by event as 
follows:
sending a non-agreed statim prescription (17 cases)
diffi cult-to-read prescription (20 cases; an incident report-
ing form was completed for one of them)
wrong dosage (5 cases)
mixed up labels (1 case)
error in calculating the length of cycle (2 cases)
wrong prescription (2 cases)
wrong protocol used (3 cases: trastuzumab 2 mg/kg instead 
of trastuzumab 8 mg/kg)
Since November 1st 2011, prescribing has been computerised. 
The Oncosys medical record, after 18 months of validation, is 
the only prescribing system used at the moment in our hospi-
tal (IOV) for cancer treatment. Introducing the near-miss reg-
ister is still in progress so a comparative evaluation of pre and 
postcomputerisation data was not yet possible. At present a 
reduction in near misses of up to 60% has been recorded.
Conclusions The recorded cases of near misses have stimu-
lated the development of standardised protocols, computerisa-
tion of medical records and increased awareness of potential 
medicines errors in the physicians and other healthcare staff. 
The integration of department pharmacists in the multidisci-
plinary oncological staff signifi cantly contributes to patient 
safety, ensuring appropriate prescribing and reducing medical 
errors and adverse drug effects. Moreover, cooperation within a 
multidisciplinary team enabled the shared setting up of a fully 
computerised and safe system for diagnosis and treatment.
Competing interests None.
GRP129
MEDICINES RECONCILIATION IN HOSPITAL PATIENTS 
COORDINATED WITH PRIMARY CARE†
M. Salazar, M. Torne, M. Ferrit, M.A. Bonillo, M. Trabado, M.A. Calleja 1Hospital 
Universitario Virgen de las Nieves, Hospital Pharmacy, Granada, Spain; 2Centro de 
Salud Gran Capitan, Primary Care, Granada, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.129
Background In the literature the authors fi nd many types of 
reconciliation studies, only at admission, only at discharge or 
at discharge and later in primary care. The data on discrepan-
cies can vary depending on the professionals performing the 
reconciliation.
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   133
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   133
3/9/2012   12:26:40 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:40 PM
Online Merge PDF files. Best free online merge PDF tool.
Online Merge PDF, Multiple PDF files into one. Then press the button below and download your PDF. Also you can add more PDFs to combine them and merge them into
reader merge pdf; c# merge pdf files into one
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
Merge and Split Document(s). "This online guide content Splitting Application. This C#.NET PDF document merger to help .NET developers combine PDF document files
combine pdfs online; pdf combine pages
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
134
Purpose Our objective was to create a team made up of hospi-
tal pharmacists, liaison sisters and primary care physicians to 
identify and classify the discrepancies at hospital admission, 
during and after discharge in patients with the same primary 
health area.
Materials and methods The authors performed a prospec-
tive observational study in polymedicated patients admitted 
to hospital. Patients were interviewed by the pharmacist at 
admission and discrepancies with treatment found at admis-
sion and after discharge were recorded. The discrepancies that 
required clarifi cation (not justifi ed) were classifi ed depending 
on whether the drug had been withdrawn, added or modifi ed 
with no apparent clinical justifi cation regarding the patient’s 
usual treatment. All discrepancies were reviewed later by the 
primary care physicians.
Results 55 patients were recruited, 48 patients had their medi-
cines recorded at discharge but only 29 could be reviewed in 
primary care due to death or loss to follow-up. The patients 
took an average of 8 drugs, 669 drugs were recorded on admis-
sion and 480 at discharge. 31.84% (213) and 43.96% (211 drugs) 
of medicines required clarifi cation at the time of admission and 
discharge respectively. The largest number of drugs in which 
discrepancies were found at admission was in the benzodiaz-
epines group (17.58%) while it was proton pump inhibitors at 
discharge (16.09%).
Primary care disagreed with 4 (1.07%) of the discrepancies 
classifi ed by hospital pharmacists at admission and 2 (0.75%) 
of discrepancies classifi ed at discharge.
Conclusions It is necessary to implement measures in hospi-
tals to reduce the number of unjustifi ed discrepancies. These 
checks can be carried out by hospital pharmacists; reconcili-
ation should be coordinated with primary care for follow-up 
of patients.
Competing interests None.
GRP130
IMPLEMENTATION OF MEDICINES RECONCILIATION 
AT HOSPITAL ADMISSION†
L. González-García, S. Belda-Rustarazo, M.A. García-Lirola, C. Fernández-López, 
J. Cabeza-Barrera 1Hospital Universitario San Cecilio, Pharmacy, Granada, Spain; 
2Distrito Sanitario Granada, Pharmacy, Granada, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.130
Background Medicines reconciliation processes have success-
fully reduced drug errors and adverse drug events. In a recent 
project in the Traumatology ward of our hospital, 59.3% of the 
patients had at least one unintended medicines discrepancy. 
Based on this experience The authors decided to implement 
medicines reconciliation (MR).
Purpose To determine the number and type of pharmaceuti-
cal interventions performed after the implementation of the 
program.
Materials and methods A prospective study carried out 
between October 2010-October 2011 in a tertiary care 
teaching hospital. All patients admitted to surgical wards 
were included. The authors excluded those who could not be 
interviewed due to language problems and those who were 
admitted at the weekend. The methodology used in the MR 
process is the following: within the 24 h of the patient’s 
admission, the pharmacist obtains the preadmission chronic 
treatment by interviewing the patient or the patient’s family/
care giver, or from the patient’s medical chart and primary 
care records. This is compared with the treatment prescribed 
in hospital. All of the discrepancies detected (dose, regimen, 
route of administration or omission) are discussed with the 
attending physician to determine whether it was intended 
in accordance with the patient’s condition. If the discrep-
ancy is unintended, appropriate changes are made to the 
medicines.
Results Upon the implementation of MR, reconciliation was 
performed for a total of 1464 patients. The wards involved 
were: General Surgery (637), Traumatology (548), Urology 
(262) and Vascular Surgery (17). 1390 pharmaceutical interven-
tions were performed, the most frequent being substitution for 
therapeutic equivalent (34.4%), adjustment of dose for renal 
insuffi ciency (24%), change to oral route (9.9%), omission of 
medicine (7.5%) or duration of treatment (5.5%), among oth-
ers. The acceptance rate for our interventions was 91%.
Conclusions An MR system was developed with the aim of 
continuity of treatment at each transition of care and prevent-
ing medicines errors.
Competing interests None.
GRP131
EVALUATION OF A COMPUTERISED PHYSICIAN 
ORDER ENTRY SYSTEM
C. Hofer-Dückelmann, E. Prinz, W. Beindl, K. Berger, G. Fellhofer, J.S. Mutzenbach, 
J. Schuler 1Landesapotheke am St. Johanns Spital, Drug information, Salzburg, 
Austria; 2Salzburger Landeskliniken Private Paracelsus Medical University, Cardiology, 
Salzburg, Austria; 3Landesapotheke am St. Johanns Spital, Management, Salzburg, 
Austria; 4Christian-Doppler-Klinik Private Paracelsus Medical University, Neurology, 
Salzburg, Austria
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.131
Background In a study evaluating polypharmacy in a cohort 
of older internal-medicine patients in Austria, inappropriate 
prescribing and adverse drug events (ADEs) were highly preva-
lent. According to the literature, computerised physician order 
entry systems (CPOESs) improve medication safety.
Purpose To implement a CPOES and to evaluate its benefi t 
and acceptance.
Materials and methods A study group of 3 clinical phar-
macists, 2 cardiologists and a study nurse implemented and 
evaluated the Rp-Doc CPOES on two surgical, two internal 
and one neurological ward from November 2009 to April 2010. 
Depending on the ward, the support given by the study group 
in entering data into the system was organised differently. 
The acceptance of Rp-Doc by its users was evaluated by a 
questionnaire.
Results During the study period, 1259 patients were admit-
ted. The medication of 560 patients (44%) was documented 
and analysed by Rp-Doc. Depending on the support that was 
given, Rp-Doc was used more or less (28-65%). Rp-Doc identi-
fi ed potential drug-drug interactions, wrong doses, duplicated 
medicines, contraindications and inappropriate medicines. In 
a questionnaire returned by 18 users, the time that was needed 
to document the data was considered too long, the alert over-
kill concerning potential drug-drug interactions and the lack 
of recommendation of alternatives in case a drug was consid-
ered inappropriate were criticised. The information regarding 
dosing, contraindications and drug adjustment in renal failure 
was appreciated. The majority felt that the system increased 
their vigilance regarding drug-drug interactions (69%), ADEs 
(58%), prescribing in the older (50%) and awareness of cost 
(27%). There was a lack of personal computers, staff and time 
to really use the advantages of the CPOES.
Conclusions To implement a CPOES successfully, suffi cient 
professional support and adequate infrastructure are neces-
sary. Once implemented, it would improve medication safety 
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   134
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   134
3/9/2012   12:26:40 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:40 PM
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Also able to combine generated split PDF document files Advanced component for splitting PDF document in preview Free download library and use online C# class
c# combine pdf; all jpg to one pdf converter
VB.NET PDF: Use VB.NET Code to Merge and Split PDF Documents
Merge and Split Document(s). "This online guide content is destn As [String]) Implements PDFDocument.Combine End Sub. APIs for Splitting PDF document in VB Class
pdf combine files online; build pdf from multiple files
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
135
and help to identify those patients who are in greatest need of 
pharmaceutical care.
Competing interests None.
GRP132
SEVEN REASONS TO PROMOTE CIVAS-ASSEMBLED 
POINT-OF-CARE ACTIVATED SYSTEMS FOR 
INFUSION OF LABILE DRUGS INSTEAD OF ON-WARD 
TRADITIONAL SET METHODS
J. Douchamps, A. Bury, C. Sneessens, M. Courtois 1Charleroi University Hospital, 
Pharmacy, Montigny-le-Tilleul, Belgium
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.132
Background US recommendations on patient safety sup-
port the use of point-of-care activated systems (POCAS) for 
infusion of labile drugs but this concept is almost unknown 
in Europe, which mainly uses syringe & needle (SYRNE) or 
transfer-set (TRASE) methods performed by nurses.
Purpose To identify and publicise the added value of POCAS 
on quality of care.
Materials and methods The authors conducted 4 differ-
ent studies in 4 unrelated hospitals to compare POCAS ver-
sus the SYRNE method (or TRASE method when available). 
The POCAS chosen, assembled in our CIVAS facility, was 
Augmentin 1g phial linked to a 50-mL saline Viafl o bag via 
a EuroVialMate connector. Reconstitution/administration 
(n=944) was performed by 44 nurses unfamiliar with POCAS 
and scored with subjective and objective measurements.
Results All medians were adjusted to 100%-excellence scales 
so that the SYRNE method (or TRASE method when avail-
able) scored 50%. When results were rated on this scale, 7 sig-
nifi cant arguments emerged in favour of POCAS: 1) Product 
quality due to standardised batch production: 92% versus 
SYRNE (89% versus TRASE), 2) Outsourcing opportunity for 
small hospitals without PICs-compliant facilities, as encour-
aged by Belgian health authorities, 3) Patient safety: 94%, 
due to less risk of bacterial contamination (closed system), 4) 
Nurse safety: 94%, due to no contact with sensitising drugs 
and less risk of needle pricks, 5) Intuitive training (3 adminis-
trations) and ease of use: 90% (or 89%), 6) Cost containment 
due to just-in-time reconstitution (15%) and 44% time gain 
versus SYRNE, 7) Ecological impact: 91% (or 89%), due to no 
syringe, less metal, less waste and no dioxin production during 
incineration.
Conclusions The authors recommend POCAS for daily rou-
tine infusions of labile drugs.
Competing interests None.
GRP133
DRUG SAFETY MONITORING IN THE NORTHERN 
REGION OF ZAMBIA
K. Ponshano 1The Copperbelt University, Kitwe, Zambia
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.133
Background The Copperbelt University Health Services (CBU 
Health) has been designated by the Pharmaceutical Regulatory 
Authority (PRA) as its agent for coordinating pharmacovigi-
lance in Copperbelt, Luapula, Northern, North Western and 
Western Provinces. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are the 
major concern for hospital admissions. Nearly one quarter of 
the patients are admitted due to adverse drug reactions.
Purpose CBU Health’s purpose includes encouraging the 
reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) as well collecting 
and collating all ADR reports from health institutions in the fi ve 
provinces. This report covers our experiences from May 2008.
Materials and methods Beginning in early May this year, 
CBU Health has been visiting health institutions in the study 
areas on a monthly basis. Activities include holding discus-
sions with health workers, distributing ADR forms and col-
lecting ADR reports. Once collected these reports are entered 
into the ADR Register at CBU Health and thereafter causality 
is assessed. A report is then prepared for the PRA on a quar-
terly basis. At the PRA, serious ADRs are noted and recom-
mendations made to the Ministry of Health.
Results One hundred and fi fty (150) ADRs were collected May 
– December, 2010. These reports were obtained from twenty-
one (21) institutions in the Copperbelt. The reports have all 
been documented and assessed using the WHO Causality 
Method. Most of the ADRs reports were caused by antiretro-
viral drugs (ARVs) and some by antimalarial drugs like arte-
mether/lumefantrine – Coartem. Fifty reports were sent to the 
Uppsala Monitoring Centre Vigifl ow for further analysis.
Conclusions Pharmacovigilance is the science relating to the 
detection, assessment, understanding and prevention of the 
adverse effects of drugs. It is an important public health spe-
cialty as drug safety awareness can lead to better patient out-
comes and reductions in drug-related morbidity. Our results 
show that pharmacovigilance is becoming an integral part of 
clinical care in Zambia for patient safety.
Competing interests None.
GRP134
PARENTERAL MEDICATION PREPARATION BY 
PHARMACY TECHNICIANS ON THE WARD IMPROVES 
MEDICATION SAFETY
A. van de Plas, C. Smits, W. Mens, R. van Leeuwen, E. Frankfort, C. Neef 1Maastricht 
University Centre Maastricht, Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Maastricht, The 
Netherlands
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.134
Background Preparation of parenteral medications is associ-
ated with considerable risk that is medication errors and risk of 
microbiological contamination. In Dutch hospitals parenteral 
medications are commonly prepared on the ward by nursing 
staff. In a pilot in the Maastricht University Medical Centre, 
pharmacy technicians instead of nurses prepared parenteral 
medications on the ward. For preparation specifi c protocols 
per medication in which calculation templates and double 
checks were included were used and hygienic measures were 
increased. The effect on medications errors and risk of micro-
biological contamination was measured.
Purpose To determine the effect of substituting preparation 
of parenteral medications on the ward by nurses to pharmacy 
technicians on medication errors as well as on the risk of 
microbiological contamination. Materials and Methods The 
study was carried out on two wards of Maastricht University 
Medical Centre in 2009 and 2010 Medication errors Before and 
after implementation of the pilot 200 preparations of parenteral 
drugs were randomly observed by a disguised observer and 
medication errors were measured. The severity of medication 
errors was assessed by an independent panel. Risk of micro-
biological contamination Before and after implementation of 
the pilot 200 broth simulation preparations were prepared by 
nurses and pharmacy technicians respectively. Microbiological 
contamination based on turbidity was identifi ed.
Results Medication errors Medication errors signifi cantly 
decreased from 40% in parenteral medication preparation 
by nurses to 1% in preparation by pharmacy technicians 
(p<0,0001). The severity of medication errors decreased and 
double check signifi cantly increased from 40% to 100%. Risk 
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   135
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   135
3/9/2012   12:26:41 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:41 PM
C# PowerPoint - Merge PowerPoint Documents in C#.NET
Combine and Merge Multiple PowerPoint Files into One Using C#. This part illustrates how to combine three PowerPoint files into a new file in C# application.
batch merge pdf; append pdf
C# Word - Merge Word Documents in C#.NET
Combine and Merge Multiple Word Files into One Using C#. This part illustrates how to combine three Word files into a new file in C# application.
add pdf pages together; batch combine pdf
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
136
of microbiological contamination Risk of microbiological con-
tamination decreased as contaminated broth simulations sig-
nifi cantly decreased from 8% to 0% (p<0,0001).
Conclusions Substitution of parenteral medication prepara-
tion by pharmacy technicians on the ward instead of nurses 
signifi cantly reduced medication errors and the risk of micro-
biological contamination.
Competing interests None.
GRP135
DESIGN, INTRODUCTION AND EVALUATION OF A 
NEW OUTPATIENT/DISCHARGE PRESCRIPTION FORM 
FOR BEAUMONT HOSPITAL
M. McCullagh 1Pharmacy Department, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9, Ireland
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.135
Background In early 2010 traditional, small (102 mm x 178 
mm) single copy outpatient / discharge prescription forms were 
in use in Beaumont Hospital. This raised patient safety and 
legal concerns. International studies have demonstrated that 
redesign of prescription forms can improve patient safety.
Purpose The aim of this project was to design and introduce 
a new outpatient / discharge prescription form to address 
the patient safety and legal concerns surrounding the tradi-
tional form and to evaluate the new form through an audit 
of the provision of prescriber details and a user satisfaction 
survey.
Materials and methods A new A4 (210 mm x 297 mm) trip-
licate prescription form was designed. The new form included 
copies for the general practitioner and healthcare record. 
Samples of completed traditional and new forms were audited 
for inclusion of the prescriber’s medical council registration 
number (MCRN) and contact details. Evaluation included a 
prescriber survey and a postal survey of community pharma-
cists. Statistical analysis was performed using PASW.
Results Analysis of the prescription audit revealed that inclu-
sion of the prescriber’s MCRN increased from 15% with the 
traditional form to 76% with the new form (p<0.001). Only 
45% of prescribers provided any identifi cation detail on the 
traditional form but 100% of prescribers provided two or more 
identifi cation details on the new form (p<0.001).The survey 
found that 81.3% of prescribers strongly agreed or agreed that 
the new form was an improvement over the traditional form 
compared to 100% of pharmacists (p=0.025). Consultants 
were less likely to agree or strongly agree that the new form 
was an improvement compared to the non-consultant hospital 
doctors (NCHDs) (p<0.001).
Conclusion A new A4 triplicate prescription form introduced 
in Beaumont Hospital was well received by both prescribers 
and community pharmacists. Prescribers were signifi cantly 
more likely to include their MCRN and other contact details 
on the new form compared to the traditional form.
Competing interests None.
GRP136
CONNECTION BETWEEN THE HOSPITAL 
PRESCRIPTION PROGRAM AND THE PARENTERAL 
NUTRITION COMPOUNDING PROGRAM
R.M. Romero Jimenez, I. Yeste Gomez, B. Marzal Alfaro, S. Pernia Lopez, I. Marquinez 
Alonso, V. Escudero Vilaplana, A. de Lorenzo Pinto, A. Ribed Sanchez, M.N. Sanchez 
Fresneda, M. Sanjurjo Saez
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.136
Background During the parenteral nutrition (PN) compound-
ing process, medical prescriptions must be transcribed in the 
pharmacy department, where there is an increased risk of med-
ication errors.
Purpose To describe the implementation of the connection 
between the hospital prescription program and the PN com-
pounding program.
Materials and methods From November to December 2010, 
an explanatory document was prepared to cover all the products 
used in the preparation of PN for adult and paediatric patients 
and the calculations performed to convert the medical prescrip-
tion in the units of volume for the PN preparation. A second 
document was developed to collect the data issued by the elec-
tronic prescription program (Prescriplant), patient information 
(history number, name, service, bed, and weight), prescription 
information (date, time, service, prescribing physician) and 
information on PN (total volume, nitrogen, glucose, lipids, 
sodium, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, calcium, chlo-
ride, acetate, zinc, trace elements and vitamins). From January 
to February 2011, an external provider (Intercath) entered this 
information in the PN program of the MedicalOne®parenteral 
database and made the necessary adjustments so that the pro-
gram could automatically calculate PN.
Results The Prescriplant® program was connected with the 
MedicalOne®parenteral program. The PN was generated 
automatically in the MedicalOne®parenteral program using 
the information obtained from the Prescriplant® program 
according to previous indications. Tests were performed over a 
month to validate the calculations made by the program, both 
for adult and paediatric patients. The necessary adjustments 
were made, and the calculations that the program did not per-
form well were corrected.
Conclusions Connection of the Prescriplant® program with 
the MedicalOne®parenteral program avoids manual tran-
scription of the hospital pharmacist and simplifi es the PN 
compounding process.
Competing interests None.
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   136
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   136
3/9/2012   12:26:41 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:41 PM
VB.NET TIFF: Merge and Split TIFF Documents with RasterEdge .NET
String], docList As [String]()) TIFFDocument.Combine(filePath, docList In our online VB.NET tutorial, users & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
merge pdf online; split pdf into multiple files
VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
Just like we need to combine PPT files, sometimes, we also want to separate a Note: If you want to see more PDF processing functions in VB.NET, please follow
pdf merge files; add pdf together
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
137
Technology (including: robots for production, 
Incompatibilities, drug production and 
analytics, CRS)
TCH001
PRESCRIBING AND ROBOTIC DISPENSING: 
THE IMPACT OF TECHNOLOGY ON THE 
PROFESSIONAL MODEL
R. Beard 1Sunderland Royal Hospital, Pharmacy, Sunderland, United Kingdom
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.137
Background Sunderland Royal Hospital has approximately 
1,000 beds, and has operated an integrated electronic pre-
scribing system (EP) since 2001. In September 2009, a robotic 
dispenser directly linked to EP was installed in the main 
pharmacy.
Purpose Using electronic prescribing directly linked to dis-
pensing robots delivers a series of benefi ts in terms of error 
reduction and effi ciency (1)(2). Our aim was to investigate the 
impact of this on professional practice.
Materials and methods A qualitative survey was under-
taken of 8 pharmacists to pilot a semistructured question-
naire. Standard thematic analysis methods (3) were used. 
Any issue raised by pharmacists was noted and assigned to 
a theme. This was independently assessed for accuracy (GK). 
Staff interviewed varied from newly-qualifi ed pharmacists to 
experienced managers.
Results The results of the survey shown were collated and 
analysed. The main points are listed in order of positive ben-
efi ts scored:
Feeling more empowered on wards 87%
Availability of relevant patient information 87%
Enhanced ward-based relationships 75%
Effi ciency of EP + Robots combined 75%
Improvement in enforcing hospital medicines policies 37%
There was a series of lesser-scoring themes not included for 
space reasons.
Conclusions The direct linking of a robotic dispensing 
machine to electronic prescribing, besides increasing effi -
ciency, seems to offer enhancement of professional aspects of 
clinical pharmacy. Removing mundane aspects of drug supply 
and policy enforcement allows greater focus on patient-cen-
tred activities and enhances professional relationships at ward 
level. This might in part relate to removal of ‘policing’ func-
tions of hospital policies because these are done electronically 
instead of relying on the ward pharmacist. Further detailed 
work is required to explore the issues raised by this study, and 
its impact on the professional model. GK = Dr Gulia Karimova, 
Sunderland Royal Hospital, Sunderland England SR4 7TP.
Competing interests None.
TCH002
FINANCIAL ASSESSMENT OF ASEPTIC PREPARATION 
FACILITIES IN EUROPEAN HOSPITAL PHARMACIES
B. Dekyndt, D. Meyer, C. Barthélémy, P. Odou 1Institute of Pharmacy University 
Hospital of Lille, Department of Biopharmacy Galenic and Hospital Pharmacy (EA 
GRIIOT 4481) Université Lille Nord de France F-59000 Lille France., Lille Cedex, 
France; 2Getinge Life Sciences, Department of Marketing, 31170 Tournefeuille, 
France 3Institute of Pharmacy University Hospital of Lille and University Hospital of 
Lille, Department of Biopharmacy Galenic and Hospital Pharmacy (EA GRIIOT 4481) 
Université Lille Nord de France F-59000 Lille France., Lille Cedex, France
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.138
Background The drug manufacturing conditions in hospi-
tals have become increasingly demanding and the use of a 
Controlled Atmosphere Area (CAA) in the preparation unit is 
now mandatory.
Purpose To make an inventory of fi xtures used for European 
aseptic manufacturing units; to compare the cost of CAA 
provided by isolators to CAA provided by Biological Safety 
Cabinets (BSCs) in order to determine the most economical 
scheme in hospital and to develop a model to estimate CAA 
design and operating costs.
Materials and methods 43 hospitals were interviewed (21 
French and 22 from four other European countries) by email, 
telephone and visits over 7 months. A form with 390 items 
was programmed in VBA (Visual Basic for Applications) to 
assist with replying. Hospitals were compared according to 
their location and their type of workstation: BSCII, BSCIII or 
UDF (Unidirectional Flow) (Group B) and Isolator (Group I). 
Statistics were generated using the Mann-Whitney test and 
Monte Carlo modelling.
Results 21 hospitals responded (11 French and 10 foreign). All 
European preparation units were organised similarly except 
that in France, isolator use seems more common than in the rest 
of Europe (73% vs 30% respectively; p=0.0502). Each cost item 
was compared; only 2 were signifi cantly different: the staff 
training cost/agent and the cost/m2 of microbiological con-
trol were signifi cantly higher in Group B than in Group I with 
3,404 € and 1,731 €/agent respectively (p=0.0028) and 50.46 € 
and 2.68 €/m2 respectively (p=0.0017). A synthesis costs pro-
gram was drafted to calculate an estimate preparation cost. 
The preparation cost in Group B seemed higher than in Group 
I (41 € and 30 € respectively in study conditions) although this 
cost difference disappeared when the annual number of items 
prepared increased.
Conclusions This pilot study provides data that could be used 
to optimise resources and save money. A further international 
study would enable signifi cant results to be obtained.
Competing interests Ownership: GETINGE GETINGE life Science company has 
taken coverage of B.Dekyndt’s travel expenses and Mr Meyer is Marketing Manager 
for Isolation Technology in GETINGE LIFE SCIENCES Company.
TCH003
MICROWAVE FREEZE-THAW TREATMENT OF 
CYTOTOXIC AND HAZARDOUS INJECTABLE DRUGS: 
A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE FROM 1980 TO 2011
J.D. Hecq, J. Jamart, L.M. Galanti 1CHU Mont-Godinne, Hospital Pharmacy, Yvoir, 
Belgium; 2CHU Mont-Godinne, Scientific support unit, Yvoir, Belgium; 3CHU Mont-
Godinne, Medical laboratory, Yvoir, Belgium
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.139
Background Microwave freeze-thaw treatment (MFTT) of 
injectable drugs can support the development of centralised 
intravenous admixtures services (CIVAS).
Purpose The aim of the review was to collect information 
and results about MFTT of cytotoxic and hazardous drugs.
Materials and methods The scientifi c literature about drug 
stability studies was systematically reviewed. The data were 
presented in a table and described the name of the drug, pro-
ducer, fi nal concentration, temperature and time of frozen 
storage, type of microwave oven, thawing power, method 
of evaluating the concentration and results after treatment or 
fi nal long-term storage at 2-8°C.
Results From 1980 to 2011, 8 drugs (cyclophosphamide, cytar-
abine, doxorubicin, epirubicin, fl uorouracil, ganciclovir, meth-
otrexate sodium, Mitomycin C) were studied by MFTT and 
the results were presented in 8 publications. The frozen stor-
age temperature varied from –20°C to – 30°C, the storage time 
from 11 to 364 days, the microwave power from moderate to 
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   137
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   137
3/9/2012   12:26:41 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:41 PM
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
138
full power. The concentrations were mainly found by High 
Performance Liquid Chromatography. The 8 drugs were stable 
during and after the treatment. However, mitomycin needs to 
be stored at – 30°C. Only 2 research teams have tested the 
long term stability after MFTT, the fi rst for ganciclovir after 
7 days, the second for fl uorouracil after 28 days. 6 drugs were 
tested after one to 11 cycles of refreezing and rethawing, with 
loss < 5%.
Conclusions This review may help hospital pharmacists to 
undertake the production of 8 dose-banded ready-to-use inject-
able cytotoxic and hazardous drugs. Freezing enhances their 
long-term stability. Validated microwave thawing reduces the 
time taken to defrost these drugs at the concentrations tested 
without altering their chemical stability.
Competing interests None.
TCH004
COMPLEXATION’S STUDIES OF CHENODEOXICHOLIC 
ACID WITH β-CYCLODEXTRINS FOR PREPARATION OF 
LIQUID AND ORAL PHARMACEUTICAL FORMS
D. Paoletti, B. D’Elia, D. Iozzi, C. Laudisio, A. Vergati, A. Tarantino, I. Corti, A. D’Arpino, 
E. Cesqui, M.G. Rossetti 1Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Farmacia 
Ospedaliera, Siena, Italy; 2Università di Siena, Dipartimento Farmaco Chimico 
Tecnologico, Siena, Italy; 3ASL 4 Terni, Farmaceutica Territoriale, Terni, Italy
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.140
Background The cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis is a rare 
metabolic disease with alterations in hereditary of storage lip-
ids (in Italy, 20 confi rmed cases). The basic defect of this dis-
order is the defi cit a liver enzyme (sterol 27alfa-hydroxylase), 
which catalyses the hydroxylation of a sterol intermediate 
of the biosynthetic way of bile acids, thus causing the accu-
mulation of cholesterol in most tissues. It’s characterised by 
abundant deposits of cholesterol and cholestanol, mostly in 
the Achilles’ heel, lungs, brain and peripheral nerve myelin. 
In cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis you have stabilisation or 
improvement of the neurological and systemic clinical condi-
tions as a result of chronic therapy with chenodeoxicolic acid 
(CDCA). This drug normalises the main metabolic alteration 
restoring normal cholestanol levels, with a mechanism of feed-
back inhibition of 27 alfa –hydroxylase.
Purpose The purpose of this work was the preparation and 
evaluation of the stability of a liquid formulation oral of CDCA 
for paediatric use (easy to take and pleasant taste) for the treat-
ment of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis.
Materials and methods To make the formulation was evalu-
ated the solubility of the drug, the ability to form complexes 
inclusion with β-cyclodextrin, stability after complexation 
and the correction of taste and smell. The formation of inclu-
sion complexes between the CDCA and β-cyclodextrins has 
been carried out both by the method ‘Freeze-drying’ (in water 
solution and in water solution with ethanol or methanol) and 
with the method ‘Kneading’ (solid state). Obtained in the sam-
ples was determined the amount of complex formed with the 
chromatography LC-MS technique. The stability of the dosage 
form was tested at room temperature, after storage at 3 ° C and 
-15 ° C using chromatographic techniques.
Results Chenodeoxicolic acid proved insoluble in water but 
in the form of β-CD complex has a higher solubility. The 
complex formed between CDCA and β-CD in 1:5 ratio has 
been shown to be stable for at least 15 days in water solution 
(r.t.20°C T0=21.32 mg/ml; T1 after 1 week=20.84 mg/ml; T2 
after 2 week=20.72 mg/ml; Fridge 3°C T0=21.08 mg/ml; T1 
after 1 week=21.13 mg/ml; T2 after 2 week=20.94 mg/ml; 
Freezer -15°C T0=20.98;T1 after 1 week=21.08 mg/ml; T2 after 
2 week=20.82 mg/ml.) The liquid pharmaceutical form was 
then created by selecting the mode of complexation and solid 
state using CDCA and β-CD in 1:5 molar ratios. The prepara-
tion was pleasant and palatable.
Conclusions The complexation between CDCA and β-CD 
allowed to make available a liquid pharmaceutical form of 
pleasant taste, thus improving a good compliance of paediat-
ric patients.
Competing interests None.
TCH005
LONG-TERM STABILITY OF MORPHINE HCL IN 0.9% 
NACL INFUSION
J.D. Hecq, M. Godet, J. Jamart, L. Galanti 1CHU Mont-Godinne, Pharmacy, Yvoir, 
Belgium; 2CHU Mont-Godinne, Medical laboratory, Yvoir, Belgium; 3CHU Mont-
Godinne, Scientific Support Unit, Yvoir, Belgium
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.141
Background To extend the range of injectable preparations in 
a centralised intravenous admixture service (CIVAS).
Purpose To investigate the long term stability of morphine 
in 0.9% NaCl infusion polyolefi n bags (PB) and polypropyl-
ene syringes (PS) after storage at 5±3°C, and to evaluate the 
infl uence of initial freezing and microwave thawing on this 
stability.
Materials and methods Ten PB and fi ve PS containing 100 
ml of 1 mg/ml of morphine solution in 0.9% NaCl were pre-
pared under aseptic conditions. Five PB were frozen at -20°C 
for 90 days before storage. Immediately after the prepara-
tion and after thawing, 2 ml of each bag were withdrawn for 
the initial concentration measurements. All PB and PS bags 
were then refrigerated at 5± 3°C for 58 days during which 
the morphine concentrations were measured periodically by 
high performance liquid chromatography using a reversed 
phase column, naloxone as internal standard, a mobile phase 
consisting of 5% acetonitrile and 95% of KH
2
PO
buffer (pH 
3.50), and detection with diode array detector at 254 nm. 
Visual and microscopic observations, spectrophotometric and 
pH measurements were also performed. Solutions were con-
sidered stable if the concentration remains superior to 90% of 
the initial concentration by regression analysis. The degrada-
tion products peaks were not quantitatively signifi cant and 
were resolved from the native drug.
Results PB and PS solutions were stable when stored at 5± 
3°C during these 58 days. No colour change or precipitation 
in the solutions was observed. The physical stability was 
confi rmed by microscopic and spectrophotometric inspec-
tion. There was no signifi cant change in pH during storage. 
Freezing and microwave thawing didn’t infl uence the infu-
sion stability.
Conclusions Morphine infusions may be prepared in advance 
by CIVAS, frozen in PB and microwave thawed before storage 
under refrigeration until 58 days either in polyolefi n bags or 
polypropylene syringes. Such treatment could improve safety 
and management.
Competing interests None.
TCH006
COMPOUNDING PARENTERAL METHYLTIONINIUM 
CHLORIDE 1% SOLUTION IN HOSPITAL PHARMACY 
AND RISK ASSESSMENT OF PREPARATION
E. Najdovska, J. Bajraktar, B. Lazarova 1Clinical hospital, Department for 
compounding steril products, Bitola, FYROM; 2Institute for Hemodialysis, Hospital 
Pharmacy, Struga, FYROM; 3Clinical hospital, Hospital pharmacy, Stip, FYROM
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.142
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   138
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   138
3/9/2012   12:26:41 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:41 PM
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
139
Background Methyltioninium chloride is an organic thiazine 
dye.It is used for management of methaemoglobinaemia, also 
as a visualising agent in surgical procedures, as an antidote for 
cyanide poisoning. It should be used with caution in patient 
with severe renal impairment. It is dark green odourless hygro-
scopic crystals, soluble 1 in 25 of water. A 1% solution has a 
pH of 3 to 4,5. Methyltioninium chloride is absorbed in the 
gastrointestinal tract and usually is excreted in the urine. It is 
administrated intravenously as a 1% solution in doses 1-4 mg 
per kg body-weight.
Purpose The fact that is lack of Methyltioninium Chloride 
1% injection on the drug market in our country, the aim of 
presented work was to created the conditions to start small 
scale productions of this formulation and to determinate the 
risk assessment of the preparations.
Materials and methods Parenteral Methyltioninium 
Chloride 1% Solution was prepared in the Department for 
Compounding Sterile Products in our hospital, following 
established procedure for parenteral preparations and exam-
ined the content of Methyltioninium Chloride according the 
requirement of Ph.Eur.(Ph.Eur.monograph 1132).The prepara-
tion was storage protected from light.
Results According to the Standard Operating Procedure, 
Parenteral Methyltioninium Chloride 1% Solution was pre-
pared aseptically in the laminar fl ow cabinet and sterilised by 
autoclaving. The fi nal solution was then submitted to qual-
ity control, where a set of selected assays have been defi ned 
that ensures both raw material and fi nal product are of assured 
quality Risk assessment of preparation.
Conclusions With applied technological procedure, it was 
possible to prepared Parenteral Methyltioninium Chloride 
1% Solution in our hospital. The result for risk assessment is 
higher than 100, so the preparation was considered a ‘high -risk 
preparation’, that’s why The authors followed GMP Guide to 
prepare it.
Competing interests None.
TCH007
AUTOMATION BY CLEANROOM ROBOTS IS 
CLEVER GMP
O.A. Sørensen, T. Schnor, H. Bräuner 1Odense University Hospital, Pharmacy, Odense 
C, Denmark; 2Capital Region of Denmark, Pharmacy, Copenhagen, Denmark; 3Amgros, 
The Danish Research Unit for Hospital Pharmacy, Copenhagen, Denmark
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.143
Background The traditional process of preparing ready-to-use 
antibiotics imposes the following challenges: 1) Limited capac-
ity leading to shortage problems, 2) Monotonous repetitive 
work, 3) High-risk human involvement in large-scale aseptic 
processing. To address these issues, two collaborating Danish 
hospital pharmacies have automated the process by introduc-
ing cleanroom robots. But is automation the key to success?
Purpose To evaluate the implementation of cleanroom robots 
in preparing ready-to-use antibiotics.
Materials and methods In 2007, the hospital pharmacies 
from the Capital Region of Denmark and Odense University 
TCH006 table 1
Type of preparation
parenteral preparation
5
Amount prepared annualy(units)
liquid
2
Pharmacological effects of the active ingredients
strong
3
Supply
mainly internal
2
Preparation process
terminal sterilisation
4
Result
240
Hospital decided to automate the process of preparing ready-
to-use antibiotics. Technology was used to maximise compli-
ance with GMP. All qualifi cation and validation tests were 
completed by the fi rst product release in June 2011.
Results The authors discovered that:
1) Production capacity increased from 150 products per hour 
to 350 products per hour with equivalent man-hours
2) The monotonous repetitive work was reduced to a 
minimum
3) Compliance with GMP was optimised by:
Excluding human interference in class A
Using dedicated cleanroom robots
Qualifying robot movement and UDF (unidirectional 
airfl ow)
Manufacturing machine parts in polished 316 stainless 
steel
Using vision and image processing for continuous process 
monitoring
Fitting probes for particle count
But this was achieved at the cost of:
a large fi nancial investment (~1 million €)
a signifi cant delivery time on equipment (~2 years)
a high demand for qualifi cation and validation (time 
consuming)
restricted handling of different materials (eg, vials)
Conclusions The use of cleanroom robots in preparing ready-
to-use antibiotics has proven to be clever GMP. Automation 
requires initial investments and time, but automating the pro-
cess has increased production capacity and facilitates a healthy 
work environment. Concurrently, automation made it possible 
to optimise compliance with GMP on several critical aspects 
of large-scale aseptic processing.
Competing interests None.
TCH008
DIAGNOSTIC HANDLING OF THE PREPARATION OF 
EPICUTANEOUS PATCH TESTS REQUESTED BY THE 
ALLERGOLOGY DEPARTMENT
P. Araque Arroyo, A.M. Burgos Montero, L.A. González Sanchez, E. Jérez Fernández, 
D. Fraga Fuentes, M. Sánchez Ruiz de Gordoa 1La Mancha Centro Hospital, Pharmacy 
Department, Alcázar de San Juan (Ciudad Real), Spain; 2La Mancha Centro Hospital, 
Alergology Department, Alcázar de San Juan (Ciudad Real), Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.144
Background In epicutaneous patch testing, the substance 
suspected of being responsible for the skin reaction (contact 
dermatitis and/or delayed drug reaction) is applied (in excipi-
ent) on the skin under occlusion to confi rm/rule out a delayed 
hypersensitivity response. Various epicutaneous patch test 
batteries are commercially available.
Purpose To develop a work procedure for the Pharmacy 
Department to meet the demand for epicutaneous patches not 
commercially available.
Materials and methods The preparation procedure depends 
on the physical form of the active principle (AP) and the selec-
tion of excipient (according to the solubility of the AP). The 
solubility characteristics of the APs were recorded and The 
authors searched for commercially-available dosage forms 
and concentrations of the APs requested and for the pure APs. 
1st option: use of pure AP; 2nd option: solid oral dosage form: 
pulverisation; 3rd option: syrup/drops; 4th option: parenteral 
form. When the AP was water-insoluble, a lipophilic excipient 
(vaseline) was used, when it was water-soluble, a hydrophilic 
excipient (lanolin-vaseline ointment) was used. Finally, the 
mixture was placed in a labelled 5-mL syringe.
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   139
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   139
3/9/2012   12:26:42 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:42 PM
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
140
Results The authors evaluated 13 patients during the 10-month 
study period. The authors prepared 29 types of patch (21% 
corticosteroids, 14% antiepileptics, 31% antibiotics and 34% 
other). The authors used the pure product in 6 patches and 
the commercial dosage form in 23 patches. 8 APs were water 
soluble and 21 were insoluble or poorly soluble in water. The 
authors diagnosed two delayed fi xed drug exanthema-type 
reactions (to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and metronidazole) 
and one contact dermatitis (from povidone-iodine); these tests 
were positive at 48 and 96 h.
Conclusions Preparation of epicutaneous patches in the 
Hospital Pharmacy Department is an effective option to diag-
nose contact dermatitis and/or delayed drug reaction in cases 
for which no commercial patch test is available.
Competing interests None.
TCH009
THE DEVELOPMENT OF HOSPITAL MANUFACTURED 
READY TO USE HEPARIN SOLUTION TO FLUSH 
CATHETERS
M. Trsan, S. Mitrovic, A. Puncuh 1University medical centre Ljubljana, Pharmacy, 
Ljubljana, Slovenia
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.145
Background Heparin fl ush solution is a sterile preparation of 
heparin sodium with suffi cient sodium chloride to make it iso-
tonic with blood. So far heparin was mainly prepared on wards 
from concentrated solution (25.000 IU/ml) prior to application.
Purpose To streamline the preparation and provide prod-
ucts that meets all the quality criteria. Information about the 
desired concentrations and quantities of different concen-
trations of heparin in saline solution were obtained using a 
3-month data collection on hospital wards.
Materials and methods A literature search was made and the 
conclusions of stability studies were respected and obtained 
monographs were studied. Materials: Heparin Sodium, inject-
able grade; Sodium Chloride low in endotoxins, suitable for 
the biopharmaceutical production. Method of preparation: 
suitable amount of Heparin Sodium and Sodium Chloride are 
weighed in sterile glass and dissolved in chilled water (20 °C) 
for injections. After homogenisation the sample for in process 
control is taken. The solution is then fi ltered by 0.2 μm mem-
brane fi lter in 100 ml Asolvex glass bottles and sterilised by 
steam sterilisation 15 min by 121 °C.
Results The authors have prepared a series of solutions of var-
ious content of Heparin Sodium in 9 mg/ml Sodium Chloride 
solution. Heparin content was measured before and after fi l-
tration and before and after sterilisation. Tests were made in 
accordance with the European Pharmacopoeia chapter 2.7.5. 
At the same time the pH value and the content of sodium and 
chloride was measured. All samples were sent for Sterility 
testing and testing for Pyrogens.
Conclusions Solutions of heparin in concentrations from 1 IU 
to 100 IU/ml in sodium chloride solution are stable under ster-
ilisation conditions. No signifi cant decrease in heparin activity 
during autoclaving cycle at 121 °C 15 min was detected.
Competing interests None.
TCH010
INTRODUCTION OF AN AUTOMATED MEDICINES 
STORAGE AND DISPENSING SYSTEM IN A 
PHARMACY DEPARTMENT†
P. Sempere Serrano, A.I. Cachafeiro Pin, P. Castellano Copa, N. Perez 
rRodriguez 1Hospital Lucus Augusti, Farmacia Hospitalaria, Lugo, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.146
Background The authors wanted to compare the traditional 
system of dispensing medicines and the new automated 
Kardex medicines storage and dispensing system.
Purpose To describe the process of introducing an automated 
Kardex medicines storage and dispensing system in the phar-
macy service and to evaluate its use during the fi rst three 
months.
Materials and methods To prepare for the internal Kardex 
system drug list The authors excluded from the selection pro-
cess artifi cial nutrition, anticancer drugs, thermolabile prod-
ucts, antidotes and areas of medical exclusivity. Each drug 
was entered into the Kardex system software (Mercurio) with 
maximum and minimum allowed stock levels, as well as a 
physical space required for its intrinsic volume and repackag-
ing. The authors started to use the Kardex system for hospital 
dispensing in December 2010 and the assessment period was 
three months of active use. The authors used the pharmacy 
Mercurio and Sinfhos software to acquire and capture data.
Results Initially, the internal Kardex system was used for 62% 
of all pharmacy drugs. The percentage of free holes was 25.5% 
in week 3 of activity, decreasing to 9.14% in week 12. The 
average number of daily prescriptions dispensed and properly 
completed was 7.6 in week 3 and increased to 38.6 at week 12, 
whereas the traditional storage system catered for an average 
of 14.4 orders. The diffi culties The authors experienced were 
mainly due to lack of medicines and lack of repackaged drugs 
for stock.
Conclusions In spite of the great initial diffi culty and the 
resistance of nursing assistants to the Pharmacy service, The 
authors consider that the automated Kardex medicines stor-
age and dispensing system offers us advantages. The authors 
can dispense prescribed drugs and operate Pyxis replacement 
stations with more effi cient management of human resources. 
The Kardex system software provides information on inci-
dents that arise during dispensing, to make it possible to quan-
tify and analyse our mistakes.
Competing interests None.
TCH011
STOCK HOLDING OF COMPOUNDED CYTOSTATICS Ñ 
HOW DO SPCS SUPPORT THIS?
I. Larsson, C. Sorensen, C. Ravn, S. Lassen, T. Kart 1Amgros, The Danish Research 
Unit for Hospital Pharmacy, Copenhagen OE, Denmark
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.147
Background Increasing demand for hospital-prepared cyto-
statics has forced Danish hospital pharmacies to develop solu-
tions which support effective work fl ow in decentralised and 
future centralised production units. One way to optimise the 
logistics is to hold stock of prepared cytostatics for 1-3 months. 
This requires documentation of extended shelf lives of the pre-
pared products. This can be done in different ways but the 
authorities’ opinion is crucial for the quality. The Danish Drug 
Agency in spring 2011 stated that stability data for prepared 
cytostatics should be delivered by the industry and stated in 
the summary of product characteristics (SPC).
Purpose The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of the 
shelf lives and the usefulness of the information stated in sec-
tion 6.3 in the SPCs for 13 selected prepared cytostatics.
Materials and methods The SPCs were identifi ed on www. 
produktresume.dk and www.ema.europa.eu 5 May 2011.
Results 150 SPCs were identifi ed for 13 cytostatics. The lon-
gest shelf life identifi ed for prepared cytostatics was 28 days 
for doxorubicin, epirubicin, gemcitabine and irinotecan. Great 
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   140
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   140
3/9/2012   12:26:42 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:42 PM
Abstracts
European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy April 2012 Vol 19 No 2
141
variation between the minimum and maximum shelf lives for 
the same drug substance was observed. One of the biggest dis-
crepancies occurred for epirubicin with a minimum shelf life 
of ‘use immediately after preparation’ and a maximum shelf 
life of 28 days after preparation. Apart from a few exceptions 
the times for which the concentrations are stable, which can 
be applied to the shelf lives, are not stated in the SPCs. Often 
no shelf lives for the prepared product are stated but only for 
the original or reconstituted product, and consistent terminol-
ogy is lacking in the SPCs.
Conclusions Due to the limited information on shelf lives in 
the SPCs it is not possible to produce cytostatics in DK for 
stock; the quality of the SPCs is defi cient.
Competing interests None.
TCH012
BATCH OR NAMED-PATIENT PREPARATION: 
INTRODUCTION OF A DECISION ALGORITHM
M. Grouzmann, S. Lamon, G. Podilsky, A. Pannatier 1Pharmacy Department, 
Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, 1011 Lausanne, Switzerland 2School of 
Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Geneva University of Lausanne, 1211 Geneve 
4, Switzerland
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.148
Background One of the tasks of the Pharmacy Department 
of the CHUV (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois) is to 
supply the hospital with drugs. Medicines not commercially 
available must be manufactured by the pharmacy. This can 
be done batch-wise or through named prescriptions for indi-
vidual patients.
Purpose Batch manufacturing implies a number of prin-
ciples and constraints such as planning, delays to be taken 
into account, number of items per batch, fi nal check by the 
Quality Control Unit and storage and distribution by the 
Pharmaceutical Logistics Unit. Because these are often incom-
patible with personalised medicine, it was necessary to defi ne 
criteria allowing the Manufacturing Unit to decide between 
batch and individual preparation.
Materials and methods Three pharmacists collaborated to 
design and develop a decision algorithm meeting the above objec-
tive. This algorithm was then introduced and is being applied to 
all preparations manufactured by the Pharmacy Division.
Results The following criteria were taken into account when 
designing the algorithm: standardised doses, stability, fre-
quency and number of prescriptions, urgency and costs. A 
total of 440 preparations were analysed according to the algo-
rithm; 174 have been earmarked for batch production and 266 
for named-patient preparation.
Conclusions This algorithm now provides the Manufacturing 
Unit with an objective tool with which to decide between 
batch-wise and named-patient classifi cation for new prepara-
tions and to review the status of preparations annually.
Competing interests None.
TCH013
INTRODUCTION OF AN AUTOMATED DRUG 
DISPENSING SYSTEM IN AN INTENSIVE CARE UNIT
P. Sempere Serrano, A.I. Cachafeiro Pin, P. Castellano Copa, N. Perez 
Rodriguez 1Hospital Lucus Augusti, Farmacia Hospitalaria, Lugo, Spain
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.149
Background In January 2011 the old Xeral-Calde hospital in 
the city of Lugo moved to new premises. The new hospital 
management decided to set up an automated storage and dis-
pensing system in the intensive care unit.
Purpose To analyse the automated Pyxis dispensing system 
in the hospital’s intensive care unit (ICU) from the fi nancial 
and human resources point of view.
Materials and methods A drugs list was established for use 
in the Pyxis system. Large volume medicines and emergency 
trolley medicines were not included. They were arranged in 
the Pyxis by size, frequency of use and safety considerations. 
A period of 10 days was set aside for training the unit person-
nel, facilitating the integration of the Pyxis system into the 
department and involving the whole personnel in the process. 
To acquire and data capture The authors used the SINFHOS 
Drugstore management software, the Web Reporting associ-
ated with the Pyxis storage system and the hospital collabo-
rated with us over supervision.
Results The average monthly / patient cost in ICU comparing 
the periods January–March, 2010 (without the Pyxis system) 
and January–March, 2011 (with the Pyxis system) was reduced 
by 20.3%. The number of drugs stocked has increased 11.4%, 
but less space is needed for storage in the unit. The pharmacy 
staff was required to spend more time on personnel training, 
each nursing assistant needing about 14 h’ more training a 
week; however nurses working in ICU were able to reduce the 
time taken for their daily work by an average of two h.
Conclusions Introducing the Pyxis system in the intensive 
care unit is seen as a step forward in both the ICU and the 
pharmacy. The main advantages were the decrease in costs 
assigned to the unit by the reduction of accumulated stock, 
more information is available about the medicines for each 
patient and bureaucratic work has been reduced in the ICU, 
giving staff more time for patient care.
Competing interests None.
TCH014
USE OF COMPUTERS TO IMPROVE EFFICIENCY AND 
SAFETY OF UNIT-DOSE PREPARATIONS
P. Polidori, C. Di Giorgio, R. Di Stefano, A. Provenzani 1Ismett, Clinical Pharmacy, 
Palermo, Italy
10.1136/ejhpharm-2012-000074.150
Background Unit-dose drug distribution is a medication man-
agement system, promoted by ISMETT clinical pharmacy, for 
optimal pharmaceutical patient care. Suitable software was 
fundamental to controlling the therapeutic process from pre-
scription to the administration to patients in the care unit.
Purpose The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the 
effi ciency of the software in 2 areas: helping pharmacists do 
their job and preventing failure of drug administration.
Materials and methods The software used by the pharmacy 
processes all information about the patient and the injectable 
medicines prescribed in the electronic clinical chart. A label is 
generated for each preparation and all information (patient’s 
name, date of birth, identifi cation code, unit, room, drug, dose, 
dilution, expiry date, rate of administration and storage condi-
tions) is printed. A barcode is used for the last check before 
administration. Then technician prepares the daily batch of 
injections under pharmacist supervision.
Results From January to September 2011, 75000 preparations 
were made (average of 275 per day). 31% were continuous infu-
sions and 69% were bolus including antibiotics (46%), gastro-
protectives (12%), cardiac stimulants (9%), antihypertensives 
(5%), antiarrhythmics (1.5%), hypoglycaemics (7%), anaes-
thetics (6%), antithrombotics (5%), antifungals (2%), antivi-
rals (1%), other (8.5%). This software supports the pharmacist 
in providing the right drug to the right patient in the right dose 
and dosage form by means of the electronic interface with the 
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   141
13_ejhpharm-2012-000074.indd   141
3/9/2012   12:26:42 PM
3/9/2012   12:26:42 PM
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested