asp net mvc 5 pdf viewer : Acrobat reader merge pdf files control SDK platform web page wpf winforms web browser myers_supervsion0-part1943

Nursing
Cardiometabolic
Billie-Jean Martin, William G. Herbert, Marco Guazzi and Ross Arena
American Heart Association
Print ISSN: 0009-7322. Online ISSN: 1524-4539 
Circulation 
doi: 10.1161/CIR.0000000000000101
2014;130:1014-1027; originally published online August 18, 2014;
Circulation. 
http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/130/12/1014
World Wide Web at: 
http://circ.ahajournals.org//subscriptions/
is online at: 
Circulation 
Information about subscribing to 
Subscriptions:
http://www.lww.com/reprints
Information about reprints can be found online at: 
Reprints:
document. 
Permissions and Rights Question and Answer 
this process is available in the
Circulation
in
Permissions:
at Universitaet Bern on September 20, 2014
http://circ.ahajournals.org/
Downloaded from 
at Universitaet Bern on September 20, 2014
http://circ.ahajournals.org/
Downloaded from 
Acrobat reader merge pdf files - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
acrobat split pdf into multiple files; combine pdf
Acrobat reader merge pdf files - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
pdf mail merge; append pdf files reader
AHA Scientific Statement
1014
T
he standard exercise test is a well-established procedure 
that has been widely used in cardiovascular medicine for 
many decades, with staffing issues that have changed over 
time. The test is frequently considered the “gatekeeper” to 
more expensive and/or invasive procedures since it is often 
the first diagnostic evaluation when coronary artery disease 
(CAD) is suspected. Thus, it is used to help guide decisions 
regarding diagnosis and/or medical and interventional man-
agement. Moreover, the prognostic value of aerobic capacity 
and other variables obtained during exercise is firmly estab-
lished in those who are apparently healthy and in virtually all 
patient populations.
1,2
Generally, peak or symptom-limited 
exercise testing is used to detect signs or symptoms of myo-
cardial ischemia and to discern fundamental information on 
exercise capacity, exercise hemodynamics, dysrhythmias, 
oxygenation, neuroautonomic health, symptoms, and other 
physiological responses. In most instances, peak effort entails 
at least brief periods of high-intensity exercise, and evidence 
suggests that such vigorous physical exertion may cause a tran-
sient increase in the risk of cardiovascular events in high-risk 
individuals.
3,4
Because the exercise test is typically performed 
in patients with known or suspected cardiovascular disease, 
guidelines and scientific statements on exercise testing have 
historically recommended physician presence for supervision 
as a means both to optimize functional and diagnostic testing 
decisions and safety and to administer emergency treatment 
should complications occur. However, systematic surveys of 
multiple centers and reports from individual clinical exercise 
laboratories have shown that contemporary exercise tests are 
often conducted and supervised by nonphysicians (eg, exer-
cise physiologists, nurses, physical therapists [PTs], physician 
assistants [PAs]). These reports and empirical evidence sug-
gest that testing efficacy and safety are similar in laboratories 
where tests are directly supervised by physicians and those 
where nonphysicians administer testing under the egis of a 
physician supervisor.
5–11
This issue has been the topic of sig-
nificant debate in the past, and there are currently no consis-
tent or widely accepted standards on exercise test supervision.
To some extent, staffing shifts in exercise testing laborato-
ries have been motivated by growing priorities for cost contain-
ment and greater efficiencies of medical care. Nonphysician 
care providers often now conduct the mechanics of exercise 
testing under a physician’s supervision at less cost than test-
ing performed directly by physicians. Although the details of 
supervision and physician proximity vary between individuals 
and institutions, the key point is that direct physician contact 
with the patient has diminished
5–12
while involvement by allied 
healthcare providers has expanded. A premise of this scientific 
statement is to characterize testing strategies that center atten-
tion on quality compared with cost. Nonphysicians may even 
provide some advantages in regard to patient care but not as sur-
rogates for physicians’ clinical skills and medical knowledge.
Previous statements are related to physician qualifications 
for the supervision of exercise testing from the American 
(Circulation. 2014;130:1014-1027.)
© 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.
Circulation is available at http://circ.ahajournals.org 
DOI: 10.1161/CIR.0000000000000101
The American Heart Association makes every effort to avoid an
or a personal, professional, or business interest of a member of the writing panel. Specifically, all members of the writing group are required to complete 
and submit a Disclosure Questionnaire showing all such relationships that might be perceived as real or potential conflicts of interest.
This statement was approved by the American Heart Association Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee on March 27, 2014. A copy of the 
document is available at http://my.americanheart.org/statements by selecting either the “By Topic” link or the “By Publication Date” link. To purchase 
additional reprints, call 843-216-2533 or e-mail kelle.ramsay@wolterskluwer.com.
The American Heart Association requests that this document be cited as follows: Myers J, Forman DE, Balady GJ, Franklin BA, Nelson-Worel J, 
Martin B-J, MD, Herbert WG, Guazzi M, Arena R; on behalf of the American Heart Association Subcommittee on Exercise, Cardiac Rehabilitation, and 
Prevention of the Council on Clinical Cardiologyvention, and Council 
on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing. Supervision of exercise testing by nonphysicians: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. 
Circulation. 2014;130:1014–1027.
Expert peer review of AHA Scientific Statements is conducted by the AHA Office of Science Operations. For more on AHA statements and guidelines 
development, visit http://my.americanheart.org/statements and select the “Policies and Development” link.
ution of this document are not permitted without the express 
permission of the American Heart .heart.org/HEARTORG/General/Copyright-
Permission-Guidelines_UCM_300404_Article.jsp. A link to the “Copyright Permissions Request Form” appears on the right side of the page.
Supervision of Exercise Testing by Nonphysicians
A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association
Jonathan Myers, PhD, FAHA, Chair; Daniel E. Forman, MD, FAHA;  
Gary J. Balady, MD, FAHA; Barry A. Franklin, PhD, FAHA; Jane Nelson-Worel, MS, APNP,  
Billie-Jean Martin, MD; William G. Herbert, PhD; Marco Guazzi, MD, PhD;  
Ross Arena, PhD, PT, FAHA; on behalf of the American Heart Association Subcommittee  
on Exercise, Cardiac Rehabilitation, and Prevention of the Council on Clinical Cardiology, Council on 
Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health, Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, and Council  
on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing
at Universitaet Bern on September 20, 2014
http://circ.ahajournals.org/
Downloaded from 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Merge, split PDF files. Insert, delete PDF pages. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF.
batch merge pdf; merge pdf online
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. By using the Windows Viewer, you can convert word files as follows: Convert to PDF.
break a pdf into multiple files; split pdf into multiple files
Myers et al  Supervision of Exercise Testing by Nonphysicians  1015
Heart Association (AHA)/American College of Cardiology 
(ACC) and the American College of Physicians.
13,14
Performance criteria and personnel certification programs 
have been available from the American College of Sports 
Medicine (ACSM) for >30 years, but AHA/American College 
of Physicians statements in this area have been directed at 
the physician. However, in contemporary exercise laborato-
ries, physicians often provide supervision or oversight but are 
less frequently physically present for testing. “Supervision” 
has been interpreted in different ways, and for the purposes of 
this document, 3 categories of physician supervision are used, 
depending on the type of patient being tested
13
: (1) personal 
supervision, requiring a physician’s presence in the room; (2) 
direct supervision, requiring a physician to be in the immedi-
ate vicinity or on the premises or the floor and available for 
emergencies (explicitly defined as the ability to be in the test-
ing room within 30 seconds of notification); and (3) general 
supervision, requiring the physician to be available by phone 
or by page (generally appropriate for healthy, asymptomatic 
individuals).The present statement responds to the need to 
specify the appropriate education, training, experience, and 
cognitive and procedural skills necessary for nonphysicians to 
conduct exercise testing and to delineate standards that main-
tain patient safety. This statement also responds to the need 
to provide physicians with guidance in terms of cognitive and 
procedural skills that strengthen their ability to supervise non-
physician health professionals who perform exercise testing.
Key principles endorsed by this statement include recog-
nition that proficiency and quality of exercise testing can be 
achieved by nonphysician health professionals but that physi-
cian participation also remains indispensable. Ideally, exercise 
testing entails a team approach. Nonphysician health profes-
sionals may administer and even supervise exercise testing 
independently, but physician involvement is essential with 
respect to delineation of testing policies/standards, medical 
safety standards and monitoring, physical proximity in emer-
gent situations, and direct participation for patients at high risk.
The necessity for this statement also evolves from changes 
in clinical practice patterns in regard to exercise testing in 
which many exercise tests—in some centers, most exercise 
tests—are administered by nonphysicians,
5–12
including those 
in low- to high-risk patients. As these changes have evolved, 
ambiguity about the physician’s role relative to the nonphy-
sician has been increasingly common. Other AHA scientific 
statements address cardiopulmonary exercise testing and 
exercise and pharmacological imaging procedures specifi-
cally, each of which has its own unique set of cognitive and 
procedural skills.
15–17
This document is intended to comple-
ment a previous ACC/AHA statement on clinical competence 
on exercise testing for physicians
13
and to extend previous 
AHA scientific statements related to exercise testing.
12,13,16–19
The writing group has considered current practice patterns; 
studies on risks associated with exercise testing; efforts by 
the ACSM and other organizations to formulate knowledge, 
skills, and abilities for conducting clinical exercise testing; 
legal implications; and the recognized scope of responsibili-
ties for nonphysician health professionals who might perform 
exercise testing. Competence is a complex issue, and by its 
nature, an evidence basis for recommendations is not always 
available; when this is the case, the writing group has used 
consensus opinion to formulate recommendations.
Continued Relevance of the Exercise Test
Publication of this document on exercise test supervision is in 
the context of a broader debate on the utility and application 
of functional and diagnostic testing. Whereas exercise test-
ing was originally based on the assumption that cardiac risk 
was determined primarily by obstructive CAD, which could 
be reliably detected by provocative testing,
16
coronary risk is 
now attributed more to inflammatory processes, plaque stabil-
ity, or the nature of coronary lesions.
20
Therefore, many now 
regard biomarkers as superior gauges of risk and imaging as 
a preferred methodology to quantify or characterize plaque, 
calcium, or other pertinent anatomic lesions.
Nonetheless, this statement presumes an enduring and unam-
biguous value of exercise testing. For ischemic heart disease, 
exercise testing yields a physiological perspective on plaque 
burden and is a pertinent gauge of hemodynamics, arrhyth-
mias, symptoms, and other indexes that provide independent 
and additive information to inflammatory and other biopeptide 
markers, adding critical perspectives on prognostic evaluation 
and management choices.
2
Moreover, exercise testing has sub-
stantive value as a means to delineate ischemic ECG, angina 
thresholds, and other abnormal physiological responses during 
activity, as well as facilitating pertinent assessments in heart 
failure, valvular heart disease, arrhythmias (supraventricular 
and ventricular), conduction disease, peripheral arterial dis-
ease, pulmonary hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmo-
nary disease, and other subclinical disease processes that are 
increasingly prevalent in an aging population prone to chronic 
diseases and multimorbidity.
2
Functional quantification is 
a key end point for all these conditions, and this measure-
ment is enriched when integrated with hemodynamics, heart 
rate changes, conduction changes, and symptoms, as well 
as in combination with myocardial perfusion imaging,
21
gas 
exchange,
17
and associated metabolic parameters.
22
Decisions 
about patient selection, type of test, and which end points are 
to be prioritized require sophistication and expertise.
The blend of physician and nonphysician personnel adds 
to the potential for excellence and efficiency. The range of 
clinical needs and testing modalities implies the need for a 
variety of testing expertise, with physicians often benefitting 
from complementary skill sets of allied providers. Therefore, 
instead of focusing on exercise testing personnel as a single 
prototype with redundant roles, it is important to identify 
where physicians and nonphysicians overlap and where they 
differ and thus how they can best complement one another to 
optimize test performance and safety.
Evolution of Exercise Test Supervision
Over the past 30 years since the AHA released its first set of 
standards for adult exercise testing laboratories,
23
the role of 
the physician in ensuring that the exercise laboratory is prop-
erly equipped and appropriately staffed with qualified per-
sonnel who adhere to a written set of policies and procedures 
specific to that laboratory has not changed. However, the issue 
of whether all exercise tests should be directly and personally 
supervised by a physician has evolved over time, as has the 
at Universitaet Bern on September 20, 2014
http://circ.ahajournals.org/
Downloaded from 
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
add pdf together; attach pdf to mail merge
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
Features and Benefits. Powerful image converter to convert images of JPG, JPEG formats to PDF files; No need for Adobe Acrobat Reader; Seamlessly integrated into
acrobat merge pdf; asp.net merge pdf files
1016  Circulation  September 16, 2014
range of patients being tested. In 1979, the AHA stated that 
“a physician must be immediately available, but may delegate 
the actual conduct of the test where he has determined it can 
be safely performed by experienced paramedical person-
nel.”
23
Since that time, the AHA, ACC, ACSM, and American 
Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation 
have consistently addressed this issue in subsequent iterations 
of their respective guidelines.
12,16,24,25
In 2000, the ACC/AHA/
American College of Physicians–American College of Internal 
Medicine Competency Task Force focused its efforts on outlin-
ing the specific cognitive and training requirements for those 
personnel involved with the supervision and interpretation of 
exercise ECG testing and with stress imaging tests adminis-
tered to adults, children, and adolescents. That seminal docu-
ment was the first to look beyond the specific professional type 
(eg, physician, nurse, exercise physiologist) and focus on spe-
cific competencies of the individual staff member.
13
Detailed 
recommendations of the most recent version of professional 
guidelines are provided in Table 1.
12,13,16,24,25
Common to each 
of the published guidelines are several key recommendations: 
Patients are screened before exercise testing to identify the 
most appropriate personnel to supervise the test; exercise test-
ing may be supervised by nonphysician staff who are deemed 
competent according to the criteria as outlined in the ACC/
AHA statement
13
; a physician is always immediately available 
to assist as needed (ie, to provide direct supervision as defined 
in Table 1); and in high-risk patients, the physician personally 
supervises the test (as defined in Table 1).
A critical component common to each of these previous rec-
ommendations is that patients are screened before the exercise 
test to identify when direct physician presence is necessary. 
Therefore, the nonphysician staff should be able to distinguish 
when physician supervision is indicated. Furthermore, if this 
decision is unclear, the nonphysician staff should have the 
experience and judgment to defer to the physician directing 
the exercise laboratory. Screening should include cardiovas-
cular history, general medical conditions and circumstances, 
and signs or symptoms that warrant direct physician supervi-
sion. Recommendations for key types of patients who require 
direct physician supervision (physically present in the room) 
are outlined in Table 2. This is not an evidenced-based list 
(general Level of Evidence, C) but represents a guideline 
based on judgment of the writing group in response to greater 
aggregate patient risks.
Risk of Exercise Testing by Physician and 
Nonphysician Healthcare Providers
Pathophysiological evidence suggests that the increased 
cardiac demands of vigorous to maximal exercise may pre-
cipitate cardiovascular events or other clinical instability in 
individuals with known or occult heart disease and other perti-
nent diseases, particularly among habitually sedentary people 
performing unaccustomed, high-intensity physical activity.
4
Vigorous physical activity can provoke plaque rupture and 
thrombotic occlusion of a coronary vessel, presumably as a 
result of the associated abrupt increases in heart rate and blood 
pressure, induced coronary artery spasm in diseased artery 
segments, or twisting of the epicardial coronary arteries.
26
An increase in platelet activation and hyperreactivity, which 
could contribute to (or even trigger) coronary thrombosis, 
has also been reported in habitually sedentary subjects who 
engaged in sporadic strenuous exercise but not in physically 
trained individuals.
27
Symptomatic or silent myocardial isch-
emia, sodium-potassium imbalance, increased catecholamine 
excretion, circulating free fatty acids, and decreased coronary 
perfusion resulting from abrupt cessation of maximal exercise 
may also be arrhythmogenic. Other complications that may be 
induced by exercise testing include hemodynamic (especially 
among patients with structural heart disease) and conduction 
perturbations, bronchospasm (especially among patients with 
chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), and hypoglycemia, 
all increasingly common among the wide range of patients 
now routinely referred to many exercise testing laboratories.
In 1971, Rochmis and Blackburn
28
published results of a 
survey on the procedures, safety, and litigation experience in 
≈170 000 exercise tests performed in 73 medical centers, a 
time when testing focused primarily on CAD patients. The 
overall mortality rate from these centers was 0.10 deaths per 
1000 tests (0.01%), and the combined morbidity and mortality 
(total complications) rate was 0.34 per 1000 tests (0.034%). 
Another widely quoted survey of 518 448 exercise tests con-
ducted in 1375 centers revealed a 50% lower mortality rate, 
0.05 deaths per 1000 tests (0.005%), but a higher combined 
complication rate, 0.89 per 1000 tests (0.089%).
29
However, 
application of these often-cited survey results to contempo-
rary exercise laboratories is tenuous at best because of the 
varied testing modalities, protocols and end points used, as 
well as the mix of submaximal and maximal tests, differences 
in exclusion criteria and types of patients studied, expanded 
role of cardiopulmonary exercise testing in functional assess-
ment and risk stratification, and gradual shift in direct physi-
cian supervision of these tests to highly trained nonphysician 
health professionals. Current emergent revascularization 
procedures (which markedly decrease early postinfarction 
mortality), cardioprotective pharmacotherapies (eg, aspirin, 
statins, antiarrhythmic and β-adrenergic blocking agents, 
angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors), and the increas-
ing number of middle-aged and older adults with pacemakers 
or implantable cardioverter-defibrillators may also reduce the 
risk of exercise testing in specific patient subsets.
Since the publication of these early survey data, numerous 
investigators have reported the cardiovascular complication 
rates of exercise testing using direct supervision by either 
physicians (generally cardiologists or internal medicine spe-
cialists) or highly trained nonphysician health professionals 
with a physician available in the immediate area for pretest 
evaluation of selected patients and to assist in the event of 
complications. A summary of 19 different reports (1971–
2012) involving >2.1 million exercise tests is given in Table 3, 
with specific reference to year of publication, morbidity and 
mortality rates, total complications, and direct supervision (ie, 
physician versus nonphysician).
5–9,11,28–40
Subjects included 
apparently healthy individuals and adults with known or 
suspected cardiovascular disease, athletes, and patients with 
a history of high-risk cardiac conditions, including chronic 
heart failure (ie, New York Heart Association class II–IV 
heart failure caused by left ventricular systolic dysfunction), 
hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, pulmonary hypertension, aortic 
at Universitaet Bern on September 20, 2014
http://circ.ahajournals.org/
Downloaded from 
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
add two pdf files together; batch merge pdf
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
build pdf from multiple files; apple merge pdf
Myers et al  Supervision of Exercise Testing by Nonphysicians  1017
stenosis, malignant ventricular arrhythmias, or combinations 
thereof. Complications were defined primarily as the occur-
rence of acute myocardial infarction or exercise-induced 
threatening arrhythmias (ventricular tachycardia, ventricular 
fibrillation, or marked bradycardia) that mandated immediate 
medical treatment. However, other complications were broadly 
reported in some studies and included supraventricular tachy-
cardias, atrial fibrillation, stroke, transient ischemic attack, 
Table 1. 
Organization
Guideline /Year
Recommendation
AHA/ACC
“Clinical Competence  
Statement on Stress  
Testing”13/2000
(PMID 11015355)
AHA
“Recommendations for  
Clinical Exercise  
Laboratories”12/2009
(PMID 19487589)
AHA
“Exercise Standards for 
Testing and Training”19/2013
13
ACSM
“Guidelines for Exercise  
Testing and 
Prescription”24/2010
on clinical competence in stress testing.13 In most cases, clinical exercise tests can 
AACVPR
“Guidelines for Cardiac 
Rehabilitation and Secondary 
Prevention Programs”
25
/2013
the physician supervisor as per established guidelines.13 In all cases, the supervising 
physician must be immediately available to respond.
ACP, American College of Physicians; 
*Three levels of supervision for diagnostic tests as follows: (1) personal supervision requires a physician’s presence in the room; (2) direct supervision requires a 
physician to be in the immediate vicinity or on the premises or the floor and available for emergencies; and (3) general supervision requires the physician to be available 
by phone or by page.13
at Universitaet Bern on September 20, 2014
http://circ.ahajournals.org/
Downloaded from 
GIF to PDF Converter | Convert GIF to PDF, Convert PDF to GIF
PDF files to GIF images with high quality. It can be functioned as an integrated component without the use of external applications & Adobe Acrobat Reader.
pdf merge; best pdf combiner
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
interface; Powerful image converter for Bitmap and PDF files; No need for Adobe Acrobat Reader & print driver during conversion; Support
c# merge pdf pages; pdf mail merge
1018  Circulation  September 16, 2014
nonsustained ventricular tachycardia, syncope, implantable 
cardioverter-defibrillator discharges requiring hospitalization, 
and vasovagal episodes, resulting in considerable variation in 
the associated test morbidity and total complications.
A review of these separate studies (Table 3) shows that 
16 of the 19 reports included complication rates derived 
from >1000 exercise tests. The reported death rate for test-
ing, which generally included a follow-up period to capture 
patients hospitalized as a result of a documented adverse 
event (ie, death within 48 hours of the exercise test), ranged 
between 0 and 0.25 per 1000 tests. In the same populations, 
the combined rates for morbidity and mortality (total com-
plications) were between 0 and 78.0 events per 1000 tests. 
However, the latter complication rate (78.0 events per 1000 
tests) was derived from 5 reported cases of sustained ventricu-
lar tachycardia in 64 exercise tests in patients with a history 
of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias.
35
Similarly, in a 
series of 263 patients with a history of malignant ventricular 
arrhythmias who underwent a total of 1377 peak or sign- or 
symptom-limited exercise tests, investigators reported 32 epi-
sodes of sustained ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrilla-
tion, or profound bradycardia mandating immediate medical 
treatment.
32
Although no deaths or myocardial infarctions 
were noted in either report,
32,35
combining these 2 studies of 
high-risk patients yields an alarming complication rate, 25.7 
per 1000 tests. If these 2 reports involving small numbers of 
extremely high-risk patients are excluded from Table 3, the 
total complication rate ranges from 0 to 3.46 events per 1000 
tests. Although it is not possible from these data to stratify risk 
by population or testing method, the rate of total complica-
tions appears higher in populations who are undergoing diag-
nostic exercise testing, including patients with chronic heart 
failure, impaired left ventricular function, or threatening ven-
tricular arrhythmias, compared with young adults being tested 
for athletics or as part of a preventive medical examination. 
Although the current treatment era includes many patients 
who are complex and potentially at higher risk for an adverse 
event, given the evolution in cardiovascular management with 
respect to procedures, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, 
chronic resynchronization therapy devices, and medications, 
many of these older surveys may provide an overestimation of 
risk in contemporary clinical practice. 
Required Training and 
Demonstrated Competencies
There are several nonphysician health professions for which 
the academic training creates the foundation to achieve the 
level of competence required to independently supervise clini-
cal exercise tests. These include nurses, nurse practitioners 
(NPs), PAs, clinical exercise physiologists (CEPs), and PTs. 
However, it should not be assumed that the academic training 
of any of these health professions provides the necessary edu-
cational experiences without proper vetting for a given individ-
ual. Thus, requirements for academic training and experiences 
focus on universally required educational experiences and 
competencies rather than a specific nonphysician health pro-
fession. Although numerous nonphysician health professionals 
function in a clinical exercise testing laboratory with varied 
responsibilities,
12,18
the following sections describe the knowl-
edge requirements and demonstrated competencies needed to 
operate autonomously, running day-to-day operations under 
the guidance of the physician director of the laboratory who 
must also be highly knowledgeable and proficient in all of 
these areas. The demonstrated cognitive and practical experi-
ences and skills and abilities needed to independently super-
vise clinical exercise tests are summarized in Table 4. Although 
some of the skills described below and in Table 4 may be del-
egated to support personnel, the nonphysician health profes-
sional granted the ability to independently conduct the exercise 
test must demonstrate proficiency in all these areas.
Cognitive and Practical Skills Required to Conduct 
Exercise Testing
The ability to achieve diagnostic accuracy and to maintain a 
high degree of safety depends on understanding and identify-
ing test indications and contraindications, selecting an appro-
priate incremental protocol (with respect to both mode and 
intensity), knowing when to terminate the test, and being pre-
pared for and rapidly responding to any emergencies that may 
arise. Although most exercise testing guidelines have been 
written oriented to CAD, the population of patients consid-
ered for exercise tests has expanded. Clinical sophistication 
in terms of CAD, heart failure, structural heart disease, con-
duction disease, aortic stenosis and other valvular diseases, 
diabetes mellitus, pulmonary hypertension, and interstitial 
pulmonary disease is pertinent for safe and effective testing 
in most contemporary exercise testing laboratories. Insights 
pertaining to age, obesity, sex, and frailty are also relevant. 
These include knowing the normal and abnormal ECG and 
hemodynamic responses to different types and intensities of 
exercise, the associated adverse signs and symptoms and their 
pathophysiological implications, and the potential impact 
of the patient’s prescribed medications on these parameters. 
Accordingly, physicians and nonphysicians who directly 
Table 2. Recommendations for Patients Requiring Personal 
Physician Supervision Based on Clinical Safety Criteria*
Moderate to severe aortic stenosis in an asymptomatic or questionably 
symptomatic patient
Moderate to severe mitral stenosis in an asymptomatic or questionably 
symptomatic patient
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: risk stratification and exercise  
gradient assessment
History of malignant or exertional arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death
History of exertional syncope or presyncope
Intracardiac shunts
Genetic channelopathies
Within 7 d of myocardial infarction or other acute coronary syndrome
New York Heart Association class III heart failure
status has recently deteriorated and those who have never undergone  
prior exercise testing)
Severe pulmonary arterial hypertension
obstructive lung disease)
*Personal supervision defined as physical presence in the room.
at Universitaet Bern on September 20, 2014
http://circ.ahajournals.org/
Downloaded from 
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
batch combine pdf; acrobat combine pdf files
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat. profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and components
add multiple pdf files into one online; pdf merge comments
Myers et al  Supervision of Exercise Testing by Nonphysicians  1019
supervise exercise tests must have the necessary cognitive 
and technical skills as delineated in the competency statement 
of the ACC/AHA/American College of Physicians,
13
experi-
ence in exercise testing as outlined in the ACC Foundation 
Task Force on Training in Electrocardiography and Exercise 
Testing
41
(requiring a minimum of 200 tests for level 1 pro-
ficiency), and an understanding of the standards of practice 
and research-based guidelines from other professional orga-
nizations involved in the training/certification of these indi-
viduals, including the ACSM
24
(Table 1). The expanded range 
of patients undergoing exercise testing underlies one of the 
strong priorities of continued physician involvement even in a 
staff accustomed to routine exercise testing.
Screening for indications and contraindications from the 
medical history and baseline 12-lead ECG can generally be 
achieved by highly trained nonphysician health professionals, 
provided that an appropriate physician staff member (eg, inter-
nal medicine, cardiology) is also available to evaluate selected 
patients before testing. The nonphysician should bring ques-
tions related to appropriate use criteria to the attention of the 
physician. Decisions about the proper triaging of patients to 
appropriate levels of supervision during exercise testing are 
critical before the test (Table 2). Nonphysicians can also make a 
timely and accurate interpretation of the significance of evoked 
signs or symptoms, terminating an exercise test at an appro-
priate intensity level. Standardized methodological procedures 
and test termination criteria with a minimum of personal inter-
pretation help preserve safety. Because all exercise testing staff 
should have current credentialing in basic life support and ide-
ally advanced cardiac life support, complications should be 
appropriately managed in the interval before the designated 
covering physician or emergency response team arrives. A 
distinct, clearly audible, and easily activated emergency alarm 
system, specific to the testing room location where the compli-
cation has occurred, is strongly recommended for this purpose. 
Finally, several reports suggest that highly trained NPs, PAs, 
Table 3. Complication Rates of Exercise Testing (1971–2012)
Reference
Year
Tests,  
n
Morbidity Rate,  
n per 1000
Mortality Rate,  
n per 1000
Total Complications,  
n per 1000
Physician  
Supervised?
Rochmis and 
Blackburn28
1971
≈170 000
0.24
0.10
0.34
Yes*
Scherer and 
Kaltenbach
30
1979
353 638†
0
0
0
Yes*
712 285‡
0.14
0.02
0.16
Yes*
Atterhog et al31
1979
50 000
0.52
0.04
0.56
Yes*
Stuart and 
Ellestad29
1980
518 448
0.84
0.05
0.89
Yes*
Young et al32
1984
1377§
23.2
0
23.2
Yes*
Lem et al
33
1985
4050
0.03
0
0.03
No‖
Cahalin et al9
1987
18 707
0.38
0.09
0.47
No‖
DeBusk34
1988
>12 000
NR
0.25
NR
No‖
Allen et al
35
1988
64
78.0
0
78.0
Yes
Gibbons et al36
1989
71 914
0.07
0.01
0.08
Yes*
Knight et al8
1995
28 133
0.32
0
0.32
No‖
Franklin et al
5
1997
58 047
0.21
0.03
0.24
No‖
Ilia and Gueron37
1997
38 970
1.10
0
1.10
Yes
Squires et al
7
1999
289
3.46
0
3.46
No‖
Myers et al
6
2000
75 828
0.12
0
0.12
Yes*
Scardovi et al38
2007
395
2.53
0
2.53
NR
Kane et al
39
2008
8592
0.93
0
0.93
No‖
Keteyian et al
40
2009
4411
0.45
0
0.45
Yes/No¶
Skalski et al11
2012
5060
1.58
0
1.58
No‖
NR indicates not reported.
†Athletes.
‡Coronary patients.
of serious arrhythmias during exercise testing (ie, mandated 
physiologist or nurse) with medical supervision in close proximity.
at Universitaet Bern on September 20, 2014
http://circ.ahajournals.org/
Downloaded from 
1020  Circulation  September 16, 2014
exercise physiologists, and technicians can provide an accurate 
preliminary interpretation of exercise test responses, in excel-
lent agreement with attending physician or cardiology consult 
overreads.
42–45
Thus, the nonphysician who meets the appropri-
ate qualifications can provide a preliminary interpretation and 
discussion of the results to the patient.
An in-depth understanding of both resting and exer-
tional cardiovascular and pulmonary physiology is perhaps 
the most important competency area for the nonphysician 
health professional supervising clinical exercise tests. The 
nonphysician health professional should be able to provide 
a detailed description of both normal and abnormal resting 
and exertional responses of these physiological systems. 
This understanding is needed to determine whether a clini-
cal exercise test should be initiated and, if initiated, when the 
test should be terminated as a result of either abnormal signs 
or symptoms or an inappropriate physiological response. The 
nonphysician health professional must be able to demonstrate 
his/her academic and experiential training by accurately inter-
preting resting and exertional cardiovascular and pulmonary 
responses. Ideally, these experiences should be reinforced 
by attending continuing education courses and independent 
reading of appropriate texts and journal articles. Numerous 
exercise testing guidelines, texts, and journal articles serve 
as invaluable resources in this regard
12,16–19,24,46,47
(Table 1). 
In addition to demonstration of appropriate academic train-
ing, the nonphysician health professional must maintain, at a 
minimum, basic life support certification. There are additional 
certifications such as the ACSM Registered Clinical Exercise 
Physiologist and Certified Clinical Exercise Specialist (http://
certification.acsm.org/) that the nonphysician health profes-
sional should be encouraged to obtain if eligible. Although 
highly recommended and possibly even required by specific 
exercise laboratories, these additional certifications are not 
Table 4. 
Exercise Tests
Essential Criteria
Where Obtained
How Assessed
Cognitive  
experiences
Exposure to and understanding of normal and 
abnormal resting and exertional physiology of the 
cardiovascular and pulmonary systems
Exposure to clinical exercise testing principles
Exposure to ECG interpretation during both rest and 
exertion.
Academic curricula, continuing  
education courses, and  
additional certifications
Academic transcripts,  
continuing education certificates,  
and documentation of certification 
credentials
Practical  
experiences
Previous time spent in a clinical exercise testing 
laboratory, either working independently or 
under supervision, during academic training or 
after graduation. Physicians and nonphysicians 
should meet level 1 Core Cardiology Training 
Symposium standard for conducting exercise 
testing, requiring a minimum of 200 tests.41 
A minimum of 50 tests per y should be 
performed to maintain competency.
Clinical exercise  
testing laboratory
Previous experience documented 
on curriculum vitae, letters of 
recommendation
Skills and  
abilities
Screens patients for the appropriate indication, 
type of test, and contraindications. Assesses 
patient history, symptoms, and signs that suggest 
increased risk so that the appropriate level of 
medical supervision is provided. 
Recognizes appropriate termination criteria for the 
clinical exercise test.
Recognizes when baseline signs and symptoms 
indicate the clinical exercise test is not warranted. 
Effectively communicates with the patient about 
the reason for testing; obtains informed consent; 
selects appropriate exercise testing procedures; 
and prepares patient for the exercise test. 
Operates/maintains all clinical exercise testing 
equipment independently.
Appropriately interprets clinical exercise testing 
data and generates appropriate reports, the 
parameters of which are defined by the  
laboratory medical director.
Clinical exercise  
testing laboratory
Direct supervision of nonphysician  
health professional conducting and 
interpreting clinical exercise tests by 
medical director or designee
Clinical vignettes/written  
assessments
Simulated ECG interpretation  
exercises
at Universitaet Bern on September 20, 2014
http://circ.ahajournals.org/
Downloaded from 
Myers et al  Supervision of Exercise Testing by Nonphysicians  1021
universally mandated for the ability to independently super-
vise clinical exercise tests.
The logistics of each clinical exercise test performed should 
account for characteristics of the individual patient undergoing 
the assessment. For example, patients who present with signif-
icant functional compromise (eg, New York Heart Association 
class III heart failure) would benefit from a conservative 
testing protocol. Likewise, older patients often benefit from 
lower-intensity protocols than those used in young adults. The 
nonphysician health professional must demonstrate an ability 
to make appropriate decisions about the mode of exercise and 
the protocol to use on a case-by-case basis. He/she must also 
demonstrate an ability to appropriately explain the rationale 
for exercise testing to the patient, to obtain informed consent, 
and to prepare the patient for the exercise test.
The nonphysician health professional, when hired in a given 
clinical exercise testing laboratory, should not be immediately 
granted the role to independently supervise clinical exercise 
tests, regardless of academic training, additional certifications, 
or previous experiences. The medical director of the labora-
tory should determine the proficiency of a staff member before 
he or she is granted the responsibility to conduct tests without 
direct supervision. Both physician and nonphysician person-
nel should meet the 2008 ACC Foundation Core Cardiology 
Training Task Force recommendation of a minimum of 200 
tests for level 1 proficiency.
41
A minimum of 50 tests per year 
should be performed to maintain proficiency. Previous experi-
ence in another clinical exercise testing laboratory where the 
nonphysician health professional conducted tests indepen-
dently can be taken into consideration to reduce the number of 
tests that are directly supervised. In addition to direct observa-
tion, the medical director may choose to develop competency 
assessments in accordance with national standards and specific 
to that laboratory (eg, written clinical vignettes followed by a 
series of questions, real-time ECG analysis with a simulator).
Interpretation of exercise test data is ultimately the responsi-
bility of the medical director overseeing the laboratory, includ-
ing overreading of reports. The medical director may choose 
to delegate certain interpretation and report-generating respon-
sibilities to nonphysician health professionals with appropri-
ate medical sophistication, but final responsibility ultimately 
remains with the physician as a standard of care. Therefore, 
as determined by the clinical exercise testing laboratory medi-
cal director, the nonphysician health professional must dem-
onstrate the ability to accurately interpret preliminary exercise 
testing data and to generate an appropriate report.
Ancillary Tests
Advanced clinical exercise testing laboratories typically 
include cardiac perfusion imaging and often have the ability 
to collect ventilatory expired gas analysis during testing. The 
utility of imaging is a key adjunctive technology to improve 
test sensitivity to diagnose CAD. In these settings, the non-
physician must have sophistication about the criteria for when 
imaging may be indicated and the requisite skills for com-
pleting the exercise testing protocols that are integrated with 
echocardiography and nuclear perfusion imaging techniques. 
This also entails the capacity for working with supplementary 
staff, including echocardiography sonographers and nuclear 
perfusionists, and physicians (or nurses) in cases when echo-
cardiographic contrast or pharmacological stress is indicated. 
Perhaps most important, nonphysician staff must have the 
insight and accessibility to the supervising physician to imme-
diately share their impressions about which patients may ben-
efit from imaging modalities.
Exercise testing, coupled with ventilatory expired gas 
analysis, is also indicated for specific test indications such as 
patients diagnosed with heart failure who are being considered 
for device implantation or transplantation and patients being 
assessed for unexplained exertional dyspnea.
17
In these set-
tings, the nonphysician health professional must also have the 
sophistication to identify appropriate patients and to be able to 
readily share this information with the supervising physician. 
Moreover, he/she must be able to independently operate this 
equipment, including calibration and collection of appropriate 
data during the exercise test.
Laboratory Maintenance
The nonphysician health professional must be able to man-
age all equipment housed within the clinical exercise testing 
laboratory. This equipment commonly includes a motorized 
treadmill, an electronically braked cycle ergometer, and blood 
pressure, ECG, and pulse oximetry monitoring equipment. A 
ventilatory expired gas analysis system may also be housed 
within the clinical exercise testing laboratory. The nonphysi-
cian health professional is typically responsible for the main-
tenance and upkeep of this equipment and for ensuring that 
all devices are properly calibrated to be able to collect valid 
and reliable data. The nonphysician health professional may 
have various degrees of ability in repairing equipment, and 
advanced skills in this area are not considered a requirement. 
However, this individual must be able to recognize when equip-
ment is not working properly and contact external support staff 
to schedule repairs. Exercise testing laboratory standards have 
been detailed in previous AHA scientific statements.
12,17
Specific Roles and Responsibilities 
for Nonphysician Staff
A critical role of the nonphysician health professional is to 
triage patients into appropriate risk groups and to understand 
the level of physician oversight required for a given patient. 
Physicians are responsible for teaching their nonphysician 
staff which tests should be considered high risk, and the phy-
sician should be available to directly supervise those tests 
when they are identified by nonphysician support staff. As 
outlined in previous scientific statements related to exercise 
testing (Table 1), patients should be triaged into 3 categories 
by level of risk
13
to determine the degree of physician supervi-
sion required. These levels are as follows: (1) personal super-
vision, requiring a physician’s presence in the room (Table 2); 
(2) direct supervision, requiring a physician to be in the imme-
diate vicinity or on the premises or the floor and available for 
emergencies (immediate vicinity is defined as the ability to 
physically enter the exercise testing room within 30 seconds 
of notification); and (3) general supervision, requiring the 
physician to be available by phone or by page.
Individuals who supervise and administer exercise tests, 
whatever their professional designation, must be highly 
at Universitaet Bern on September 20, 2014
http://circ.ahajournals.org/
Downloaded from 
1022  Circulation  September 16, 2014
competent with specific clinical expertise and technical skills. 
These skills have been outlined by the ACC, AHA, ACSM, 
and others
13,24
(Tables 1 and 4). Although all professionals 
supervising exercise tests must have a core set of skills, the 
considerable variation in educational preparation, certifica-
tion, and licensing of these healthcare professionals underlies 
differences in their roles in the administration and supervision 
of exercise tests, although this may also vary from state to 
state and with the availability of professionals at a given insti-
tution. Suggested roles of nonphysicians working in exercise 
laboratories, including CEPs, nurses and NPs, PAs, and PTs, 
are outlined below.
Clinical Exercise Physiologist
The CEP is specifically trained to perform clinical exercise 
testing, write exercise prescriptions, and provide supervision, 
as well as health education and promotion.
48
The educational 
preparation of a CEP is a minimum of a bachelor degree in 
exercise science, exercise physiology, or kinesiology that 
includes courses covering exercise physiology, clinical exer-
cise testing, exercise prescription, exercise training, and basic 
clinical assessment.
48
This specialized education, training, and 
certification prepares the CEP for a broad range of roles and 
responsibilities within the context of exercise test supervision, 
particularly in selecting exercise test protocols, monitoring 
hemodynamic responses to exercise, helping to determine test 
end points, and quantifying peak exercise workload to estimate 
the patient’s functional capacity in metabolic equivalents.
Registered Nurses and NPs
Registered nurses are trained to perform physical examina-
tions, to take health histories, to provide health education and 
counseling, to interpret patient information, and to make criti-
cal decisions about treatment strategies. They are licensed to 
administer medications and to perform a variety of medical 
procedures under the supervision or direction of a physician or 
person who is licensed to practice medicine.
49
NPs complete 
a course of advanced training (master’s or doctorate degree) 
and are licensed (in most states) to diagnose and treat acute 
and chronic problems, to interpret test results, and to prescribe 
medications and other therapies.
50
To conduct exercise test-
ing, registered nurses should have specific training and skills 
in cardiovascular disease assessment and rhythm management 
and should be certified in advanced cardiovascular life sup-
port. They should be well prepared to take the health history, 
to perform the physical examination before exercise testing, 
and to monitor the patient for adverse responses to incre-
mental exercise, including the identification and treatment of 
serious arrhythmias. They may also help determine the end 
point of testing on the basis of the patient’s symptoms, start 
intravenous medications, and deliver medications during life-
threatening complications. Because of their advanced train-
ing, certification, and licensure, NPs may be able interpret test 
results and communicate them with referring physicians.
Physician Assistants
PAs complete training in an accredited PA program after 
having completed at least 2 years of undergraduate courses 
in basic and behavioral sciences. Although PAs receive a 
broad-based medical education, they, like many health pro-
fessionals, continue learning in the clinical work environment 
and through continuing medical education.
51
Theoretically, 
their role in exercise testing may be interchangeable with that 
of registered nurses and NPs, depending on the specific train-
ing of individuals in each discipline.
Physical Therapists
PTs are trained to provide care to patients who have physical 
impairments, activity limitations, and participation restrictions 
as a result of musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, cardiovascular/
pulmonary, or integumentary disorders.
52
However, the edu-
cational background of PTs can include specialized training 
in cardiovascular and exercise physiology, potentially making 
their role in exercise testing similar to that of the CEP.
As a general rule, the relative areas of expertise of each of 
these disciplines overlap, but they are also distinctive. Nurses, 
NPs, and PAs have relatively more medical training and sophis-
tication, but the degree of relevant cardiovascular, pulmonary, 
and exercise science background may vary. Likewise, CEPs 
and PTs may be similar in regard to their expertise in exercise 
science, but the overall skill set in relation to disease may vary 
from individual to individual, depending on the person’s par-
ticular training and experience. Ideally, nonphysician person-
nel should work as a team rather than in a hierarchical manner.
Role of the Physician
Whereas the physician’s role has gradually evolved from 
directly supervising exercise tests,
28
the contemporary phy-
sician now more typically oversees nonphysicians conduct-
ing these assessments. However, the physician is ultimately 
responsible for the quality and safety of all exercise tests done 
under his or her direct or indirect supervision, as well as the 
final interpretation of the findings. Referral for exercise test-
ing and decisions about appropriate use criteria for standard 
exercise testing or stress imaging are under the purview of the 
physician. Therefore, high standards of time-sensitive com-
munication, documentation, and coordination between physi-
cians and nonphysicians are essential.
Competencies required to supervise exercise tests have 
been outlined previously by the ACC/AHA.
13,41
Physicians 
supervising exercise tests must have cognitive skills includ-
ing knowledge of indications and contraindications for testing, 
knowledge of basic cardiovascular and exercise physiology, 
and knowledge of testing protocols. Furthermore, they must 
have the skills necessary to interpret test results. Physicians 
who oversee exercise tests should meet proficiency standards 
outlined in the 2008 ACC Foundation Task Force 2 train-
ing statement, which require conducting a minimum of 200 
exercise tests during training.
41
This experience is frequently 
obtained during cardiology fellowship, during which tests are 
reviewed by faculty. During this period of training, the fellow 
should not be considered a surrogate for the attending physi-
cian. The attending physician has a supervising role in teaching 
the fellow and overreading the tests and to be present in the 
room when high-risk patients are undergoing testing (Table 2). 
To maintain competency, clinicians should perform at least 
50 exercise tests per year (level 1, personally supervised) and 
should be certified in advanced cardiovascular life support.
at Universitaet Bern on September 20, 2014
http://circ.ahajournals.org/
Downloaded from 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested