asp net mvc 5 pdf viewer : Split pdf into multiple files Library application component .net html winforms mvc NaturalLanguageProcessingWithPython21-part2081

like CNJ V ADJ P -
near P ADV ADJ DET
open ADJ V N ADV
past N ADJ DET P
present ADJ ADV V N
read V VN VD NP
right ADJ N DET ADV
second NUM ADV DET N
set VN V VD N -
that CNJ V WH DET
Your Turn: Open the POS concordance tool 
nltk.app.concordance()
and load the complete Brown Corpus (simplified tagset). Now pick
some of the words listed at the end of the previous code example and
see how the tag of the word correlates with the context of the word. E.g.,
search for 
near
to see all forms mixed together, 
near/ADJ
to see it used
as an adjective, 
near N
to see just those cases where a noun follows, and
so forth.
5.3  Mapping Words to Properties Using Python Dictionaries
As we have seen, a tagged word of the form 
(word, tag)
is an association between a
word and a part-of-speech tag. Once we start doing part-of-speech tagging, we will be
creating programs that assign a tag to a word, the tag which is most likely in a given
context. We can think of this process as mapping from words to tags. The most natural
way to store mappings in Python uses the so-called dictionary data type (also known
as an associative array or hash array in other programming languages). In this sec-
tion, we look at dictionaries and see how they can represent a variety of language in-
formation, including parts-of-speech.
Indexing Lists Versus Dictionaries
A text, as we have seen, is treated in Python as a list of words. An important property
of lists is that we can “look up” a particular item by giving its index, e.g., 
text1[100]
.
Notice how we specify a number and get back a word. We can think of a list as a simple
kind of table, as shown in Figure 5-2.
Figure 5-2. List lookup: We access the contents of a Python list with the help of an integer index.
5.3  Mapping Words to Properties Using Python Dictionaries s | | 189
Split pdf into multiple files - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
add pdf together; add two pdf files together
Split pdf into multiple files - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
c# merge pdf pages; merge pdf files
Contrast this situation with frequency distributions (Section 1.3), where we specify a
word and get back a number, e.g., 
fdist['monstrous']
, which tells us the number of
times a given word has occurred in a text. Lookup using words is familiar to anyone
who has used a dictionary. Some more examples are shown in Figure 5-3.
Figure 5-3. Dictionary lookup: we access the entry of a dictionary using a key such as someone’s name,
a web domain, or an English word; other names for dictionary are map, hashmap, hash, and
associative array.
In the case of a phonebook, we look up an entry using a name and get back a number.
When we type a domain name in a web browser, the computer looks this up to get
back an IP address. A word frequency table allows us to look up a word and find its
frequency in a text collection. In all these cases, we are mapping from names to num-
bers, rather than the other way around as with a list. In general, we would like to be
able to map between arbitrary types of information. Table 5-4 lists a variety of linguistic
objects, along with what they map.
Table 5-4. Linguistic objects as mappings from keys to values
Linguistic object
Maps from
Maps to
Document Index
Word
List of pages (where word is found)
Thesaurus
Word sense
List of synonyms
Dictionary
Headword
Entry (part-of-speech, sense definitions, etymology)
Comparative Wordlist t Gloss term
Cognates (list of words, one per language)
Morph Analyzer
Surface form
Morphological analysis (list of component morphemes)
Most often, we are mapping from a “word” to some structured object. For example, a
document index maps from a word (which we can represent as a string) to a list of pages
(represented as a list of integers). In this section, we will see how to represent such
mappings in Python.
Dictionaries in Python
Python provides a dictionary data type that can be used for mapping between arbitrary
types. It is like a conventional dictionary, in that it gives you an efficient way to look
things up. However, as we see from Table 5-4, it has a much wider range of uses.
190 | | Chapter 5: Categorizing and Tagging Words
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
outputFiles); Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files in C#. You can use the following C# demo to split PDF document to four files.
acrobat merge pdf; combine pdf files
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF file into two or multiple files in ASP.NET webpage online. Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files Demo Code in VB.NET.
append pdf files reader; acrobat combine pdf files
To illustrate, we define 
pos
to be an empty dictionary and then add four entries to it,
specifying the part-of-speech of some words. We add entries to a dictionary using the
familiar square bracket notation:
>>> pos = {}
>>> pos
{}
>>> pos['colorless'] = 'ADJ' 
>>> pos
{'colorless': 'ADJ'}
>>> pos['ideas'] = 'N'
>>> pos['sleep'] = 'V'
>>> pos['furiously'] = 'ADV'
>>> pos 
So, for example, 
says that the part-of-speech of colorless is adjective, or more spe-
cifically, that the key 
'colorless'
is assigned the value 
'ADJ'
in dictionary 
pos
. When
we inspect the value of 
pos
we see a set of key-value pairs. Once we have populated
the dictionary in this way, we can employ the keys to retrieve values:
>>> pos['ideas']
'N'
>>> pos['colorless']
'ADJ'
Of course, we might accidentally use a key that hasn’t been assigned a value.
>>> pos['green']
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in ?
KeyError: 'green'
This raises an important question. Unlike lists and strings, where we can use 
len()
to
work out which integers will be legal indexes, how do we work out the legal keys for a
dictionary? If the dictionary is not too big, we can simply inspect its contents by eval-
uating the variable 
pos
. As we saw earlier in line 
, this gives us the key-value pairs.
Notice that they are not in the same order they were originally entered; this is because
dictionaries are not sequences but mappings (see Figure 5-3), and the keys are not
inherently ordered.
Alternatively, to just find the keys, we can either convert the dictionary to a list 
or
use the dictionary in a context where a list is expected, as the parameter of 
sorted()
or in a 
for
loop 
.
>>> list(pos) 
['ideas', 'furiously', 'colorless', 'sleep']
>>> sorted(pos) 
['colorless', 'furiously', 'ideas', 'sleep']
>>> [w for w in pos if w.endswith('s')] 
['colorless', 'ideas']
5.3  Mapping Words to Properties Using Python Dictionaries s | | 191
Online Split PDF file. Best free online split PDF tool.
Easy split! We try to make it as easy as possible to split your PDF files into Multiple ones. You can receive the PDF files by simply
append pdf; pdf merge
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
the ability to inserting a new PDF page into existing PDF PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how to split PDF document in
pdf merger online; pdf merge comments
When you type 
list(pos)
, you might see a different order to the one
shown here. If you want to see the keys in order, just sort them.
As well as iterating over all keys in the dictionary with a 
for
loop, we can use the 
for
loop as we did for printing lists:
>>> for word in sorted(pos):
...     print word + ":", pos[word]
...
colorless: ADJ
furiously: ADV
sleep: V
ideas: N
Finally, the dictionary methods 
keys()
values()
, and 
items()
allow us to access the
keys, values, and key-value pairs as separate lists. We can even sort tuples 
, which
orders them according to their first element (and if the first elements are the same, it
uses their second elements).
>>> pos.keys()
['colorless', 'furiously', 'sleep', 'ideas']
>>> pos.values()
['ADJ', 'ADV', 'V', 'N']
>>> pos.items()
>>> for key, val in sorted(pos.items()): 
...     print key + ":", val
...
colorless: ADJ
furiously: ADV
ideas: N
sleep: V
We want to be sure that when we look something up in a dictionary, we get only one
value for each key. Now suppose we try to use a dictionary to store the fact that the
word sleep can be used as both a verb and a noun:
>>> pos['sleep'] = 'V'
>>> pos['sleep']
'V'
>>> pos['sleep'] = 'N'
>>> pos['sleep']
'N'
Initially, 
pos['sleep']
is given the value 
'V'
. But this is immediately overwritten with
the new value, 
'N'
. In other words, there can be only one entry in the dictionary for
'sleep'
. However, there is a way of storing multiple values in that entry: we use a list
value, e.g., 
pos['sleep'] = ['N', 'V']
. In fact, this is what we saw in Section 2.4 for
the CMU Pronouncing Dictionary, which stores multiple pronunciations for a single
word.
192 | | Chapter 5: Categorizing and Tagging Words
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. Turn multiple pages PDF into multiple jpg files in VB.NET class.
c# merge pdf files into one; how to combine pdf files
VB.NET TWAIN: Scanning Multiple Pages into PDF & TIFF File Using
This VB.NET TWAIN pages scanning control add-on is developed to offer programmers an efficient solution to scan multiple pages into one PDF or TIFF
pdf split and merge; batch pdf merger
Defining Dictionaries
We can use the same key-value pair format to create a dictionary. There are a couple
of ways to do this, and we will normally use the first:
Note that dictionary keys must be immutable types, such as strings and tuples. If we
try to define a dictionary using a mutable key, we get a 
TypeError
:
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: list objects are unhashable
Default Dictionaries
If we try to access a key that is not in a dictionary, we get an error. However, it’s often
useful if a dictionary can automatically create an entry for this new key and give it a
default value, such as zero or the empty list. Since Python 2.5, a special kind of dic-
tionary called a 
defaultdict
has been available. (It is provided as 
nltk.defaultdict
for
the benefit of readers who are using Python 2.4.) In order to use it, we have to supply
a parameter which can be used to create the default value, e.g., 
int
float
str
list
,
dict
tuple
.
>>> frequency = nltk.defaultdict(int)
>>> frequency['colorless'] = 4
>>> frequency['ideas']
0
>>> pos = nltk.defaultdict(list)
>>> pos['sleep'] = ['N', 'V']
>>> pos['ideas']
[]
These default values are actually functions that convert other objects to
the specified type (e.g., 
int("2")
list("2")
). When they are called with
no parameter—say, 
int()
list()
—they return 
0
and 
[]
respectively.
The preceding examples specified the default value of a dictionary entry to be the default
value of a particular data type. However, we can specify any default value we like, simply
by providing the name of a function that can be called with no arguments to create the
required value. Let’s return to our part-of-speech example, and create a dictionary
whose default value for any entry is 
'N'
. When we access a non-existent entry 
, it
is automatically added to the dictionary 
.
>>> pos = nltk.defaultdict(lambda: 'N') 
>>> pos['colorless'] = 'ADJ'
>>> pos['blog'] 
'N'
5.3  Mapping Words to Properties Using Python Dictionaries s | | 193
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
C#.NET PDF Splitter to Split PDF File. In this section, we aims to tell you how to divide source PDF file into two smaller PDF documents at the page
break a pdf into multiple files; all jpg to one pdf converter
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Simply integrate into VB.NET project, supporting conversions to or from multiple supported images formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete
best pdf combiner; c# combine pdf
>>> pos.items()
[('blog', 'N'), ('colorless', 'ADJ')] 
This example used a lambda expression, introduced in Section 4.4. This
lambda expression specifies no parameters, so we call it using paren-
theses with no arguments. Thus, the following definitions of 
f
and 
g
are
equivalent:
>>> f = lambda: 'N'
>>> f()
'N'
>>> def g():
...     return 'N'
>>> g()
'N'
Let’s see how default dictionaries could be used in a more substantial language pro-
cessing task. Many language processing tasks—including tagging—struggle to cor-
rectly process the hapaxes of a text. They can perform better with a fixed vocabulary
and a guarantee that no new words will appear. We can preprocess a text to replace
low-frequency words with a special “out of vocabulary” token, 
UNK
, with the help of a
default dictionary. (Can you work out how to do this without reading on?)
We need to create a default dictionary that maps each word to its replacement. The
most frequent n words will be mapped to themselves. Everything else will be mapped
to 
UNK
.
>>> alice = nltk.corpus.gutenberg.words('carroll-alice.txt')
>>> vocab = nltk.FreqDist(alice)
>>> v1000 = list(vocab)[:1000]
>>> mapping = nltk.defaultdict(lambda: 'UNK')
>>> for v in v1000:
...     mapping[v] = v
...
>>> alice2 = [mapping[v] for v in alice]
>>> alice2[:100]
>>> len(set(alice2))
1001
Incrementally Updating a Dictionary
We can employ dictionaries to count occurrences, emulating the method for tallying
words shown in Figure 1-3. We begin by initializing an empty 
defaultdict
, then process
each part-of-speech tag in the text. If the tag hasn’t been seen before, it will have a zero
194 | | Chapter 5: Categorizing and Tagging Words
count by default. Each time we encounter a tag, we increment its count using the 
+=
operator (see Example 5-3).
Example 5-3. Incrementally updating a dictionary, and sorting by value.
>>> counts = nltk.defaultdict(int)
>>> from nltk.corpus import brown
>>> for (word, tag) in brown.tagged_words(categories='news'):
...     counts[tag] += 1
...
>>> counts['N']
22226
>>> list(counts)
>>> from operator import itemgetter
>>> sorted(counts.items(), key=itemgetter(1), reverse=True)
The listing in Example 5-3 illustrates an important idiom for sorting a dictionary by its
values, to show words in decreasing order of frequency. The first parameter of
sorted()
is the items to sort, which is a list of tuples consisting of a POS tag and a
frequency. The second parameter specifies the sort key using a function 
itemget
ter()
. In general, 
itemgetter(n)
returns a function that can be called on some other
sequence object to obtain the nth element:
>>> pair = ('NP', 8336)
>>> pair[1]
8336
>>> itemgetter(1)(pair)
8336
The last parameter of 
sorted()
specifies that the items should be returned in reverse
order, i.e., decreasing values of frequency.
There’s a second useful programming idiom at the beginning of Example 5-3, where
we initialize a 
defaultdict
and then use a 
for
loop to update its values. Here’s a sche-
matic version:
>>> my_dictionary = nltk.defaultdict(function to create default value)
>>> for item in sequence:
...      my_dictionary[item_keyis updated with information about item
Here’s another instance of this pattern, where we index words according to their last
two letters:
>>> last_letters = nltk.defaultdict(list)
>>> words = nltk.corpus.words.words('en')
>>> for word in words:
...     key = word[-2:]
...     last_letters[key].append(word)
...
5.3  Mapping Words to Properties Using Python Dictionaries s | | 195
>>> last_letters['ly']
>>> last_letters['zy']
The following example uses the same pattern to create an anagram dictionary. (You
might experiment with the third line to get an idea of why this program works.)
>>> anagrams = nltk.defaultdict(list)
>>> for word in words:
...     key = ''.join(sorted(word))
...     anagrams[key].append(word)
...
>>> anagrams['aeilnrt']
Since accumulating words like this is such a common task, NLTK provides a more
convenient way of creating a 
defaultdict(list)
, in the form of 
nltk.Index()
:
>>> anagrams['aeilnrt']
nltk.Index
is a 
defaultdict(list)
with extra support for initialization.
Similarly, 
nltk.FreqDist
is essentially a 
defaultdict(int)
with extra
support for initialization (along with sorting and plotting methods).
Complex Keys and Values
We can use default dictionaries with complex keys and values. Let’s study the range of
possible tags for a word, given the word itself and the tag of the previous word. We will
see how this information can be used by a POS tagger.
>>> pos = nltk.defaultdict(lambda: nltk.defaultdict(int))
...     pos[(t1, w2)][t2] += 1 
...
>>> pos[('DET', 'right')] 
This example uses a dictionary whose default value for an entry is a dictionary (whose
default value is 
int()
, i.e., zero). Notice how we iterated over the bigrams of the tagged
corpus, processing a pair of word-tag pairs for each iteration 
. Each time through the
loop we updated our 
pos
dictionary’s entry for 
(t1, w2)
, a tag and its following word
. When we look up an item in 
pos
we must specify a compound key 
, and we get
back a dictionary object. A POS tagger could use such information to decide that the
word right, when preceded by a determiner, should be tagged as 
ADJ
.
196 | | Chapter 5: Categorizing and Tagging Words
Inverting a Dictionary
Dictionaries support efficient lookup, so long as you want to get the value for any key.
If 
d
is a dictionary and 
k
is a key, we type 
d[k]
and immediately obtain the value. Finding
a key given a value is slower and more cumbersome:
>>> counts = nltk.defaultdict(int)
...     counts[word] += 1
...
>>> [key for (key, value) in counts.items() if value == 32]
'every', 'been']
If we expect to do this kind of “reverse lookup” often, it helps to construct a dictionary
that maps values to keys. In the case that no two keys have the same value, this is an
easy thing to do. We just get all the key-value pairs in the dictionary, and create a new
dictionary of value-key pairs. The next example also illustrates another way of initial-
izing a dictionary 
pos
with key-value pairs.
>>> pos2 = dict((value, key) for (key, value) in pos.items())
>>> pos2['N']
'ideas'
Let’s first make our part-of-speech dictionary a bit more realistic and add some more
words to 
pos
using the dictionary 
update()
method, to create the situation where mul-
tiple keys have the same value. Then the technique just shown for reverse lookup will
no longer work (why not?). Instead, we have to use 
append()
to accumulate the words
for each part-of-speech, as follows:
>>> pos2 = nltk.defaultdict(list)
>>> for key, value in pos.items():
...     pos2[value].append(key)
...
>>> pos2['ADV']
['peacefully', 'furiously']
Now we have inverted the 
pos
dictionary, and can look up any part-of-speech and find
all words having that part-of-speech. We can do the same thing even more simply using
NLTK’s support for indexing, as follows:
>>> pos2['ADV']
['peacefully', 'furiously']
A summary of Python’s dictionary methods is given in Table 5-5.
5.3  Mapping Words to Properties Using Python Dictionaries s | | 197
Table 5-5. Python’s dictionary methods: A summary of commonly used methods and idioms involving
dictionaries
Example
Description
d = {}
Create an empty dictionary and assign it to 
d
d[key] = value
Assign a value to a given dictionary key
d.keys()
The list of keys of the dictionary
list(d)
The list of keys of the dictionary
sorted(d)
The keys of the dictionary, sorted
key in d
Test whether a particular key is in the dictionary
for key in d
Iterate over the keys of the dictionary
d.values()
The list of values in the dictionary
dict([(k1,v1), (k2,v2), ...])
Create a dictionary from a list of key-value pairs
d1.update(d2)
Add all items from 
d2
to 
d1
defaultdict(int)
A dictionary whose default value is zero
5.4  Automatic Tagging
In the rest of this chapter we will explore various ways to automatically add part-of-
speech tags to text. We will see that the tag of a word depends on the word and its
context within a sentence. For this reason, we will be working with data at the level of
(tagged) sentences rather than words. We’ll begin by loading the data we will be using.
>>> from nltk.corpus import brown
>>> brown_tagged_sents = brown.tagged_sents(categories='news')
>>> brown_sents = brown.sents(categories='news')
The Default Tagger
The simplest possible tagger assigns the same tag to each token. This may seem to be
a rather banal step, but it establishes an important baseline for tagger performance. In
order to get the best result, we tag each word with the most likely tag. Let’s find out
which tag is most likely (now using the unsimplified tagset):
>>> nltk.FreqDist(tags).max()
'NN'
Now we can create a tagger that tags everything as 
NN
.
>>> tokens = nltk.word_tokenize(raw)
>>> default_tagger = nltk.DefaultTagger('NN')
>>> default_tagger.tag(tokens)
198 | | Chapter 5: Categorizing and Tagging Words
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested