asp net mvc 5 pdf viewer : Append pdf files reader software control cloud windows azure html class NaturalLanguageProcessingWithPython23-part2083

In this way, a Brill tagger successively transforms a bad tagging of a text into a better
one. As with n-gram tagging, this is a supervised learning method, since we need an-
notated training data to figure out whether the tagger’s guess is a mistake or not. How-
ever, unlike n-gram tagging, it does not count observations but compiles a list of trans-
formational correction rules.
The process of Brill tagging is usually explained by analogy with painting. Suppose we
were painting a tree, with all its details of boughs, branches, twigs, and leaves, against
a uniform sky-blue background. Instead of painting the tree first and then trying to
paint blue in the gaps, it is simpler to paint the whole canvas blue, then “correct” the
tree section by over-painting the blue background. In the same fashion, we might paint
the trunk a uniform brown before going back to over-paint further details with even
finer brushes. Brill tagging uses the same idea: begin with broad brush strokes, and
then fix up the details, with successively finer changes. Let’s look at an example in-
volving the following sentence:
(1) The President said he will ask Congress to increase grants to states for voca-
tional rehabilitation.
We will examine the operation of two rules: (a) replace 
NN
with 
VB
when the previous
word is 
TO
; (b) replace 
TO
with 
IN
when the next tag is 
NNS
Table 5-6 illustrates this
process, first tagging with the unigram tagger, then applying the rules to fix the errors.
Table 5-6. Steps in Brill tagging
Phrase
to
increase grants s to
states for r vocational rehabilitation
Unigram
TO NN
NNS
TO NNS
IN
JJ
NN
Rule 1
VB
Rule 2
IN
Output
TO VB
NNS
IN
NNS
IN
JJ
NN
Gold
TO VB
NNS
IN
NNS
IN
JJ
NN
In this table, we see two rules. All such rules are generated from a template of the
following form: “replace T
1
with T
2
in the context C.” Typical contexts are the identity
or the tag of the preceding or following word, or the appearance of a specific tag within
two to three words of the current word. During its training phase, the tagger guesses
values for T
1
T
2
, and C, to create thousands of candidate rules. Each rule is scored
according to its net benefit: the number of incorrect tags that it corrects, less the number
of correct tags it incorrectly modifies.
Brill taggers have another interesting property: the rules are linguistically interpretable.
Compare this with the n-gram taggers, which employ a potentially massive table of n-
grams. We cannot learn much from direct inspection of such a table, in comparison to
the rules learned by the Brill tagger. Example 5-6 demonstrates NLTK’s Brill tagger.
5.6  Transformation-Based Tagging g | 209
Append pdf files reader - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
merge pdf online; add two pdf files together
Append pdf files reader - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
break pdf file into multiple files; merge pdf
Example 5-6. Brill tagger demonstration: The tagger has a collection of templates of the form X 
→ 
Y
if the preceding word is Z; the variables in these templates are instantiated to particular words and
tags to create “rules”; the score for a rule is the number of broken examples it corrects minus the
number of correct cases it breaks; apart from training a tagger, the demonstration displays residual
errors.
>>> nltk.tag.brill.demo()
Training Brill tagger on 80 sentences...
Finding initial useful rules...
Found 6555 useful rules.
     |
  F   r   O  |        Score = Fixed - Broken
  i   o   t  |  R     Fixed = num tags changed incorrect -> correct
  d   n   r  |  e
12  13   1   4  | NN -> VB if the tag of the preceding word is 'TO'
...
>>> print(open("errors.out").read())
left context |    word/test->gold     | right context
5.7  How to Determine the Category of a Word
Now that we have examined word classes in detail, we turn to a more basic question:
how do we decide what category a word belongs to in the first place? In general, linguists
use morphological, syntactic, and semantic clues to determine the category of a word.
210 | | Chapter 5: Categorizing and Tagging Words
.NET PDF SDK | Read & Processing PDF files
editing and clean-up features provided by this .NET Imaging PDF Reader Add-on Simple to convert PDF files to raster images (color or grayscale) in .NET Imaging
batch merge pdf; batch combine pdf
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Merge and Append TIFF Files
Merge and Append Tiff Files. How to Merge and Append TIFF Files in C# by Using RasterEdge XDoc.Tiff for .NET SDK. Merge and Append TIFF Files in C#.NET Overview.
reader combine pdf pages; pdf merge comments
Morphological Clues
The internal structure of a word may give useful clues as to the word’s category. For
example, -ness is a suffix that combines with an adjective to produce a noun, e.g., happy
→ happinessill → illness. So if we encounter a word that ends in -ness, this is very likely
to be a noun. Similarly, -ment is a suffix that combines with some verbs to produce a
noun, e.g., govern → government and establish → establishment.
English verbs can also be morphologically complex. For instance, the present par-
ticiple of a verb ends in -ing, and expresses the idea of ongoing, incomplete action (e.g.,
fallingeating). The -ing suffix also appears on nouns derived from verbs, e.g., the falling
of the leaves (this is known as the gerund).
Syntactic Clues
Another source of information is the typical contexts in which a word can occur. For
example, assume that we have already determined the category of nouns. Then we
might say that a syntactic criterion for an adjective in English is that it can occur im-
mediately before a noun, or immediately following the words be or very. According to
these tests, near should be categorized as an adjective:
(2) a.the near window
b.The end is (very) near.
Semantic Clues
Finally, the meaning of a word is a useful clue as to its lexical category. For example,
the best-known definition of a noun is semantic: “the name of a person, place, or thing.”
Within modern linguistics, semantic criteria for word classes are treated with suspicion,
mainly because they are hard to formalize. Nevertheless, semantic criteria underpin
many of our intuitions about word classes, and enable us to make a good guess about
the categorization of words in languages with which we are unfamiliar. For example,
if all we know about the Dutch word verjaardag is that it means the same as the English
word birthday, then we can guess that verjaardag is a noun in Dutch. However, some
care is needed: although we might translate zij is vandaag jarig as it’s her birthday to-
day, the word jarig is in fact an adjective in Dutch, and has no exact equivalent in
English.
New Words
All languages acquire new lexical items. A list of words recently added to the Oxford
Dictionary of English includes cyberslackerfatoushblamestorm, SARS, cantopop,
bupkisnoughtiesmuggle, and robata. Notice that all these new words are nouns, and
this is reflected in calling nouns an open class. By contrast, prepositions are regarded
as a closed class. That is, there is a limited set of words belonging to the class (e.g.,
abovealongatbelowbesidebetweenduringforfrominnearonoutsideover,
5.7  How to Determine the Category of a Word d | 211
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
' Convert PDF file to HTML5 files DocumentConverter.ConvertToHtml5("..\1.pdf", "..output\", RelativeType.SVG). Copyright © <2000-2016> by <RasterEdge.com>.
split pdf into multiple files; pdf combine files online
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
How to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to HTML5 Files in C#.NET Class. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
acrobat merge pdf; break pdf into multiple files
pastthroughtowardsunderupwith), and membership of the set only changes very
gradually over time.
Morphology in Part-of-Speech Tagsets
Common tagsets often capture some morphosyntactic information, that is, informa-
tion about the kind of morphological markings that words receive by virtue of their
syntactic role. Consider, for example, the selection of distinct grammatical forms of the
word go illustrated in the following sentences:
(3) a.Go away!
b.He sometimes goes to the cafe.
c.All the cakes have gone.
d.We went on the excursion.
Each of these forms—go, goesgone, and went—is morphologically distinct from the
others. Consider the form goes. This occurs in a restricted set of grammatical contexts,
and requires a third person singular subject. Thus, the following sentences are
ungrammatical.
(4) a.*They sometimes goes to the cafe.
b.*I sometimes goes to the cafe.
By contrast, gone is the past participle form; it is required after have (and cannot be
replaced in this context by goes), and cannot occur as the main verb of a clause.
(5) a.*All the cakes have goes.
b.*He sometimes gone to the cafe.
We can easily imagine a tagset in which the four distinct grammatical forms just dis-
cussed were all tagged as 
VB
. Although this would be adequate for some purposes, a
more fine-grained tagset provides useful information about these forms that can help
other processors that try to detect patterns in tag sequences. The Brown tagset captures
these distinctions, as summarized in Table 5-7.
Table 5-7. Some morphosyntactic distinctions in the Brown tagset
Form
Category
Tag
go
base
VB
goes
third singular present t VBZ
gone
past participle
VBN
going gerund
VBG
went
simple past
VBD
212 | | Chapter 5: Categorizing and Tagging Words
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Also able to combine generated split PDF document files with other PDF files to form a new PDF file. Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files in C#.
merge pdf files; add pdf files together reader
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
splitter control provides VB.NET developers an easy to use solution that they can split target multi-page PDF document file to one-page PDF files or they can
add pdf together one file; pdf mail merge plug in
In addition to this set of verb tags, the various forms of the verb to be have special tags:
be/BE
being/BEG
am/BEM
are/BER
is/BEZ
been/BEN
were/BED
, and 
was/BEDZ
(plus extra
tags for negative forms of the verb). All told, this fine-grained tagging of verbs means
that an automatic tagger that uses this tagset is effectively carrying out a limited amount
of morphological analysis.
Most part-of-speech tagsets make use of the same basic categories, such as noun, verb,
adjective, and preposition. However, tagsets differ both in how finely they divide words
into categories, and in how they define their categories. For example, is might be tagged
simply as a verb in one tagset, but as a distinct form of the lexeme be in another tagset
(as in the Brown Corpus). This variation in tagsets is unavoidable, since part-of-speech
tags are used in different ways for different tasks. In other words, there is no one “right
way” to assign tags, only more or less useful ways depending on one’s goals.
5.8  Summary
• Words can be grouped into classes, such as nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs.
These classes are known as lexical categories or parts-of-speech. Parts-of-speech
are assigned short labels, or tags, such as 
NN
and 
VB
.
• The process of automatically assigning parts-of-speech to words in text is called
part-of-speech tagging, POS tagging, or just tagging.
• Automatic tagging is an important step in the NLP pipeline, and is useful in a variety
of situations, including predicting the behavior of previously unseen words, ana-
lyzing word usage in corpora, and text-to-speech systems.
• Some linguistic corpora, such as the Brown Corpus, have been POS tagged.
• A variety of tagging methods are possible, e.g., default tagger, regular expression
tagger, unigram tagger, and n-gram taggers. These can be combined using a tech-
nique known as backoff.
• Taggers can be trained and evaluated using tagged corpora.
• Backoff is a method for combining models: when a more specialized model (such
as a bigram tagger) cannot assign a tag in a given context, we back off to a more
general model (such as a unigram tagger).
• Part-of-speech tagging is an important, early example of a sequence classification
task in NLP: a classification decision at any one point in the sequence makes use
of words and tags in the local context.
• A dictionary is used to map between arbitrary types of information, such as a string
and a number: 
freq['cat'] = 12
. We create dictionaries using the brace notation:
pos = {}
, .
• N-gram taggers can be defined for large values of n, but once n is larger than 3, we
usually encounter the sparse data problem; even with a large quantity of training
data, we see only a tiny fraction of possible contexts.
5.8  Summary y | | 213
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
file using C#. Instantly convert all PDF document pages to SVG image files in C#.NET class application. Perform high-fidelity PDF
best pdf combiner; .net merge pdf files
VB.NET PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in vb.net
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Others. Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document.
break a pdf into multiple files; pdf merge
• Transformation-based tagging involves learning a series of repair rules of the form
“change tag s to tag t in context c,” where each rule fixes mistakes and possibly
introduces a (smaller) number of errors.
5.9  Further Reading
Extra materials for this chapter are posted at http://www.nltk.org/, including links to
freely available resources on the Web. For more examples of tagging with NLTK, please
see the Tagging HOWTO at http://www.nltk.org/howto. Chapters 4 and 5 of (Jurafsky
& Martin, 2008) contain more advanced material on n-grams and part-of-speech tag-
ging. Other approaches to tagging involve machine learning methods (Chapter 6). In
Chapter 7, we will see a generalization of tagging called chunking in which a contiguous
sequence of words is assigned a single tag.
For tagset documentation, see 
nltk.help.upenn_tagset()
and 
nltk.help.brown_tag
set()
. Lexical categories are introduced in linguistics textbooks, including those listed
in Chapter 1 of this book.
There are many other kinds of tagging. Words can be tagged with directives to a speech
synthesizer, indicating which words should be emphasized. Words can be tagged with
sense numbers, indicating which sense of the word was used. Words can also be tagged
with morphological features. Examples of each of these kinds of tags are shown in the
following list. For space reasons, we only show the tag for a single word. Note also that
the first two examples use XML-style tags, where elements in angle brackets enclose
the word that is tagged.
Speech Synthesis Markup Language (W3C SSML)
That is a <emphasis>big</emphasis> car!
SemCor: Brown Corpus tagged with WordNet senses
ured by the three dimensions.
(Wordnet form/nn sense 4: “shape, form, config-
uration, contour, conformation”)
Morphological tagging, from the Turin University Italian Treebank
SING) porto turistico dell' Albania .
Note that tagging is also performed at higher levels. Here is an example of dialogue act
tagging, from the NPS Chat Corpus (Forsyth & Martell, 2007) included with NLTK.
Each turn of the dialogue is categorized as to its communicative function:
Statement  User117 Dude..., I wanted some of that
ynQuestion User120 m I missing something?
Bye        User117 I'm gonna go fix food, I'll be back later.
System     User122 JOIN
System     User2   slaps User122 around a bit with a large trout.
Statement  User121 18/m pm me if u tryin to chat
214 | | Chapter 5: Categorizing and Tagging Words
5.10  Exercises
1.○ Search the Web for “spoof newspaper headlines,” to find such gems as: British
Left Waffles on Falkland Islands, and Juvenile Court to Try Shooting Defendant.
Manually tag these headlines to see whether knowledge of the part-of-speech tags
removes the ambiguity.
2.○ Working with someone else, take turns picking a word that can be either a noun
or a verb (e.g., contest); the opponent has to predict which one is likely to be the
most frequent in the Brown Corpus. Check the opponent’s prediction, and tally
the score over several turns.
3.○ Tokenize and tag the following sentence: They wind back the clock, while we
chase after the wind. What different pronunciations and parts-of-speech are
involved?
4.○ Review the mappings in Table 5-4. Discuss any other examples of mappings you
can think of. What type of information do they map from and to?
5.○ Using the Python interpreter in interactive mode, experiment with the dictionary
examples in this chapter. Create a dictionary 
d
, and add some entries. What hap-
pens whether you try to access a non-existent entry, e.g., 
d['xyz']
?
6.○ Try deleting an element from a dictionary 
d
, using the syntax 
del d['abc']
. Check
that the item was deleted.
7.○ Create two dictionaries, 
d1
and 
d2
, and add some entries to each. Now issue the
command 
d1.update(d2)
. What did this do? What might it be useful for?
8.○ Create a dictionary 
e
, to represent a single lexical entry for some word of your
choice. Define keys such as 
headword
part-of-speech
sense
, and 
example
, and as-
sign them suitable values.
9.○ Satisfy yourself that there are restrictions on the distribution of go and went, in
the sense that they cannot be freely interchanged in the kinds of contexts illustrated
in (3), Section 5.7.
10.○ Train a unigram tagger and run it on some new text. Observe that some words
are not assigned a tag. Why not?
11.○ Learn about the affix tagger (type 
help(nltk.AffixTagger)
). Train an affix tagger
and run it on some new text. Experiment with different settings for the affix length
and the minimum word length. Discuss your findings.
12.○ Train a bigram tagger with no backoff tagger, and run it on some of the training
data. Next, run it on some new data. What happens to the performance of the
tagger? Why?
13.○ We can use a dictionary to specify the values to be substituted into a formatting
string. Read Python’s library documentation for formatting strings (http://docs.py
5.10  Exercises s | | 215
thon.org/lib/typesseq-strings.html) and use this method to display today’s date in
two different formats.
14.◑ Use 
sorted()
and 
set()
to get a sorted list of tags used in the Brown Corpus,
removing duplicates.
15.◑ Write programs to process the Brown Corpus and find answers to the following
questions:
a.Which nouns are more common in their plural form, rather than their singular
form? (Only consider regular plurals, formed with the -s suffix.)
b.Which word has the greatest number of distinct tags? What are they, and what
do they represent?
c.List tags in order of decreasing frequency. What do the 20 most frequent tags
represent?
d.Which tags are nouns most commonly found after? What do these tags
represent?
16.◑ Explore the following issues that arise in connection with the lookup tagger:
a.What happens to the tagger performance for the various model sizes when a
backoff tagger is omitted?
b.Consider the curve in Figure 5-4; suggest a good size for a lookup tagger that
balances memory and performance. Can you come up with scenarios where it
would be preferable to minimize memory usage, or to maximize performance
with no regard for memory usage?
17.◑ What is the upper limit of performance for a lookup tagger, assuming no limit
to the size of its table? (Hint: write a program to work out what percentage of tokens
of a word are assigned the most likely tag for that word, on average.)
18.◑ Generate some statistics for tagged data to answer the following questions:
a.What proportion of word types are always assigned the same part-of-speech
tag?
b.How many words are ambiguous, in the sense that they appear with at least
two tags?
c.What percentage of word tokens in the Brown Corpus involve these ambiguous
words?
19.◑ The 
evaluate()
method works out how accurately the tagger performs on this
text. For example, if the supplied tagged text was 
[('the', 'DT'), ('dog',
'NN')]
and the tagger produced the output 
[('the', 'NN'), ('dog', 'NN')]
, then
the score would be 
0.5
. Let’s try to figure out how the evaluation method works:
a.A tagger 
t
takes a list of words as input, and produces a list of tagged words
as output. However, 
t.evaluate()
is given correctly tagged text as its only
parameter. What must it do with this input before performing the tagging?
216 | | Chapter 5: Categorizing and Tagging Words
b.Once the tagger has created newly tagged text, how might the 
evaluate()
method go about comparing it with the original tagged text and computing
the accuracy score?
c.Now examine the source code to see how the method is implemented. Inspect
nltk.tag.api.__file__
to discover the location of the source code, and open
this file using an editor (be sure to use the api.py file and not the compiled
api.pyc binary file).
20.◑ Write code to search the Brown Corpus for particular words and phrases ac-
cording to tags, to answer the following questions:
a.Produce an alphabetically sorted list of the distinct words tagged as 
MD
.
b.Identify words that can be plural nouns or third person singular verbs (e.g.,
dealsflies).
c.Identify three-word prepositional phrases of the form IN + DET + NN (e.g.,
in the lab).
d.What is the ratio of masculine to feminine pronouns?
21.◑ In Table 3-1, we saw a table involving frequency counts for the verbs adorelove,
like, and prefer, and preceding qualifiers such as really. Investigate the full range
of qualifiers (Brown tag 
QL
) that appear before these four verbs.
22.◑ We defined the 
regexp_tagger
that can be used as a fall-back tagger for unknown
words. This tagger only checks for cardinal numbers. By testing for particular prefix
or suffix strings, it should be possible to guess other tags. For example, we could
tag any word that ends with -s as a plural noun. Define a regular expression tagger
(using 
RegexpTagger()
) that tests for at least five other patterns in the spelling of
words. (Use inline documentation to explain the rules.)
23.◑ Consider the regular expression tagger developed in the exercises in the previous
section. Evaluate the tagger using its 
accuracy()
method, and try to come up with
ways to improve its performance. Discuss your findings. How does objective eval-
uation help in the development process?
24.◑ How serious is the sparse data problem? Investigate the performance of n-gram
taggers as n increases from 1 to 6. Tabulate the accuracy score. Estimate the training
data required for these taggers, assuming a vocabulary size of 105 and a tagset size
of 10
2
.
25.◑ Obtain some tagged data for another language, and train and evaluate a variety
of taggers on it. If the language is morphologically complex, or if there are any
orthographic clues (e.g., capitalization) to word classes, consider developing a reg-
ular expression tagger for it (ordered after the unigram tagger, and before the de-
fault tagger). How does the accuracy of your tagger(s) compare with the same
taggers run on English data? Discuss any issues you encounter in applying these
methods to the language.
5.10  Exercises s | | 217
26.◑ Example 5-4 plotted a curve showing change in the performance of a lookup
tagger as the model size was increased. Plot the performance curve for a unigram
tagger, as the amount of training data is varied.
27.◑ Inspect the confusion matrix for the bigram tagger 
t2
defined in Section 5.5, and
identify one or more sets of tags to collapse. Define a dictionary to do the mapping,
and evaluate the tagger on the simplified data.
28.◑ Experiment with taggers using the simplified tagset (or make one of your own
by discarding all but the first character of each tag name). Such a tagger has fewer
distinctions to make, but much less information on which to base its work. Discuss
your findings.
29.◑ Recall the example of a bigram tagger which encountered a word it hadn’t seen
during training, and tagged the rest of the sentence as 
None
. It is possible for a
bigram tagger to fail partway through a sentence even if it contains no unseen words
(even if the sentence was used during training). In what circumstance can this
happen? Can you write a program to find some examples of this?
30.◑ Preprocess the Brown News data by replacing low-frequency words with UNK,
but leaving the tags untouched. Now train and evaluate a bigram tagger on this
data. How much does this help? What is the contribution of the unigram tagger
and default tagger now?
31.◑ Modify the program in Example 5-4 to use a logarithmic scale on the x-axis, by
replacing 
pylab.plot()
with 
pylab.semilogx()
. What do you notice about the
shape of the resulting plot? Does the gradient tell you anything?
32.◑ Consult the documentation for the Brill tagger demo function, using
help(nltk.tag.brill.demo)
. Experiment with the tagger by setting different values
for the parameters. Is there any trade-off between training time (corpus size) and
performance?
33.◑ Write code that builds a dictionary of dictionaries of sets. Use it to store the set
of POS tags that can follow a given word having a given POS tag, i.e., word
i
→ tag
i
tag
i+1
.
34.● There are 264 distinct words in the Brown Corpus having exactly three possible
tags.
a.Print a table with the integers 1..10 in one column, and the number of distinct
words in the corpus having 1..10 distinct tags in the other column.
b.For the word with the greatest number of distinct tags, print out sentences
from the corpus containing the word, one for each possible tag.
35.● Write a program to classify contexts involving the word must according to the
tag of the following word. Can this be used to discriminate between the epistemic
and deontic uses of must?
36.● Create a regular expression tagger and various unigram and n-gram taggers,
incorporating backoff, and train them on part of the Brown Corpus.
218 | | Chapter 5: Categorizing and Tagging Words
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested