asp net mvc 5 pdf viewer : Combine pdf online application control utility azure html asp.net visual studio NaturalLanguageProcessingWithPython32-part2095

Symbol
Meaning
Example
V
verb
walked
P
preposition
in
A production like 
VP -> V NP | V NP PP
has a disjunction on the righthand side, shown
by the 
|
, and is an abbreviation for the two productions 
VP -> V NP
and 
VP -> V NP PP
.
If we parse the sentence The dog saw a man in the park using the grammar shown in
Example 8-1, we end up with two trees, similar to those we saw for (3):
(9) a.
b.
Since our grammar licenses two trees for this sentence, the sentence is said to be struc-
turally ambiguous. The ambiguity in question is called a prepositional phrase at-
tachment ambiguity, as we saw earlier in this chapter. As you may recall, it is an
ambiguity about attachment since the 
PP
in the park needs to be attached to one of two
places in the tree: either as a child of 
VP
or else as a child of 
NP
. When the 
PP
is attached
to 
VP
, the intended interpretation is that the seeing event happened in the park.
8.3  Context-Free Grammar r | 299
Combine pdf online - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
acrobat merge pdf files; asp.net merge pdf files
Combine pdf online - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
acrobat reader merge pdf files; pdf merger
However, if the 
PP
is attached to 
NP
, then it was the man who was in the park, and the
agent of the seeing (the dog) might have been sitting on the balcony of an apartment
overlooking the park.
Writing Your Own Grammars
If you are interested in experimenting with writing CFGs, you will find it helpful to
create and edit your grammar in a text file, say, mygrammar.cfg. You can then load it
into NLTK and parse with it as follows:
>>> grammar1 = nltk.data.load('file:mygrammar.cfg')
>>> sent = "Mary saw Bob".split()
>>> rd_parser = nltk.RecursiveDescentParser(grammar1)
>>> for tree in rd_parser.nbest_parse(sent):
...      print tree
Make sure that you put a .cfg suffix on the filename, and that there are no spaces in the
string 
'file:mygrammar.cfg'
. If the command 
print tree
produces no output, this is
probably because your sentence 
sent
is not admitted by your grammar. In this case,
call the parser with tracing set to be on: 
rd_parser = nltk.RecursiveDescent
Figure 8-3. Recursive descent parser demo: This tool allows you to watch the operation of a recursive
descent parser as it grows the parse tree and matches it against the input words.
300 | | Chapter 8: Analyzing Sentence Structure
Online Merge PDF files. Best free online merge PDF tool.
Online Merge PDF, Multiple PDF files into one. Then press the button below and download your PDF. Also you can add more PDFs to combine them and merge them into
append pdf files reader; merge pdf files
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
Merge and Split Document(s). "This online guide content Splitting Application. This C#.NET PDF document merger to help .NET developers combine PDF document files
best pdf merger; combine pdf files
Parser(grammar1, trace=2)
. You can also check what productions are currently in the
grammar with the command 
for p in grammar1.productions(): print p
.
When you write CFGs for parsing in NLTK, you cannot combine grammatical cate-
gories with lexical items on the righthand side of the same production. Thus, a pro-
duction such as 
PP -> 'of' NP
is disallowed. In addition, you are not permitted to place
multiword lexical items on the righthand side of a production. So rather than writing
NP -> 'New York'
, you have to resort to something like 
NP -> 'New_York'
instead.
Recursion in Syntactic Structure
A grammar is said to be recursive if a category occurring on the lefthand side of a
production also appears on the righthand side of a production, as illustrated in Exam-
ple 8-2. The production 
Nom -> Adj Nom
(where 
Nom
is the category of nominals) involves
direct recursion on the category 
Nom
, whereas indirect recursion on 
S
arises from the
combination of two productions, namely 
S -> NP VP
and 
VP -> V S
.
Example 8-2. A recursive context-free grammar.
grammar2 = nltk.parse_cfg("""
 -> NP VP
NP -> Det Nom | PropN
Nom -> Adj Nom | N
VP -> V Adj | V NP | V S | V NP PP
PP -> P NP
PropN -> 'Buster' | 'Chatterer' | 'Joe'
Det -> 'the' | 'a'
P -> 'on'
""")
To see how recursion arises from this grammar, consider the following trees. (10a)
involves nested nominal phrases, while (10b) contains nested sentences.
8.3  Context-Free Grammar r | 301
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Also able to combine generated split PDF document files Advanced component for splitting PDF document in preview Free download library and use online C# class
add pdf files together; reader combine pdf
VB.NET PDF: Use VB.NET Code to Merge and Split PDF Documents
Merge and Split Document(s). "This online guide content is destn As [String]) Implements PDFDocument.Combine End Sub. APIs for Splitting PDF document in VB Class
merge pdf online; pdf combine files online
(10) a.
b.
We’ve only illustrated two levels of recursion here, but there’s no upper limit on the
depth. You can experiment with parsing sentences that involve more deeply nested
structures. Beware that the 
RecursiveDescentParser
is unable to handle left-
recursive productions of the form 
X -> X Y
; we will return to this in Section 8.4.
8.4  Parsing with Context-Free Grammar
parser processes input sentences according to the productions of a grammar, and
builds one or more constituent structures that conform to the grammar. A grammar is
a declarative specification of well-formedness—it is actually just a string, not a pro-
gram. A parser is a procedural interpretation of the grammar. It searches through the
space of trees licensed by a grammar to find one that has the required sentence along
its fringe.
302 | | Chapter 8: Analyzing Sentence Structure
C# PowerPoint - Merge PowerPoint Documents in C#.NET
Combine and Merge Multiple PowerPoint Files into One Using C#. This part illustrates how to combine three PowerPoint files into a new file in C# application.
split pdf into multiple files; c# merge pdf pages
C# Word - Merge Word Documents in C#.NET
Combine and Merge Multiple Word Files into One Using C#. This part illustrates how to combine three Word files into a new file in C# application.
pdf mail merge; pdf merge
A parser permits a grammar to be evaluated against a collection of test sentences, help-
ing linguists to discover mistakes in their grammatical analysis. A parser can serve as a
model of psycholinguistic processing, helping to explain the difficulties that humans
have with processing certain syntactic constructions. Many natural language applica-
tions involve parsing at some point; for example, we would expect the natural language
questions submitted to a question-answering system to undergo parsing as an initial
step.
In this section, we see two simple parsing algorithms, a top-down method called re-
cursive descent parsing, and a bottom-up method called shift-reduce parsing. We also
see some more sophisticated algorithms, a top-down method with bottom-up filtering
called left-corner parsing, and a dynamic programming technique called chart parsing.
Recursive Descent Parsing
The simplest kind of parser interprets a grammar as a specification of how to break a
high-level goal into several lower-level subgoals. The top-level goal is to find an 
S
. The
S
→ 
NP VP
production permits the parser to replace this goal with two subgoals: find an
NP
, then find a 
VP
. Each of these subgoals can be replaced in turn by sub-subgoals, using
productions that have 
NP
and 
VP
on their lefthand side. Eventually, this expansion
process leads to subgoals such as: find the word telescope. Such subgoals can be directly
compared against the input sequence, and succeed if the next word is matched. If there
is no match, the parser must back up and try a different alternative.
The recursive descent parser builds a parse tree during this process. With the initial
goal (find an 
S
), the 
S
root node is created. As the process recursively expands its goals
using the productions of the grammar, the parse tree is extended downwards (hence
the name recursive descent). We can see this in action using the graphical demonstration
nltk.app.rdparser()
. Six stages of the execution of this parser are shown in Figure 8-4.
During this process, the parser is often forced to choose between several possible pro-
ductions. For example, in going from step 3 to step 4, it tries to find productions with
N
on the lefthand side. The first of these is 
N
→ man. When this does not work it
backtracks, and tries other 
N
productions in order, until it gets to 
N
→ dog, which
matches the next word in the input sentence. Much later, as shown in step 5, it finds
a complete parse. This is a tree that covers the entire sentence, without any dangling
edges. Once a parse has been found, we can get the parser to look for additional parses.
Again it will backtrack and explore other choices of production in case any of them
result in a parse.
NLTK provides a recursive descent parser:
>>> rd_parser = nltk.RecursiveDescentParser(grammar1)
>>> sent = 'Mary saw a dog'.split()
>>> for t in rd_parser.nbest_parse(sent):
...     print t
(S (NP Mary) (VP (V saw) (NP (Det a) (N dog))))
8.4  Parsing with Context-Free Grammar r | 303
VB.NET TIFF: Merge and Split TIFF Documents with RasterEdge .NET
String], docList As [String]()) TIFFDocument.Combine(filePath, docList In our online VB.NET tutorial, users & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
pdf mail merge plug in; pdf merge files
VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
Just like we need to combine PPT files, sometimes, we also want to separate a Note: If you want to see more PDF processing functions in VB.NET, please follow
best pdf combiner; pdf merge documents
RecursiveDescentParser()
takes an optional parameter 
trace
. If 
trace
is greater than zero, then the parser will report the steps that it takes as
it parses a text.
Recursive descent parsing has three key shortcomings. First, left-recursive productions
like 
NP -> NP PP
send it into an infinite loop. Second, the parser wastes a lot of time
considering words and structures that do not correspond to the input sentence. Third,
the backtracking process may discard parsed constituents that will need to be rebuilt
again later. For example, backtracking over 
VP -> V NP
will discard the subtree created
for the 
NP
. If the parser then proceeds with 
VP -> V NP PP
, then the 
NP
subtree must be
created all over again.
Recursive descent parsing is a kind of top-down parsing. Top-down parsers use a
grammar to predict what the input will be, before inspecting the input! However, since
the input is available to the parser all along, it would be more sensible to consider the
input sentence from the very beginning. This approach is called bottom-up parsing,
and we will see an example in the next section.
Shift-Reduce Parsing
A simple kind of bottom-up parser is the shift-reduce parser. In common with all
bottom-up parsers, a shift-reduce parser tries to find sequences of words and phrases
that correspond to the righthand side of a grammar production, and replace them with
the lefthand side, until the whole sentence is reduced to an 
S
.
Figure 8-4. Six stages of a recursive descent parser: The parser begins with a tree consisting of the
node S; at each stage it consults the grammar to find a production that can be used to enlarge the tree;
when a lexical production is encountered, its word is compared against the input; after a complete
parse has been found, the parser backtracks to look for more parses.
304 | | Chapter 8: Analyzing Sentence Structure
The shift-reduce parser repeatedly pushes the next input word onto a stack (Sec-
tion 4.1); this is the shift operation. If the top n items on the stack match the n items
on the righthand side of some production, then they are all popped off the stack, and
the item on the lefthand side of the production is pushed onto the stack. This replace-
ment of the top n items with a single item is the reduce operation. The operation may
be applied only to the top of the stack; reducing items lower in the stack must be done
before later items are pushed onto the stack. The parser finishes when all the input is
consumed and there is only one item remaining on the stack, a parse tree with an 
S
node as its root. The shift-reduce parser builds a parse tree during the above process.
Each time it pops n items off the stack, it combines them into a partial parse tree, and
pushes this back onto the stack. We can see the shift-reduce parsing algorithm in action
using the graphical demonstration 
nltk.app.srparser()
. Six stages of the execution of
this parser are shown in Figure 8-5.
Figure 8-5. Six stages of a shift-reduce parser: The parser begins by shifting the first input word onto
its stack; once the top items on the stack match the righthand side of a grammar production, they can
be replaced with the lefthand side of that production; the parser succeeds once all input is consumed
and one S item remains on the stack.
NLTK provides 
ShiftReduceParser()
, a simple implementation of a shift-reduce parser.
This parser does not implement any backtracking, so it is not guaranteed to find a parse
for a text, even if one exists. Furthermore, it will only find at most one parse, even if
more parses exist. We can provide an optional 
trace
parameter that controls how ver-
bosely the parser reports the steps that it takes as it parses a text:
8.4  Parsing with Context-Free Grammar r | 305
>>> sr_parse = nltk.ShiftReduceParser(grammar1)
>>> sent = 'Mary saw a dog'.split()
>>> print sr_parse.parse(sent)
(S (NP Mary) (VP (V saw) (NP (Det a) (N dog))))
Your Turn: Run this parser in tracing mode to see the sequence of shift
and reduce operations, using 
sr_parse = nltk.ShiftReduceParser(gram
mar1, trace=2)
.
A shift-reduce parser can reach a dead end and fail to find any parse, even if the input
sentence is well-formed according to the grammar. When this happens, no input re-
mains, and the stack contains items that cannot be reduced to an 
S
. The problem arises
because there are choices made earlier that cannot be undone by the parser (although
users of the graphical demonstration can undo their choices). There are two kinds of
choices to be made by the parser: (a) which reduction to do when more than one is
possible and (b) whether to shift or reduce when either action is possible.
A shift-reduce parser may be extended to implement policies for resolving such con-
flicts. For example, it may address shift-reduce conflicts by shifting only when no re-
ductions are possible, and it may address reduce-reduce conflicts by favoring the re-
duction operation that removes the most items from the stack. (A generalization of the
shift-reduce parser, a “lookahead LR parser,” is commonly used in programming lan-
guage compilers.)
The advantages of shift-reduce parsers over recursive descent parsers is that they only
build structure that corresponds to the words in the input. Furthermore, they only build
each substructure once; e.g., 
NP(Det(the), N(man))
is only built and pushed onto the
stack a single time, regardless of whether it will later be used by the 
VP -> V NP PP
reduction or the 
NP -> NP PP
reduction.
The Left-Corner Parser
One of the problems with the recursive descent parser is that it goes into an infinite
loop when it encounters a left-recursive production. This is because it applies the
grammar productions blindly, without considering the actual input sentence. A left-
corner parser is a hybrid between the bottom-up and top-down approaches we have
seen.
left-corner parser is a top-down parser with bottom-up filtering. Unlike an ordinary
recursive descent parser, it does not get trapped in left-recursive productions. Before
starting its work, a left-corner parser preprocesses the context-free grammar to build a
table where each row contains two cells, the first holding a non-terminal, and the sec-
ond holding the collection of possible left corners of that non-terminal. Table 8-2 il-
lustrates this for the grammar from 
grammar2
.
306 | | Chapter 8: Analyzing Sentence Structure
Table 8-2. Left corners in grammar2
Category
Left corners (pre-terminals)
S
NP
NP
Det, PropN
VP
V
PP
P
Each time a production is considered by the parser, it checks that the next input word
is compatible with at least one of the pre-terminal categories in the left-corner table.
Well-Formed Substring Tables
The simple parsers discussed in the previous sections suffer from limitations in both
completeness and efficiency. In order to remedy these, we will apply the algorithm
design technique of dynamic programming to the parsing problem. As we saw in
Section 4.7, dynamic programming stores intermediate results and reuses them when
appropriate, achieving significant efficiency gains. This technique can be applied to
syntactic parsing, allowing us to store partial solutions to the parsing task and then
look them up as necessary in order to efficiently arrive at a complete solution. This
approach to parsing is known as chart parsing. We introduce the main idea in this
section; see the online materials available for this chapter for more implementation
details.
Dynamic programming allows us to build the 
PP
in my pajamas just once. The first time
we build it we save it in a table, then we look it up when we need to use it as a sub-
constituent of either the object 
NP
or the higher 
VP
. This table is known as a well-formed
substring table, or WFST for short. (The term “substring” refers to a contiguous se-
quence of words within a sentence.) We will show how to construct the WFST bottom-
up so as to systematically record what syntactic constituents have been found.
Let’s set our input to be the sentence in (2). The numerically specified spans of the
WFST are reminiscent of Python’s slice notation (Section 3.2). Another way to think
about the data structure is shown in Figure 8-6, a data structure known as a chart.
Figure 8-6. The chart data structure: Words are the edge labels of a linear graph structure.
In a WFST, we record the position of the words by filling in cells in a triangular matrix:
the vertical axis will denote the start position of a substring, while the horizontal axis
will denote the end position (thus shot will appear in the cell with coordinates (1, 2)).
To simplify this presentation, we will assume each word has a unique lexical category,
8.4  Parsing with Context-Free Grammar r | 307
and we will store this (not the word) in the matrix. So cell (1, 2) will contain the entry
V
. More generally, if our input string is a
1
a
2
... a
n
, and our grammar contains a pro-
duction of the form A → a
i
, then we add A to the cell (i-1, i).
So, for every word in 
text
, we can look up in our grammar what category it belongs to.
[V -> 'shot']
For our WFST, we create an (n-1) × (n-1) matrix as a list of lists in Python, and initialize
it with the lexical categories of each token in the 
init_wfst()
function in Exam-
ple 8-3. We also define a utility function 
display()
to pretty-print the WFST for us. As
expected, there is a 
V
in cell (1, 2).
Example 8-3. Acceptor using well-formed substring table.
def init_wfst(tokens, grammar):
numtokens = len(tokens)
for i in range(numtokens):
productions = grammar.productions(rhs=tokens[i])
wfst[i][i+1] = productions[0].lhs()
return wfst
def complete_wfst(wfst, tokens, grammar, trace=False):
numtokens = len(tokens)
for span in range(2, numtokens+1):
for start in range(numtokens+1-span):
end = start + span
for mid in range(start+1, end):
nt1, nt2 = wfst[start][mid], wfst[mid][end]
if nt1 and nt2 and (nt1,nt2) in index:
wfst[start][end] = index[(nt1,nt2)]
if trace:
return wfst
def display(wfst, tokens):
for i in range(len(wfst)-1):
print "%d   " % i,
for j in range(1, len(wfst)):
print "%-4s" % (wfst[i][j] or '.'),
print
>>> tokens = "I shot an elephant in my pajamas".split()
>>> wfst0 = init_wfst(tokens, groucho_grammar)
>>> display(wfst0, tokens)
WFST 1    2    3    4    5    6    7
   NP   .    .    .    .    .    .
   .    V    .    .    .    .    .
   .    .    Det  .    .    .    .
   .    .    .    N    .    .    .
308 | | Chapter 8: Analyzing Sentence Structure
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested