.net c# pdf reader : Asp.net merge pdf files software SDK cloud windows winforms web page class KentBeck_TDD_byexample0-part37

Test-driven development 
Copyright © 2002 Kent Beck, All Rights Reserved 
3/8/02, 132 Pages 
Test-Driven Development 
By Example 
Kent Beck, Three Rivers Institute 
Notes to reviewers: 
· Are there diagrams that would help orient the examples? 
· Section I: Money Example is now completely re-written. Does the new style work 
better than the old one? I have noticed several changes— shorter chapters, more 
careful adherence to “the r ules”, less American -isms. Better, worse, same? 
· Please suggest your favorite glossary items 
· How does the new how/why refactoring format work? Do I need an example, or is 
it sufficient to point people to Martin’s book? 
Publically availabe at
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/testdrivendevelopment/files/
Asp.net merge pdf files - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
reader combine pdf; asp.net merge pdf files
Asp.net merge pdf files - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
add pdf together; attach pdf to mail merge in word
Test-driven development
2 of 132 
To Do 
Glossary 
To-do lists, chapter hooks, and reviews for xUnit 
Convert to Frame (sigh…)  
Finish missing patterns 
Bold source code changes 
Run Money through Jester and a coverage tool 
Deadend in Money. Where, oh where? 
VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. FREE TRIAL: HOW TO: XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for C#▶: C# ASP.NET:
combine pdfs online; c# combine pdf
Online Merge PDF files. Best free online merge PDF tool.
Thus, C#.NET PDF document merge library control can Download and try RasterEdge.XDoc. PDF for .NET and imaging solutions, available for ASP.NET AJAX, Silverlight
attach pdf to mail merge; merge pdf online
Test-driven development
3 of 133 
Random Thoughts 
Another mental picture— programming is like exploring a dark house. You go from 
room to room to room. Writing the test is like turning on the light. Then you can avoid 
the furniture and save your shins (the clean design resulting from refactoring). Then 
you’re ready to explore the next room. 
I need an adjective which means “can be made to work in one step”. Atomic? 
Achievable? Progressive? 
At the different stages of the cycle you are solving different problems, so the 
aesthetics change: Write a test-what should the API be? Make it compile— do as little 
as possible to satisfy the compiler. Make it run— — get back to green so you have 
confidence. Refactor— — remove duplication to prepare for the next test. 
Interesting error. I had two tests, one USD->USD and one USD->GBP. If I had kept 
the two assertions in the same test I wouldn’t have gone off the rails. What’s the rule 
there? When do you add assertions to existing tests and when do you write a new test? 
Splitting into orthogonal dimensions didn’t happen in either example. What up with 
that? I thought that was such an important technique. Maybe that’s what “isolate 
change” is really about, and taking smaller steps than I usually do results in making 
progress along one dimension before having to make progress in the other. 
More orientation material at the beginning of the example chapters— UML, lists of 
tests running, to do list 
Brian Marick on test-first tests as tests?  
TDD as a gesture— technical, political, aesthetic, emotional. Relationship to other 
practices. 
Since people are likely to read the chapters in the example one or two at a time, it is 
important to provide context at the beginning of each one-UML, maybe a list of the 
test cases that are running at the beginning. 
Test coverage. Use data structures that make special cases go away- iterators, number-
like numbers. 
Balancing reasoning and testing. Every one of those reasoning steps is subject to error, 
which adds risks. Replacing each and every reasoning step with a concrete test is 
extremely expensive (impossibly expensive, really). There is some tradeoff. Maybe 
that’s part of being a TDD— being aware of tradeoffs and intelligently choosing the 
crossover point for this particular situation. 
Assuming a certain geekoid value system— you want to do well by doing good (or 
vice versa). That is, you like clean code, you enjoy the feeling of designing and 
building well, and you want to be seen to be successful by managers and customers. 
Code aesthetics. For any given set of test cases, we are trying to minimize a 
complicated cost function— number of classes, number of methods, number of unique 
selectors, number of arguments, complexity of flow of control, visibility of methods 
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Embed converted html files in html page or iframe. Export PDF form data to html form in .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Turn PDF images to HTML images in VB.NET.
best pdf merger; pdf combine pages
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. FREE TRIAL: HOW TO: XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for C#▶: C# ASP.NET:
pdf combine two pages into one; acrobat combine pdf files
Test-driven development
4 of 133 
and members, coupling and cohesion. Either that or we are trying to give ourselves a 
glimpse through a tiny keyhole at an eternal realm of dynamic order. 
Once and only once— part of philosophical underpinnings. Also emergence. How 
about the attractor stuff Phlip talks about? Make it run, make it right, make it fast. 
Concrete to abstract, existential to universal. 
“Clever” play on words in the title. Test -driven development is development by 
example. The book is also structured by example.  
One paragraph of my history with TDD (preface?) 
What exactly is the relationship between test cases and design patterns? Test cases and 
refactorings? 
Tease apart “test-driven development”.  
This book is another example of my overall quest to find fundamental rules underlying 
effective software development. I’m looking for a theory in the physics sense, but I 
always take something I enjoy doing, subject it to a microscopic examination, and see 
if following simple rules enhances my enjoyment. Software patterns in general, SBPP, 
XP, and now this all have the same form. 
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF file into two or multiple files in ASP.NET webpage online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files in .NET WinForms.
pdf split and merge; acrobat merge pdf
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
HTML5 Viewer for C# .NET. Related Resources. To view, convert, edit, process, protect, sign PDF files, please refer to XDoc.PDF SDK for .NET overview.
c# merge pdf; combine pdf files
Test-driven development
5 of 133 
Contents 
TO DO 
2 
RANDOM THOUGHTS 
3 
CONTENTS 
5 
PREFACE 
9 
Fear 
10 
Acknowledgements 
11 
STORY TIME 
13 
SECTION I: MONEY EXAMPLE 
15 
MONEY EXAMPLE 
16 
DEGENERATE OBJECTS 
22 
EQUALITY FOR ALL 
24 
PRIVACY 
27 
FRANC-LY SPEAKING 
29 
EQUALITY FOR ALL, REDUX 
32 
APPLES AND ORANGES 
35 
MAKIN’ OBJECTS 
37 
TIMES WE’RE LIVIN’ I I N 
40 
THE ROOT OF ALL EVIL 
45 
ADDITION, FINALLY 
51 
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. FREE TRIAL: HOW TO: XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for C#▶: C# ASP.NET:
pdf combine pages; scan multiple pages into one pdf
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
Instantly convert all PDF document pages to SVG image files in C#.NET class application. Perform high-fidelity PDF to SVG conversion in both ASP.NET web and
best pdf combiner; append pdf files reader
Test-driven development
6 of 134 
MAKE IT 
55 
CHANGE 
60 
MIXED CURRENCIES 
64 
ABSTRACTION, FINALLY 
68 
MONEY RETROSPECTIVE 
72 
Metaphor 
72 
JUnit Usage 
73 
Code Statistics 
73 
Process 
74 
Test Quality 
75 
EXAMPLE: XUNIT 
76 
XUNIT TEST-FIRST 
78 
SET THE TABLE 
82 
COUNTING 
87 
HOW SUITE IT IS 
90 
XUNIT RETROSPECTIVE 
94 
SECTION III: PATTERNS 
95 
PATTERNS FOR TEST-DRIVEN DEVELOPMENT 
96 
Test n. 
96 
Isolated Test 
96 
Test List 
97 
Test-First 
98 
Assert First 
99 
Test Data 
100 
Evident Data 
101 
Implementation Strategies 
102 
Test-driven development
7 of 135 
Fake It (‘Til You Make It) 
102 
Triangulate 
103 
Obvious Implementation 
104 
One to Many 
104 
Process 
106 
One Step Test 
106 
Starter Test 
107 
Explanation Test 
108 
Another Test 
108 
Regression Test 
108 
Break 
109 
Do Over 
110 
Cheap Desk, Nice Chair 
110 
Testing Techniques 
111 
Child Test 
111 
Mock Object 
111 
Self Shunt 
112 
Log String 
114 
Crash Test Dummy 
114 
Broken Test 
115 
Clean Check-in 
116 
Using xUnit 
116 
Assertion 
116 
Fixture 
117 
External Fixture 
118 
Test Method 
119 
Exception Test 
119 
AllTests 
119 
Design Patterns 
120 
Null Object 
120 
Command 
121 
Template Method 
121 
Composite 
121 
Pluggable Object 
121 
Collecting Parameter 
121 
Value Object 
122 
Imposter 
123 
Refactoring 
123 
Reconcile Differences 
123 
Isolate Change 
124 
Migrate Data 
125 
Extract Method 
126 
Test-driven development
8 of 136 
Inline Method 
126 
Extract Interface 
126 
Move Method 
126 
Method Object 
126 
Add Parameter 
127 
Method Parameter to Constructor Parameter 
127 
MASTERING TDD 
129 
How large should your steps be? 
129 
How much feedback do you need? 
129 
When should you delete tests? 
131 
How does the programming language and environment influence TDD? 
132 
How can you use TDD to teach programming, design, and/or testing? 
132 
Can you test-drive enormous systems? 
132 
Can you drive development with application-level tests? 
133 
Is TDD sensitive to initial conditions? 
133 
Why does TDD work? 
134 
GLOSSARY 
135 
APPENDIX 1: INFLUENCE DIAGRAMS 
136 
Feedback 
136 
System Control 
137 
Test-driven development
9 of 133 
Preface 
Test-Driven Development: 
· Don’t write a line of new code unless you first have a failing automated test. 
· Eliminate duplication. 
Two simple rules, but they generate complex individual and group behavior. Some of 
the technical implications are: 
· You must design organically, with running code providing feedback between 
decisions 
· You must write your own tests, since you can’t wait twenty times a day for 
someone else to write a test 
· Your development environment must provide rapid response to small changes 
· Your designs must consist of many highly cohesive, loosely coupled 
components, just to make testing easy 
The two rules imply an order to the tasks of programming: 
· Red— write a little test that doesn’t work, perhaps doesn’t even compile at first  
· Green— make the test work quickly, committing whatever sins necessary in the 
process 
· Refactor— eliminate all the duplication created in just getting the test to work 
Red/green/refactor. The TDDs mantra. 
Assuming for the moment that such a style is possible, it might be possible to 
dramatically reduce the defect density of code and make the subject of work crystal 
clear to all involved. If so, writing only code demanded by failing tests also has social 
implications: 
· If the defect density can be reduced enough, QA can shift from reactive to 
proactive work 
· If the number of nasty surprises can be reduced enough, project managers can 
estimate accurately enough to involve real customers in daily development 
· If the topics of technical conversations can be made clear enough, 
programmers can work in minute-by-minute collaboration instead of daily or 
weekly collaboration 
· Again, if the defect density can be reduced enough, we can have shippable 
software with new functionality every day, leading to new business 
relationships with customers 
So, the concept is simple, but what’s my motivation? Why would a programmer take 
on the additional work of writing automated tests? Why would a programmer work in 
tiny little steps when their mind is capable of great soaring swoops of design? Fear. 
Test-driven development
10 of 133 
Fear 
Test-driven development (TDD) is a way of managing fear during programming. I 
don’t mean fear in a bad way, pow widdle prwogwammew needs a pacifiew, but fear 
in the legitimate, this-is-a-hard-problem-and-I-can’t-see-the-end-from-the-beginning 
sense. If pain is nature’s way of saying “Stop!”, fear is nature’s way of saying “Be 
careful.” The problem is that fear has a host of other effects:  
· Makes you tentative 
· Makes you grumpy 
· Makes you want to communicate less 
· Makes you shy from feedback 
None of these effects are helpful when programming, especially when programming 
something hard. So, how can you face a difficult situation and  
· Instead of being tentative, begin learning concretely as quickly as possible. 
· Instead of clamming up, communicate more clearly. 
· Instead of avoiding feedback, search out helpful, concrete feedback. 
· (You’ll have to work on grumpiness on your own.)  
Imagine programming as turning a crank to pull a bucket 
of water from a well. When the bucket is small, a free-
spinning crank is fine. When the bucket is big and full of 
water, you’re going to get tired before the bucket is all 
the way up. You need a ratchet mechanism to enable you 
to rest between bouts of cranking. The heavier the 
bucket, the closer the teeth need to be on the ratchet.  
The tests in test-driven development are the teeth of the 
ratchet. Once you get one test working, you know it is 
working, now and forever. You are one step closer to 
having everything working than you were when the test 
was broken. Now get the next one working, and the next, and the next. By analogy, the 
tougher the programming problem, the less ground should be covered by each test. 
Readers of Extreme Programming Explained will notice a difference in tone between 
XP and TDD. TDD isn't an absolute like Extreme Programming. XP says, “Here are 
things you must be able to do to be prepared to evolve further.” TDD is a little fuzzier. 
TDD is an awareness of the gap between decision and feedback during programming, 
and control over that gap. You could have only application-level tests and be doing 
TDD. The gap between decision and feedback would be large— days, even— but for 
extremely skilled programmers that might be enough feedback.  
TDD gives you control over feedback. When you are cruising along in overdrive and 
the snow begins to fall, you can shift into 4WD Low and keep making progress. When 
the road clears, you can up shift and away you go. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested