.net c# pdf reader : Add pdf files together reader SDK control project wpf web page winforms UWP KentBeck_TDD_byexample1-part38

Test-driven development
11 of 133 
That said, most people who learn TDD find their programming practice changed for 
good. “Test Infected” is the phrase Erich Gamma coined to describe this shift. You 
might find yourself writing more tests earlier, and working in smaller steps than you 
ever dreamed would be sensible. On the other hand, some programmers learn TDD 
and go back to their earlier practices, reserving TDD for special occasions when 
ordinary programming isn’t making progress. 
There are certainly programming tasks that can’t be driven primarily by tests (or at 
least, not yet). Security software and concurrency, for example, are two topics where 
TDD has no obvious application. The ability to write concrete, deterministic, 
automated tests is a prerequisite for applying TDD. 
Once you are finished reading this book, you should be ready to: 
· Start simply 
· Write automated tests 
· Refactor to add design decisions one at a time 
This book is organized into three sections. 
1. An example of writing typical model code using TDD. The example is one I got 
from Ward Cunningham years ago, and have used many times since, multi-
currency arithmetic. In it you will learn to write tests before code, grow a design 
organically, and fail with grace (there is a dead end in the example which I swear I 
put in for pedagogical purposes.) 
2. An example of testing more complicated logic, including reflection and 
exceptions, by developing a framework for automated testing. This example also 
serves to introduce you to the xUnit architecture that is at the heart of many 
programmer-oriented testing tools. In the second example you will learn to work in 
even smaller steps than in the first example, including the kind of self-referential 
hooha beloved of computer scientists. 
3. Patterns for TDD. Included are patterns for the deciding what tests to write, how to 
write tests using xUnit, and a greatest hits selection of the design patterns and 
refactorings used in the examples. 
I wrote the examples imagining a pair programming session. For me, joking and 
banter are signs of respect between peers, and an important outlet for tension. If you 
like looking at the map before wandering around, you may want to go straight to the 
patterns in section 3 and use the examples as illustrations. If you prefer just wandering 
around and then looking at the map to see where you’ve been, try reading the 
examples through, refering to the patterns when you want more detail about a 
technique, then using the patterns as a reference. 
Acknowledgements 
Thanks to all my many brutal and opinionated reviewers. I take full responsibility for 
the contents, but this book would have been much less readable and useful without 
their help. In the order in which I typed them in, they were: Steve Freeman, Frank 
Add pdf files together reader - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
add pdf pages together; append pdf files reader
Add pdf files together reader - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
pdf combine files online; best pdf combiner
Test-driven development
12 of 133 
Westphal, Ron Jeffries, Dierk König, Edward Hieatt, Tammo Freese, Jim Newkirk, 
Johannes Link, Manfred Lange, Steve Hayes, Alan Francis, Jonathan Rasmusson, 
Shane Clauson, Simon Crase, Kay Pentecost, Murray Bishop, Ryan King, Bill Wake,  
To all of the programmers I’ve test-driven code with, I certainly appreciate your 
patience going along with what was a pretty crazy sounding idea, especially in the 
early years. I’ve learned far more from you all than I could ever think of myself. Not 
wishing to offend everyone else, but Massimo Arnoldi, Ralph Beattie, Ron Jeffries, 
and last but certainly not least Erich Gamma stand out in my memory as partners from 
whom I’ve learned much. 
My life as a real programmer started for me with patient mentoring from and 
continuing collaboration with Ward Cunningham. Sometimes I see TDD as an attempt 
to give any programmer, working in any environment, the sense of comfort and 
intimacy we had with our Smalltalk environment and our Smalltalk programs. There is 
no way to sort out the source of ideas once two people have shared a brain. If you 
assume all the good ideas here are Ward’s, you won’t be far wrong.  
It is a bit of a cliché to recognize the sacrifices a family makes once one of its 
members catches the peculiar mental affliction that results in a book. It is a cliché 
because family sacrifices are as necessary to book writing as paper. To my children 
who waited breakfast until I could finish a chapter, and most of all to my wife who 
spent two months saying everything three times, my profoundest and least adequate 
thanks. 
Finally, to the unknown author of the book which I read as a weird 12-year-old that 
suggested you type in the expected output tape from a real input tape, then code until 
the actual results matched the expected result, thank you, thank you, thank you. 
C# Word - Merge Word Documents in C#.NET
empowers C# programmers to easily merge and append Word files with mature input Word documents can be merged and appended together according to Add references:
append pdf; acrobat merge pdf
C# PowerPoint - Merge PowerPoint Documents in C#.NET
together according to its loading sequence, and then saved and output as a single PowerPoint with user-defined location. C# DLLs: Merge PowerPoint Files. Add
merge pdf online; combine pdf online
Test-driven development
13 of 133 
Story Time 
Tell the WyCash multi-currency story, perhaps with a time line “0900 – –  management 
asks for the impossible, 0910 –  etc.”  
· WyCash was a system for managing portfolios of fixed income securities. 
Initially, it had been written for the US market, and …  
· One day they needed multi-currency arithmetic. 
· Ward invents Money and MoneyBag. 
· At the end of the day, the system was working. 
This was a moment business crave. Investing one day of a few programmers’ time 
multiplied the value of WyCash, already worth tens of millions of dollars, by several 
times. In fact, the business of software is making a bunch of bets like this and holding 
on long enough for one to pay off. The only reason sensible business people put up 
with the eccentricity, unreliability, and general orneriness of programmers is because 
occasionally the pony-tailed freaks spin straw into gold. 
Programmers, too, live for this kind of moment. Creativity, courage, and spark of 
genius combined to accomplish the impossible. Moments like this write a story that 
will keep the programmer in late-night conference beer for years, if told properly. 
The users experienced magic, too. Handling multiple currencies was, to them, a 
perfectly simple, understandable request. The users probably had the experience of 
making such perfectly simple, understandable requests of programmers before, and of 
receiving bizarre replies. “At least six months. But if you’d told me about this a year 
ago it would have been easy.” Instead, they made a simple request and a few days 
later, they got what they wanted. 
Moments that multiply the value of a project are a combination of method, motive and 
opportunity: 
· Method— Ward and the WyCash team needed to have constant experience 
growing the design of the system little-by-little, so the mechanics of the 
transformation were well practiced. 
· Motive— Ward and team had to understand clearly from the business the 
importance of making WyCash multi-currency, and to have the courage to start 
such a seemingly impossible task. 
· Opportunity—  The combination of comprehensive, confidence-generating 
tests; a well-factored program; and a programming language that made it 
possible to isolate design decisions meant that there were few sources of error, 
and those errors were easy to identify.  
You can’t control whether you ever get the motive to multiply the value of your 
project by spinning technical magic. Method and opportunity, however, are entirely 
under your control. Ward and his team created method and opportunity by a 
combination of superior talent, experience, and discipline. Does this mean that if you 
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping text by a method loses the original PDF document layout and all the paragraphs are joining together, our C#
combine pdf; add pdf files together reader
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
Imaging.MSWordDocx.dll", which, when used together with other online tutorial on how to add & insert controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and components
break pdf into multiple files; combine pdfs online
Test-driven development
14 of 133 
are not one of the ten best software engineers on the planet and you don’t have a wad 
of cash in the bank so you can tell your boss to take a hike, you’re going to take the 
time to do this right, that such moments are forever beyond your reach? 
No. You absolutely can place your projects in a position for you to work magic, even 
if you are a programmer with ordinary skills and you sometimes buckle under and take 
shortcuts when the pressure builds. Test-driven development is a set of techniques any 
programmer can follow, that encourage simple designs and test suites that inspire 
confidence. If you are a genius, you don’t need these rules. If you are a dolt, the rules 
won’t help. For the vast majority of us in between, though, following these two simple 
rules can lead us to work much closer to our potential: 
· Always write a failing automated test before you write any code 
· Always remove duplication 
How exactly to do this, the subtle gradations in applying these rules, and the lengths to 
which can push these two simple rules are the topic of this book. We’ll start with the 
object Ward created in his moment of inspiration— multi-currency money. 
C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
Support converting other files to Tiff, like Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, and images. Enable to add XImage.OCR for .NET into C# Tiff imaging application
break a pdf into multiple files; attach pdf to mail merge in word
C# Excel - Merge Excel Documents in C#.NET
and appended together according to its loading sequence, and then saved and output as a single Excel with user-defined location. C# DLLs: Merge Excel Files. Add
pdf merge comments; pdf merger
Test-driven development
15 of 133 
Section I: Money Example 
In this section we will develop typical model code completely driven by tests (except 
when we slip, purely for educational purposes). My goal is for you to see the rhythm 
of  test-driven development: 
1. Quickly add a test 
2. Run all tests and see the new one fail 
3. Make a little change 
4. Run all tests and see them all succeed 
5. Refactor to remove duplication 
The surprises are likely to be: 
· How each test can cover a small increment of functionality 
· How small and ugly the changes can be to make the new tests run 
· How often the tests are run 
· How many teensy tiny steps make up the refactorings 
C# Image: C# Code to Encode & Decode JBIG2 Images in RasterEdge .
Easy to add C# JBIG2 codec controls to your image and codec into PDF documents for a better PDF compression; text to the new project folder, together with .NET
batch pdf merger online; batch combine pdf
VB.NET Image: VB.NET ISSN Barcode Reader & Scanner; Decode Barcode
and recognize ISSN barcode from document files, like PDF from source PDF file, RasterEdge.Imaging.PDF.dll will And all those .NET add-ons can be integrated and
batch merge pdf; reader create pdf multiple files
Test-driven development
16 of 133 
Money Example 
We’ll start with the object Ward created at WyCash, multi-currency money. Suppose 
we have a report like this: 
Instrument 
Shares 
Price 
Total 
IBM 
1000 
25 
25000 
GE 
400 
100 
40000 
Total: 
75000 
To make a multi-currency report, we need to add currencies: 
Instrument 
Shares 
Price 
Total 
IBM 
1000 
25 USD 
25000 USD 
Novartis 
400 
150 CHF 
40000 CHF 
Total: 
75000 USD 
We also need to specify exchange rates: 
From 
To 
Rate 
CHF 
USD 
1.5 
What behavior will we need to produce the revised report? Put another way, what is 
the set of tests which, when passed, will demonstrate the presence of code we are 
confident will compute the report correctly? 
· We need to be able to add amounts in two different currencies and convert the 
result given a set of exchange rates.  
· We need to be able to multiply an amount (price per share) by a number 
(number of shares) and receive an amount. 
We’ll make a to-do list to remind us what all we need to do, keep us focused, and tell 
us when we are finished: 
T
o do
:
$5 + 
10
CHF = $
10
i
f CHF
:
USD 
is
2
:1
$5 
*
2 = $
10
What object do we need first? Trick question. We don’t start with objects, we start 
with tests (I keep having to remind myself of this, so I will pretend you are as dense as 
I am).  
Try again. What test do we need first? Looking at the list, that first test looks 
complicated. Start small or not at all. Multiplication, how hard could that be? We’ll 
work on that first. 
When we write a test, we imagine the perfect interface for our operation. We are 
telling ourselves a story about how the operation will look from the outside. Our story 
Test-driven development
17 of 133 
won’t always come true, but better to start from the best possible API and work 
backwards than to make things complicated, ugly, and “realistic” from the get g o. 
Here’s a simple example of multiplication: 
public void testMultiplication() { 
Dollar five= new Dollar(5); 
five.times(2); 
assertEquals(10, five.amount); 
(I know, I know, public fields, side-effects, integers for monetary amounts and all that. 
Small steps. We’ll make a note of the stinkiness and move on. We have a failing test 
and we want it to go green as quickly as possible.) 
T
o do
:
$5 + 
10
CHF = $
10
i
f CHF
:
USD 
is
2
:1
$5 
*
2 = $
10
Make “amoun
t
” pr
iv
a
t
Do
ll
ar 
si
de-effec
ts
Money round
i
ng? 
The test we just typed in (I’ll explain where and how we type it in later, when we talk 
more about JUnit) doesn’t even compile. That’s easy enough to fix. What’s the least 
we can do to get it to compile, even if it doesn’t run? We have four compile errors: 
· No class “Dollar” ”  
· No constructor 
· No method “times(int)”  
· No field “amount”  
Let’s take them one at a time (I always search for some numerical measure of 
progress). We can get rid of one error by defining the class Dollar: 
Dollar
Dollar  
class
class Dollar 
Now we need the constructor, but it doesn’t have to do anything just to get the test to 
compile: 
Dollar
Dollar  
Dollar(
int
int amount) { 
We need a stub implementation of times(). Again we’ll do the least work possible just 
to get the test to compile: 
Dollar
Dollar  
void
void t
imes(
int
int mul
t
iplier) { 
Finally, we need an amount field: 
Dollar
Dollar  
int
int amount
;
Now we can run the test and watch it fail. 
Test-driven development
18 of 133 
You are seeing the dreaded red bar. Our testing framework (JUnit, in this case) has run 
the little snippet of code we started with, and noticed that although we expected “10” 
as a result, we saw “0”. Sadness.  
No, no. Failure is progress. Now we have a concrete measure of failure. That’s better 
than just vaguely knowing we are failing. Our programming problem has been 
transformed from “give me multi-currency” to “make this test work, and then make 
the rest of the tests work.” Much simpler. Much smaller scope for fear. We can make 
this test work. 
You probably aren’t going to like the solution, but the goal right now is not to get the 
perfect answer, the goal is to pass the test. We’ll make our sacrifice at the altar of truth 
and beauty later. 
Here’s the smallest change I could imagine that would cause our test to pass: 
Dollar
Dollar  
int
int amount
=
 10
;
Now we get the green bar, fabled in song and story. 
Test-driven development
19 of 133 
Oh joy, oh rapture! Not so fast, hacker boy (or girl). The cycle isn’t complete. There 
are very few inputs in the world that will cause such a limited, such a smelly, such a 
naïve implementation to pass. We need to generalize before we move on. Remember, 
the cycle is: 
1. Add a little test 
2. Run all tests and fail 
3. Make a little change 
4. Run the tests and succeed 
5. Refactor to remove duplication 
Sidebar: Dependency and Duplication 
Steve Freeman pointed out that the problem with the test and code as it sits is not 
duplication (which I have not yet pointed out to you, but I promise to as soon as this 
digression is over.) The problem is the dependency between the code and the test—
you can’t change one without changing the other. Our goal is to be able to write 
another test that “mak es sense” to us, without having to change the code, something 
that is not possible with the current implementation. 
Test-driven development
20 of 133 
Dependency is the key problem in software development at all scales. If you have 
details of one vendor’s implementation of SQL scattered throughout the code and you 
decide to change to another vendor, you will discover that your code is dependent on 
the database vendor. You can’t change the database without changing the code. 
If dependency is the problem, duplication is the symptom. Duplication most often 
takes the form of duplicate logic— the same conditional expression appearing in 
multiple places in the code. Objects are excellent for abstracting away the duplication 
of logic. 
Duplication also appears in data. Symbolic constants were introduced to eliminate 
dependencies between code and magic numbers. Once you use a symbolic constant, 
your code is no longer dependent on the actual number. You can change the number 
all you want without having to touch the code. 
Unlike most problems in life, where eliminating the symptoms only makes the 
problem pop up elsewhere in worse form, eliminating duplication in programs 
eliminates dependency. That’s why the second rule appears in TDD. By eliminating 
duplication before we go on to the next test, we maximize our chance of being able to 
get the next test running with one and only one change. 
Now back to your regularly scheduled puzzling example. 
But where is the duplication? Usually you see duplication between two pieces of code. 
Here the duplication is between the data in the test and the data in the code. Don’t see 
it? How about if we write? 
Dollar
Dollar  
int
int amount
=
 5 * 2
;
That “10” had to come from somewhere. We did the multiplication in our heads so 
fast we didn’t even notice. The “5” and “2” are now in two pla
ces, and we must 
ruthlessly eliminate duplication before moving on. 
There isn’t a single step that will eliminate the 5 and 2. However, what if we move the 
setting of the amount from object initialization to the times() method? 
Dollar
Dollar  
int
int amount
;
void
void t
imes(
int
int mul
t
iplier) { 
amount
=
 5 * 2
;
The test still passes, the bar stays green. Happiness is still ours. 
Do these steps seem too small to you? Remember, TDD is not about taking teensy tiny 
steps, it’s about being able to take teensy tiny steps. Would I code day-to-day with 
steps this small? No. But when things get the least bit weird, I’m glad I can. 
Defensiveness aside, where were we? Ah, yes, we were getting rid of duplication 
between the test code and the working code. Where can we get a 5? That was the 
value passed to the constructor, so if we save it in the amount variable: 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested