.net c# pdf viewer : C# merge pdf pages application software tool html azure .net online KentBeck_TDD_byexample7-part47

Test-driven development
71 of 133 
· Once again had changes of declarations ripple through the system, and once 
again followed the compiler’s advice to fix them 
· Tried a brief experiment, then discarded it when it didn’t work out 
C# merge pdf pages - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
reader combine pdf pages; append pdf
C# merge pdf pages - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
acrobat merge pdf files; acrobat merge pdf
Test-driven development
72 of 133 
Money Retrospective 
Let’s take a look back at the Money example, both the process we used and the results. 
We will look at: 
· Metaphor— the dramatic affect metaphor has on the structure of the design 
· JUnit Usage— when we ran tests and how we used JUnit 
· Code Metrics— a numerical abstract of the resulting code 
· Process— we say red/green/refactor, but how much work goes into each step? 
· Test Quality— how do TDD tests stack up by conventional test metrics? 
Metaphor 
The biggest surprise in coding this example is how different it came out this time. I 
have programmed Money in production at least three times that I can think of. I have 
used it as an example in print another half dozen times. I have programmed it live on 
stage (relax, it’s not as exciting as it sounds…) another fifteen times. I coded another 
three or four times preparing for writing (I ripped out Section I and rewrote it based on 
early reviews.) Then, while I was writing this, I thought of using Expression as the 
metaphor and the design went in a completely different direction than it has gone 
before. 
I really didn’t expect the metaphor to be so powerful. A metaphor should just be a 
source of names, shouldn’t it? Apparently not. 
The metaphor Ward used for “ several monies together with potentially different 
currencies” was a vector, like a mathematic vector where the coefficients were 
currencies instead of x
2
. I used MoneySum for a while, then MoneyBag (which is nice 
and physical), and finally Wallet (which is commoner in most folks’ experience). All 
of these metaphors imply that the collection of Money’s is flat. For example, “2 USD 
+ 5 CHF + 3 USD” would result in “5 USD + 5 CHF”. Two values with the same 
currency would be merged. 
The Expression metaphor freed me from a bunch of nasty issues about merging 
duplicated currencies. The code came out cleaner and clearer than I’ve ever seen it 
before. I’m concerned about the performance of Expressions, but I’m happy to wait 
until I see some usage statistics before I start optimizing. 
What if I got to rewrite everything I ever wrote 20 times? Would I keep finding insight 
and surprise every time? Is there some way to be more mindful as I program so I can 
squeeze all the insight out of the first three times? The first time? 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
c# merge pdf files into one; pdf merge files
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Provide C# Users with Mature .NET PDF Document Manipulating Library for Deleting PDF Pages in C#. Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET.
reader combine pdf; pdf merge documents
Test-driven development
73 of 133 
JUnit Usage 
I had JUnit keep a log while I was coding the Money example. I pressed the Run 
button precisely 125 times. Because I was writing at the same time as I was 
programming, the interval between runs isn’t representative, but during the times I 
was just programming I ran the tests about once a minute. Only once in that whole 
time was I surprised by either success or failure, and that was a refactoring done in 
haste. 
Here is a histogram of the time interval between test runs. The large number of large 
intervals is most likely because of the time I spent writing: 
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
0
1
< 5
< 10
>= 10
Series1
Code Statistics 
Here are some statistics on the code: Replace these with the real numbers 
Functional Test 
Classes 
Functions (1) 
22 
15 
Lines (2) 
91 
89 
Cyclomatic complexity 
(3) 
1.04 
Lines/function 
4.1 (4) 
5.9 (5) 
1. Because we haven’t implemented the whole API, we can’t evaluate the absolute 
number of functions, or the number of functions per class, or lines per class. 
However, the ratios are instructive. There are roughly as many lines and functions 
in the test and functional code. 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C#: Convert PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress PDF; C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF
asp.net merge pdf files; c# combine pdf
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others in C#.NET Program. C#.NET Project DLLs: Copy and Paste PDF Pages.
apple merge pdf; scan multiple pages into one pdf
Test-driven development
74 of 133 
2. The number of lines of test code can be reduced by extracting common fixtures. 
The rough correspondance between lines of model code and lines of test code will 
remain, however. 
3. Cyclomatic complexity is a measure of conventional flow complexity. Test 
complexity is 1 because there are no branches or loops in test code. Functional 
code complexity is low because of the heavy use of polymorphism as a substitute 
for explicit control flow. 
4. This includes the function header and trailing brace. 
5. Lines/function in the tests is inflated because we have not factored out common 
fixture-building code, as explained in the section on JUnit. 
Process 
The TDD cycle is: 
1. Write a test 
2. Make it compile 
3. Make it run 
4. Remove duplication 
Assuming that writing a test is a single step, how many changes does it take to 
compile, run, and refactor? (By change, I mean changing a method or class definition.) 
Here is the raw data: (Tufte, where are you when I need you?) 
Compile Run 
Refactor 
11 
28 
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF.
acrobat reader merge pdf files; pdf combine
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
you want to read the tutorial of PDF page adding in C# class, we suggest you go to C# Imaging - how Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
build pdf from multiple files; add two pdf files together
Test-driven development
75 of 133 
14 
10 
Number of changes per refactoring
0
2
4
6
8
10
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
27
29
Number of Changes
Occurrences
I expect that if we gathered data for a large project, the number of changes to compile 
and run would remain fairly small (they could be even smaller if the programming 
environment understood what the tests were trying to tell it— creating stubs 
automatically, for instance). However, (here’s at least a master’s thesis)  the number of 
changes per refactoring should follow a “fat tail” or leptokurtotic profile, which is like 
a bell curve but with more large changes. Many measurements in nature follow this 
profile, like price changes in the stock market.
1
Test Quality 
You professional testers out there please give me some hints. What are tests that I 
missed that won’t run the first time? 
Measure Coverage 
Try defect insertion— Jester? 
1
Fractals and Scaling in Finance, Benoit Mandelbrot, editor, Springer-Verlag, 1997, ISBN 0387983635 
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
page, it is also featured with the functions to merge PDF files using C# .NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
add pdf pages together; add pdf files together online
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Output.jpg"); Following demo code will show how to convert all PDF pages to Jpeg images with C# .NET. // Load a PDF file. String
combine pdf; batch merge pdf
Test-driven development
76 of 133 
Example: xUnit 
TDD requires tests. I suppose that goes almost without say, but I’ll say it anyway, 
because it requires not just any tests, but a special kind of test. The tests must be: 
Draw influence diagrams for each of these 
· Easy to write for programmers— The basic value system of TDDs is that code 
is king. The question you want to answer at the end of the day is how much 
functionality did you get working? Test tools that require unfamiliar 
environments or languages will be less likely to be used, even if they are 
technically superior. 
· Easy to read for programmers— Unsynchronized documentation is scarce. The 
tests will be more valuable if they are readable, giving an interesting second 
perspective on the messages hidden in the source code. 
· Quick to execute— If the tests don’t run fast, they won’t get run. If they don’t 
get run, they won’t be valuable. If they aren’t valuable, they won’t continue to 
be written. Transitive closure— if the tests don’t run fast, they won’t get 
written. Any test tool that requires you to bring up the application is probably 
doomed before we start. 
· Order independent— If one test breaks, we’d like the other to succeed or fail 
independently. I once stopped automatically testing a system about the tenth 
time I received a panicked call about hundreds of failing tests that turned out to 
have a single source of error. 
· Deterministic— Tests that run one time and don’t run the next give negative 
information. The times they run you have unwarranted confidence in the 
system. This implies that TDD as described here is not suitable for the 
synchronization parts of multi-thread programming. 
· Piecemeal— We’d like to be able to write the tests a few at a time. 
· Composable— We’d like to be able to run tests in any combination. 
· Versionable— The source of the tests should play nicely with the rest of the 
source in the system. 
· A priori— We should be able to write the tests before they can possibly run. 
· Automatic— The tests should run with no human intervention. The cycle that 
kills quality is that when stress increases, errors also increase, which increases 
stress, which… Fully automated tools break this c ycle. Every time you run a 
suite of tests successfully, your stress level goes down, so you are encouraged 
to run more tests when stress increases 
· Helpful when thinking about design— Writing the tests a priori should be a 
learning experience. Tools that operate within the programming concepts of 
the system can help with design, while tools that operate the system as a black 
box cannot help with structuring the internals. 
Test-driven development
77 of 133 
There are several possible testing tools we could use to write our tests. You can go 
through the list above and eliminate GUI-based tools, script-language-based tools, and 
simple-minded source code hacks on one or more counts. Such tools certainly have a 
place in the well-stocked testing-bag-o-tricks. However, they aren’t suitable for TDD. 
JUnit and its cousins are one way to negotiate this tricky, sometimes contradictory, set 
of constraints. The basic decisions are: 
· Tests are expressed in ordinary source code 
· The execution of each test is centered on an instance of a TestCase object 
· Each TestCase, before it executes the test, has the opportunity to create an 
environment for the test, and to destroy that environment when the test finishes 
· Groups of tests can be collected together, and their results of running them all 
will be reported collectively 
· We use the language’s exception handling mechanism to catch and report 
errors 
Test-driven development
78 of 133 
xUnit Test-First 
How, oh how, to talk about the implementation of a tool for test-driven development? 
Test-driven, naturally. 
The xUnit architecture comes out very smoothly in Python, so I’ll switch to Python for 
this section. Don’t worry, I’ll skip all the backtracking and boo o -boos (which I will be 
making behind the scenes, never fear), so you’ll be left with just the good parts. I’ll 
also give a little commentary on Python, for those of you who haven’t seen it before. 
Now, writing a testing tool test-first, using itself as the tool, may seem a bit like 
performing brain surgery on yourself (“Don’t touch those motor centers — — oh, too bad, 
game over”). It will get weird from time to time. However, the logic of the testing 
framework is more complicated than the wimpy money example above. You can read 
this chapter as a step towards test-driven development of “real” software. You can 
read this chapter as a computer-sciency exercise in self-referential programming. Or 
you can skip it, and move on to the next chapter, which gives a design-oriented 
overview of xUnit. 
First, we need to be able to create a TestCase and run a test method. For example: 
TestCase(“testMethod”).run(). We have a bootstrap problem. We are writing test cases 
to test a framework that we will be using to write the test cases. Since we don’t have a 
framework yet, we will have to verify the operation of the first tiny step by hand. 
Fortunately, we are well rested and relaxed and unlikely to make mistakes, which is 
why we will go in teensy tiny steps, verifying everything six ways from Sunday. 
We are still working test-first, of course. For our first proto-test, we need a little 
program that will print out true if a test method gets called, and false otherwise. If we 
have a test case that sets a flag inside the test method, we can print the flag after we’re 
done and make sure it’s correct. Once we have verified it manually, we can automate 
the process. 
Python executes statements as it reads a file, so we can start with invoking the test 
method manually: 
test
=
 WasRun("testMethod") 
print test
.
wasRun 
test
.
testMethod() 
print test
.
wasRun 
We expect this to print “None” (None in Python is like null or nil, and stands for false, 
along with 0 and a few other objects) before the method was run, and “1” afterwards. 
It doesn’t, because we haven’t defined the class WasRun yet (test -first, test-first). 
WasRun
WasRun  
class WasRun:
pass 
(The keyword “pass” is used when there is no implementation o f a class or method.) 
Now we are told we need an attribute “wasRun”. We need to create the attribute when 
Test-driven development
79 of 133 
we create the instance is created (the constructor is called “__init__” for convenience). 
In it, we set the wasRun flag false. 
WasRun
WasRun  
class WasRun:
def __ini
t__(self
,
 name)
:
self
.
wasRun=
 None 
Running the file faithfully prints out “None”, then tells us we need to define the 
method “testMethod” (wouldn’t it be great if your IDE noticed this, provided you with 
a stub, and opened up an editor on it? Nah, too useful…)  
WasRun
WasRun  
def testMethod(self)
:
pass 
Now when we execute the file, we see “None” and “None”. We want to see “None” 
and “1”. We can get it by setting the flag in testMethod():  
WasRun
WasRun  
def testMethod(self)
:
self
.
wasRun=
 1 
Now we get the right answer (the green bar, hooray!). Now we have a bunch of 
refactoring to do, but as long as we maintain the green bar, we know we have made 
progress. 
Next we need to use our real interface, run(), instead of calling the test method 
directly. The test changes to: 
test
=
 WasRun("testMethod") 
print test
.
wasRun 
test
.run() 
print test
.
wasRun 
The implementation we can hardwire at the moment to: 
WasRun
WasRun  
def run(self)
:
self
.
testMethod() 
And our test is back to printing the right values again. Lots of refactoring has this 
feel— separating two parts so you can work on the separately. If they go back together 
when you are finished, fine, if not, you can leave them separate. In this case, we 
expect to create a superclass TestCase, eventually, but first we have to differentiate the 
parts of our one example. There is probably some clever analogy with mitosis in here, 
but I don’t know enough cellular biology to explain it. 
The next step is to dynamically invoke the testMethod. If the name attribute of the 
instance of WasRun is the string “testMethod”, then we can replace the direct call to 
“self.testMethod()” with “exec “self.” + self.name + “()”” (the dynamic invocation of 
methods is called Pluggable Selector, and should be used sparingly, and only if there 
are no reasonable alternatives). 
Test-driven development
80 of 133 
WasRun
WasRun  
class WasRun:
def __ini
t__(self
,
 name)
:
self
.
wasRun=
 None 
self
.name=
 name 
def run(self)
:
exec "self
." 
+
 self
.name 
+
 "()" 
Here is another general pattern of refactoring— take code that works in one instance 
and generalize it to work in many by replacing constants with variables. Here the 
constant was hardwired code, not a data value, but the principle is the same. Test-first 
makes this work well by giving you running concrete examples from which to 
generalize, instead of having to generalize purely with reasoning. 
Now our little WasRun class is doing two distinct jobs— one is keeping track of 
whether a method was invoked or not, the other is dynamically invoking the method. 
Time for a little of that mitosis action. First we create an empty TestCase superclass, 
and make WasRun a subclass: 
TestCase
TestCase  
class 
TestCase:
pass 
WasRun
WasRun  
class WasRun(
TestCase)
:
 … 
Now we can move the “name” attribute up to the superclass:  
TestCase
TestCase  
def __ini
t__(self
,
 name)
:
self
.name=
 name 
WasRun
WasRun  
def __ini
t__(self
,
 name)
:
self
.
wasRun=
 None 
TestCase.
__ini
t__(self
,
 name) 
Finally, the run() method only uses attributes from the superclass, so it probably 
belongs in the superclass (I’m always looking to put the operations near the data.) 
TestCase
TestCase  
def __ini
t__(self
,
 name)
:
self
.name=
 name 
def run(self)
:
exec "self
." 
+
 self
.name 
+
 "()" 
(Between every one of these steps I run the tests to make sure I’m getting the same 
answer.) 
We’re getting tired of looking to see that “None” and “1” are printed every time. 
Using the mechanism we just built, we can now write: 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested