Test-driven development
91 of 133 
· Use Python’s default parameter mechanism. Unfortunately, the default value is 
evaluated at compile time, not run time, and we don’t want to be reusing the 
same TestResult 
· Split the method into two parts, one which allocates the TestResult and the 
other which runs the test given a TestResult 
· Allocate the TestResults in the caller 
I can’t think of good names for the two parts of the method, so we will allocate the 
TestResults in the callers. This pattern is called Collecting Parameter. 
TestCaseTest
TestCaseTest  
def testSui
te(self)
:
sui
te=
TestSui
te() 
sui
te.add(WasRun("testMethod")) 
sui
te.add(WasRun("testBrokenMethod")) 
resul
t
=
TestResul
t() 
sui
te.run(resul
t) 
assert("2 run,
 1 failed" 
==
 resul
t
.summary()) 
This solution has the advantage that run() now has no explicit return: 
TestSui
te
TestSui
te  
def run(self
,
 resul
t)
:
for test 
in tests:
test
.run(resul
t) 
TestCase
TestCase  
def run(self
,
 resul
t)
:
resul
t
.
testStarted() 
self
.setUp() 
try:
exec "self
." 
+
 self
.name 
+
 "()" 
except
:
resul
t
.
testFailed() 
self
.
tearDown() 
Now we can clean up the invocation of the tests at the end of the file: 
sui
te=
TestSui
te() 
sui
te.add(
TestCaseTest("test
TemplateMethod")) 
sui
te.add(
TestCaseTest("testResul
t")) 
sui
te.add(
TestCaseTest("testFailedResul
tFormatt
ing")) 
sui
te.add(
TestCaseTest("testFailedResul
t")) 
sui
te.add(
TestCaseTest("testSui
te")) 
resul
t
=
TestResul
t() 
sui
te.run(resul
t) 
print resul
t
.summary() 
There is substantial duplication here, which we could eliminate if we had a way of 
constructing a suite automatically given a test class. However, first we have to fix the 
4 failing tests (they use the old no-argument run interface): 
Pdf mail merge plug in - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
batch merge pdf; break a pdf into multiple files
Pdf mail merge plug in - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
pdf combine files online; add pdf files together
Test-driven development
92 of 133 
TestCaseTest
TestCaseTest  
def test
TemplateMethod(self)
:
test
=
 WasRun("testMethod") 
resul
t
=
TestResul
t() 
test
.run(resul
t) 
assert("setUp testMethod tearDown " 
==
 test
.log) 
def testResul
t(self)
:
test
=
 WasRun("testMethod") 
resul
t
=
TestResul
t() 
test
.run(resul
t) 
assert("1 run,
 0 failed" 
==
 resul
t
.summary()) 
def testFailedResul
t(self)
:
test
=
 WasRun("testBrokenMethod") 
resul
t
=
TestResul
t() 
test
.run(resul
t) 
assert("1 run,
 1 failed" 
==
 resul
t
.summary()) 
def testFailedResul
tFormatt
ing(self)
:
resul
t
=
TestResul
t() 
resul
t
.
testStarted() 
resul
t
.
testFailed() 
assert("1 run,
 1 failed" 
==
 resul
t
.summary()) 
Notice that now each test allocates a result, exactly the problem solved by setUp(). We 
can simplify the tests (at the cost of making them a little more difficult to read), by 
creating the TestResult in setUp(): 
C# TIFF: Barcode Reading and Scanning from TIFF File in C#.NET
types supported by our C#.NET TIFF Barcode Reader Plug-in. C# PDF-417 Reading from TIFF, C# ISBN Reading from TIFF. C# Intelligent Mail Recognition from TIFF,
best pdf merger; merge pdf files
VB.NET Imaging - Data Matrix Plug-in SDK Control
VB Imaging - Data Matrix Generator Plug-in Overview. Creator Add-on can help .NET developers insert Data Matrix barcode into a certain page of PDF, TIFF, Word
append pdf; batch combine pdf
Test-driven development
93 of 133 
TestCaseTest
TestCaseTest  
def setUp(self)
:
self
.resul
t
=
TestResul
t() 
def test
TemplateMethod(self)
:
test
=
 WasRun("testMethod") 
test
.run(self
.resul
t) 
assert("setUp testMethod tearDown " 
==
 test
.log) 
def testResul
t(self)
:
test
=
 WasRun("testMethod") 
test
.run(self
.resul
t) 
assert("1 run,
 0 failed" 
==
 self
.resul
t
.summary()) 
def testFailedResul
t(self)
:
test
=
 WasRun("testBrokenMethod") 
test
.run(self
.resul
t) 
assert("1 run,
 1 failed" 
==
 self
.resul
t
.summary()) 
def testFailedResul
tFormatt
ing(self)
:
self
.resul
t
.
testStarted() 
self
.resul
t
.
testFailed() 
assert("1 run,
 1 failed" 
==
 self
.resul
t
.summary()) 
def testSui
te(self)
:
sui
te=
TestSui
te() 
sui
te.add(WasRun("testMethod")) 
sui
te.add(WasRun("testBrokenMethod")) 
sui
te.run(self
.resul
t) 
assert("2 run,
 1 failed" 
==
 self
.resul
t
.summary()) 
All those extra “self.”s are a bit ugly, but that’s Python. If it was an object language, 
the self would be assumed and references to global variables would require 
qualification. Instead, it is a scripting language with object support (excellent object 
support, to be sure) added, so global reference is implied and referring to self is 
explicit. 
C# Imaging - Data Matrix Plug-in SDK Control
C# Imaging - Data Matrix Generator Plug-in Overview. Users can freely embed Data Matrix into various documents including TIFF, PDF, Word, Excel and PowerPoint.
apple merge pdf; c# merge pdf files into one
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Codes on How to Scan RM4SCC barcode in .NET
This barcode plug-in component is developed to help users well as other file type such as PDF document, Microsoft postal barcode used by the Royal Mail for the
pdf mail merge plug in; acrobat reader merge pdf files
Test-driven development
94 of 133 
xUnit Retrospective 
If the time comes for you to implement your own testing framework, the above 
sequence can serve as your guide. The details of the implementation are not nearly as 
important as the test cases. If you can support a set of test cases like the ones above, 
you can write tests that are isolated and composeable, and you will be on your way to 
being able to develop test-first. 
xUnit has been ported to more than 30 languages at this writing. Your language is 
likely to already have an implementation. There are a couple of reasons for 
implementing it even if there is a version already available: 
· Mastery— The spirit of xUnit is simplicity. Martin Fowler said, “Never in the 
annals of software engineering was so much owed by so many to so little 
code.” So me of the implementations have gotten a little complicated for my 
taste. Rolling your own will give you a tool over which you have a feeling of 
mastery. 
· Exploration— Say you are faced with a new programming language. By the 
time you have implemented the first 8-10 test cases, you will have explored 
many of the facilities you will be using in daily programming 
When you begin using xUnit, you will discover a big difference between assertions 
that fail and other kinds of errors while running tests— assertion failures consistently 
take much longer to debug. Because of this, most implementations of xUnit 
distinguish between failures— meaning assertion failures— — and errors. The GUIs 
present them differently, often with the errors on top. 
JUnit declares a simple Test interface that is implemented by both TestCase and 
TestSuite. If you want your tests to be runnable by JUnit tools, you can implement the 
Test interface, too.  
public 
interface 
Test { 
public abstract 
int count
TestCases()
;
public abstract void run(
TestResul
t resul
t)
;
Languages with optimistic typing don’t even have to declare their allegiance to an 
interface, they can just implement the operations. If you write a test scripting 
language, Script can implement countTestCases() to return 1 and run to notify the 
TestResult on failure and you can run your scripts along with the ordinary TestCases. 
VB.NET Word: Create a Customized Word Rendering & Converting
to contact our technical team via E-mail RasterEdge VB.NET Word converting plug-in allows developers to and bmp, vector image format, like svg, and PDF file are
acrobat combine pdf files; acrobat merge pdf files
VB.NET TIFF: VB Code to Read Linear and 2D Barcodes from TIFF
processing add-on and .NET barcode reader plug-in, it Barcode Reading Component allows users scan PDF-417 barcode VB Code to Scan Intelligent Mail from TIFF,
break pdf into multiple files; combine pdfs online
Test-driven development
95 of 133 
Section III: Patterns 
What follows are the “greatest hits” patterns for TDD. Some of the patterns are TDD 
tricks, some are design patterns, and some are refactorings. 
The goal in these patterns is not to be comprehensive. If you want to understand 
testing, design patterns, or refactoring you will have to go elsewhere for mastery. If 
you are not familiar with these topics, there is enough here to get you going. If you are 
familiar with one of these topics, the patterns here will show you how the topics play 
with TDD. 
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Codes to Create Linear and 2D Barcodes on
with the ability to combine and merge created barcode is easy to install and integrate Micro PDF-417 barcode to add and create linear Intelligent Mail on any
reader merge pdf; split pdf into multiple files
VB.NET Image: Australia Post Barcode Reader & Scanner SDK for VB.
component, developers can easily integrate this strong linear barcode scanner plug-in into NET code; How to read Australia Post barcode image from PDF file by
pdf merge comments; pdf combine pages
Test-driven development
96 of 133 
Patterns for Test-Driven Development 
Test n. 
How do you test your software? Write an automated test. 
No programmers release even the tiniest change without testing, except the very 
confident and the very sloppy. I’ll assume that if you’ve gotten this far, your’re 
neither. While you may test your changes, testing changes is not the same as having 
tests. Why does a test that runs automatically feel different than poking a few buttons 
and looking at a few answers on the screen? 
(What follows in an influence diagram, a la Gerry Weinberg’s Quality Software 
Management. An arrow between nodes means an increase in the first node implies an 
increase in the second. An arrow with a circle means an increase in the first node 
implies a decrease in the second.) 
What happens when the stress level rises? 
Figure 1 has Stress negatively connected to Testing negatively connected to Errors 
positively connected to Stress. 
This is a positive feedback loop. The more stress you feel, the less testing you will do. 
The less testing you do, the more errors you will make. The more errors you make, the 
more stress you feel. Rinse and repeat. 
How do you get out of such a loop? Either introduce a new element, replace one of the 
elements, or change the arrows. In this case we’ll replace “testing” with “automated 
testing”.  
Figure 2 has Stress positively connected to Automated Testing negatively connected to 
Errors and Stress, and Errors positively connected to Stress. 
“Did I just break something else with that change?” When I have automated tests, 
when I start to feel stress I run the tests. “No, the tests are all still green.” The more 
stress I feel, the more I run the tests. Running the tests immediately gives me a good 
feeling, and reduces the number of errors I make, which further reduces the stress I 
feel. 
“We don’t have time to run the tests. Just release it!” The second picture isn’t 
guaranteed. If the stress level rises high enough, it breaks down. However, with the 
automated tests you have a chance to choose your level of fear. 
Isolated Test 
How should the running of tests affect each other? Not at all. 
When I was a young programmer, long long ago when we had to dig our own bits out 
of the snow and carry heavy buckets of them bare-footed back to our cubicles leaving 
bloody little footprints for the wolves to follow… Sorry, just reminiscing. My first 
experience of automated tests was having a set of GUI-based tests (you know, record 
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Codes to Read UPC-A Barcode in .NET Barcoding
A Overview. RasterEdge .NET Image SDK contains a barcode reading plug-in library tiff and bmp currently), and other document formats, such as PDF docuemnt and
adding pdf pages together; break pdf file into multiple files
C# Imaging - RM4SCC Barcode Generation Tutorial
as CBC (Customer Bar Code) within Royal Mail. RasterEdge Barcode Creator Library Plug-in, a consisting images, along with documents like PDF, Microsoft Office
c# combine pdf; best pdf combiner
Test-driven development
97 of 133 
the keystrokes and mouse events and play them back) for a debugger I was working on 
(hi Jothy, hi John!). Every morning when I came in there would be a neat stack of 
paper on my chair describing last nights test runs (hi Al!). On good days there would 
be a single sheet summarizing that nothing broke. On bad days there would be many 
many sheets, one for each broken test. I began to dread days when I saw a pile of 
paper on my chair. 
I took two lessons from this experience. First, make the tests so fast to run that I can 
run them myself, and run them often. That way I can catch errors before anyone else 
sees them, and I don’t have to dread coming in in the morning. Second, I noticed after 
a while that a huge stack of paper didn’t usually mean a huge list of problems. More 
often it meant that one test had broken early, leaving the system in an unpredictable 
state for the next test. 
We tried to get around this problem by starting and stopping the system between each 
test, but it took to long, which taught me another lesson about seeking tests at a 
smaller scale than the whole application. But the main lesson I took was that tests 
should be able to ignore each other completely. If I had one test broken, I wanted one 
problem. If I had two tests broken, I wanted two problems. 
One convenient implication of isolated tests is that the tests are order independent. If I 
want to grab a subset of tests and run them, I can do so without worrying that a test 
will break now because a prerequisite test is gone. 
Performance is the usual reason cited for having tests share data. A second implication 
of isolated tests is that you have to work, sometimes work hard, to break your problem 
into little orthogonal dimensions, so setting up the environment for each test is easy 
and quick. Isolating tests encourages you to compose solutions out of many highly 
cohesive, loosely coupled objects. I always heard this was a good idea, and I was 
happy when I achieved it, but I never knew exactly how to regularly achieve high 
cohesion and loose coupling until I started writing isolated tests. 
Test List 
What should you test? Before you begin, write a list of all the tests you know you will 
have to write. 
The first part of our strategy for dealing with programming stress is to never take a 
step forward unless we know where our foot is going to land. When we sit down to a 
programming session, what is it we intend to accomplish? 
One strategy for keeping track of what we’re trying to accomplish is to hold it all in 
our heads. I tried this for several years, and found I got into a positive feedback loop. 
The more experience I accumulated, the more things I knew that might need to be 
done. The more things I knew might need to be done, the less attention I had for what 
I was doing. The less attention I had for what I was doing, the less I accomplished. 
The less I accomplished, the more things I knew that needed to be done. 
Just ignoring random items on the list and programming at whim did not appear to 
work to break this cycle. 
Test-driven development
98 of 133 
I got in the habit of writing down everything I wanted to accomplish over the next few 
hours on a slip of paper next to my computer. I had a similar list, but with weekly or 
monthly scope pinned on the wall. As soon as I had all that written down, I knew I 
wasn’t going to forget something. When a new item came up, I would quickly and 
consciously decide whether it belonged on the “now” list, the “later” list, or it didn’t 
really need to be done at all. 
Applied to test-driven development, what we put on the list are the tests we want to 
implement. If you want a comprehensive treatment of this subject, I recommend Bob 
Binder’s “???”. The material here is just enough to get you started. First, put on the list 
examples of every operation that you know you need to implement. Next, for those 
operations that don’t already exist, put the null version of that operation. Finally, list 
all the refactorings that you think you will have to do to have clean code at the end of 
this session. 
Instead of outlining the tests, we could just go ahead and implement them. There are a 
couple of reasons this hasn’t worked for me. First, every test you implement is a bit of 
inertia when you have to refactor. With automated refactoring tools this is less of a 
problem, but when you’ve implemented ten tests and then you discover the arguments 
need to be in the opposite order, you are just that much less likely to go clean up. 
Second, if you have ten tests broken, you are a long way from the green bar. If you 
want to get to green quickly, you have to throw all ten tests away. If you want to get 
all the tests working, you are going to be staring at a red bar for a long time. 
Conservative mountain climbers have a rule that you have to have three out of your 
four hands and feet attached at any one time. Dynamic moves where you let go of two 
at once are much more dangerous. The extreme form of TDD, where you are never 
more than one change away from a green bar, is like that three out of four rule. 
As you make the tests run, the implementation will imply new tests. Write the new 
tests down on the list. Likewise with refactorings. “This is getting ugly.” “<sigh> Put 
it on the list. We’ll get to it before we check in.”  
Items that are left on the list when the session is done need to be taken care of. If you 
are really half way through a piece of functionality, use the same list later. If you have 
discovered larger refactorings that are out of scope for the moment, move them to the 
“later” list. I can’t recall ever moving a test case to the “later” list. If I can think of a 
test that might not work, nothing is more important than getting it to work. 
Test-First 
When should you write your tests? Before you write the code that is to be tested. 
You won’t test after. Your goal as a programmer is running functionality. 
You need a way to think about design 
You need a method for scope control 
Let’s look at the usual influence diagram relating stress and testing (but not stress 
testing, that’s different): 
Stress above negatively connected to testing below negatively connected to stress. 
Test-driven development
99 of 133 
The more stress you feel, the less likely you are to test enough. When you know you 
haven’t tested enough, you add to your stress. Positive feedback loop. Once again, 
there needs to be a way to break the loop. 
What if we adopted the rule that we would always test first. Then we can invert the 
diagram and get a virtuous cycle: 
Test-first above negatively connected to stress below negatively connected to test-
First.. 
When we test-first, we reduce the stress, which makes us more likely to test. There are 
lots of other elements feeding into stress, however, so the tests must live in other 
virtuous cycles or they will be abandoned when stress increases enough. 
Assert First 
When should you write the asserts? Try writing them first. 
Don't you just love self-similarity?  
· Where should you start building a system? With the stories that you will be 
able to tell about the system when it is done. 
· Where should you start writing a bit of functionality? With the tests that will 
run when it is done.  
· Where should you start writing a test? With the asserts that will pass when it is 
done. 
Jim Newkirk introduced me to this technique. When I test assert-first I find it has a 
powerful simplifying effect. When you are writing a test, you are solving several 
problems at once, even if you no longer have to think about the implementation. 
· Where does the functionality belong? Is it a modification of an existing 
method, a new method on an existing class, an existing method name 
implemented in a new place, or a new class? 
· What should the names be called? 
· How are you going to check for the right answer? 
· What is the right answer? 
· What other tests does this test suggest? 
Pea-sized brains like mine can't possibly do a good job of solving all these problems at 
once. The two problems from the list that can be easily separated from the rest are 
"what is the right answer?" and "how am I going to check?" 
Here's an example. Suppose we want to communicate with another system over a 
socket. When we're done, the socket should be closed and we should have read the 
string "abc". 
Test-driven development
100 of 133 
testCompleteTransact
ion() { 
...
assert
True(reader.isClosed())
;
assertEquals("abc",
 reply.
contents())
;
Where does the buffer come from? The socket, of course: 
testCompleteTransact
ion() { 
...
Buffer reply=
 reader.
contents()
;
assert
True(reader.isClosed())
;
assertEquals("abc",
 reply.
contents())
;
And the socket? We create it by connecting to a server: 
testCompleteTransact
ion() { 
...
Socket reader=
 Socket("localhost",
 defaul
tPort())
;
Buffer reply=
 reader.
contents()
;
assert
True(reader.isClosed())
;
assertEquals("abc",
 reply.
contents())
;
But before this, we need to open a server: 
testCompleteTransact
ion() { 
Server wri
ter=
 Server(defaul
tPort()
,
 "abc")
;
Socket reader=
 Socket("localhost",
 defaul
tPort())
;
Buffer reply=
 reader.
contents()
;
assert
True(reader.isClosed())
;
assertEquals("abc",
 reply.
contents())
;
Now we may have to adjust the names based on actual usage, but we have created the 
outlines of the test in teensy tiny steps, informing each decision with feedback within 
seconds. 
Test Data 
What data do you use for test-first tests? Use data that makes the tests easy to read and 
follow. 
You are writing tests to an audience. Don’t scatter data values around just to be 
scattering data values around. If there is a difference in the data, it should be 
meaningful. If there isn’t a conceptual difference between 1 and 2, use 1. 
Test Data isn’t a license to stop short of full confidence. If your system has to handle 
multiple inputs, your tests should reflect multiple inputs. However, don’t have a list of 
10 items as the input data is a list of 3 items will lead you to the same design and 
implementation decisions. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested