adobe pdf reader c# : Combine pdf files control software system azure windows wpf console lidar-analysis-forestry-101-part623

Lidar Analysis in ArcGIS 10 for Forestry Applications 
J-9999 
The images that follow show three of the elements as reported by the Point File 
Information tool, including 
■ 
A uniform grid showing the extents of each lidar file.  
■ 
The attribute table associated with the lidar extents, showing the average point 
spacing, point count, minimum and maximum z-values, and originating file names. 
■ 
The average point spacing as indicated by the statistics from the Pt_Spacing column. 
In this example, the average point spacing tends to be approximately 0.6 meter. The 
lidar dataset used in this paper was captured at a sampling density of two returns per 
square meter; thus, 0.6 meter gives a good approximation to the ordered capture rate. 
Again, if there were any significant outliers in the files, these would be highlighted 
for further inspection. 
Lidar Classification in 
ArcGIS 
LAS files contain a classification field that identifies each point's return type. This is 
known as the class code. A classification describes the point return as Ground returns, 
Canopy returns, Building returns, or Unclassified. This is useful in determining the 
content of each lidar file. 
Esri White Paper 
Combine pdf files - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
c# combine pdf; pdf mail merge
Combine pdf files - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
split pdf into multiple files; acrobat merge pdf
Lidar Analysis in ArcGIS 10 for Forestry Applications 
J-9999 
Having the classification field available as part of the tool immediately identifies whether 
the lidar file has been classified and whether it can be used for interpreting the terrain or 
forest structure. If no classifications exist, either there is a problem with the file, which 
may need to be updated, or the lidar file has not been classified at all. The field also helps 
the analyst when interpreting data where no documentation exists. It provides a good 
understanding of the file's content and how it has been classified. 
ArcGIS reads the classification field with the Point File Information tool. Toggling the 
Summarize by class code causes the tool to scan through the LAS files and analyze the 
class code values. The attribute table of the output feature class will contain statistical 
information for each class code encountered. 
Loading the Lidar 
Files to ArcGIS 
Lidar data is characterized by very dense collections of points over an area, known as 
point clouds. One laser pulse can be returned many times to the airborne sensor. A pulse 
can be reflected off a tree's trunk, branches, and foliage as well as reflected off the 
ground. The diagram below provides a visual example of this process. 
January 2011 
Online Merge PDF files. Best free online merge PDF tool.
RasterEdge C#.NET PDF document merging toolkit (XDoc.PDF) is designed to help .NET developers combine PDF document files created by different users to one PDF
combine pdf online; pdf combine two pages into one
C# Word - Merge Word Documents in C#.NET
RasterEdge C#.NET Word document merging toolkit (XDoc.Word) is designed to help .NET developers combine Word document files created by different users to one
reader combine pdf; attach pdf to mail merge
Lidar Analysis in ArcGIS 10 for Forestry Applications 
J-9999 
These multiple returns create a data management challenge. A single lidar file can 
typically be 60 MB to 100 MB in size and can contain several million points. If this data 
is loaded directly into a table, it creates many millions of records, which results in a large 
data file that becomes difficult to manage. This challenge is overcome by loading the 
points into the geodatabase feature type known as multipoint.  
Multipoints are used to store thousands of points per database row. This is achieved by 
storing the geometries in a Shape field and optional attributes in an Esri binary large 
object (BLOB) field. The Shape field and the BLOB field are collections of binary data 
stored as a single entity in a database. Storing the data as multipoints allows optimized 
compression of shapes, reduces storage requirements, and improves database 
performance. Any tool written to exploit these fields needs to understand the Esri BLOB 
and Shape fields structures. 
The tool to load lidar files into the geodatabase is called LAS to Multipoint. It is part of 
the 3D Analyst toolset in ArcGIS (ArcToolbox\3D Analyst Tools\Conversion\From 
File\LAS to Multipoint). 
LAS to Multipoint 
Tool 
The LAS to Multipoint tool enables the user to read the lidar data files and load them into 
the geodatabase. Many lidar analysis applications on the market today can perform 
detailed analyses against lidar files, but only on individual files. Loading the lidar files in 
a geodatabase allows a seamless mosaic of the entire lidar dataset, which then can be 
analyzed by ArcGIS tools. 
Esri White Paper 
C# PowerPoint - Merge PowerPoint Documents in C#.NET
RasterEdge C#.NET PowerPoint document merging toolkit (XDoc.PowerPoint) is designed to help .NET developers combine PowerPoint document files created by
scan multiple pages into one pdf; combine pdf files
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
C#.NET PDF Merger to Combine PDF Files. Using following C#.NET PDF document merging APIs, you can easily merge two or more independent PDF files to create a
pdf merge; pdf merger
Lidar Analysis in ArcGIS 10 for Forestry Applications 
J-9999 
January 2011 
10 
When using the LAS to Multipoint tool, all the points can be loaded into the geodatabase. 
This is useful for producing a point density map; however, this is not useful for canopy 
and ground analysis. For this type of analysis, it is better to separate data into unique 
classifications. 
LAS files captured since September 2008 should conform to the LAS 1.2 specification. 
This specification allows the separation of lidar data into ground returns and nonground 
returns by the classification field. A full description of the specification can be found at 
asprs.org/society/committees/standards/LiDAR_exchange_format.html
Lidar datasets captured prior to this will often contain the classification in the metadata 
that is associated with lidar data. 
The table below is an extract from the specification and describes the classification codes. 
When lidar data is provided as part of a data order, the classifications would normally be 
provided as part of the delivered documentation. 
Classification Value 
Description 
Created (never classified) 
Unclassified 
Ground 
Low Vegetation 
Medium Vegetation 
High Vegetation 
Building 
Low Point (noise) 
Model Key Point (mass point) 
Water 
When the LAS data files are read by the LAS to Multipoint tool, it can accommodate 
these classifications and separate them into unique feature classes. 
The LAS 1.2 specification also defines how to separate returns from the first return 
through the last return. The return value is stored in the LAS file with the point 
information. Having these values enables the extraction of the upper canopy data based 
on the first reflected values. Midcanopy and ground values are reflected at any time. 
The LAS to Multipoint tool needs certain specifications depending on the project. In the 
following screen capture 
■ 
A folder is specified for the data source. (Individual files can be specified, but when 
large amounts of lidar data are being read, then it is a best practice to specify the 
folder.) 
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Split PDF document by PDF bookmark and outlines. Also able to combine generated split PDF document files with other PDF files to form a new PDF file.
build pdf from multiple files; batch combine pdf
VB.NET Word: Merge Multiple Word Files & Split Word Document
As List(Of DOCXDocument), destnPath As [String]) DOCXDocument.Combine(docList, destnPath) End imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and components
how to combine pdf files; combine pdf
Lidar Analysis in ArcGIS 10 for Forestry Applications 
J-9999 
Esri White Paper 
11 
■ 
The Output Feature Class is specified in a file geodatabase. (Multipoint feature 
classes exist in geodatabases and shapefiles, but geodatabases are preferred due to 
the extended capabilities of the geodatabase and the size restrictions of a shapefile.) 
■ 
The ground spacing is specified. (This was acquired from the Point File Information 
tool or from the supplied metadata.) 
■ 
The Input Class Code to be extracted is specified. (The specific code entered will 
vary depending on the classification being analyzed.) 
■ 
The returns are focused on the ground returns. 
■ 
The LAS file extension is designated as a .las file. 
■ 
The coordinate system is specified. 
Other specifications may also be considered: 
■ 
If the goal is to create a canopy surface, then the Input Class Codes need to be 
specified as 5 and the Input Return Values as first returns only. If the supplied lidar 
data has only been classified as ground and unclassified, the Input Class Code is 1 
for Unclassified, and the Input Return Value is first. 
■ 
If the entire canopy is to be modeled, then the Input Class Codes need to be specified 
as 3, 4, and 5 as these contain the upper, middle, and lower canopy returns, 
respectively. 
■ 
If the goal is to produce a ground surface, then the Input Class Codes need to be 
specified as 2 and the Input Return Values as ANY_RETURNS. 
VB.NET TIFF: Merge and Split TIFF Documents with RasterEdge .NET
String], docList As [String]()) TIFFDocument.Combine(filePath, docList powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files and components
add pdf pages together; c# merge pdf files into one
VB.NET TIFF: .NET TIFF Merger SDK to Combine TIFF Files
VB.NET TIFF merging API only allows developers to combine two source powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and components
pdf merger online; c# merge pdf pages
Lidar Analysis in ArcGIS 10 for Forestry Applications 
J-9999 
The screen capture below represents ground returns using a series of points. In its raw 
form, a multipoint feature class is not designed to be displayed; it is designed as an 
efficient storage medium for the many millions of points found in a lidar dataset. 
In this example, the points appear to be merging into a single dense mass of points, as 
there are so many points contained in the feature class. 
The ArcMap screen capture also shows the attribute table with the Shape field as a 
Multipoint Z, the Intensity field is a BLOB, and the PointCount field shows how many 
points are stored per record. The PointCount in this case is showing 3,500 records per 
row. This is 3,500 points per record in the geodatabase. In a normal point feature class, 
there is one point per record. Having many points per record enables the feature class to 
be highly compressed, thus making the geodatabase an efficient method to store and 
manage lidar data. The intensity value is a BLOB record. This means that each intensity 
value is linked to each point via a specialized method in the Intensity field. To access this 
BLOB field, the program needs to understand how to interpret the BLOB field. 
January 2011 
12 
Lidar Analysis in ArcGIS 10 for Forestry Applications 
J-9999 
Figure 2 
Ground Return Multipoint Feature Class 
Ground return multipoint feature class shows Shape, Intensity, and PointCount fields. 
Visualizing and 
Storing Lidar Data 
with ArcGIS 
Visualizing Lidar 
Data 
Storing, mosaicking, and separating data in a multipoint feature class in a geodatabase is 
the first stage of managing lidar data. The next stage is analyzing and visualizing the 
data. 
A forester or land manager may want to visualize the data to enable understanding of 
■ 
Ground terrain 
■ 
Canopy structure 
■ 
Forest type and/or species 
Esri White Paper 
13 
Lidar Analysis in ArcGIS 10 for Forestry Applications 
J-9999 
January 2011 
14 
A forester may want to analyze the data to enable understanding of 
■ 
Tree heights 
■ 
Vegetation biomass/density 
■ 
Creek and river lines 
■ 
Locations of road networks for both existing and new road planning 
■ 
Existing terrains for the location of new plantations 
When analyzing and visualizing the data, a decision needs to be made whether to convert 
raw elevation point data to a geodatabase terrain or to an elevation raster file. 
Although both these formats are useful for analysis in the forest application, selecting the 
best format depends on the application. 
Advantages of a 
Raster 
If the only source of data is lidar, then an elevation raster can be ideal as there is no 
blending of additional data sources required. An elevation raster can be quickly produced 
and created at any resolution. The raster often does not produce the highest-quality 
results, but lidar data tends to be so dense that for many applications, the reduced 
accuracy may be sufficient. 
When working with lidar raster datasets, there will be situations where no returns are 
recorded. With ground returns, this can be exaggerated where dense canopy exists and 
the lidar cannot penetrate to the ground. Where no returns occur, holes or NULL values 
will appear in the raster. This is the main disadvantage of using the Point To Raster tool. 
These holes can be reduced with postprocessing techniques that will be discussed later in 
this paper. 
Advantages of a 
Geodatabase Terrain 
A geodatabase terrain is the optimal format to use if elevation data sources include lidar 
(mass points); breaklines such as roads, water bodies, or rivers; and spot heights. The 
geodatabase terrain is capable of blending these multiple data sources into one uniform 
surface with a simple, easy-to-use wizard. A geodatabase terrain resides inside a feature 
dataset in the geodatabase with the corresponding feature classes that were used to build it. 
A geodatabase terrain references the original feature classes. It does not store a surface as 
a raster or a triangulated irregular network (TIN). Rather, it organizes the data for fast 
retrieval and derives a TIN surface on the fly based on the feature classes it resides with. 
A terrain is not static and can be edited and updated as required. Local edits can be 
performed, and rebuilding of the terrain is only required for the area of editing. If new 
data is acquired, it can be easily added to the existing terrain and, again, only rebuilt for 
the area of new data. 
Supported data types for a terrain include 
■ 
Points 
■ 
Multipoints 
■ 
Polylines 
■ 
Polygons 
Lidar Analysis in ArcGIS 10 for Forestry Applications 
J-9999 
Esri White Paper 
15 
In forestry applications, data types can be derived from 
■ 
Bare earth lidar data 
■ 
First/All return lidar data 
■ 
Breaklines representing water body shorelines, rivers, culverts, and roads 
Building and 
Delivering DEMs 
and DSMs from 
Lidar  
In forest applications, DEMs are useful for planning and operational activities. Terrain 
beneath the tree canopy provides important information needed by silviculturists, 
engineers, and equipment operators. 
DSMs delineate aboveground vegetation and are therefore useful for understanding the 
forest structure. They identify stands with similar characteristics, and when used in 
conjunction with a DEM, use it to calculate tree heights. 
Lidar data provides the user with the ability to make two distinct high-resolution 
surfaces: a first return, or canopy surface, and a ground surface. Typically, the DSM will 
contain tree canopy and buildings, and the DEM will contain bare earth or ground 
returns. With the data loaded into a multipoint feature class in a geodatabase, it becomes 
necessary to consider the workflow for DEM analysis. 
Deciding whether to build a geodatabase terrain or a raster grid model will depend on the 
requirements. Processing the data into a geodatabase terrain will be the most efficient 
method for maintaining the data, but delivering to clients for consumption will require the 
conversion of the final geodatabase terrain to a raster DEM format. This presents the user 
with a problem—trying to process a single terrain into a single file with billions of points 
will create a file too big to work with and process with most DEM applications. It is 
therefore necessary to divide these raster files into smaller workable files. Again, the 
problem presents itself of how these can then be served as a single terrain to clients. 
Esri's ArcGIS Server Image extension solves this problem. It can consume the raster 
DEM files and serve them through ArcGIS Server as an image service. The image service 
can be consumed by ArcGIS clients as a visualized terrain or an elevation service. The 
elevation service can then be utilized in ArcGIS extensions such as ArcGIS 3D Analyst 
or ArcGIS Spatial Analyst for further terrain analysis. 
The Workflow to 
Create a Terrain and 
Deliver to Clients 
Typically, the workflow to get the data from the raw lidar files to a format that can be 
consumed by client applications is as follows: 
■ 
Convert the raw lidar data files to a multipoint feature class in a geodatabase. 
■ 
Incorporate the multipoint feature class into a geodatabase terrain. 
At this point, the terrain can be visualized and consumed by ArcGIS and geoprocessing 
tools. If the datasets are very large, they can be served to GIS clients by the ArcGIS 
Server Image extension. The workflow to move a geodatabase terrain to the image 
service is to 
■ 
Convert the geodatabase terrain to a series of DEM rasters. 
Lidar Analysis in ArcGIS 10 for Forestry Applications 
J-9999 
■ 
Consume the multiple raster DEMs in the ArcGIS Server Image extension and serve 
to clients as an elevation service or Web Coverage Service (WCS). 
This workflow will be addressed in the ArcGIS Server Image extension section of this 
paper. 
Building a 
Geodatabase Terrain 
Geodatabase terrains reside in a feature dataset in the geodatabase. All features used by 
the geodatabase terrain also reside in this feature dataset. This ensures that all the 
contributing features have the same spatial reference. A terrain dataset is a 
multiresolution, TIN-based surface built from measurements stored as features in a 
geodatabase. 
As all terrain datasets reside in a feature dataset in the geodatabase, the feature classes 
used to construct the terrain must also reside in the feature dataset. 
Here is how to generate a terrain dataset: 
Initially, create a feature dataset in the geodatabase. From the File menu in ArcCatalog
select New > Feature Dataset. 
It is important when creating a feature dataset that the coordinate system be the same as 
the data to be used in the terrain dataset. All features that reside in a feature dataset, 
including the terrain, have the same coordinate system.  
With the feature dataset created, load the raw lidar data into a multipoint feature class in 
the feature dataset using the LAS to Multipoint tool. If other elevation data sources are 
available, such as breaklines and spot heights, copy them into the feature dataset. 
Note: The feature class copy will fail if there is a mismatch between the coordinate 
system of the feature dataset and the feature class. 
January 2011 
16 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested