THUMB TAB 
COLOMBIA
CARIBBEAN COAST  ••  Barranquilla 
www.lonelyplanet.com
year-round as soon as a group is assembled. 
You carry your own personal belongings. 
Take a flashlight, water container and insect 
repellent. 
The trip takes three days uphill to Ciudad 
Perdida, one day at the site and two days back 
down. The hike may be tiring due to the heat, 
and if it’s wet (as it is most of the year) the 
paths are pretty muddy. The driest period 
is from late December to February or early 
March. There are several creeks to cross on 
the way; be prepared to get your shoes wet 
and carry a spare pair.
Guerrilla activity is prevalent – be extra 
careful when traveling around these parts.
BARRANQUILLA  
%
5  /  pop 1.3 million  
A maze of concrete blocks and dusty streets, 
Barranquilla is an industrial giant and key 
port that ranks as Colombia’s fourth-biggest 
city. There are few tourist attractions and 
little reason to visit, unless you enjoy touring 
obscure Latin American port cities or happen 
to be around during  Barranquilla’s explosive 
four-day Carnaval, one of the biggest and best 
of Colombia’s many festivals. 
If you’re stuck, you could kill some time at 
the Catedral Metropolitana (cnr Calle 53 & Carrera 46), 
which has a bunkerlike facade but a remark-
able interior decorated with stained-glass 
pieces imported from Germany. 
The city center is run down and unattrac-
tive, but if you are looking for some cheap 
accommodations this is your best bet; try the 
Hotel Colonial Inn (
%
5-379-0241; Calle 42 No 43-131; 
s/d/tr US$11/16/18; 
a
), an atmospheric building 
with fairly comfortable rooms with TV. If you 
have a little more cash to spend it is better to 
stay in El Prado, 3km northwest of the center. 
Here you will find Hotel Sima (
%
5-358-4600; 
hotelsima@enred.com; Carrera 49 No 72-19; s/d incl breakfast 
US$30/36; 
a
), a reasonable place with air-con 
rooms and cable TV. 
The bus terminal is located 7km from the 
city center. It’s not convenient, and it may take 
up to an hour to get to the terminal by urban 
bus. It’s much faster to go by taxi (US$4, 20 
minutes).
CARTAGENA  
%
5  /  pop 1.1 million  
A fairytale city of romance, legends and 
sheer beauty,  Cartagena de Indias is an 
addictive place that can be hard to escape. 
Routine sightseeing tours won’t do it justice 
so throw away your checklist of museums 
and instead just stroll through Cartagena’s 
maze of cobbled alleys, where enormous 
balconies are shrouded in bougainvillea and 
massive churches cast their shadows across 
leafy plazas. 
Founded in 1533, Cartagena swiftly blos-
somed into the main Spanish port on the 
Caribbean coast and the gateway to the north 
of the continent. Treasure plundered from 
the indigenous people was stored here until 
the galleons were able to ship it back to 
Spain. As such it became a tempting target 
for pirates and, in the 16th century alone, it 
suffered five dreadful sieges, the best known 
of which was that led by Francis Drake in 
1586.
In response to pirate attacks, the Spaniards 
decided to make Cartagena an impregnable 
port and constructed elaborate walls encir-
cling the town, and a chain of forts. These 
fortifications helped save Cartagena from 
subsequent sieges, particularly the fiercest 
attack of all led by Edward Vernon in 1741. 
In spite of these attacks Cartagena con tinued 
to flourish. During the colonial period, the 
city was the key outpost of the Spanish em-
pire and influenced much of Colombia’s 
history.
Today Cartagena has expanded dramati-
cally and is surrounded by vast suburbs. It is 
now Colombia’s largest port and an important 
industrial center of 1.1 million inhabitants. 
Nevertheless the old walled town has changed 
very little. It’s a living museum of 16th- and 
17th-century Spanish architecture with nar-
row winding streets, churches, plazas and 
large mansions.
Over the past decades, Cartagena has be-
come a fashionable seaside resort. A modern 
tourist district has sprung up on Bocagrande 
and El Laguito, an L-shaped peninsula south 
of the old town. This sector, packed with top-
class hotels and expensive restaurants, has 
become the main destination for moneyed 
Colombians and international charter tours. 
Most backpackers, however, stay in the his-
toric part of town.
Cartagena’s climate is hot but a fresh breeze 
blows in the evening, making this a pleasant 
time to stroll around the city. Theoretically 
the driest period is from December to April, 
while October and November are the wettest 
months.
582
© Lonely Planet Publications
Pdf combine - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
acrobat split pdf into multiple files; asp.net merge pdf files
Pdf combine - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
reader combine pdf; acrobat combine pdf files
THUMB TAB 
COLOMBIA
www.lonelyplanet.com 
CARIBBEAN COAST  ••  Cartagena - Old Town
5
4
6
D
1
3
2
B
A
C
El Laguito (2.3km)
(2km); Bocagrande (2km);
Bus Terminal (6km)
Mercado Bazurto (3km);
de Barajas (1km);
Bureau (2km); La Escollera 
(2km); Convention; Visitors 
To Venezuelan Consulate
To Castillo de San Felipe
de la Popa (3km)
To Convento
Totumo (53km)
(7km); Volcán de Lodo El
To Airport (3km); La Boquilla
El Centro
Getsemaní
La Matuna
San Diego
S e a
Cabrero
Laguna del
Chambacú
Laguna de
San Lázaro
Laguna de
Ánimas
Bahía de las
C a r i b b e a n
Trinidad
Santísima
Iglesia de
de Madrid
Plaza Fernandez
San Diego
Plaza de
de Mangrovejo
Santo Toribio
Iglesia de
Cabrero
Ermita del
Convenciones
Centro de
Santa Orden
San Roque
Iglesia de la
Iglesia de
Centenario
Parque del
Las Murallas
Las M
urallas
Av del Mercado
Av Santander
Av Santander
Av del Arsenal
C de la Media Luna
Av Daniel Lemaître
Av Venezuela
Av Blas de Lezo
Domingo
Santo
Plaza de
Teresa
Plaza Santa
Heredia
Puente
Puente Román
SHOPPING
DRINKING
49
44
45
46
47
TRANSPORT
ENTERTAINMENT
EATING
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
40
41
42
39
29
43
48
INFORMATION
2
3
4
5
6
7
9
10
8
SIGHTS & ACTIVITIES
12
13
14
15
16
18
19
20
21
17
11
23
24
25
26
27
28
22
1
SLEEPING
C4
C5
B4
B5
B4
Avianca.......................
D5
A4
B4
D5
D4
C3
B4
B4
A4
Hostal Santo Domingo..
Hotel El Viajero..............
Hotel Holiday................
Hotel La Casona............
Hotel Sofitel Santa Clara..
El Bistro..........................
El Rincón de la Mantilla..
La Bodeguita del Medio..
Parrilla Argentina
D4
C3
A4
Restaurante Coroncoro..
Restaurante Vegetariano
Girasoles....................
Restaurante Vesuvio......
Restaurants on Muelle de los
Pegasos...................(see 20)
A4
Quebracho................
Mister Babilla..............
Lincoln Road................
Tu Candela..................
Via Libre......................
D6
C6
Leon de Baviera...........
C4
Cenrto Uno.................
C4
B5
C4
A4
C4
B4
B5
B6
B4
Bancolombia........................
Biblioteca Bartalome Calvo...
Café Internet.......................
Forum Bookshop.................
Giros & Finanzas..................
Intranet................................
Micronet..............................
Muelle Turístico...............(see 10)
Panamanian Consulate.........
Turismo Cartagena de
Indias.............................
B5
D6
B5
A4
C2
B4
D3
B5
B5
B3
Convento de San Pedro
Claver............................
Cultura del Mar.................
Iglesia de San Pedro Claver..
Iglesia de Santo Domingo..
Las Bóvedas.......................
Las Murallas.......................
Monument to Pedro de
Heredia..........................
Monument to the India
Catalina.........................
Muelle de los Pegasos........
Museo de Arte Moderno...
B4
Catedral.............................
A5
B4
B4
B5
B5
B4
Museo Naval del Caribe....
Palacio de la Inquisición.....
Plaza de Bolívar..................
Plaza de la Aduana.............
Plaza de los Coches............
Puerto del Reloj..................
B4
Museo del Oro..................
B4
Banco Unión Colombiano....
Casa Relax B&B.............
Casa Viena....................
Confectionary Stands..(see 27)
SHOPPING
DRINKING
49
44
45
46
47
TRANSPORT
ENTERTAINMENT
EATING
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
40
41
42
39
29
43
48
INFORMATION
2
3
4
5
6
7
9
10
8
SIGHTS & ACTIVITIES
12
13
14
15
16
18
19
20
21
17
11
23
24
25
26
27
28
22
1
SLEEPING
C4
C5
B4
B5
B4
Avianca.......................
D5
A4
B4
D5
D4
C3
B4
B4
A4
Hostal Santo Domingo..
Hotel El Viajero..............
Hotel Holiday................
Hotel La Casona............
Hotel Sofitel Santa Clara..
El Bistro..........................
El Rincón de la Mantilla..
La Bodeguita del Medio..
Parrilla Argentina
D4
C3
A4
Restaurante Coroncoro..
Restaurante Vegetariano
Girasoles....................
Restaurante Vesuvio......
Restaurants on Muelle de los
Pegasos...................(see 20)
A4
Quebracho................
Mister Babilla..............
Lincoln Road................
Tu Candela..................
Via Libre......................
D6
C6
Leon de Baviera...........
C4
Cenrto Uno.................
C4
B5
C4
A4
C4
B4
B5
B6
B4
Bancolombia........................
Biblioteca Bartalome Calvo...
Café Internet.......................
Forum Bookshop.................
Giros & Finanzas..................
Intranet................................
Micronet..............................
Muelle Turístico...............(see 10)
Panamanian Consulate.........
Turismo Cartagena de
Indias.............................
B5
D6
B5
A4
C2
B4
D3
B5
B5
B3
Convento de San Pedro
Claver............................
Cultura del Mar.................
Iglesia de San Pedro Claver..
Iglesia de Santo Domingo..
Las Bóvedas.......................
Las Murallas.......................
Monument to Pedro de
Heredia..........................
Monument to the India
Catalina.........................
Muelle de los Pegasos........
Museo de Arte Moderno...
B4
Catedral.............................
A5
B4
B4
B5
B5
B4
Museo Naval del Caribe....
Palacio de la Inquisición.....
Plaza de Bolívar..................
Plaza de la Aduana.............
Plaza de los Coches............
Puerto del Reloj..................
B4
Museo del Oro..................
B4
Banco Unión Colombiano....
Casa Relax B&B.............
Casa Viena....................
Confectionary Stands..(see 27)
48
28
20
26
27
25
14
11
15
46
45
47
17
16
43
13
29
3
7
34
4
49
36
5
8
37
42
18
30
32
44
33
31
35
41
21
12
23
22
24
19
10
9
40
39
38
6
2
1
CARTAGENA – OLD TOWN
0
200 m
0
0.1 miles
583
© Lonely Planet Publications
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
PDF Merging & Splitting Application. This C#.NET PDF document merger & splitter control toolkit is designed to help .NET developers combine PDF document files
pdf merger; pdf combine two pages into one
Online Merge PDF files. Best free online merge PDF tool.
RasterEdge C#.NET PDF document merging toolkit (XDoc.PDF) is designed to help .NET developers combine PDF document files created by different users to one PDF
combine pdf; break a pdf into multiple files
THUMB TAB 
COLOMBIA
CARIBBEAN COAST  ••  Cartagena 
www.lonelyplanet.com
Information  
BOOKSTORES   
Biblioteca Bartolome Calvo (
%
5-660-0778; Calle 
de la Inquisición; 
h
8:30am-6pm Mon-Fri, 9am-1pm Sat) 
City library.
Forum Bookshop (
%
5-664-8290; cnr De Los Estribos 
& Paseo del Triunfo; 
h
9am-8:30pm Mon-Sat, 4-8pm 
Sun) Good selection of books on Cartagena. It also serves 
coffee and snacks. 
INTERNET ACCESS  
The 2nd floor of Centro Uno has several small 
internet cafés. 
Café Internet (Calle Roman No 34-02; per hr US$1.20; 
h
8am-7:30pm Mon-Sat, 9am-2pm Sun)
Intranet (Av Daniel Lemaitre; per hr US$1; 
h
8am-6pm 
Mon-Sat)
Micronet (Calle de la Estrella No 4-47; per hr US80¢; 
h
8:30am-7:30pm Mon-Fri, 9am-4pm Sat)
MONEY  
Cartagena is the only city in Colombia where 
you are likely to be propositioned (sometimes 
persistently) by street money changers offer-
ing fantastic rates. Don’t be fooled. They are 
con artists and are very skilled at stealing your 
money. Central banks that change traveler’s 
checks and/or cash:
Banco Unión Colombiano (Av Venezuela) 
Bancolombia (Av Venezuela, Edificio Sur Americana) 
Giros & Finanzas (Av Venezuela No 8A-87) This casa de 
cambio in the old town represents Western Union.
TOURIST INFORMATION  
Turismo Cartagena de Indias (
%
5-655-0211; 
www.turismocartagena.com in Spanish; Av Blas de Lezo; 
h
8am-noon & 2-6pm Mon-Fri, 8am-noon Sat) The 
tourist office is situated in the Muelle Turístico.
Sights  
Cartagena’s old town is its principal attraction, 
particularly the inner walled town consisting 
of the historical districts of El Centro and San 
Diego. Almost every street is worth strolling 
down. Getsemaní, the outer walled town, is 
less impressive and not so well preserved, but 
it is also worth exploring. Be careful – this 
part of the city may not be safe, especially 
after dark.
The old town is surrounded by Las Murallas, 
the thick walls built to protect it. Construction 
was begun toward the end of the 16th cen-
tury, after the attack by Francis Drake; until 
that time, Cartagena was almost completely 
unprotected. The project took two centuries 
to complete, due to repeated storm damage 
and pirate attacks.
The main gateway to the inner town was 
what is now the Puerta del Reloj (the clock 
tower was added in the 19th century). Just 
behind it is the Plaza de los Coches, a square 
once used as a slave market. Note the fine 
old houses with colonial arches and balconies 
and the monument to Pedro de Heredia, the 
founder of the city.
A few steps southwest is the Plaza de la Adu-
ana, the oldest and largest square in the old 
town. It was used as a parade ground and all 
governmental buildings were gathered around 
it. At the southern outlet from the plaza is 
the Museo de Arte Moderno (
%
5-664-5815; Plaza de 
San Pedro Claver; admission US50¢; 
h
9am-noon & 3-6pm 
Mon-Fri, 10am-1pm Sat), which presents temporary 
exhibitions.
Close by is the Convento de San Pedro Claver, 
built by the Jesuits, originally under the 
name of San Ignacio de Loyola. The name 
was changed in honor of the Spanish-born 
monk Pedro Claver, who lived and died in 
the convent. He spent his life ministering to 
the slaves brought from Africa. The convent 
is a monumental three-story building sur-
rounding a tree-filled courtyard and part of 
it, including Claver’s cell, is open to visitors 
as a museum (
%
5-664-4991; Plaza de San Pedro Claver; 
admission US$2; 
h
8am-5pm Mon-Sat, to 4pm Sun).
The church alongside, Iglesia de San Pedro 
Claver, has an imposing stone façade. The 
remains of San Pedro Claver are kept in a glass 
coffin in the high altar. Behind the church 
the Museo Naval del Caribe (
%
5-664-7381; Calle San 
Juan de Dios; admission US$3.50; 
h
9am-7pm Tue-Sun) 
traces the naval history of Cartagena and the 
Caribbean.
Nearby, the Plaza de Bolívar is in a particu-
larly beautiful area of the old town. On one 
side of the square is the Palacio de la Inquisición, 
a fine example of late-colonial architecture 
dating from the 1770s with its overhanging 
balconies and magnificent baroque stone 
gateway. It is now a museum (
%
5-664-4113; 
Plaza de Bolívar; admission US$1.60; 
h
9am-7pm) that 
displays Inquisitors’ instruments of torture, 
pre-Columbian pottery and works of art from 
the colonial and independence periods. 
Across the plaza, the Museo del Oro (
%
5-660-
0778; Plaza de Bolívar; admission free; 
h
10am-1pm & 3-6pm 
Tue-Fri, 10am-1pm & 2-5pm Sat) has a good collection 
of gold and pottery from the Sinú culture. The 
Catedral was begun in 1575 but was partially 
584
© Lonely Planet Publications
VB.NET PDF: Use VB.NET Code to Merge and Split PDF Documents
APIs for Merging PDF Documents in VB.NET. Private Sub Combine(source As List(Of BaseDocument), destn As Stream) Implements PDFDocument.Combine End Sub Private
add pdf together; c# merge pdf files
C# PowerPoint - Merge PowerPoint Documents in C#.NET
Combine and Merge Multiple PowerPoint Files into One Using C#. This part illustrates how to combine three PowerPoint files into a new file in C# application.
pdf combine; add pdf files together reader
THUMB TAB 
COLOMBIA
www.lonelyplanet.com 
CARIBBEAN COAST  ••  Cartagena
destroyed by Drake’s cannons in 1586, and 
not completed until 1612. The dome on the 
tower was added early in the 20th century.
One block west of the plaza is Calle Santo 
Domingo, a street that has hardly changed since 
the 17th century. On it stands the Iglesia de 
Santo Domingo, the city’s oldest church. It is 
a large, heavy construction, and buttresses 
had to be added to the walls to support the 
naves.
At the northern tip of the old town are Las 
Bóvedas, 23 dungeons built in the defensive 
walls at the end of the 18th century. This was 
the last construction done in colonial times, 
and was destined for military purposes. Today 
the dungeons are tourist shops.
While you’re wandering around call in at 
the Muelle de Los Pegasos, a lovely old port full 
of fishing, cargo and tourist boats, just outside 
the old town’s southern walls.
Several forts were built at key points out-
side the walls to protect the city from pirates. 
By far the greatest is the huge stone fortress 
Castillo de San Felipe de Barajas (
%
5-656-0590, 
5-666-4790; Av Arévalo; admission US$3; 
h
8am-6pm)
east of the old town, begun in 1639 but not 
completed until some 150 years later. Don’t 
miss the impressive walk through the complex 
system of tunnels, built to facilitate the supply 
and evacuation of the fort.
The Convento de La Popa (
%
5-666-2331; admis-
sion US$2.50; 
h
9am-5pm), perched on top of a 
150m hill beyond the San Felipe fortress, was 
founded by the Augustinians in 1607. It has 
a nice chapel and a lovely flower-filled patio, 
and offers panoramic views of the city. There 
have been some cases of armed robbery on 
the zigzagging access road to the top – take a 
taxi (there’s no public transport).
Activities  
Taking advantage of the extensive coral reefs 
along  Cartagena’s coast, Cartagena has grown 
into an important scuba-diving center. Most 
local dive schools are in Bocagrande and El 
Laguito.
Caribe Dive Shop (
%
5-665-3517; www.caribedive 
shop.com; Hotel Caribe, Bocagrande) 
Cultura del Mar (
%
5-664-9312; Calle del Pozo 25-95, 
Getsamaní) 
Dolphin Dive School (
%
5-660-0814; www.dolphin
diveschool.com; Edificio Costamar, Av San Martín No 6-105, 
Bocagrande) 
Eco Buzos (
%
5-655-5449; Edificio Alonso de Ojeda, 
Av Almirante Brion, El Laguito)
Festivals & Events  
Cartagena’s major annual events:
Festival Internacional de Cine International 
film festival, held in March/April, usually shortly before 
Easter.
Feria Artesanal y Cultural Regional craft fair taking 
place in June/July, accompanied by folk-music concerts and 
other cultural events.
Reinado Nacional de Belleza National beauty pageant 
held on November 11 to celebrate Cartagena’s indepen-
dence day. The fiesta strikes up several days before and the 
city goes wild. The event, also known as the Carnaval de 
Cartagena or Fiestas del 11 de Noviembre, is the city’s most 
important annual bash.
Sleeping  
Cartagena has a reasonable choice of budget 
accommodations and despite its touristy sta-
tus, the prices of its hotels are no higher than 
in other large cities. The tourist peak is from 
late December to late January but, even then, 
it’s relatively easy to find a room.
Most backpackers stay in Getsemaní. There 
are lots of small lodges here where you can get 
a bed for US$5 or less. However, even if you 
are on a tight budget Cartagena is one city 
where you may want to upgrade and stay in 
the nicer barrio of El Centro or San Diego, 
especially if you can get a room with air-con. 
All hotels listed below have rooms with fans, 
unless specified.
Hotel Holiday (
%
5-664-0948; Calle de la Media Luna, 
Getsemaní; s/d with bathroom US$4.50/9) A popular 
and friendly traveler hangout. Its 13 neat, 
airy double rooms with bath are good value, 
and there are four smaller rooms without 
private facilities.
Casa Viena (
%
5-664-6242; www.casaviena.com; Calle 
San Andrés, Getsemaní; dm with air-con US$3, d with/with-
out bathroom US$10/5; 
ai
) One of the most 
popular and cheapest backpacker haunts has 
simple rooms, most with shared bathrooms. 
The hotel offers a typical range of facilities 
including laundry, book exchange, individual 
strongboxes and tourist information. 
Hotel La Casona (
%
5-664-1301; Calle Tripita y Media 
No 31-32, Getsemaní; s/d with air-con US$12/16.50, without 
air-con US$7/12; 
a
) This family-run hotel con-
sists of several boxy rooms with private bath-
room. There’s a friendly monkey in residence, 
as well as some tropical birds. 
Hotel Las Vegas (
%
5-664-5619; Calle San Agustín No 
6-08; s/d/tr US$14/19/23; 
a
) Just round the corner 
from El Viajero, Las Vegas is another decent 
choice in this central area. Rooms are clean 
Book accommodations online at lonelyplanet.com
585
© Lonely Planet Publications
C# Word - Merge Word Documents in C#.NET
Combine and Merge Multiple Word Files into One Using C#. This part illustrates how to combine three Word files into a new file in C# application.
combine pdf online; break pdf file into multiple files
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Split PDF document by PDF bookmark and outlines. Also able to combine generated split PDF document files with other PDF files to form a new PDF file.
batch merge pdf; pdf split and merge
THUMB TAB 
COLOMBIA
CARIBBEAN COAST  ••  Cartagena 
www.lonelyplanet.com
and come with TV. But those that face the 
street are noisy day and night.
Hotel El Viajero (
%
5-664-3289; Calle del Porvenir No 
35-68; s/d US$16/21; 
a
) One of the best budget 
bets in the area, this recently renovated 14-
room hotel has a spacious courtyard and free 
use of the kitchen. 
Hostal Santo Domingo (
%
5-664-2268; Calle Santo 
Domingo No 33-46; s/d/tr with bathroom US$20/28/34; 
a
) 
On a lovely street in El Centro, this one offers 
few amenities for the price. For air-con, tack 
on another US$6 per person.
Casa Relax B&B (
%
5-664-1117; www.cartagenarelax
.com; Calle de Pozo No 20-105; s/d US$36/45; 
ais
) 
The best place to stay in Getsemaní, this 
French-run B&B has 10 well-appointed 
rooms with TV and modern bathroom. A 
French breakfast is served around a com-
munal table, allowing you to get to know the 
other guests. 
Eating  
Cartagena is a good place to eat, particularly 
at the upmarket level, but cheap places are 
also plentiful. Dozens of simple restaurants 
in the old town serve set almuerzos for less 
than US$2, and many also offer set comidas
Among the most reliable is Restaurante Coron-
coro (Calle Tripita y Media, Getsemaní; 
h
8am-8pm). For 
veggie meals, try Restaurante Vegetariano Gira-
soles (Calle Quero, San Diego; 
h
11:30am-5pm)
A dozen stalls on the Muelle de los Pegasos 
operate around the clock and offer plenty of 
local snacks, plus an unbelievable selection of 
fruit juices – try níspero (round fruit with soft 
flesh), maracuyá (passion fruit), lulo (prickly 
fruit with very soft flesh), zapote (eggplant-
shaped fruit with orange, fibrous flesh) and 
guanábana (soursop). You can also try some 
typical local sweets at the confectionery stands 
at El Portal de los Dulces on the Plaza de los 
Coches. 
Plaza Santo Domingo hosts six open-air 
cafés, serving a varied menu of dishes, snacks, 
sweets and drinks. The cafés are not that 
cheap but the place is trendy and invariably 
fills up in the evening.
El Bistro (Calle de Ayos No 4-42; sandwiches US$2.50; 
h
8am-11pm Mon-Sat) Run by a pair of Germans, 
El Bistro offers useful travel tips and serves 
budget lunches and excellent dinners. 
La Bodeguita del Medio (Calle Santo Domingo; mains 
US$6-9; 
h
noon-midnight) Eat, drink and be merry 
under the watchful eyes of Che Guevara and 
Fidel Castro.
Restaurante Vesuvio (Calle de la Factoria No 36-11; 
mains US$5-8; 
h
11am-3pm & 6pm-1am Mon-Sat, 6pm-
1am Sun) Run by a friendly Neapolitan named 
Mariano, this place serves authentic Italian 
meals and desserts. It’s a favorite among Ital-
ian expats living in Cartagena. 
El Rincón de la Mantilla (Calle de la Mantilla No 3-32; 
mains US$6-9; 
h
8am-10pm Mon-Sat) This atmos-
pheric Colombian place serves meals both hot 
and fast. To cool off, try their excellent sapote, 
an addictive milk and fruit shake. 
Parrilla Argentina Quebracho (Calle de Baloco; mains 
US$8-12; 
h
noon-3pm & 7pm-midnight Mon-Thu, noon-
midnight Fri & Sat) Argentine cuisine including 
famous juicy steaks in appropriately deco-
rated surroundings, plus tango shows in the 
evening.
Drinking  
A number of bars, taverns, discos and other 
venues stay open late. Plenty of them are on 
Av del Arsenal in Getsemaní, Cartagena’s 
Zona Rosa. 
Leon de Baviera (Av del Arsenal No 10B-65; 
h
4pm-
3am Tue-Sat) Run by an expat German named 
Stefan, this place is a little heavy on the Bavar-
ian atmosphere, but still a great place to start 
a night of boozing. Expect lots of ’80s and 
’90s rock music. 
Entertainment
You can go on a night trip aboard a chiva, a 
typical Colombian bus, with a band playing 
Book accommodations online at lonelyplanet.com
SPLURGE!  
Hotel Sofitel Santa Clara 
(
%
5-664-6070; www.hotelsantaclara.com; Calle del Torno, San Diego; d US$300, ste 
US$360-400; 
pnais
)
The sumptuous hotel shows little of its bland past – it used to be 
the Convento de Santa Clara (dating from 1621), and was later a charity hospital. Now the essence 
of luxury, it has 162 rooms and 18 suites, a gym, business center and two restaurants (French 
and Italian). As the premier place in town, it has seen its share of famous faces – even President 
Clinton lunched here in 2000. If you can’t afford to spend the night it’s still worth coming in for 
a drink; try the atmospheric El Coro bar, which is dressed up like an antiquarian library. 
586
© Lonely Planet Publications
VB.NET TIFF: Merge and Split TIFF Documents with RasterEdge .NET
filePath As [String], docList As [String]()) TIFFDocument.Combine(filePath, docList) End to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
pdf merge comments; batch combine pdf
VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
Just like we need to combine PPT files, sometimes, we also want to separate a Note: If you want to see more PDF processing functions in VB.NET, please follow
add pdf files together online; split pdf into multiple files
THUMB TAB 
COLOMBIA
www.lonelyplanet.com 
CARIBBEAN COAST  ••  Around Cartagena
vallenato, a popular local rhythm. Chivas de-
part around 8pm from Av San Martín between 
Calles 4 and 5 in Bocagrande for a three- to 
four-hour trip, and leave you at the end of 
the tour in a discotheque – a good point from 
which to continue partying for the rest of 
the night.
Mister Babilla (Av del Arsenal No 8B-137; admission 
US$6; 
h
9pm-4am) This is one of the most popu-
lar discos in this area, yet also one of the 
most expensive ones. You will find cheaper 
venues nearby; just walk along the street, as 
everybody does, and take your pick.
Tu Candela (Portal de los Dulces No 32-25; admission 
US$4; 
h
8pm-4am) The upstairs portion of this 
club is great for salsa dancing while the down-
stairs is better for a quiet drink. It has a great 
location in the old town.
GAY & LESBIAN VENUES  
Lincoln Road (Centro Calle del Porvenir No 35-18; admission 
US$4; 
h
10:30pm-3am Thu-Sat) Ultraflash gay club 
with lasers, strobe lights and pumping music, 
plus the occasional striptease.
Via Libre (Centro Calle de la Soledad No 5-52; admission 
US$4; 
h
10pm-4am Sat) Only open one night a 
week, this gay and lesbian–friendly disco-
theque is more casual than Lincoln Rd. 
Getting There & Away  
AIR  
All major Colombian carriers operate flights 
to and from Cartagena. There are flights to 
Bogotá (US$90 to US$120), Cali (US$120 
to US$150), Medellín (US$80 to US$125) 
and San Andrés (US$230 to US$250 return) 
among others. 
The airport is in the suburb of Crespo, 3km 
northeast of the old city, and is serviced by 
frequent local buses that depart from vari-
ous points, including India Catalina and Av 
Santander. Colectivos to Crespo depart from 
India Catalina; the trip costs US$3 by taxi. 
The terminal has two ATMs and the Casa 
de Cambio América (in domestic arrivals) 
changes cash and traveler’s checks.
BOAT  
There’s no ferry service between Cartagena 
and Colón in Panama, and there are very few 
cargo boats. A more pleasant way of getting to 
Panama is by sailboat. There are various boats, 
mostly foreign yachts, that take travelers from 
Cartagena to Colón via San Blas Archipelago 
(Panama) and vice versa, but this is not a 
regular service. The trip takes four to six days 
and normally includes a couple of days at 
San Blas for snorkeling and spear fishing. It 
costs between US$220 to US$270, plus about 
US$30 for food.
Check the advertising boards at Casa 
Viena and Hotel Holiday in Cartagena for 
contact details. Boats include the Golden Eagle 
(
%
311-419-0428) and the Melody (
%
315-756-2818; 
freshaircharters@yahoo.com); both have semiregular 
departures. 
Beware of any con men attempting to lure 
you into ‘amazing’ Caribbean boat trips. 
We’ve heard horror stories of boats breaking 
down midvoyage, barely able to reach land 
because of a damaged mast or some other 
equipment failure. The most reliable boats 
trips will be organized via Casa Viena.
BUS  
The bus terminal is on the eastern outskirts 
of the city, a long way from the center. Large 
green-and-white air-con Metrocar buses shut-
tle between the two every 10 minutes (US50¢, 
40 minutes). In the center, you can catch them 
on Av Daniel Lemaitre. Catch the one with 
red letters on the board, which goes by a more 
direct route and is faster.
Half-a-dozen buses go daily to Bogotá 
(US$43, 20 hours) and another half-a-dozen 
to Medellín (US$40, 13 hours). Buses to Bar-
ranquilla run every 15 minutes or so (US$4, 
two hours), and some continue on to Santa 
Marta; if not, just change in Barranquilla. 
Unitransco has one bus to Mompós at 7am 
(US$15, eight hours); see Mompós ( p590 ). 
Three bus companies – Expreso Brasilia 
(
%
5-663-2119)Expresos Amerlujo (
%
5-653-2536) 
and Unitransco/Bus Ven (
%
5-663-2065) – operate 
daily buses to Caracas (US$68, 20 hours) via 
Maracaibo (US$37, 10 hours). Unitransco is a 
bit cheaper than the other two, but you have to 
change buses on the border in Paraguachón. 
All buses go via Barranquilla, Santa Marta 
and Maicao. You’ll save if you do the trip 
to Caracas in stages by local transport, with 
changes in Maicao and Maracaibo.
AROUND CARTAGENA  
Islas del Rosario  
This archipelago, about 35km southwest of 
Cartagena, consists of 27 small coral islands, 
including some tiny islets only big enough for a 
single house. The whole area has been decreed 
a national park, the Corales del Rosario.
587
© Lonely Planet Publications
THUMB TAB 
COLOMBIA
CARIBBEAN COAST  ••  Around Cartagena 
www.lonelyplanet.com
Cruises through the islands are well estab-
lished. Tours depart year-round from the Mu-
elle Turístico in Cartagena. Boats leave between 
8am and 9am daily and return about 4pm to 
6pm. The cruise office at the Muelle sells tours 
in big boats for about US$18, but independent 
operators hanging around may offer cheaper 
tours in smaller vessels, for US$16 or even 
less. It’s probably best (and often cheapest) to 
arrange the tour through one of the budget 
gringo hotels. Tours normally include lunch, 
but not the entrance fee to the aquarium (US$5) 
on one of the islands, the port tax (US$2) and 
the national-park entrance fee (US$2).
Playa Blanca  
This is one of the most beautiful beaches 
around Cartagena. It’s about 20km southwest 
of the city, on the Isla de Barú, and it’s the 
usual stop for the boat tours to the Islas del 
Rosario. The place is also good for snorkeling 
as the coral reef begins just off the beach (take 
snorkeling gear).
The beach has some rustic places to stay 
and eat. The most popular with travelers is 
Campamento Wittenberg (
%
311-436-6215), run 
by a Frenchman named Gilbert. It offers ac-
commodations in beds (US$4) or hammocks 
(US$3) and serves meals.
The easiest way of getting to the beach is 
with Gilbert, who comes to Casa Viena in 
Cartagena once a week (usually on Wednes-
day) and takes travelers in his boat (US$6, 45 
minutes). If this doesn’t coincide with your 
itinerary, go to Cartagena’s main market, 
Mercado Bazurto, and go by boat or bus. 
Boats depart from about 8am to 10:30am 
daily except Sunday, when an early-morning 
bus runs directly to the beach.
La Boquilla  
This small fishing village is 7km north of 
Cartagena on a peninsula between the sea and 
the seaside lagoon. There’s a pleasant place 
known as El Paraíso, a five-minute walk from 
the bus terminus, where you can enjoy a day 
on the beach. The locals fish with their famous 
atarrayas (a kind of net) at the lagoon, and 
you can arrange boat trips with them along 
the narrow water channels cutting through 
the mangrove woods. Negotiate the price and 
only pay after they bring you back.
Plenty of beachfront palm-thatched res-
taurants attract people from Cartagena on 
weekends; most are closed at other times. 
Frequent city buses run to La Boquilla from 
India Catalina in Cartagena (US40¢, 30 
minutes).
Volcán de Lodo El Totumo  
About 50km northeast of Cartagena, on the 
bank of the shallow Ciénaga del Totumo, is an 
intriguing 15m mound, looking like a minia-
ture volcano. It’s indeed a volcano but instead 
of lava and ashes it spews mud, a phenomenon 
caused by the pressure of gases emitted by 
decaying organic matter underground.
El Totumo is the highest mud volcano in 
Colombia. Lukewarm mud with the consist-
ency of cream fills its crater. You can climb to 
the top by specially built stairs, then go down 
into the crater and have a refreshing mud bath 
(US50¢). It’s a unique experience – surely 
volcano-dipping is something you haven’t yet 
tried! The mud contains minerals acclaimed 
for their therapeutic properties. Once you’ve 
finished your session, go down and wash the 
mud off in the ciénaga (lagoon). 
To get to the volcano from Cartagena, take a 
bus from Mercado Bazurto, from where hourly 
buses depart in the morning to Galerazamba. 
They travel along the old Barranquilla road 
up to Santa Catalina then, shortly after, turn 
north onto a side road to Galerazamba. Get off 
on the coastal highway by the petrol station at 
Lomita Arena (US$1.50, 1½ hours) and walk 
along the highway 2.5km toward Barranquilla 
(30 minutes), then to the right (southeast) 1km 
to the volcano (another 15 minutes). The last 
direct bus from Lomita Arena back to Carta-
gena departs at around 5pm.
Several tour operators in Cartagena or-
ganize minibus trips to the volcano (trans-
port only US$11; with lunch in La Boquilla 
US$14), which can be booked through popu-
lar backpacker hotels. 
Jardín Botánico Guillermo Piñeres  
A pleasant half-day escape from the city rush, 
this botanical garden (
%
5-663-7172; admission US$4; 
h
9am-4pm Tue-Sun) is on the outskirts of the 
town of  Turbaco, 15km southeast of Carta-
gena. Take the Turbaco bus departing regu-
larly from next to the Castillo de San Felipe in 
Cartagena and ask the driver to drop you at 
the turnoff to the garden (US75¢, 45 minutes). 
From there it’s a 20-minute stroll down the 
largely unpaved side road. The 20-acre garden 
features plants typical of the coast, including 
two varieties of coca plant.
588
© Lonely Planet Publications
THUMB TAB 
COLOMBIA
www.lonelyplanet.com 
CARIBBEAN COAST  ••  Mompós
MOMPÓS  
%
5  /  pop 28,000  
In the evenings, when the residents of  Mom-
pós rock calmly in their rocking chairs and the 
bats flutter through the eaves, you may feel 
like you’ve stepped into the pages of Huckle-
berry Finn or Gone with the Wind. 
The atmosphere evoked in the Mompós en-
virons is unique in Colombia (it may feel more 
like Mississippi) and is worth experiencing, de-
spite the hardships of getting here. Surrounded 
by muddy rivers and thick vegetation, Mompós 
is 230km southeast of Cartagena, and reached 
by a combination of bus, boat and car. 
Founded in 1537 on the eastern branch of 
the Río Magdalena, the town soon became an 
important port through which all merchan-
dise from Cartagena passed to the interior of 
the colony. Several imposing churches and 
many luxurious mansions were built.
Toward the end of the 19th century ship-
ping was diverted to the other branch of the 
Magdalena, ending the town’s prosperity. 
Mompós has been left in isolation and little 
has changed since. Its colonial character is 
very much in evidence. 
Mompós also has a tradition in literature 
and was the setting for Chronicle of a Death 
Foretold by Gabriel García Márquez.
Information  
ATM (BBVA; Plaza de Bolívar)
Club Net (Carrera 1 No 16-53; per hr US80¢; 
h
6am-9:30pm) Internet café.
4
1
3
2
D
B
A
C
(85km)
To El Banco
Cartagena (231km)
To Bodega (36km);
Río Magdalena (Brazo Mompós)
Hospital
Iglesia de la
Santa Barbara
Plaza de
de Santo
Iglesia
Domingo
Concepción
San Agustín
Juan de Diós
Francisco
Iglesia de 
Iglesia de San 
Iglesia de San
N
u
e
v
a
C
C de Atrás (Carrera 3)
C Nueva (Carrera 4)
C 13
C 14
C 15
C 16
C 17
C 18
C 19
C 20
C de la Albarrada (Carrera 1)
C
 R
e
a
l d
e
l M
e
d
io
 (C
a
rre
ra
 2
)
Concepción
Bolívar
Pinillos
Libertad
Plaza de 
Plaza Real de la 
Colegio
Plaza de la
6
12
3
2
13
1
14
15
11
9
10
5
8
4
7
16
19
18
17
Telecom
19
18
17
16
TRANSPORT
15
DRINKING
14
13
12
EATING
11
10
9
SLEEPING
8
7
6
5
SIGHTS & ACTIVITIES
4
3
2
1
INFORMATION
Cartagena)..................
D4
Unitransco Office (Buses to
Colectivos to El Banco.....
C2
Banco........................... B2
Colectivos to Bodega & El
Magangué...................
C2
Boats to El Banco &
Bar Luna de Mompós......
C2
Pan de la Villa.................. B2
La Pizzeria.......................
C2
Comedor Costeño............ C1
Mompox.....................
D3
Residencias Villa de
Hotel San Andrés............. B2
Hotel La Casona................. B2
Museo Cultural.................. C2
Jardín Botánico.................. C4
Iglesia de Santa Bárbara.... D4
Casa de la Cultura............. C3
Tourist Office..................... B2
Money changer................. C2
Club Net............................ C2
ATM.................................. C2
MOMPÓS
0.1 miles
0
200 m
0
THUMB TAB 
COLOMBIA
SAN ANDRÉS & PROVIDENCIA 
www.lonelyplanet.com
Money changer (Plaza de Bolívar) May change your US 
dollars at a very poor rate.
Tourist office (
%
5-685-5738; Plaza de la Libertad) 
Located in the Alcaldía building. Ask where to find artisans 
workshops where you can see and buy local jewelry.
Sights  
Most of the central streets are lined with fine 
whitewashed colonial houses with character-
istic metal-grill windows, imposing doorways 
and lovely hidden patios. Six colonial churches 
complete the scene; all are interesting, though 
rarely open. Don’t miss the Iglesia de Santa 
Bárbara (Calle 14) with its Moorish-style tower, 
unique in Colombian religious architecture.
The Casa de la Cultura (Calle Real del Medio; 
admission US50¢; 
h
8am-5pm Mon-Fri) displays 
memorabilia relating to the town’s history. 
Museo Cultural (Calle Real del Medio; admission US$1.50; 
h
9:30am-noon & 3-5pm Tue-Fri, 9:30am-noon Sat & Sun) 
features a collection of religious art. There’s 
a small Jardín Botánico (Calle 14), with lots of 
hummingbirds and butterflies. Knock on 
the gate to be let in.
Festivals & Events  
Holy Week celebrations are very elaborate in 
Mompós. The solemn processions circle the 
streets for several hours on Maundy Thursday 
and Good Friday nights.
Sleeping  
Hotel Celeste (
%
5-685-5875; Calle Real del Medio No 14-
174; s/d with fan US$7/13.50) This family-run place 
with nanna atmosphere has good service, 
though the rooms are a tad small.
Residencias Villa de Mompox (
%
5-685-5208; Calle 
Real del Medio No 14-108; s/d with fan US$7/13.50, with air-con 
US$10/19; 
a
) Low-priced air-con rooms.
Hotel La Casona (
%
5-685-5307; Calle Real del Medio 
No 18-58; s/d with fan US$8/13.50, with air-con US$13.50/23; 
a
) This residencia has well-appointed rooms, 
a welcoming common area and a friendly 
staff. 
Hotel San Andrés (
%
5-685-5886; Calle Real del Medio 
No 18-23; s/d with fan US$9/13.50, with air-con US$13.50/23; 
a
) Bland rooms are somewhat enlivened 
by parakeets and parrots that inhabit the 
courtyard. 
Eating & Drinking  
Comedor Costeño (Calle de la Albarrada No 18-45; 
h
5:30am-4:30pm) One of several rustic, river-
front restaurants in the market area to provide 
cheap meals. 
Pan de la Villa (Calle 18 No 2-53; 
h
7am-10pm) Spe-
cializes in ice cream, cakes and baked goods, 
but also serves crêpes. 
La Pizzeria (Carrera 2 No 16-02; pizzas US$6-9;
h
5-
10pm) In the evenings you can sit at tables set 
in the middle of the street and enjoy a cold 
drink or pizza. 
Bar Luna de Mompós (Calle de la Albarrada; 
h
6pm-
late) This low-key bayou drinking hole will 
keep you entertained until you pass out or 
the doors close. 
Getting There & Away  
Mompós is well off the main routes, but can 
be reached relatively easily by road and river. 
Most travelers come here from Cartagena. 
Unitransco has one direct bus daily leaving 
Cartagena at 7:30am (US$15, eight hours). 
It’s faster to take a bus to Magangué (US$11, 
four hours); Brasilia has half-a-dozen depar-
tures per day – change for a boat to Bodega 
(US$2, 20 minutes) with frequent departures 
until about 3pm, and continue by colectivo 
to Mompós (US$2.50, 40 minutes). There 
may also be direct chalupas (river boats) from 
Magangué to Mompós.
If you depart from Bucaramanga, take a 
bus to El Banco (US$13.50, seven hours) and 
continue to Mompós by jeep or boat (either 
costs US$5 and takes about two hours).
SAN ANDRÉS & 
PROVIDENCIA  
Located 750km northwest of Cartagena (but 
just 230km east of Nicaragua), this tidy bead 
of islands is Colombia’s smallest department. 
It’s made up of a southern group, with San 
Andrés as its largest and most important is-
land, and a northern group, centered on the 
mountainous island of Providencia.
In the past, travelers used the islands as a 
stepping-stone between Central America and 
South America. Nowadays, however, connec-
tions are less frequent. 
While   San Andrés is not quite paradise on 
earth,  Providencia is certainly unique and 
worth a visit in its own right (provided you 
can afford all the flights needed to get there 
and back). Both islands offer excellent scuba-
diving and snorkeling opportunities.
A glance at history shows that the islands 
were once a colony of Britain. Although Co-
Book accommodations online at lonelyplanet.com
590
© Lonely Planet Publications
THUMB TAB 
COLOMBIA
www.lonelyplanet.com 
SAN ANDRÉS & PROVIDENCIA  ••  San Andrés
lombia took possession after independence, 
the English influence on language, religion 
and architecture remained virtually intact 
until modern times. Local lifestyle only started 
to change from the 1950s, when a regular 
domestic air service was established with the 
Colombian mainland. Providencia has man-
aged to preserve much more of its colonial 
character.
The tourist season peaks from mid-Decem-
ber to mid-January, during the Easter week, 
and from mid-June to mid-July. All visitors 
staying more than one day are charged a local 
government levy of US$8 on arrival.
SAN ANDRÉS  
%
8  /  pop 75,000  
Covered in coconut palms and cut by sharp 
ravines that turn into rivers after rain, the 
seahorse-shaped San Andrés is the main 
commercial and administrative center of the 
archipelago and, as the only transport hub to 
the mainland, it’s the first and last place you 
are likely to see.
The island, 12.5km long and 3km wide, 
is made accessible by a 30km scenic paved 
road that circles the island, and several roads 
that cross inland. The main urban center and 
capital of the archipelago is the town of San 
Andrés (known locally as El Centro), in the 
northern end of the island. It has two-thirds 
of the island’s 60,000 inhabitants and is the 
principal tourist and commercial area, packed 
with hotels, restaurants and stores.
Information  
All of the following are in San Andrés town. 
Details for the Costa Rica and Honduras con-
sulates can be found on  p630 .
Bancolombia (Map  p592 ; Av Atlantico) Changes travel-
er’s checks and cash. 
Café Internet Sol (Map  p592 ; Av Duarte Blum; 
h
8am-
10pm)
Creative Shop (Map  p592 ; Av Las Américas) Internet café 
located below the Hotel Hernando Henry. 
Giros & Finanzas (Map  p592 ; Centro Comercial San 
Andrés, Local 12, Av Costa Rica) The local agent of Western 
Union. 
Macrofinanciera (Map  p592 ; Edificio Leda, Av Providen-
cia No 2-47) Changes US dollars. 
Secretaría de Turismo Departamental (Map  p592 ; 
%
8-512-5058; www.sanandres.gov.co; Av Newball) 
In the building of the Gobernación, Piso 3. At the time of 
research it had a temporary office across from the Restau-
rante La Regatta.
Sights  
Most people stay in El Centro, but take some 
time to look around the island. El Centro’s 
beach, along Av Colombia, is handy and fine 
but it may be crowded in tourist peak seasons. 
There are no beaches along the island’s western 
shore, and those along the east coast are nothing 
special, except for the good beach in San Luis.
The small village of  La Loma (Map  p591 ), 
in the central hilly part of the island, is noted 
for its Baptist church, the first established on 
San Andrés.
The Cueva de Morgan (Map  p591 ) is an under-
water cave where the Welsh pirate Henry 
Morgan is said to have buried some of his 
treasure. Hoyo Soplador (Map  p591 ), at the 
southern tip of the island, is a sort of small 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested