THUMB TAB 
COLOMBIA
AMAZON BASIN  ••  Leticia 
www.lonelyplanet.com
token, don’t bring reais to Bogotá. Change all 
the money of the country you’re leaving in 
Leticia–Tabatinga.
There are casas de cambio on Calle 8 be-
tween Carrera 11 and the market. They change 
US dollars, Colombian pesos, Brazilian reais 
and Peruvian soles. They open weekdays from 
8am or 9am until 5pm or 6pm and Saturday 
until around 2pm. Shop around; rates vary.
Money-changing facilities in Tabatinga: 
Banco do Brasil (Av da Amizade 60) Offers cash 
advances in reais on Visa.
Banco Ganadero (cnr Carrera 10 & Calle 7) Changes 
Amex traveler’s checks (but not cash) and gives peso 
advances on Visa. 
Cambios El Opita (Carrera 11 No 7-96) Changes traveler’s 
checks.
CNM Câmbio e Turismo (Av da Amizade 2017) About 
500m from the border, exchanges cash and traveler’s 
checks and pays in reais or pesos, as you wish, but the rate 
may be a bit lower than in Leticia.
TOURIST INFORMATION  
Secretaría de Turismo y Fronteras (
%
8-592-7569; 
Calle 8 No 9-75; 
h
7am-noon & 2-5:30pm Mon-Fri) 
Sights  
The Jardín Zoológico Departamental (Av Vásquez 
Cobo; admission US$1; 
h
8am-noon & 2-5pm Mon-Fri, 
8am-5:30pm Sat & Sun), near the airport, houses 
animals typical of the region including ana-
condas, tapirs, monkeys, caimans, ocelots, 
eagles, macaws and a friendly manatee named 
Polo.
Reader combine pdf - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
reader merge pdf; .net merge pdf files
Reader combine pdf - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
batch pdf merger; add two pdf files together
THUMB TAB 
COLOMBIA
www.lonelyplanet.com 
AMAZON BASIN  ••  Leticia
The small Museo del Hombre Amazónico (
%
8-
592-7729; Carrera 11 No 9-43; admission free; 
h
9am-noon & 
2:30-5pm Mon-Fri, 9am-1pm Sat) features artifacts and 
household implements of indigenous groups 
living in the region.
Have a look around the market and stroll 
along the waterfront. Visit the Parque Santander 
before sunset for an impressive spectacle, 
when thousands of small screeching parrots 
(locally called pericos) arrive for their nightly 
rest in the park’s trees.
JUNGLE TRIPS  
There are a dozen tour operators in Leti-
cia focusing on  jungle trips. Most agencies 
offer standard one-day tours, which go up 
the Amazon to Puerto Nariño and include 
lunch, a short walk in the forest and a visit 
to an indigenous village. These excursions 
are usually well organized, comfortable and 
trouble-free, but will hardly give you a real 
picture of the rainforest or its inhabitants.
The real wilderness begins well off the 
Amazon proper, along its small tributaries. 
The further you go the more chance you have 
to observe wildlife in relatively undamaged 
habitat and visit indigenous settlements. This 
involves more time and money, but the expe-
rience can be much more rewarding.
Multiday tours are run from Leticia by 
several companies, three of which have estab-
lished small nature reserves and built jungle 
lodges. All three reserves are along the lower 
reaches of the Río Yavarí, on the Brazil–Peru 
border.
Reserva Natural Zacambú is the nearest to Le-
ticia, about 70km by boat. Its lodge is on Lake 
Zacambú, just off Río Yavarí on the Peruvian 
side of the river. The lodge is simple, with 
small rooms without bathrooms, and the total 
capacity for about 30 guests. The lodge and 
tours are run from Leticia by Amazon Jungle 
Trips (
%
8-592-7377; amazonjungletrips@yahoo.com; Av 
Internacional No 6-25).
Reserva Natural Palmarí is another 20km fur-
ther upstream of Río Yavarí, about 110km 
by river from Leticia. Its rambling lodge sits 
on the high south (Brazilian) bank of the 
river, overlooking a wide bend where pink 
and gray dolphins are often seen. The lodge 
features several cabañas with baths and a 
round maloca with hammocks. The reserve 
is managed from Bogotá by its owner, Axel 
Antoine-Feill (
%
1-531-1404, 310-786-2770; www.palmari
.org; Carrera 10 No 93-72, Bogotá), who speaks several 
languages, including English. His representa-
tive in Leticia is Francisco Avila (
%
8-592-4156, 
310-596-0203).
Reserva Natural Heliconia, about 110km from 
Leticia, provides room and board in thatch-
covered cabins, plus tours via boat or on foot 
of the river, creeks and jungle. There are also 
organized visits to indigenous villages and 
special tours devoted to bird-watching and 
dolphin-watching. The reserve is managed 
from an office (
%
311-508-5666; www.amazonheliconia
.com; Calle 13 No 11-74) in Leticia. 
All three operators offer three- to six-day 
all-inclusive packages, based at the lodges. 
The packages include accommodations (in 
beds), meals, excursions with guides and re-
turn transport from Leticia. The cost largely 
depends on the number of people in the party, 
length of the stay, season etc; count on US$40 
to US$80 per person per day. Tours don’t 
usually have a fixed timetable; the agents nor-
mally wait until they have enough people un-
less you don’t want to wait and are prepared to 
pay more. Contact the operators in advance. 
Legally you should have a Brazilian or Peru-
vian visa to stay in the reserves, so check this 
issue with the agencies (unless nationals of 
your home country don’t need a visa).
Palmarí is the only operator that, apart 
from tours, has a budget offer for independ-
ent travelers who want to stay in the reserve 
but don’t want to pay for an all-inclusive tour. 
The lodge (hammocks/r per person US$7/10) simply 
charges for accommodations and food (break-
fast/lunch/dinner US$3/4/5) and you can plan 
your stay and excursions as you wish, using 
the reserve’s canoes and guides if they are not 
too busy with tours or other tasks.
Apart from the Palmarí’s backpacker offer, 
other budget ways of getting a taste of the jun-
gle include guided excursions in the Parque 
Nacional Amacayacu ( p625 ) and trips with 
the locals from Puerto Nariño ( p625 ). Bring 
enough mosquito repellent from Bogotá be-
cause you can’t get good-quality repellent in 
Leticia. Take high-speed film – the jungle is 
always dark.
Sleeping  
LETICIA  
Residencias Marina (
%
8-592-6014; Carrera 9 No 9-29; 
s/d/tr US$7/10/15) Acceptable central hotel pro-
viding rooms with fan and fridge.
Residencias El Divino Niño (
%
8-592-5598; Av Inter-
nacional No 7-23; s/d US$8/11; 
a
) There is nothing 
Book accommodations online at lonelyplanet.com
623
© Lonely Planet Publications
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
PDF Merging & Splitting Application. This C#.NET PDF document merger & splitter control toolkit is designed to help .NET developers combine PDF document files
c# merge pdf files; pdf split and merge
VB.NET PDF: Use VB.NET Code to Merge and Split PDF Documents
Combine End Sub Private Sub Combine(source As List(Of [String]), destn As [String]) Implements PDFDocument.Combine End Sub. APIs for Splitting PDF document in
adding pdf pages together; reader combine pdf pages
THUMB TAB 
COLOMBIA
AMAZON BASIN  ••  Leticia 
www.lonelyplanet.com
special about this basic place, except that it’s 
very cheap. Located near the border with 
Brazil.
Hospedaje Los Delfines (
%
8-592-7388; losdelfines
leticia@hotmail.com; Carrera 11 No 12-81; s/d/tr US$14/18/22) 
Small family-run place offering nine neat 
rooms with fan and fridge, arranged around 
a leafy patio.
Hotel Yurupary (
%
8-592-7983; www.hotelyurupary
.col.nu in Spanish; Calle 8 No 7-26; s/d/tr US$18/27/35, all incl 
breakfast; 
a
) One of the best affordable bets 
in town. It has ample rooms with fridge and 
cable TV.
TABATINGA   
Hotel Cristina (
%
92-412-2558; Rua Marechal Mallet 248; 
s/d with fan US$6/8, with air-con US$8/12) Convenient 
basic shelter if you plan on taking the early-
morning boat to Iquitos.
Hotel Bela Vista (
%
92-412-3846; Rua Marechal Rondon 
1806; d US$16; 
a
) It may not be fancy, but this 
place packs a great combination – cheap, clean, 
air-conditioned and only steps from the morn-
ing boat to Iquitos. And it’s friendly to boot. 
Posada do Sol (
%
92-412-3987; Rua General Sampaio; 
s/d/tr US$20/24/36, all incl breakfast; 
as
) One of 
the most pleasant places around. This large 
family-run mansion has seven rooms with 
TV and fridge.
Eating  
LETICIA
Food in Leticia is generally good and not too 
expensive. The local specialty is fish, including 
the delicious gamitana and pirarucu. 
Restaurante El Sabor (Calle 8 No 9-25; set meals US$2-4; 
h
24hr Tue-Sun) Leticia’s best budget eatery, with 
excellent-value set meals, vegetarian burgers, 
banana pancakes and fruit salad, plus unlim-
ited free juices with your meal. 
A Me K Tiar (Carrera 9 No 8-15; mains US$3-5; 
h
noon-
11:30pm Mon-Sat, 5-11:30pm Sun) Some of the best 
parrillas and barbecued meat in town, at very 
reasonable prices.
Restaurante Acuarius (Carrera 7 No 8-12; mains US$3-5; 
h
7am-9pm) This pleasant outdoor restaurant 
serves excellent meat and chicken dishes, as 
well as local fish such as pirarucu.
TABATINGA
Tabatinga’s culinary picture has improved 
over recent years.
Restaurante Fazenda (Av da Amizade 196; mains 
US$3-7) Good-value Brazilian food served in a 
pleasant interior.
Restaurante Tres Fronteiras do Amazonas (Rua 
Rui Barbosa; mains US$4-7; 
h
9am-11pm) Attractive 
palm-thatched open-air restaurant with a 
wide choice of fish and meat dishes.
Drinking   
Discoteca Tacones (Carrera 11 No 6-14) Probably the 
trendiest disco in Leticia. 
Taberna Americana (Carrera 10 No 11-108) A cheap, 
rustic bar playing salsa music till late. 
Getting There & Away  
AIR  
The only passenger airline that services Leticia 
is AeroRepública (
%
8-592-7666; Calle 7 No 10-36). It 
flies between Leticia and Bogotá several days a 
week (US$110 to US$140). It may be difficult 
to get on flights out of Leticia in the holiday 
season – book as early as you can.
Two airlines (Trip and Rico) fly from 
Tabatinga to Manaus; between them they 
fly every day except Wednesday. Tickets can 
be bought from Tabatinga’s travel agency, 
Turamazon (
%
92-412-2026; Av da Amizade 2271)
or CNM Câmbio e Turismo (
%
92-412-3281; Av da 
Amizade 2017), both near the border. The air-
port is 2km south of Tabatinga; colectivos 
marked ‘Comara’ from Leticia will drop you 
off nearby.
Book accommodations online at lonelyplanet.com
GETTING TO BRAZIL & PERU
Leticia may be in the middle of nowhere, but it is something of a jumping off point to desti-
nations in neighboring countries. The quickest way out is by air to Manaus, although a more 
interesting option is to take a hydroplane to Iquitos in Peru. Although slower, the more enjoyable 
route out of Letitia is by river boat to either Manaus or Iquitos. Note that Iquitos is as isolated 
as Letitia, if not more so. 
Letitia is on good terms with its neighbors and as such there is no formal border between 
Colombia and Brazil. Before leaving the country you’ll need to get stamped out at the DAS of-
fice in Letitia and stamped in at the Polícia Federal in Tabatinga. For more information on these 
border crossings see  p394  and  p936 .
624
© Lonely Planet Publications
VB.NET Image: Barcode Reader SDK, Read Intelligent Mail from Image
How to combine PDF Document Processing DLL with Barcode As String = FolderName & "Sample.pdf" Dim reImage own customized Word Intelligent Mail Barcode Reader.
pdf combine files online; break a pdf into multiple files
C# PowerPoint - Merge PowerPoint Documents in C#.NET
Combine and Merge Multiple PowerPoint Files into One Using C#. This part illustrates how to combine three PowerPoint files into a new file in C# application.
add multiple pdf files into one online; add pdf together one file
THUMB TAB 
COLOMBIA
www.lonelyplanet.com 
AMAZON BASIN  ••  Parque Nacional Amacayacu
A small Peruvian airline, TANS, flies its 15-
seat hydroplane from Santa Rosa to Iquitos, 
on Wednesday and Saturday (US$65). Infor-
mation and tickets are available from Cambios 
La Sultana (
%
8-592-7071; Calle 8 No 11-57) in Leticia. 
You need to go by boat from Leticia or Tabat-
inga to Santa Rosa to catch the plane.
BOAT  
Leticia is a jumping-off point for travelers 
looking for backwater Amazonian adventures, 
downstream to Manaus (Brazil) or upriver to 
Iquitos (Peru).
Boats down the Amazon to Manaus leave 
from Porto Fluvial de Tabatinga, beyond 
the hospital, and call at Benjamin Constant. 
There are three boats per week, departing 
from Tabatinga on Wednesday, Friday and 
Saturday around 2pm, with a stop in Ben-
jamin Constant. More boats may go on other 
days, so check.
The trip to Manaus takes three days and four 
nights and costs US$65 in your own hammock, 
or US$240 for a double cabin. (Upstream from 
Manaus to Tabatinga, the trip usually takes six 
days, and costs about US$110 in your ham-
mock or US$330 for a double cabin.) Food is 
included but is poor and monotonous. Bring 
snacks and bottled water. Boats come to Taba-
tinga one or two days before their scheduled 
departure back down the river. You can string 
up your hammock or occupy the cabin as soon 
as you’ve paid the fare, saving on hotels. Food, 
however, is only served after departure. Beware 
of theft on board.
Three small boat companies, Transtur, 
Mayco and Mi Reyna (
%
92-412-2945; Rua Marechal 
Mallet 248), in Tabatinga, run high-powered pas-
senger boats (rápidos) between Tabatinga and 
Iquitos. Each company has a few departures a 
week, so there is at least one boat almost every 
day. The boats depart Tabatinga’s Porto da 
Feira at 5am and arrive in Iquitos about 10 to 
12 hours later. The boats call at Santa Rosa’s 
immigration post. The journey costs US$60 
in either direction, including breakfast and 
lunch. Don’t forget to get an exit stamp in 
your passport from DAS at Leticia’s airport 
the day before.
There are also irregular cargo boats from 
Santa Rosa to Iquitos, once or twice a week. 
The journey takes about three days and costs 
US$25 to US$30, including food. Downstream 
from Iquitos to Santa Rosa, it generally doesn’t 
take any longer than two days.
Note that there are no roads out of Iquitos 
into Peru. You have to fly or continue by river 
to Pucallpa (five to seven days), from where 
you can go overland to Lima and elsewhere.
PARQUE NACIONAL AMACAYACU  
Amacayacu national park takes in 2935 sq km 
of   jungle on the northern side of the Amazon, 
about 55km upstream from Leticia. A spa-
cious visitor center (hammocks/dm US$8/12), with 
food (three meals about US$8) and accommo-
dations facilities, has been built on the bank 
of the Amazon. The park entry fee is US$9. 
In Leticia, the Aviatur office (Calle 7 near Carrera 11
handles bookings.
From the visitor center, you can explore 
the park either by marked paths or by water. 
Local guides accompany visitors on all excur-
sions and charge roughly US$10 to US$20 per 
group, depending on the route. In the high-
water period (May to June) much of the land 
turns into swamps and lagoons, significantly 
reducing walking options; trips in canoes are 
organized at this time. Bring plenty of mos-
quito repellent, a flashlight, long-sleeve shirt 
and waterproof gear.
Boats from Leticia to Puerto Nariño (see 
following) will drop you off at the park’s visi-
tor center (US$10, 1½ hours). 
PUERTO NARIÑO  
%
 /  pop 2000  
Puerto Nariño’s main attraction is its iso-
lation. Sitting around 60km up the Ama-
zon from Leticia (15km upstream from the 
Amacayacu park), this tiny town is located 
on the bank of the great river in the mid-
dle of absolutely nowhere. This isolation has 
never dampened the pride of the local people, 
and today it’s one of the cleanest places in 
the country – each morning citizen brigades 
march across town to pick up lingering gar-
bage. About 10km west of Puerto Nariño is 
the Lago Tarapoto, a beautiful lake accessible 
only by river, where you can see the pink 
dolphins. A half-day trip to the lake in a 
small motorized boat can be organized from 
Puerto Nariño (around US$25 per boat for up 
to four people). Locals can take you on boat 
or walking excursions to many other places, 
including the Parque Nacional Amacayacu, 
or you can just rent a canoe (US$8 per day) 
and do your own tour.
Puerto Nariño has quite a few accommoda-
tions choices.
625
© Lonely Planet Publications
C# Word - Merge Word Documents in C#.NET
Combine and Merge Multiple Word Files into One Using C#. This part illustrates how to combine three Word files into a new file in C# application.
pdf merge documents; break pdf file into multiple files
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Split PDF document by PDF bookmark and outlines. Also able to combine generated split PDF document files with other PDF files to form a new PDF file.
build pdf from multiple files; best pdf merger
THUMB TAB 
COLOMBIA
COLOMBIA DIRECTORY  ••  Accommodations 
www.lonelyplanet.com
Brisas del Amazonas (
%
311-281-2473; dm US$6) 
has simple rooms in a stylish, if dilapidated, 
mansion.
Eware Tourist Refuge (
%
311-474-3466; zoraidavel
oza@yahoo.com; dm US$10) is one of several rustic 
inns about a 10-minute boat ride from town. 
There is free use of the canoe and a small 
tower with a view of the surrounding jungle. 
The charming El Alto del Águila (dm/d US$5/10) 
is a 20-minute walk from town, with sightings 
of monkeys, macaws and great river views. 
Budget jungle trips can be organized.
Casa Selva (
%
310-221-4379, 311-217-7758; s/d/tr 
US$28/38/42) has impeccably clean rooms with 
private bathrooms and a six-hammock dorm. 
Meals are available.
For cheap meals, try one of the two basic 
town restaurants near the waterfront: Doña 
Francisca or Las Margaritas.
Three small boat companies, Expreso Tres 
Fronteras, Transporte Amazónico and Ex-
preso Líneas Amazonas (all with offices near 
the waterfront in Leticia), operate scheduled 
fast passenger boats to Puerto Nariño at 2pm 
from Monday to Friday and at 1pm on week-
ends (US$14, two hours). Buy your ticket in 
the morning or a day before departure.
COLOMBIA DIRECTORY  
ACCOMMODATIONS  
There is a constellation of places to stay in 
Colombia, in the largest cities and small-
est villages. The vast majority are straight 
Colombian hotels where you are unlikely to 
meet foreigners, but some budget traveler 
haunts have appeared over the past decade. 
You’ll find them in most large cities (Bogotá, 
Medellín, Cali, Cartagena) and popular tourist 
destinations.
Accommodations appear under a variety 
of names including hotel, residencias, hos-
pedaje, hostería and posadaResidencias and 
hospedaje are the most common names for 
budget places. A hotel generally suggests a 
place of a higher standard, or at least a higher 
price, though the distinction is often aca-
demic. In this guide, hotels will almost always 
have private bathroom while hosteríasresi-
dencias and guesthouses have mainly shared 
facilities. 
On the whole, residencias and hospedajes 
are unremarkable places without much style 
or atmosphere, but there are some pleasant 
exceptions. Many cheapies have a private 
bathroom, which includes a toilet and shower. 
Note that cheap hotel plumbing can’t cope 
with toilet paper, so throw it in the box or 
basket that is usually provided.
In hot places (ie the lowland areas), a ceil-
ing fan or table fan is often provided. Always 
check the fan before you take the room. On 
the other hand, above 2500m where the nights 
can be chilly, count how many blankets you 
have, and check the hot water if they claim 
to have it.
By and large, residencias (even the cheap-
est) provide a sheet and some sort of cover 
(another sheet or blankets, depending on the 
temperature). Most will also give you a towel, 
a small piece of soap and a roll of toilet paper. 
The cheapies cost US$3 to US$8 for a single 
room, US$5 to US$15 a double.
Many hospedajes have matrimonios (rooms 
with a double bed intended for couples). A 
matrimonio is usually cheaper than a double 
and slightly more expensive than a single 
(or even the same price). Note that traveling 
as a couple considerably reduces the cost of 
accommodations.
Many cheap residencias double as love hotels, 
renting rooms by the hour. Intentionally or not, 
you are likely to find yourself in such a place 
from time to time. This is actually not a major 
problem, as love hotels are normally as clean 
and safe as other hotels, and the sex section is 
usually separated from the genuine hotel.
Camping is not popular and there are only 
a handful of campsites in the country. Camp-
ing wild is possible outside the urban centers 
but you should be extremely careful. Don’t 
leave your tent or gear unattended.
ACTIVITIES  
With its amazing geographical diversity  Co-
lombia offers many opportunities for hiking, 
though some regions are infiltrated by guer-
rillas and should be avoided.
Colombia’s coral reefs provide good con-
ditions for snorkeling and scuba diving. The 
main centers are San Andrés ( p592 ), Provi-
dencia ( p594 ), Santa Marta ( p579 ), Taganga 
( p580 ) and Cartagena ( p585 ), each of which 
has several diving schools offering courses 
and other diving services. Colombia is con-
sidered one of the world’s cheapest countries 
for diving. 
Colombia has also developed greatly as a 
center of paragliding. The main hub is Medel-
626
© Lonely Planet Publications
VB.NET TIFF: Merge and Split TIFF Documents with RasterEdge .NET
filePath As [String], docList As [String]()) TIFFDocument.Combine(filePath, docList) End to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
pdf merge comments; asp.net merge pdf files
VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
Just like we need to combine PPT files, sometimes, we also want to separate a Note: If you want to see more PDF processing functions in VB.NET, please follow
c# merge pdf files into one; combine pdf
THUMB TAB 
COLOMBIA
www.lonelyplanet.com 
COLOMBIA DIRECTORY  ••  Books
lín ( p597 ), but there are also gliding schools 
in Bogotá, Cali and elsewhere. Paragliding in 
Colombia is cheap.
White-water rafting is pretty new in Co-
lombia but is developing fast, with its major 
base in San Gil ( p572 ). There are fledgling 
operations in San Agustín ( p612 ) and Suesca 
( p565 ). Like most other outdoor activities, 
rafting is also cheap in Colombia.
Cycling is one of Colombia’s favorite spec-
tator sports, yet bicycle-rental agencies have 
only begun to appear in recent years.
Other possible activities include mountain-
eering, horse-riding, rock-climbing, windsurf-
ing, fishing, caving and even bathing in a mud 
volcano (Volcán de Lodo El Totumo,  p588 ).
BOOKS  
For more detailed travel information, pick up 
a copy of Lonely Planet’s Colombia.
The Fruit Palace (1998) by Charles Ni-
choll is a very funny diary of his wanderings 
through the country in the 1980s. It’s dated, 
but the personal stories are as relevant today 
as when they were written.
For an account on Colombia’s drug war, 
ready More Terrible than Death: Violence, 
Drugs and America’s War in Colombia (2003) 
by Robin Kirk, who spent a dozen years in Co-
lombia working for Human Rights Watch and 
recounts some of the most brutal incidents of 
terror she witnessed during her fieldwork.
A more academic account of the same 
conflict is Americas Other War: Terroriz-
ing Colombia (2005) by Doug Stokes. The 
author, critical of US policy in Colombia, 
gets his message across by using declassified 
documents. 
Although Colombians appear to be less 
than interested in reading about FARC, Pablo 
Escobar is still a very popular topic and Killing 
Pablo: The Hunt for the World’s Greatest Out-
law (2002) by Mark Bowden is a hot seller. 
BUSINESS HOURS  
The office working day is, theoretically at least, 
eight hours long, usually from 8am to noon 
and 2pm to 6pm Monday to Friday. Many 
offices in Bogotá have adopted the so-called 
jornada continua, a working day without a 
lunch break, which finishes two hours earlier. 
Banks (except for those in Bogotá – see  p557 ) 
are open 8am to 11:30am and 2pm to 4pm 
Monday to Thursday, and 8am to 11:30am 
and 2pm to 4:30pm on Friday.
As a rough guide only, the usual shopping 
hours are from 9am to 6pm or 7pm Monday 
to Saturday. Some shops close for lunch while 
others stay open. Large stores and supermar-
kets usually stay open until 8pm or 9pm or 
even longer. Most of the better restaurants in 
the larger cities, particularly in Bogotá, tend 
to stay open until 10pm or longer, whereas 
restaurants in smaller towns often close by 
9pm or earlier. 
The opening hours of museums and other 
tourist sights vary greatly. Most museums are 
closed on Monday but are open on Sunday.
CLIMATE  
Colombia’s proximity to the equator means 
its temperature varies little throughout the 
year. Colombia, however, does have dry and 
wet seasons, the pattern of which varies in 
different parts of the country. As a rough 
guideline only, in the Andean region and the 
Caribbean coast (where you are likely to spend 
most of the time) there are two dry and two 
rainy seasons per year. 
The main dry season falls between January 
and March, with a shorter, less-dry period 
between June and August. The most pleasant 
time to visit Colombia is in the dry season. 
This is particularly true if you plan on hiking 
or some other outdoor activities. The dry 
season also gives visitors a better chance to 
savor local cultural events, as many festivals 
and fiestas take place during these periods. 
For more information and climate charts, 
see the South America Directory ( p1062 ).
CUSTOMS  
Customs procedures are usually a formality, 
both on entering and on leaving the country. 
However, thorough luggage checks occasion-
ally occur, more often at the airports than at the 
overland borders, and they can be very exhaus-
tive, with a body search included. They aren’t 
looking for your extra iPod, but for drugs. Try-
ing to smuggle dope through the border is the 
best way to see what the inside of a Colombian 
jail looks like, for quite a few years.
DANGERS & ANNOYANCES  
While security has been improving for several 
years,  Colombia still has plenty of dangers to 
be aware of. Look beyond the media headlines 
because kidnapping is the least of your wor-
ries (this almost never happens to foreigners). 
However, robbery and scams do occur. 
627
© Lonely Planet Publications
THUMB TAB 
COLOMBIA
COLOMBIA DIRECTORY  ••  Dangers & Annoyances 
www.lonelyplanet.com
Theft & Robbery  
Theft is the most common traveler danger. 
Generally speaking, the problem is more se-
rious in the largest cities. The more rural the 
area, the quieter and safer it is. The most 
common methods of theft are snatching your 
daypack, camera or watch, pickpocketing, or 
taking advantage of a moment’s inattention 
to pick up your gear and run away. 
In practice, it’s good to carry a decoy bun-
dle of small notes, the equivalent of US$5 to 
US$10, ready to hand over in case of an as-
sault; if you really don’t have a peso, robbers 
can become frustrated and, as a consequence, 
unpredictable.
Armed holdups in the cities can occur even 
in some more upmarket suburbs. If you are 
accosted by robbers, it is best to give them 
what they are after, but try to play it cool and 
don’t rush to hand them all your valuables 
at once – they may well be satisfied with just 
your decoy wad. Don’t try to escape or strug-
SAFE TRAVEL  
When traveling in Colombia use common sense and don’t get paranoid. Travelers do come to 
Colombia and few have any problems. Here are some basic rules of safe travel in Colombia.
For your own personal safety:
Unless the rural area you plan to visit is regarded as safe, make cities the focus of your travel 
rather than the countryside.
Don’t accept any food, drink or cigarettes from strangers.
Don’t venture into poor suburbs, desolate streets or suspicious-looking surroundings, 
especially after dark.
Before arriving in a new place, make sure you have a map or at least a rough idea of 
orientation.
Behave confidently on the street; don’t look lost or stand with a blank expression in the 
middle of the street.
Use taxis if this seems the appropriate way to avoid walking through risky areas.
When traveling between cities:
Consider air travel if the overland route is notorious for a lack of safety.
Seek local advice about the safety of the region you are traveling in and the one you’re 
heading for.
If traveling by bus, do so during the daytime.
Don’t use a rented car (but if you insist on traveling this way we provide some guidelines 
under Car & Motorcycle,  p647 ).
Should you feel compelled to go off the beaten track, leave details about your planned 
whereabouts prior to departure.
To avoid the risk of theft:
Leave money and valuables in a safe place at your hotel. If you must bring valuables on the 
street, keep it in a moneybelt next to your skin.
When traveling, distribute your valuables about your person and luggage to avoid the risk of 
losing everything in one fell swoop.
Wear casual and inexpensive clothes, preferably in plain, sober tones rather than in bright 
colors.
Keep your camera out of sight as much as possible and only take it out to snap a photo.
Look around to see whether you’re being observed or followed, especially while leaving a 
bank, casa de cambio or an ATM.
Arrange comprehensive travel insurance just in case something goes wrong.
628
© Lonely Planet Publications
THUMB TAB 
COLOMBIA
www.lonelyplanet.com 
COLOMBIA DIRECTORY  ••  Dangers & Annoyances
gle – your chances are slim. Don’t count on 
any help from passers-by.
Be careful when drawing the cash from 
an ATM – some cases of robbery have been 
reported. Criminals just watch who is drawing 
money, and then assault people either at the 
ATM or at a convenient place a few blocks 
down the street.
Drugs  
Cocaine is essentially an export product but 
it is also available locally. More widespread 
is marijuana, which is more easily available. 
However, be careful with drugs – never carry 
them. The police and army can be very thor-
ough in searching travelers, often looking for 
a nice fat bribe.
Sometimes you may be offered dope to buy 
on the street, in a bar or a disco, but never 
accept these offers. The vendors may well be 
setting you up for the police, or their accom-
plices will follow and stop you later, show you 
false police documents and threaten you with 
jail unless you pay them off. There have been 
reports of drugs being planted on travelers, so 
keep your eyes open.
The burundanga is more bad news. It is 
a drug obtained from a species of tree that 
is widespread in Colombia and is used by 
thieves to render a victim unconscious. It 
can be put into sweets, cigarettes, chewing 
gum, spirits, beer – virtually any kind of food 
or drink – and it doesn’t have any particular 
taste or odor. The main effects are loss of will 
and memory, and sleepiness lasting from a 
few hours to several days. An overdose can 
be fatal. Think twice before accepting a ciga-
rette from a stranger or a drink from a new 
‘friend.’
Guerrillas  
You could travel for months around Colom-
bia’s main cities and tourist spots and not 
have any clue that some regions are in the 
midst of a low-level war. In recent years guer-
rilla and paramilitary activity has been pushed 
deeper and deeper into remote jungle and 
mountain areas that you are unlikely to visit. 
The principal areas of conflict are Chocó, Pu-
tumayo and the vast, low-lying Amazon Basin 
that covers the southeast part of the country. 
Various methods of negotiation have been 
carried out between the rebel FARC and the 
Uribe government and there has been some 
success in disarming some rebel factions and 
paramilitaries. While the advantage is back 
with the government, the four-decade war 
is far from over and levels of violence could 
flare up anytime. 
As a general rule, avoid any off-the-beaten-
track travel. It’s best to stick to the main 
routes and travel during daytime only. Yet 
even main routes may sometimes be risky – 
there have been assaults on buses and cars on 
the Popayán–Pasto and Medellín–Cartagena 
roads. In most cases these assaults are purely 
political – all passengers and their luggage 
are kindly let off before the bus is put to the 
torch. 
Since Uribe came to office in 2002, cases of 
kidnapping for ransom have decreased sig-
nificantly. When they do occur the targets are 
RISE AND FALL OF THE COCA PLANT  
The coca  plant thrives in Colombia’s mineral-rich soils and four of the five varieties of coca grow 
here. Indigenous peoples of South America have been chewing coca leaves for centuries to cure 
everything from altitude sickness to toothache. It is also used in religious ceremonies, as an of-
fering to the sun or to produce smoke during sacrificial ceremonies. Coca leaves are read as a 
form of divination in the same way that other cultures read tea leaves. Chewing coca is still an 
important form of cultural identity for indigenous communities.
Coca was first introduced to Europe in the 16th century; its early users included William Shake-
speare and Queen Victoria of England. Then in 1855 German chemist Friedrich Gaedcke achieved 
the isolation of the cocaine alkaloid. Western doctors and scientists, including Sigmund Freud, 
started experimenting with the drug. The drug took off as an energy booster and an anesthetic, 
but its addictive properties were also becoming evident. Its use was made illegal in the US in 
1915, although the flow of drugs from South America to the US, Europe and beyond has never 
waned. 
Today in the US, a k
will try cocaine for the first time – 75% of whom will become addicted. 
629
© Lonely Planet Publications
THUMB TAB 
COLOMBIA
COLOMBIA DIRECTORY  ••  Driver’s License 
www.lonelyplanet.com
almost exclusively wealthy Colombian busi-
nessmen or their family members, and foreign 
businessmen. The danger of being kidnapped, 
however, cannot be completely ruled out – the 
last case of tourists being abducted occurred 
on a trek to Ciudad Perdida in 2003.
Ambushing of car and bus travelers for 
their valuables has occurred. These surprise 
attacks mostly happen at night at roadblocks 
set up by common criminals and also by 
guerrillas, although these attacks are also on 
the decrease.
Monitor current guerrilla movements. It’s 
not that easy because things change rapidly 
and unexpectedly, but make the most of 
various resources. Regional press and TV 
news can be useful. Possibly better and more 
specific is advice from guesthouse owners. 
Ask other travelers along the way and check 
online resources.
DRIVER’S LICENSE  
It is possible to drive a car or motorbike in   Co-
lombia and some travelers have been manag-
ing this without too much trouble. A driver’s 
license from your home country is accepted, 
although it’s probably best to bring along an 
International Driver’s License.
ELECTRICITY  
Colombia uses two-pronged US-type plugs 
that run at 110V, 60 Hz.
EMBASSIES & CONSULATES  
Embassies & Consulates in Colombia  
Foreign diplomatic representatives in Bogotá 
include the following (embassy and consu-
late are at the same address unless specified 
otherwise). For locations of these and other 
consulates, see individual city maps.
Australia Bogotá honorary consulate (
%
1-636-5247; 
Carrera 18 No 90-38)
Brazil Bogotá (
%
1-218-0800; Calle 93 No 14-20, Piso 8); 
Leticia (Map  p622 ; 
%
8-592-7530; Carrera 9 No 13-84); 
Medellín (Map  p596 ; 
%
4-265-7565; Calle 29D No 55-91) 
Canada (
%
1-657-9800; Carrera 7 No 115-33, Piso 14, 
Bogotá)
Costa Rica (Map  p591 ; 
%
8-512-4938; 
Av Colombia, in Novedades Regina shop, San Andrés) 
Ecuador Bogotá (
%
1-212-6512; Calle 72 No 6-30); 
Ipiales consulate (Map  p619 ; 
%
2-773-2292; Carrera 7 No 
14-10); Medellín (Map  p596 ; 
%
4-512-1303; Calle 50 No 
52-22, Oficina 603)
France (
%
1-638-1400; Carrera 11 No 93-12, Bogotá)
Germany (
%
1-249-4911; Carrera 4 No 72-35, Bogotá)
Honduras San Andrés (Map  p591 ; 
%
8-512-3235; 
Av Colombia, in Hotel Tiuna)
Israel (
%
1-327-7500; Calle 35 No 7-25, Piso 14, Bogotá)
Panama Bogotá (
%
1-257-4452; Calle 92 No 7-70); 
Cartagena (Map  p583 ; 
%
5-664-1433; Plaza de San 
Pedro Claver No 30-14, El Centro); Medellín (Map  p596 ; 
%
4-268-1358; Carrera 43A No 7-50, Oficina 1607) 
Peru Bogotá embassy (
%
1-257-0505; Calle 80A 
No 6-50), Bogotá consulate (
%
1-257-6846; Calle 90 
No 14-26); Leticia (Map  p622 ; 
%
8-592 7204; Calle 13 
No 10-70)
UK (
%
1-326-8301; www.britain.gov.co; Carrera 9 No 
76-49, Piso 9, Bogotá)
USA (
%
1-315-0811; Calle 22D Bis No 47-51, Bogotá)
Venezuela Bogotá embassy (
%
1-640-1213; Carrera 11 
No 87-51, Piso 5), Bogotá consulate (
%
1-636-4011; Av 13 
No 103-16); Cartagena (Map  p583 ; 
%
5-665-0382; Carrera 
3 No 8-129, Bocagrande); Cúcuta (Map  p576 ; 
%
7-579-
1956; Av Camilo Daza); Medellín (Map  p596  ; 
%
4-351-
1614; Calle 32B No 69-59) 
Colombian Embassies & Consulates 
Abroad  
Colombia has embassies and consulates in 
all neighboring countries, as well as in the 
following:
Australia (
%
02-9955-0311; 100 Walker St, North 
Sydney, NSW 2060)
Brazil (
%
92-412-2104; Rua General Sanpaio 623, 
Tabatinga)
Canada (
%
514-849-4852; 1010 Sherbrooke St West, 
Suite 420, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2R7; 
%
416-977-0475; 
1 Dundas St West, Suite 2108, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1Z3)
France (
%
01-4265-4608; 12 rue de L’Elysee, Paris 
75008)
Germany (
%
030-263-9610; Kurfürsternstrasse 84, 
10787 Berlin)
UK (
%
020-7589-9177; www.colombianembassy.co.uk; 
3 Hans Crescent, London SW 1X OLN)
USA (
%
202-387-8338; 2118 Leroy Place NW, Washing-
LANDMINES   
Colombia ranks third in the world (after 
Cambodia and Afghanistan) for victims 
of  landmine blasts. An estimated 100,000 
mines are scattered around the country, 
mainly in remote, FARC-held areas. There 
were 1070 land-mine victims in 2005. None 
of the areas mentioned in this chapter are 
affected by landmines, but be doubly care-
ful if you end up in any rebel-held regions 
such as Chocó, Los Llanos, Putumayo or 
the Amazon.
630
© Lonely Planet Publications
THUMB TAB 
COLOMBIA
www.lonelyplanet.com 
COLOMBIA DIRECTORY  ••  Festivals & Events
ton, DC 20008; 
%
305-441-1235; 280 Aragon Ave, Coral 
Gables, Miami, FL 33134; 
%
212-949-9898; 10 East 46th 
St, New York, NY 10017)
FESTIVALS & EVENTS  
Colombians love fiestas. There are more than 
200 festivals and events ranging from small, 
local affairs to international festivals lasting 
several days. Most of the celebrations are re-
gional, and the most interesting ones are listed 
in individual destination sections.
FOOD & DRINK  
Colombian Cuisine  
Colombian cuisine is varied and regional. 
Among the most typical regional dishes:
ajiaco (a·khee·a·ko) – soup with chicken and three varieties 
of potato, served with corn and capers; a Bogotán specialty
bandeja paisa (ban·de·kha pai·sa) – typical Antioquian 
dish made of ground beef, sausage, red beans, rice, fried 
green banana, fried egg, fried salt pork and avocado
chocolate santafereño (cho·ko·la·te san·ta·fe·re·nyo) – 
cup of hot chocolate accompanied by a piece of cheese and 
bread (traditionally you put the cheese into the chocolate); 
another Bogotán specialty
cuy (kooy) – grilled guinea pig, typical of Nariño
hormiga culona (or·mee·ga koo·lo·na) – large fried ants; 
probably the most exotic Colombian specialty, unique to 
Santander
lechona (le·cho·na) – pig carcass stuffed with its own 
meat, rice and dried peas and then baked in an oven; a 
specialty of Tolima
tamal (ta·mal) – chopped pork with rice and vegetables 
folded in a maize dough, wrapped in banana leaves and 
steamed; there are many regional varieties
Variety does not, unfortunately, apply to the 
basic set meal (comida corriente), which is the 
principal diet of most Colombians eating out. It 
is a two-course meal consisting of sopa (soup) 
and bandeja or seco (main course). At lunch-
time (from noon to 2pm) it is called almuerzo; 
at dinnertime (after 6pm) it becomes comida, 
but it is identical to lunch. The almuerzos and 
comidas are the staple, sometimes the only, of-
fering in countless budget restaurants. They are 
the cheapest way to fill yourself up, costing be-
tween US$1.50 and US$2.50 – roughly half the 
price of an à la carte dish. A proper desayuno 
(breakfast) can be hard to come by and is rarely 
anything to write home about. You might find 
some scrambled eggs and coffee, otherwise save 
your appetite for lunch.
Colombia has an amazing variety of fruits, 
some of which are endemic to the country. 
You should try guanábana, lulo, curuba, za-
pote, mamoncillo, uchuva, feijoa, granadilla, 
maracuyá, tomate de árbol, borojó, mamey 
and tamarindo, to name just a few.
Drinks  
Coffee is the number one drink – tinto (a 
small cup of black coffee) is served every-
where. Other coffee drinks are perico or pin-
tado, a small milk coffee, and café con leche, 
which is larger and uses more milk.
Tea is of poor quality and not very popular. 
On the other hand, the aromáticas – herb teas 
made with various plants like cidrón (citrus 
leaves), yerbabuena (mint) and manzanilla 
(chamomile) – are cheap and good. Agua de 
panela (unrefined sugar melted in hot water) 
is tasty with lemon.
Beer is popular, cheap and generally not 
bad. This can’t be said about Colombian wine, 
which is best avoided.
Aguardiente is the local alcoholic spirit, 
flavored with anise and produced by several 
companies throughout the country; Cristal 
from Caldas and Nectar from Cundinamarca 
THE REAL THING  
Coca Sek may ring for 
it on the supermarket shelves when you return home. Produced by Nasa Indians in southern 
Colombia, the soft drink is made from coca-leaf extract. There’s not enough coca in it to get you 
high, but the bottlers describe it as an ‘energizing drink,’ lightly stimulating like coffee.
The drink is available domestically, but Coca-Cola and Pepsi corporations can sleep easy at 
night with the knowledge that Coca Sek will probably never make it to the US, UK or most other 
countries. Laws prohibiting the importation of raw coca would stop the pop at customs. 
Coca Sek (which means Coca of the Sun) looks like apple cider and tastes vaguely like ginger 
ale. While complete testing has not been performed, it’s known that the coca makes up less than 
0.5% in the drink itself. Coca Sek is produced and bottled by a staff of around 15 Nasa Indians. 
A portion of the profits made by the company goes to coca farmers. 
631
© Lonely Planet Publications
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested