adobe pdf viewer c# : Reader merge pdf application Library utility html asp.net wpf visual studio Macbeth_text4-part780

No Fear Shakespeare – Macbeth (by SparkNotes) 
-41- 
Original Text 
Modern Text 
135 
MACBETH 
How say’st thou that Macduff denies his person 
At our great bidding? 
MACBETH 
What do you think about the fact that Macduff 
refuses to come to me when I command him? 
LADY MACBETH 
Did you send to him, sir? 
LADY MACBETH 
Did you send for him, sir? 
140 
145 
MACBETH 
I hear it by the way; but I will send. 
There’s not a one of them but in his house 
I keep a servant fee’d. I will tomorrow— 
And betimes I will—to the weird sisters. 
More shall they speak, for now I am bent to know, 
By the worst means, the worst. For mine own good, 
All causes shall give way. I am in blood 
Stepped in so far that, should I wade no more, 
Returning were as tedious as go o'er. 
Strange things I have in head, that will to hand, 
Which must be acted ere they may be scanned. 
MACBETH 
I’ve heard about this indirectly, but I will send for 
him. In every one of the lords' households I have 
a servant paid to spy for me. Tomorrow, while it’s 
still early, I will go see the witches. They will tell 
me more, because I’m determined to know the 
worst about what’s going to happen. My own 
safety is the only important thing now. I have 
walked so far into this river of blood that even if I 
stopped now, it would be as hard to go back to 
being good as it is to keep killing people. I have 
some schemes in my head that I’m planning to 
put into action. I have to do these things before I 
have a chance to think about them. 
Act 3, Scene 4, Page 8 
LADY MACBETH 
You lack the season of all natures, sleep. 
LADY MACBETH 
You haven’t slept. 
150 
MACBETH 
Come, we’ll to sleep. My strange and self-abuse 
Is the initiate fear that wants hard use. 
We are yet but young in deed. 
MACBETH 
Yes, let’s go to sleep. My strange self-delusions 
just come from inexperience. We’re still just 
beginners when it comes to crime. 
Exeunt 
They exit. 
Act 3, Scene 5 
Thunder. Enter the three WITCHES meetingHECATE 
Thunder. The three WITCHES enter, 
meetingHECATE
FIRST WITCH 
Why, how now, Hecate! You look angerly. 
FIRST WITCH 
What’s wrong, Hecate? You look angry. 
10 
15 
HECATE 
Have I not reason, beldams as you are? 
Saucy and overbold, how did you dare 
To trade and traffic with Macbeth 
In riddles and affairs of death, 
And I, the mistress of your charms, 
The close contriver of all harms, 
Was never called to bear my part, 
Or show the glory of our art? 
And, which is worse, all you have done 
Hath been but for a wayward son, 
Spiteful and wrathful, who, as others do, 
Loves for his own ends, not for you. 
But make amends now. Get you gone, 
And at the pit of Acheron 
Meet me i' th' morning. Thither he 
Will come to know his destiny. 
Your vessels and your spells provide, 
HECATE 
Don’t I have a reason to be angry, you 
disobedient hags? How dare you give Macbeth 
riddles and prophecies about his future without 
telling me? I am your boss and the source of your 
powers. I am the one who secretly decides what 
evil things happen, but you never called me to 
join in and show off my own powers. And what’s 
worse, you’ve done all this for a man who 
behaves like a spoiled brat, angry and hateful. 
Like all spoiled sons, he chases after what he 
wants and doesn’t care about you. But you can 
make it up to me. Go away now and in the 
morning meet me in the pit by the river in hell. 
Macbeth will go there to learn his destiny. You 
bring your cauldrons, your spells, your charms, 
and everything else. I’m about to fly away. I’ll 
spend tonight working to make something horrible 
Reader merge pdf - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
add pdf together; merge pdf online
Reader merge pdf - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
combine pdfs online; add two pdf files together
No Fear Shakespeare – Macbeth (by SparkNotes) 
-42- 
Original Text 
Modern Text 
20 
25 
Your charms and everything beside. 
I am for the air. This night I’ll spend 
Unto a dismal and a fatal end. 
Great business must be wrought ere noon. 
Upon the corner of the moon 
There hangs a vap'rous drop profound. 
I’ll catch it ere it come to ground. 
And that distilled by magic sleights 
Shall raise such artificial sprites 
As by the strength of their illusion 
Shall draw him on to his confusion. 
happen. I have a lot to do before noon. An 
important droplet is hanging from the corner of 
the moon. I’ll catch it before it falls to the ground. 
When I work it over with magic spells, the drop 
will produce magical spirits that will trick Macbeth 
with illusions. 
Act 3, Scene 5, Page 2 
30 
He shall spurn fate, scorn death, and bear 
His hopes 'bove wisdom, grace, and fear. 
And you all know, security 
Is mortals' chiefest enemy. 
He will be fooled into thinking he is greater than 
fate, he will mock death, and he will think he is 
above wisdom, grace, and fear. As you all know, 
overconfidence is man’s greatest enemy. 
Music and a song within: 'Come away, come away,' 
&c 
Music plays offstage, and voices sing a song with 
the words “Come away, come away.” 
35 
Hark! I am called. My little spirit, see, 
Sits in a foggy cloud and stays for me. 
Listen! I’m being called. Look, my little spirit is 
sitting in a foggy cloud waiting for me. 
Exit 
HECATE exits. 
FIRST WITCH 
Come, let’s make haste; she’ll soon be back again. 
FIRST WITCH 
Come on, let’s hurry. She’ll be back again soon. 
Exeunt 
They all exit. 
Act 3, Scene 6 
Enter LENNOX and another LORD 
LENNOX and another LORD enter. 
10 
15 
20 
LENNOX 
My former speeches have but hit your thoughts, 
Which can interpret farther. Only I say 
Things have been strangely borne. The gracious 
Duncan 
Was pitied of Macbeth. Marry, he was dead. 
And the right-valiant Banquo walked too late, 
Whom, you may say, if ’t please you, Fleance killed, 
For Fleance fled. Men must not walk too late. 
Who cannot want the thought how monstrous 
It was for Malcolm and for Donalbain 
To kill their gracious father? Damnèd fact! 
How it did grieve Macbeth! Did he not straight 
In pious rage the two delinquents tear 
That were the slaves of drink and thralls of sleep? 
Was not that nobly done? Ay, and wisely too, 
For ’twould have angered any heart alive 
To hear the men deny ’t. So that, I say, 
He has borne all things well. And I do think 
That had he Duncan’s sons under his key— 
As, an’t please heaven, he shall not—they should 
find 
What ’twere to kill a father. So should Fleance. 
But, peace! For from broad words, and 'cause he 
LENNOX 
What I’ve already said shows you we think alike, 
so you can draw your own conclusions. All I’m 
saying is that strange things have been going on. 
Macbeth pitied Duncan—after Duncan was dead. 
And Banquo went out walking too late at night. If 
you like, we can say that Fleance must have 
killed him, because Fleance fled the scene of the 
crime. Clearly, men should not go out walking too 
late! And who can help thinking how monstrous it 
was for Malcolm and Donalbain to kill their 
gracious father? Such a heinous crime—how it 
saddened Macbeth! Wasn’t it loyal of him to kill 
those two servants right away, while they were 
still drunk and asleep? That was the right thing to 
do, wasn’t it? Yes, and it was the wise thing, too, 
because we all would have been outraged to hear 
those two deny their crime. Considering all this, I 
think Macbeth has handled things well. If he had 
Duncan’s sons in prison—which I hope won’t 
happen—they would find out how awful the 
punishment is for those who kill their fathers, and 
so would Fleance. But enough of that. I hear that 
Macduff is out of favor with the king because he 
XImage.Barcode Scanner for .NET, Read, Scan and Recognize barcode
VB.NET File: Merge PDF; VB.NET File: Split PDF; VB.NET VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for C#; C#; XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
pdf merger online; reader combine pdf
C# Imaging - Scan Barcode Image in C#.NET
RasterEdge Barcode Reader DLL add-in enables developers to add barcode image recognition & barcode types, such as Code 128, EAN-13, QR Code, PDF-417, etc.
break a pdf into multiple files; how to combine pdf files
No Fear Shakespeare – Macbeth (by SparkNotes) 
-43- 
Original Text 
Modern Text 
failed 
His presence at the tyrant’s feast, I hear 
Macduff lives in disgrace. Sir, can you tell 
Where he bestows himself? 
speaks his mind too plainly, and because he 
failed to show up at Macbeth’s feast. Can you tell 
me where he’s hiding himself? 
25 
30 
35 
LORD 
The son of Duncan— 
From whom this tyrant holds the due of birth— 
Lives in the English court and is received 
Of the most pious Edward with such grace 
That the malevolence of fortune nothing 
Takes from his high respect. Thither Macduff 
Is gone to pray the holy king upon his aid 
To wake Northumberland and warlike Siward, 
That by the help of these—with Him above 
To ratify the work—we may again 
Give to our tables meat, sleep to our nights, 
Free from our feasts and banquets bloody knives, 
Do faithful homage and receive free honors. 
All which we pine for now. And this report 
Hath so exasperated the king that he 
Prepares for some attempt of war. 
LORD 
Duncan’s son Malcolm, whose birthright and 
throne Macbeth has stolen, lives in the English 
court. There, the saintly King Edward treats 
Malcolm so well that despite Malcolm’s 
misfortunes, he’s not deprived of respect. 
Macduff went there to ask King Edward for help. 
He wants Edward to help him form an alliance 
with the people of Northumberland and their lord, 
Siward. Macduff hopes that with their help—and 
with the help of God above—he may once again 
put food on our tables, bring peace back to our 
nights, free our feasts and banquets from violent 
murders, allow us to pay proper homage to our 
king, and receive honors freely. Those are the 
things we pine for now. Macbeth has heard this 
news and he is so angry that he’s preparing for 
war. 
Act 3, Scene 6, Page 2 
40 
LENNOX 
Sent he to Macduff? 
LENNOX 
Did he tell Macduff to return to Scotland? 
LORD 
He did, and with an absolute “Sir, not I,” 
The cloudy messenger turns me his back, 
And hums, as who should say “You’ll rue the time 
That clogs me with this answer.” 
LORD 
He did, but Macduff told the messenger, “No 
way.” The messenger scowled and rudely turned 
his back on Macduff, as if to say, “You’ll regret 
the day you gave me this answer.” 
45 
50 
LENNOX 
And that well might 
Advise him to a caution, t' hold what distance 
His wisdom can provide. Some holy angel 
Fly to the court of England and unfold 
His message ere he come, that a swift blessing 
May soon return to this our suffering country 
Under a hand accursed! 
LENNOX 
That might well keep Macduff away from 
Scotland. Some holy angel should go to the court 
of England and give Macduff a message. He 
should return quickly to free our country, which is 
suffering under a tyrant! 
LORD 
I’ll send my prayers with him. 
LORD 
I’ll send my prayers with him. 
Exeunt 
They exit. 
Act 4, Scene 1 
A cavern. In the middle, a boiling cauldron. Thunder. 
Enter the three WITCHES
A cavern. In the middle, a boiling cauldron. 
Thunder. The three WITCHES enter. 
FIRST WITCH 
Thrice the brinded cat hath mewed. 
FIRST WITCH 
The tawny cat has meowed three times. 
SECOND WITCH 
Thrice, and once the hedge-pig whined. 
SECOND WITCH 
Three times. And the hedgehog has whined once. 
THIRD WITCH 
THIRD WITCH 
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
On this page, besides brief introduction to RasterEdge C#.NET PDF document viewer & reader for Windows Forms application, you can also see the following aspects
attach pdf to mail merge; attach pdf to mail merge in word
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
File & Page Process. Create new file, load PDF from existing files. Merge, split PDF files. Insert, delete PDF pages. Re-order, rotate PDF pages. PDF Read.
pdf mail merge plug in; c# merge pdf files into one
No Fear Shakespeare – Macbeth (by SparkNotes) 
-44- 
Original Text 
Modern Text 
Harpier cries, “'Tis time, ’tis time.” 
My spirit friend, Harpier, is yelling, “It’s time, it’s 
time!” 
FIRST WITCH 
Round about the cauldron go, 
In the poisoned entrails throw. 
Toad, that under cold stone 
Days and nights has thirty-one 
Sweltered venom sleeping got, 
Boil thou first i' th' charmèd pot. 
FIRST WITCH 
Dance around the cauldron and throw in the 
poisoned entrails. (holding up a toad) You’ll go in 
first—a toad that sat under a cold rock for a 
month, oozing poison from its pores. 
10 
ALL 
Double, double toil and trouble, 
Fire burn, and cauldron bubble. 
ALL 
Double, double toil and trouble, 
Fire burn, and cauldron bubble. 
15 
SECOND WITCH 
Fillet of a fenny snake, 
In the cauldron boil and bake. 
Eye of newt and toe of frog, 
Wool of bat and tongue of dog, 
Adder’s fork and blind-worm’s sting, 
Lizard’s leg and owlet’s wing, 
For a charm of powerful trouble, 
Like a hell-broth boil and bubble. 
SECOND WITCH 
(holding something up) We’ll boil you in the 
cauldron next—a slice of swamp snake. All the 
rest of you in too: a newt’s eye, a frog’s tongue, 
fur from a bat, a dog’s tongue, the forked tongue 
of an adder, the stinger of a burrowing worm, a 
lizard’s leg, an owl’s wing. (speaking to the 
ingredients) Make a charm to cause powerful 
trouble, and boil and bubble like a broth of hell. 
20 
ALL 
Double, double toil and trouble, 
Fire burn and cauldron bubble. 
ALL 
Double, double toil and trouble, 
Fire burn and cauldron bubble. 
Act 4, Scene 1, Page 2 
25 
30 
THIRD WITCH 
Scale of dragon, tooth of wolf, 
Witches' mummy, maw and gulf 
Of the ravined salt-sea shark, 
Root of hemlock digged i' th' dark, 
Liver of blaspheming Jew, 
Gall of goat and slips of yew 
Slivered in the moon’s eclipse, 
Nose of Turk and Tartar’s lips, 
Finger of birth-strangled babe 
Ditch-delivered by a drab, 
Make the gruel thick and slab. 
Add thereto a tiger’s chaudron, 
For the ingredients of our cauldron. 
THIRD WITCH 
Here come some more ingredients: the scale of a 
dragon, a wolf’s tooth, a witch’s mummified flesh, 
the gullet and stomach of a ravenous shark, a 
root of hemlock that was dug up in the dark, a 
Jew’s liver, a goat’s bile, some twigs of yew that 
were broken off during a lunar eclipse, a Turk’s 
nose, a Tartar’s lips, the finger of a baby that was 
strangled as a prostitute gave birth to it in a 
ditch. (to the ingredients) Make this potion thick 
and gluey. (to the other WITCHES) Now let’s add 
a tiger’s entrails to the mix. 
35 
ALL 
Double, double toil and trouble, 
Fire burn and cauldron bubble. 
ALL 
Double, double toil and trouble, 
Fire burn and cauldron bubble. 
SECOND WITCH 
Cool it with a baboon’s blood, 
Then the charm is firm and good. 
SECOND WITCH 
We’ll cool the mixture with baboon blood. After 
that the charm is finished. 
Enter HECATE and the other three WITCHES 
HECATE enters with three other WITCHES
40 
HECATE 
Oh well done! I commend your pains, 
And every one shall share i' th' gains. 
And now about the cauldron sing, 
Like elves and fairies in a ring, 
HECATE 
Well done! I admire your efforts, and all of you will 
share the rewards. Now come sing around the 
cauldron like a ring of elves and fairies, 
enchanting everything you put in. 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF reader installed. Able to zoom and crop image and achieve image resizing. Merge several images into PDF.
batch merge pdf; combine pdf online
XDoc, XImage SDK for .NET - View, Annotate, Convert, Edit, Scan
Adobe PDF. XDoc PDF. Scanning. XImage OCR. Microsoft Office. XDoc Word. XDoc Excel. XDoc PowerPoint. Barcoding. XImage Barcode Reader. XImage Barcode Generator.
add pdf files together reader; c# merge pdf
No Fear Shakespeare – Macbeth (by SparkNotes) 
-45- 
Original Text 
Modern Text 
Enchanting all that you put in. 
Music and a song: “Black spirits,” &c. HECATEretires 
Music plays and the six WITCHES sing a song 
called “Black Spirits.” HECATE leaves. 
45 
SECOND WITCH 
By the pricking of my thumbs, 
Something wicked this way comes. 
Open, locks, 
Whoever knocks. 
SECOND WITCH 
I can tell that something wicked is coming by the 
tingling in my thumbs. Doors, open up for 
whoever is knocking! 
Act 4, Scene 1, Page 3 
Enter MACBETH 
MACBETH enters. 
MACBETH 
How now, you secret, black, and midnight hags? 
What is ’t you do? 
MACBETH 
What’s going on here, you secret, evil, midnight 
hags? What are you doing? 
ALL 
A deed without a name. 
ALL 
Something there isn’t a word for. 
50 
55 
60 
MACBETH 
I conjure you by that which you profess— 
Howe'er you come to know it—answer me. 
Though you untie the winds and let them fight 
Against the churches, though the yeasty waves 
Confound and swallow navigation up, 
Though bladed corn be lodged and trees blown 
down, 
Though castles topple on their warders' heads, 
Though palaces and pyramids do slope 
Their heads to their foundations, though the treasure 
Of nature’s germens tumble all together, 
Even till destruction sicken, answer me 
To what I ask you. 
MACBETH 
I don’t know how you know the things you do, but 
I insist that you answer my questions. I command 
you in the name of whatever dark powers you 
serve. I don’t care if you unleash violent winds 
that tear down churches, make the foamy waves 
overwhelm ships and send sailors to their deaths, 
flatten crops and trees, make castles fall down on 
their inhabitants' heads, make palaces and 
pyramids collapse, and mix up everything in 
nature. Tell me what I want to know. 
FIRST WITCH 
Speak. 
FIRST WITCH 
Speak. 
SECOND WITCH 
Demand. 
SECOND WITCH 
Demand. 
THIRD WITCH 
We’ll answer. 
THIRD WITCH 
We’ll answer. 
FIRST WITCH 
Say, if th' hadst rather hear it from our mouths, 
Or from our masters'. 
FIRST WITCH 
Would you rather hear these things from our 
mouths or from our master’s? 
MACBETH 
Call 'em. Let me see 'em. 
MACBETH 
Call them. Let me see them. 
65 
FIRST WITCH 
Pour in sow’s blood, that hath eaten 
Her nine farrow; grease that’s sweaten 
From the murderer’s gibbet throw 
Into the flame. 
FIRST WITCH 
Pour in the blood of a sow who has eaten her 
nine offspring. Take the sweat of a murderer on 
the gallows and throw it into the flame. 
Act 4, Scene 1, Page 4 
ALL 
Come, high or low; 
ALL 
Come, high or low spirits. Show yourself and 
C# PDF: How to Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET with
The PDF document viewer & reader created by this C#.NET imaging toolkit can be used by developers for reliably & quickly PDF document viewing, PDF annotation
pdf combine two pages into one; scan multiple pages into one pdf
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
VB.NET File: Merge PDF; VB.NET File: Split PDF; VB.NET VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for C#; C#; XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
all jpg to one pdf converter; pdf split and merge
No Fear Shakespeare – Macbeth (by SparkNotes) 
-46- 
Original Text 
Modern Text 
70 Thyself and office deftly show! 
what you do. 
Thunder. FIRST APPARITION : an armed head 
Thunder. The FIRST APPARITION appears, 
looking like a head with an armored helmet. 
MACBETH 
Tell me, thou unknown power— 
MACBETH 
Tell me, you unknown power— 
FIRST WITCH 
He knows thy thought. 
Hear his speech but say thou nought. 
FIRST WITCH 
He can read your thoughts. Listen, but don’t 
speak. 
FIRST APPARITION 
Macbeth! Macbeth! Macbeth! Beware Macduff. 
Beware the thane of Fife. Dismiss me. Enough. 
FIRST APPARITION 
Macbeth! Macbeth! Macbeth! Beware Macduff. 
Beware the thane of Fife. Let me go. Enough. 
Descends 
The FIRST APPARITION descends. 
75 
MACBETH 
Whate'er thou art, for thy good caution, thanks. 
Thou hast harped my fear aright. But one word 
more— 
MACBETH 
Whatever you are, thanks for your advice. You 
have guessed exactly what I feared. But one 
word more— 
FIRST WITCH 
He will not be commanded. Here’s another 
More potent than the first. 
FIRST WITCH 
He will not be commanded by you. Here’s 
another, stronger than the first. 
Thunder. SECOND APPARITION : a bloody child 
Thunder. The SECOND APPARITION appears, 
looking like a bloody child. 
SECOND APPARITION 
Macbeth! Macbeth! Macbeth!— 
SECOND APPARITION 
Macbeth! Macbeth! Macbeth! 
80 
MACBETH 
Had I three ears, I’d hear thee. 
MACBETH 
If I had three ears I’d listen with all three. 
SECOND APPARITION 
Be bloody, bold, and resolute. Laugh to scorn 
The power of man, for none of woman born 
Shall harm Macbeth. 
SECOND APPARITION 
Be violent, bold, and firm. Laugh at the power of 
other men, because nobody born from a woman 
will ever harm Macbeth. 
Descends 
The SECOND APPARITION descends. 
Act 4, Scene 1, Page 5 
85 
MACBETH 
Then live, Macduff. What need I fear of thee? 
But yet I’ll make assurance double sure, 
And take a bond of fate. Thou shalt not live, 
That I may tell pale-hearted fear it lies, 
And sleep in spite of thunder. 
MACBETH 
Then I don’t need to kill Macduff. I have no 
reason to fear him. But even so, I’ll make doubly 
sure. I’ll guarantee my own fate by having you 
killed, Macduff. That way I can conquer my own 
fear and sleep easy at night. 
Thunder. THIRD APPARITION : a child crowned, 
with a tree in his hand 
Thunder. The THIRD APPARITION appears, in 
the form of a child with a crown on his head and 
a tree in his hand. 
90 
What is this 
That rises like the issue of a king, 
And wears upon his baby-brow the round 
And top of sovereignty? 
What is this spirit that looks like the son of a king 
and wears a crown on his young head? 
ALL 
Listen but speak not to ’t. 
ALL 
Listen but don’t speak to it. 
95 
THIRD APPARITION 
Be lion-mettled, proud, and take no care 
Who chafes, who frets, or where conspirers are. 
THIRD APPARITION 
Be brave like the lion and proud. Don’t even 
worry about who hates you, who resents you, 
No Fear Shakespeare – Macbeth (by SparkNotes) 
-47- 
Original Text 
Modern Text 
Macbeth shall never vanquished be until 
Great Birnam Wood to high Dunsinane Hill 
Shall come against him. 
and who conspires against you. Macbeth will 
never be defeated until Birnam Wood marches to 
fight you at Dunsinane Hill. 
Descends 
The THIRD APPARITION descends. 
100 
105 
MACBETH 
That will never be. 
Who can impress the forest, bid the tree 
Unfix his earthbound root? Sweet bodements! Good! 
Rebellious dead, rise never till the wood 
Of Birnam rise, and our high-placed Macbeth 
Shall live the lease of nature, pay his breath 
To time and mortal custom. Yet my heart 
Throbs to know one thing. Tell me, if your art 
Can tell so much: shall Banquo’s issue ever 
Reign in this kingdom? 
MACBETH 
That will never happen. Who can command the 
forest and make the trees pull their roots out of 
the earth? These were sweet omens! Good! My 
murders will never come back to threaten me 
until the forest of Birnam gets up and moves, and 
I will be king for my entire natural life. But my 
heart is still throbbing to know one thing. Tell me, 
if your dark powers can see this far: will 
Banquo’s sons ever reign in this kingdom? 
Act 4, Scene 1, Page 6 
ALL 
Seek to know no more. 
ALL 
Don’t try to find out more. 
110 
MACBETH 
I will be satisfied. Deny me this, 
And an eternal curse fall on you! Let me know. 
Why sinks that cauldron? And what noise is this? 
MACBETH 
I demand to be satisfied. If you refuse, let an 
eternal curse fall on you. Let me know. Why is 
that cauldron sinking? And what is that music? 
Hautboys 
Hautboys play music for a ceremonial 
procession. 
FIRST WITCH 
Show. 
FIRST WITCH 
Show. 
SECOND WITCH 
Show. 
SECOND WITCH 
Show. 
THIRD WITCH 
Show. 
THIRD WITCH 
Show. 
115 
ALL 
Show his eyes and grieve his heart. 
Come like shadows; so depart! 
ALL 
Show him and make him grieve. Come like 
shadows and depart in the same way! 
A show of eight kings, the last with a glass in his 
hand, followed by BANQUO 
Eight kings march across the stage, the last one 
with a mirror in his hand, followed by the GHOST 
OF BANQUO
120 
125 
MACBETH 
Thou art too like the spirit of Banquo. Down! 
Thy crown does sear mine eyeballs. And thy hair, 
Thou other gold-bound brow, is like the first. 
A third is like the former.—Filthy hags! 
Why do you show me this? A fourth? Start, eyes! 
What, will the line stretch out to th' crack of doom? 
Another yet? A seventh? I’ll see no more. 
And yet the eighth appears, who bears a glass 
Which shows me many more, and some I see 
That twofold balls and treble scepters carry. 
Horrible sight! Now I see ’tis true; 
For the blood-boltered Banquo smiles upon me 
And points at them for his. 
MACBETH 
You look too much like the ghost of Banquo. Go 
away!     (to the first) Your crown hurts 
my eyes. (to the second) Your blond hair, which 
looks like another crown underneath the one 
you’re wearing, looks just like the first king’s hair. 
Now I see a third king who looks just like the 
second. Filthy hags! Why are you showing me 
this? A fourth! My eyes are bulging out of their 
sockets! Will this line stretch on forever? Another 
one! And a seventh! I don’t want to see any 
more. And yet an eighth appears, holding a 
mirror in which I see many more men. And some 
are carrying double balls and triple scepters, 
meaning they’re kings of more than one country! 
No Fear Shakespeare – Macbeth (by SparkNotes) 
-48- 
Original Text 
Modern Text 
Horrible sight! Now I see it is true, they are 
Banquo’s descendants. Banquo, with his blood-
clotted hair, is smiling at me and pointing to them 
as his. 
Act 4, Scene 1, Page 7 
Apparitions vanish 
The spirits of the kings and the GHOST OF 
BANQUO vanish. 
What, is this so? 
What? Is this true? 
130 
135 
FIRST WITCH 
Ay, sir, all this is so. But why 
Stands Macbeth thus amazedly? 
Come, sisters, cheer we up his sprites, 
And show the best of our delights. 
I’ll charm th' air to give a sound, 
While you perform your antic round. 
That this great king may kindly say, 
Our duties did his welcome pay. 
FIRST WITCH 
Yes, this is true, but why do you stand there so 
dumbfounded? Come, sisters, let’s cheer him up 
and show him our talents. I will charm the air to 
produce music while you all dance around like 
crazy, so this king will say we did our duty and 
entertained him. 
Music. The WITCHES dance and then vanish 
Music plays. The WITCHES dance and then 
vanish. 
140 
MACBETH 
Where are they? Gone? Let this pernicious hour 
Stand aye accursèd in the calendar! 
Come in, without there. 
MACBETH 
Where are they? Gone? Let this evil hour be 
marked forever in the calendar as cursed. (calls 
to someone offstage) You outside, come in! 
Enter LENNOX 
LENNOX enters. 
LENNOX 
What’s your grace’s will? 
LENNOX 
What does your grace want? 
MACBETH 
Saw you the weird sisters? 
MACBETH 
Did you see the weird sisters? 
LENNOX 
No, my lord. 
LENNOX 
No, my lord. 
MACBETH 
Came they not by you? 
MACBETH 
Didn’t they pass by you? 
LENNOX 
No, indeed, my lord. 
LENNOX 
No, indeed, my lord. 
145 
MACBETH 
Infected be the air whereon they ride, 
And damned all those that trust them! I did hear 
The galloping of horse. Who was ’t came by? 
MACBETH 
The air on which they ride is infected. Damn all 
those who trust them! I heard the galloping of 
horses. Who was it that came here? 
Act 4, Scene 1, Page 8 
LENNOX 
'Tis two or three, my lord, that bring you word 
Macduff is fled to England. 
LENNOX 
Two or three men, my lord, who brought the 
message that Macduff has fled to England. 
MACBETH 
Fled to England? 
MACBETH 
Fled to England? 
LENNOX 
Ay, my good lord. 
LENNOX 
Yes, my good lord. 
150 
MACBETH 
Time, thou anticipat’st my dread exploits. 
MACBETH 
Time, you thwart my dreadful plans. Unless a 
No Fear Shakespeare – Macbeth (by SparkNotes) 
-49- 
Original Text 
Modern Text 
155 
160 
The flighty purpose never is o'ertook 
Unless the deed go with it. From this moment 
The very firstlings of my heart shall be 
The firstlings of my hand. And even now, 
To crown my thoughts with acts, be it thought and 
done: 
The castle of Macduff I will surprise, 
Seize upon Fife, give to th' edge o' th' sword 
His wife, his babes, and all unfortunate souls 
That trace him in his line. No boasting like a fool. 
This deed I’ll do before this purpose cool. 
But no more sights!—Where are these gentlemen? 
Come, bring me where they are. 
person does something the second he thinks of 
it, he’ll never get a chance to do it. From now on, 
as soon as I decide to do something I’m going to 
act immediately. In fact, I’ll start following up my 
thoughts with actions right now. I’ll raid Macduff’s 
castle, seize the town of Fife, and kill his wife, his 
children, and anyone else unfortunate enough to 
stand in line for his inheritance. No more foolish 
talk. I will do this deed before I lose my sense of 
purpose. But no more spooky visions!—Where 
are the messengers? Come, bring me to them. 
Exeunt 
They exit. 
Act 4, Scene 2 
Enter LADY MACDUFF, her SON, and ROSS 
LADY MACDUFF, her SON, and ROSS enter. 
LADY MACDUFF 
What had he done to make him fly the land? 
LADY MACDUFF 
What did he do that made him flee this land? 
ROSS 
You must have patience, madam. 
ROSS 
You have to be patient, madam. 
LADY MACDUFF 
He had none. 
His flight was madness. When our actions do not, 
Our fears do make us traitors. 
LADY MACDUFF 
He had no patience. He was crazy to run away. 
Even if you’re not a traitor, you’re going to look 
like one if you run away. 
ROSS 
You know not 
Whether it was his wisdom or his fear. 
ROSS 
You don’t know whether it was wisdom or fear 
that made him flee. 
10 
LADY MACDUFF 
Wisdom! To leave his wife, to leave his babes, 
His mansion and his titles in a place 
From whence himself does fly? He loves us not; 
He wants the natural touch. For the poor wren, 
The most diminutive of birds, will fight, 
Her young ones in her nest, against the owl. 
All is the fear and nothing is the love, 
As little is the wisdom, where the flight 
So runs against all reason. 
LADY MACDUFF 
How could it be wisdom! To leave his wife, his 
children, his house, and his titles in a place so 
unsafe that he himself flees it! He doesn’t love us. 
He lacks the natural instinct to protect his family. 
Even the fragile wren, the smallest of birds, will 
fight against the owl when it threatens her young 
ones in the nest. His running away has everything 
to do with fear and nothing to do with love. And 
since it’s so unreasonable for him to run away, it 
has nothing to do with wisdom either. 
15 
20 
25 
ROSS 
My dearest coz, 
I pray you school yourself. But for your husband, 
He is noble, wise, judicious, and best knows 
The fits o' th' season. I dare not speak much further; 
But cruel are the times when we are traitors 
And do not know ourselves; when we hold rumor 
From what we fear, yet know not what we fear, 
But float upon a wild and violent sea 
Each way and none. I take my leave of you. 
Shall not be long but I’ll be here again. 
Things at the worst will cease, or else climb upward 
To what they were before.—My pretty cousin, 
Blessing upon you. 
ROSS 
My dearest relative, I’m begging you, pull yourself 
together. As for your husband, he is noble, wise, 
and judicious, and he understands what the times 
require. It’s not safe for me to say much more 
than this, but times are bad when people get 
denounced as traitors and don’t even know why. 
In times like these, we believe frightening rumors 
but we don’t even know what we’re afraid of. It’s 
like being tossed around on the ocean in every 
direction, and finally getting nowhere. I’ll say 
good-bye now. It won’t be long before I’m back. 
When things are at their worst they have to stop, 
or else improve to the way things were before. My 
No Fear Shakespeare – Macbeth (by SparkNotes) 
-50- 
Original Text 
Modern Text 
young cousin, I put my blessing upon you. 
Act 4, Scene 2, Page 2 
LADY MACDUFF 
Fathered he is, and yet he’s fatherless. 
LADY MACDUFF 
He has a father, and yet he is fatherless. 
30 
ROSS 
I am so much a fool, should I stay longer 
It would be my disgrace and your discomfort. 
I take my leave at once. 
ROSS 
I have to go. If I stay longer, I’ll embarrass you 
and disgrace myself by crying. I’m leaving now. 
Exit 
ROSS exits. 
LADY MACDUFF 
Sirrah, your father’s dead. 
And what will you do now? How will you live? 
LADY MACDUFF 
Young man, your father’s dead. What are you 
going to do now? How are you going to live? 
SON 
As birds do, Mother. 
SON 
I will live the way birds do, Mother. 
LADY MACDUFF 
What, with worms and flies? 
LADY MACDUFF 
What? Are you going to start eating worms and 
flies? 
SON 
With what I get, I mean, and so do they. 
SON 
I mean I will live on whatever I get, like birds do. 
35 
LADY MACDUFF 
Poor bird! Thou ’dst never fear the net nor lime, 
The pitfall nor the gin. 
LADY MACDUFF 
You’d be a pitiful bird. You wouldn’t know enough 
to be afraid of traps. 
SON 
Why should I, mother? Poor birds they are not set for. 
My father is not dead, for all your saying. 
SON 
Why should I be afraid of them, Mother? If I’m a 
pitiful bird, like you say, hunters won’t want me. 
No matter what you say, my father is not dead. 
LADY MACDUFF 
Yes, he is dead. How wilt thou do for a father? 
LADY MACDUFF 
Yes, he is dead. What are you going to do for a 
father? 
40 
SON 
Nay, how will you do for a husband? 
SON 
Maybe you should ask, what will you do for a 
husband? 
LADY MACDUFF 
Why, I can buy me twenty at any market. 
LADY MACDUFF 
Oh, I can buy twenty husbands at any market. 
Act 4, Scene 2, Page 3 
SON 
Then you’ll buy 'em to sell again. 
SON 
If so, you’d be buying them to sell again. 
LADY MACDUFF 
Thou speak’st with all thy wit; and yet, i' faith, 
With wit enough for thee. 
LADY MACDUFF 
You talk like a child, but you’re very smart 
anyway. 
45 
SON 
Was my father a traitor, Mother? 
SON 
Was my father a traitor, Mother? 
LADY MACDUFF 
Ay, that he was. 
LADY MACDUFF 
Yes, he was. 
SON 
What is a traitor? 
SON 
What is a traitor? 
LADY MACDUFF 
LADY MACDUFF 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested