Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
1
Part 1
Diagnosing malaria 
The WHO guidelines for the treatment of malaria
5
recommend confirmation of the diagnosis of malaria in all 
suspected cases before administration of treatment. Confirmation requires the use of a test that demonstrates 
evidence of the malaria parasite in the blood of the patient (e.g. actual parasite or parasite protein), hence the 
term “parasite-based” or “parasitological” diagnosis. This new recommendation emphasizes the importance of 
high-quality microscopy or, where not feasible or available, quality-assured rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). The 
recommendations in the WHO treatment guidelines are a response to several factors: the introduction of new, 
more costly antimalarial medicines, concerns regarding the rise of drug resistance, and the recognition that in 
most malaria-endemic areas (as a result of more effective antimalarial control measures), a minority of cases 
of febrile illness are actually due to malaria. 
Effective control interventions and a strong demand from countries to strengthen both microscopy and malaria 
RDTs indicate the importance of scaling up parasite-based diagnosis, supported by guidance on best practice.
This manual is complementary to two further manuals, one of which deals with the procurement of RDTs
6
and 
the other with the overall management of microscopy and RDTs in NMPs.
7
1.1 Why prioritize rDTs? 
Malaria is clinically indistinguishable from many other diseases, several of them common, severe and potentially 
fatal, but treatable if appropriate management is given early enough. Even in areas with high malaria transmission, 
other treatable acute infections can cause significant morbidity and mortality. It is therefore important to 
distinguish malaria from non-malarial febrile illness early, to allow prompt and appropriate treatment of all 
causes of fever. 
Distinguishing non-malarial fever from malaria will reduce wastage of antimalarial drugs, and potentially the 
selection pressure for the emergence of antimalarial drug resistance. Obtaining accurate figures on malaria 
incidence also enables tracking of disease trends, targeting of antimalarial resources to areas of greatest need, 
and more accurate evaluation of the impact of interventions. 
The development of RDTs has been a major step forward in attempts to parasitologically diagnose malaria. 
These tests extend malaria diagnosis to populations with no access to good microscopy services. RDTs make 
this possible as a result of their:
ease of use
• 
lower training requirements
• 
lack of requirements for electricity or expensive equipment. 
• 
5 Guidelines for the treatment of malaria, 2nd ed. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2010.
6 Good practices for selecting and procuring rapid diagnostic tests for malaria. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2011.
7 Universal access to malaria rapid diagnostic tests – An operational manual. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2011.
Combine pdf - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
pdf merge; pdf merge documents
Combine pdf - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
c# merge pdf files into one; merge pdf online
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
2
As malaria transmission continues to decline across many malaria-endemic countries, due to the impact of 
interventions (e.g. use of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets, indoor residual spraying and artemisinin-based 
combination therapy, early treatment seeking behavior), the imperative to introduce parasite-based diagnosis 
and to distinguish malaria from other illnesses becomes more urgent. 
1.2 Malaria rDTs: types and targets 
Malaria RDTs, sometimes called “dipsticks” or malaria rapid diagnostic devices (MRDDs), detect parasite antigen 
in human blood and are now widely used in many countries.
Due to the variation in malaria parasite species and the target antigen, different RDTs may be appropriate for 
use in different epidemiological settings. 
1.2.1 Currently available types of RDTs
Though the principle of the test is similar, there are variations among malaria RDT products. The most common 
RDTs used in the field consist of a nitrocellulose strip secured in a plastic ‘cassette’. Some formats consist of 
the ‘strip’ without any casing, while some are secured to a cardboard plate (‘card’). Cassettes and cards tend 
to be more expensive, but simpler to use. Other RDTs may be hybrids of these designs. The ease-of-use and 
appropriateness of these formats differ, and are discussed in more detail in the WHO procurement manual.
8
It is important to note that, when well manufactured and in good condition, RDTs can achieve a level of sensitivity 
similar to that commonly achieved by expert-level field microscopy. They are therefore sufficient for case 
management of uncomplicated malaria in the field. The sensitivity of malaria RDTs is determined by the:
concentration of parasite antigen present in peripheral blood 
• 
total parasite load in the body
• 
species of parasite
• 
correctness of technique used to perform the test 
• 
correctness of interpretation by the reader
• 
variation in antigen structure and expression (e.g. non-expression of HRP2 in certain parasite 
• 
populations).
1.2.2 Target antigens of currently available RDTs 
Some RDTs can detect only one species of malaria parasite (Plasmodium falciparum), usually by detecting either 
histidine-rich protein 2 (HRP2) or plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) as the target antigen. Some also 
detect one or more of the other species of malaria parasite that infect humans, usually by detecting pLDH or 
aldolase antigen. These may be ‘pan-specific’ (detecting all species, i.e. P. falciparum, P. vivax, P. malariae, P. ovale 
and P. knowlesi) or specific for particular parasite species (Table 1). The combination of antibodies targeting 
specific parasite antigens also differs, which determines the parasite species detected, and whether species 
can be distinguished from each other.
8
Good practices for selecting and procuring rapid diagnostic tests for malaria. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2011. 
Online Merge PDF files. Best free online merge PDF tool.
RasterEdge C#.NET PDF document merging toolkit (XDoc.PDF) is designed to help .NET developers combine PDF document files created by different users to one PDF
pdf combine two pages into one; adding pdf pages together
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
PDF Merging & Splitting Application. This C#.NET PDF document merger & splitter control toolkit is designed to help .NET developers combine PDF document files
batch combine pdf; c# merge pdf pages
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
3
Table 1: Parasite species and target antigen of some commercially available RDTs
Species of parasites detected
HrP2 
pLDH
Aldolase
P. falciparum specific 
√ 
P. vivax specific 
Pan-specific (all species) 
Specific to some other species
HRP2 – Histidine-rich protein 2;  pLDH – Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase 
1.2.3 RDTs in different epidemiological settings
The choice of an RDT by the national programme or project is governed by numerous factors including the 
malaria parasite species to be detected, the likely users of the tests, the epidemiology of malaria in the area of 
intended use, and the anticipated conditions of transport and storage. The appropriateness of P. falciparum-
specific, pan-specific and non-falciparum RDTs varies with the relative prevalence of the different human malaria 
species in the intended area of use. These areas are categorized by WHO as follows. 
Zone 1: 
• 
P. falciparum only, or with non-falciparum species occurring almost always as co-infections with 
P. falciparum – most areas of sub-Saharan Africa and lowland Papua New Guinea. 
Zone 2: 
• 
P. falciparum and non-falciparum infections occurring commonly as single-species infections – 
most endemic areas in Asia and the Americas, as well as isolated areas in Africa, particularly the Ethiopian 
highlands. 
Zone 3: areas with non-falciparum malaria only – mainly 
• 
P. vivax-only areas of East Asia and Central Asia 
and some highland areas elsewhere.
These categories, as well the choice of an appropriate RDT and its subsequent procurement and delivery, 
are discussed in detail elsewhere.
9
This manual assumes that the national programme has selected the RDTs 
and arranged delivery. It focuses on the effective use of RDTs as they are distributed to the general health 
services.  
1.3 Applications of rDTs 
The specific performance requirements of a test will vary depending on its intended use or uses. While RDTs 
can be used in a number of settings, their greater potential for impact on public health is in case management 
at community or peripheral level, where good quality microscopy is difficult to maintain. Accurate malaria 
diagnosis is essential for several purposes: 
to confirm or rule out malaria infection in symptomatic patients
• 
to guide accurate prescription of treatment
• 
to monitor the incidence or prevalence of malaria, for targeting prevention activities and evaluating 
• 
health programmes.
Malaria RDTs can be used to enable rapid care of patients presenting with fever, either by providing a definitive 
diagnosis of malaria (and enabling the timely administration of life saving antimalarial therapy) if the results are 
positive, or by supporting prompt assessment of alternative diagnosis and appropriate management of fever 
if the RDT results are negative. In delivering appropriate case management of fever, health workers should 
be aware that most non-malaria febrile illnesses can be managed effectively and appropriately by following 
national guidelines.
9 Good practices for selecting and procuring rapid diagnostic tests for malaria. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2011.
VB.NET PDF: Use VB.NET Code to Merge and Split PDF Documents
Combine End Sub Private Sub Combine(source As List(Of [String]), destn As [String]) Implements PDFDocument.Combine End Sub. APIs for Splitting PDF document in
acrobat combine pdf files; reader create pdf multiple files
C# PowerPoint - Merge PowerPoint Documents in C#.NET
Combine and Merge Multiple PowerPoint Files into One Using C#. This part illustrates how to combine three PowerPoint files into a new file in C# application.
add pdf files together reader; acrobat merge pdf files
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
4
1.4 Experiences with large-scale implementation
Malaria RDTs have been used successfully on a large scale in the public health sector in parts of South America, 
South Africa and South-East Asia. In these areas and some countries in sub-Saharan Africa, RDTs have been 
integrated into routine fever case management practice (e.g. Senegal, Zambia, Thailand, Cambodia and South 
Africa). In some countries (e.g. Guyana and Cambodia), the public health sector has cooperated with the private 
sector to promote the use of RDTs in private health care facilities, through large-scale social marketing. Success 
in these programmes will require careful policy formulation and planning that covers procurement, training 
of end users, community sensitization, and monitoring of diagnostic quality results. 
However, many countries using RDTs on a large scale have only limited mechanisms in place to monitor RDT 
accuracy or determine problems causing loss of sensitivity. To this end, in 2002, WHO Western Pacific Regional 
Office (WPRO) and UNICEF-UNDP-World Bank/WHO Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical 
Diseases (TDR) launched an evaluation programme to assess the comparative performance of commercially 
available malaria RDTs. Data from this programme are used to guide national procurement decisions and to 
identify necessary quality improvements to be made at manufacturing level. Since 2009, WHO, FIND and US 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)  have published updated reports of comparative laboratory 
evaluations of RDTs for national programmes and research projects to utilize in selecting and procuring RDTs.
10
Up-to-date information for NMPs on malaria RDTs can be found on the WHO, TDR and FIND websites.
11
1.5 The implications of introducing rDTs: the big picture
Diagnostic testing usually represents the starting point in a clinical intervention, and the use of diagnostic 
tests presumes that appropriate patient management based on testing will follow. NMPs should take into 
consideration that quantification of antimalarial drugs based on incidence of suspected malaria cases is not 
accurate. In many settings where RDTs have been introduced, the true rate of parasitaemia has been found to 
be considerably lower than expected. Therefore, to avoid wastage, quantification of antimalarials should be 
based on the expected proportion of laboratory-confirmed cases and expected compliance to negative test 
results. To avoid wastage of antimalarial drugs, it is important that ACT procurement and supply management 
be synchronized with the introduction of parasitological diagnosis. Within two years of RDT implementation, if 
an adequate HMIS system is in place, there should be more accurate data available through the national HMIS 
to drive evidence-based quantification of ACTs and RDTs.
12
To have an impact on malaria diagnosis and treatment, RDTs must be seen – by both health workers and 
patients – to provide a reliable diagnosis. To achieve and maintain confidence in RDT-based parasite detection, a 
good quality control (QC) system must be in place (Figure 2) as part of a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) 
programme. Health workers will also need guidance on (as well as clinical diagnostic equipment) the investigation 
of patients for other causes of fever. Health workers must have access to and guidance on the use of appropriate 
alternative treatments to antimalarial medicines for managing fever cases that test negative with an RDT. 
Funding from different development agencies and Ministry of Health (MoH) budgets is providing the resources 
to make accurate malaria diagnosis a reality. The key to success will be planning an effective, systematic, 
evidence-based implementation. Funding for the RDT implementation programme must, in addition to 
procurement costs, include significant components for: planning and coordination (including convening 
10 Malaria Rapid Diagnostic Test Performance: Results of WHO product testing of malaria RDTs: Round 3 (2011). Geneva, World Health 
Organization, 2011.
11 http://www.wpro.who.int/sites/rdt; http://www.who.int/malaria/en/; http://apps.who.int/tdr/; http://www.finddiagnostics.org/
index.jsp . Last accessed September 2011 (all sites).
12 Strengthening Pharmaceutical Systems. Manual for Quantification of Malaria Commodities: Rapid Diagnostic Tests and Artemisinin-Based 
Combination Therapy for First-Line Treatment of Plasmodium Falciparum Malaria. Submitted to the US Agency for International 
Development by the Strengthening Pharmaceutical Systems Program. Arlington, VA: Management Sciences for Health, 2011.
C# Word - Merge Word Documents in C#.NET
Combine and Merge Multiple Word Files into One Using C#. This part illustrates how to combine three Word files into a new file in C# application.
pdf combine pages; append pdf
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Split PDF document by PDF bookmark and outlines. Also able to combine generated split PDF document files with other PDF files to form a new PDF file.
how to combine pdf files; combine pdfs online
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
5
the national coordinating committee); advocacy, communication and social mobilization; training; quality 
control; supervision; logistics; monitoring and evaluation; and procurement of RDT-related supplies (i.e. 
gloves, timers, biohazard boxes). Without this, much of the funds expended on RDTs may be wasted, and 
a loss of confidence in RDT-based diagnosis may hinder the process of strengthening appropriate malaria 
case management.
The introduction of RDT-led, parasite-based diagnosis at smaller clinics and community level for fever case 
management is an opportunity to expand the use of confirmatory diagnosis of malaria. Deployment and 
scale-up must take into consideration the fact that communities and health workers have been taught that 
“fever equals malaria”, sometimes “even when proven otherwise”. To demonstrate that not all fever is caused 
by malaria parasites, it is important to ensure that diagnosis is accurate, to demonstrate to users and the 
community that RDTs produce reliable results, and that alternative diagnoses are considered and treatments 
for those conditions are available.
Prior to the introduction of RDTs to the field, the community should be fully sensitized to the reasons for 
parasite-based diagnosis, the expected RDT accuracy of RDTs, RDT interpretation, and the use of results. Similar 
education needs to be undertaken among health workers, laboratory staff and clinicians. Training to address 
diagnosis of other causes of fever, including the development of appropriate management algorithms for 
parasite-negative cases, is necessary during the deployment of malaria parasite-based diagnosis. 
Figure 2: Quality control and quality of outcomes achieved through RDT-based diagnosis
Accurate 
malaria 
diagnosis
Job aids and 
training
Training 
and 
supervision
Quality 
control
Good 
procurement
Good 
manufacture
Lot- 
testing
Product  
testing
Product 
development
rational use of anti-
malarial drugs  
(e.g. ACT)
Early recognition 
and management of 
other diseases
Know true malaria 
rates and results of 
interventions
Reduce mortality
• 
Early referral
• 
Save resources
• 
Reduce pressure  
• 
to drug resistance
Assess impact
• 
Enable planning 
• 
Guide elimination
• 
rDT Implementation: effort and outcomes
VB.NET TIFF: Merge and Split TIFF Documents with RasterEdge .NET
filePath As [String], docList As [String]()) TIFFDocument.Combine(filePath, docList) End to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
pdf merge comments; c# pdf merge
VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
Just like we need to combine PPT files, sometimes, we also want to separate a Note: If you want to see more PDF processing functions in VB.NET, please follow
acrobat combine pdf; c# merge pdf
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
6
Part 2
Planning RDT implementation  
at central level 
This chapter outlines the essential steps a national planner or decision maker should put in place for RDT 
introduction (Figure 3). Following the endorsement of a national (laboratory and/or malaria case management) 
policy, implementation requires careful, evidence-based planning. Overall planning at central level should be 
integrated with malaria microscopy, which is discussed in the WHO guide, Universal access to malaria diagnostic 
testing: an operational manual.
13
The exact structure of programmes will differ, depending on the structure of 
the national health services. 
Figure 3: Core components of an RDT implementation programme and the interaction between them 
The experience of countries that have successfully implemented large-scale RDT programmes has shown 
that the following minimum actions are needed. 
Create strategies to build and maintain confidence in the RDT-based diagnosis policy, with a strong 
1. 
stakeholder and community engagement strategy, and a good RDT quality assurance plan. 
Build capacity to manage other causes of fever in close collaboration with other health departments (e.g. 
2. 
maternal and child health).
Work with the national/central medical supplies stores to ensure effective distribution of RDTs.
3. 
Have a clear strategy on the respective roles of microscopy and RDTs at all levels of the health system.
4. 
13 Universal access to malaria rapid diagnostic tests – An operational manual. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2011.
Central coordinating group
Central planning and strategy 
• 
development
Standard setting
• 
Procurement
• 
Advocacy / public information
• 
NMP
• 
Laboratory services
• 
Child and maternal health
• 
Monitoring and evaluation (HMIS)
• 
Logistics/stores/procurement
• 
Stakeholder engagement
• 
Development partner engagement
• 
regional, provincial, district etc.
Management of implementatiion:
training
supervision
monitoring and response
quality assurance
logistics and stock management
advocacy / public information
Policy and strategy
Training support and 
standard setting
Documentation
Monitoring data
Stock needs
Health facilities and community 
health workers
Implementatiion:
monitoring and response
quality assurance
logistics and stock management
advocacy / public information
HMIS    Health Management Information System
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
7
rDT IMPLEMENTATION TIMELINE
Example of necessary steps for implementation of Rapid Test (RDT)-based diagnosis in a national malaria programme.
Coordinating group
Appoint malaria diagnosis coordinator(s)
Policy recommendations
Written
MoH endoresment
Program Planning
Guidelines*
Written
MoH endorsement
Case management of fever of unknown origin
Case management of malaria
RDT (and microscopy) quality assurance
RDT transport and storage
Decide districts for initial / phased implementation
Fever management algorithm
Written
MoH endorsement
Community sensitization
General health care providers education 
Determine / designate transport and storage methods
regulatory Issues
Define collaborative roles (NMP and Regulatory Body)
Write/adopt regulatory guidleines
Create RDT registry for reference
Dsseminate regulatory criteria
Product selection,supply chain management
Select several products
Samples for ease-of-use assessment
Final decision on RDT
Negotiate specifications with manufacturer
Competitive bidding and Procurement
Dependent on registrationprocess
Receive first batch (of staggered delivery)
Distribution to field
Procure gloves
Procure sharps boxes
Procure other associated materials
Figure 4: A generic timeline which some experienced NMPs have used to guide their RDT implementation
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
8
rDT IMPLEMENTATION TIMELINE
Example of necessary steps for implementation of Rapid Test (RDT)-based diagnosis in a national malaria programme.
rDT Quality Control
Write sentinel site SOP
Set up/engage field based QC monitoring sites
Decide on Lot-testing site
Determne site 
Commencetesting
Post-delivery surveillance**
Training
Conduct case management training for fever
May be conducted earlier, or already in place
Develop training manual/job aids based on product 
instructions
Field-test modfied training/instructions
Training of trainers and supervisors
Health Worker Training
Advocacy, Communication, Social Mobilisation
Engaging civil society organisations
Community, including health worker, sensitisation
Engaging opinion leaders
General health care education
Monitoring and Evaluation
Develop/adopt appopriate record forms
Define methods for capturing different indicators
Integrate RDTs in the routine HMIS
Plan for a post-introduction program review
*   May already be in place
** Sentinel site mciroscopy, possibly positive control 
wells in future
Figure 4 (continued)
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
9
Develop a monitoring and evaluation plan to support phased RDT implementation and use. It should be 
5. 
noted that the deterioration of RDTs that sometimes occurs in the field is rare where good procurement 
practice and logistics management are in place.
A generic version of a preparatory timeline for an RDT programme is shown in Figure 4. Detailed examples from 
national programmes can be found in 1 together with examples of this timeline and a similar monitoring 
tool currently being used. 
Note that the pace and sequence of activities will vary for each NMP but the main components are as 
follows. 
rDT programme coordinator: A national focal point should be appointed with a clear mandate to oversee 
the implementation of the RDT programme. The coordinator should be a senior health expert with good 
management experience who can lead a task force to work closely with the national laboratory services 
and stakeholders at the central level of the NMP. The coordinator is responsible for overseeing all aspects of 
implementation, and ensuring that the benchmarks and targets set during the planning and implementation 
phases are satisfied. This will permit coordination across the different technical areas (i.e. policy, training and 
QA) and logistical areas (i.e. supply chain and storage). 
The coordinator will have to address the areas detailed below. 
Programme planning and management: The NMP prioritize the formulation or review of the national 
malaria case management policy and guidelines, to enable RDT implementation with quality-assured RDTs. 
The programme planner should take into consideration the different options and associated consequences 
of a gradual or rapid scale-up of RDT deployment. The rate and mode of implementation may vary between 
programmes depending on experience and resources, but forward planning is vital to avoid situations where 
stock-outs, lack of training or other problems that interrupt progress and damage confidence in the programme. 
Integration with other relevant policies is also crucial to facilitate a QA programme integrated across disease 
platforms.
Product selection, regulation and registration: An appropriate product selection process, addressing the 
needs of the programme and meeting the requirements of donors, must be planned. Some countries have 
national regulatory guidelines for RDTs. In this case, the coordinator should make arrangements at the planning 
stage to obtain and utilize the national registry for medical diagnostics and devices or to consult with the 
national regulatory authority about the regulatory guidelines. It is important to understand at an early stage 
the roles played by the regulatory authority and the NMP. Regulatory guidelines should address matters 
related to RDT technical specifications for RDT manufacture, importation and use; for example, quality 
assurance at the time of procurement, transport and port clearance, supplier performance and product 
variation monitoring. These details are well elaborated in the WHO manual Good practices for selecting and 
procuring rapid diagnostic tests for malaria.
14
Supply management: Good supply management is critical to the success of programmes, preventing stock-
outs and preserving quality of RDTs through safe transport and storage. This must be centrally planned and 
integrated into supply management of the wider health system, allowing for whether there is a “push” or a “pull” 
system or a mixture of both. A push strategy is a scheduled, centrally-driven system that sends a set quantity 
of a product to each health facility, based on assumptions about projected quantities to be consumed. A pull 
system is health-facility driven; orders are placed based on actual RDT consumption. A healthy supply chain is 
almost always a combination of both push and pull. 
Push systems will have the tendency to overstock or understock in some facilities. Careful attention should be 
given to consumption data, to allow a redistribution of stocks if required. If a pull system is used, an efficient 
14 Good practices for selecting and procuring rapid diagnostic tests for malaria. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2011.
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
10
method for restocking and good communications must be in place (consider electronic stock reporting) 
to ensure that re-provision occurs in time and adequate safety stocks are maintained. Detailed guidance 
specifically for RDT supply management (quantification and logistics) is provided in Good practices for selecting 
and procuring rapid diagnostic tests for malaria. The issue will also be dealt with in a forthcoming publication 
from MSH, provisionally entitled Manual for quantification of malaria commodities: Artemisinin-based combination 
treatments and rapid diagnostic tests for diagnosis and first-line treatment of Plasmodium falciparum.
15
If RDTs are to be deployed at community level, relatively small quantities of RDT kit boxes may be distributed at 
any one time, to reduce exposure to poorly-controlled conditions. Facilities that are cut off for several months 
during this time will need buffer stocks in place, in order to avoid stock-outs. The following questions must be 
answered in order to help plan the most feasible method (and periodicity) of RDT distribution at this level. 
Will the RDTs be stored at the closest health facility or distributed directly from a more centralized hub? 
• 
Does this health facility have adequate storage conditions and sufficient storage capacity to accommodate 
• 
the RDTs intended for community health workers (CHWs)? 
Do they have stocks of RDT-related supplies such as gloves, timers, biohazard protective gear, etc.?
• 
Will the CHWs collect the RDT kits? How often and by which method will the kits be transported? What 
• 
is access like during the rainy season? 
How frequently should resupply be undertaken?
• 
How will the waste management systems function? Is the waste going to be transported to the next 
• 
level for disposal or destruction?  
Is the area reserved for disposal of infectious materials sufficient? If the waste is to be disposed of locally, 
• 
have all the conditions been met?
Quality assurance plan: The combination of three activities – training, supervision and quality control – 
constitute critical components of quality assurance for RDTs at implementation level. For national programmes 
with established microscopy services, the RDT QA programme should be integrated with that of microscopy 
from the beginning, since the two methods complement each other. A well functioning microscopy QA 
programme is essential if microscopy is to be used in monitoring of RDT quality, as discussed in Section 3. 
Training and supervision should include all end users (e.g. clinicians, CHWs, laboratory personnel, and surveillance 
and logistics personnel) to foster an integrated approach to a sustainable QA programme. Many aspects of 
microscopy QC that are similar to those for RDT QA can be found elsewhere.
16
Advocacy, communication and social mobilization: Sensitization of both clinicians and health workers and 
of the wider community is essential, including regular updating of decision makers on RDT implementation 
all require careful attention at the planning stage. The first step is to identify factors that might put the success 
of the RDT programme at risk. These include existing knowledge, attitudes, practices and beliefs about 
parasitological diagnosis of malaria by the target audiences, , including health workers, and simplistic perceptions 
of the importance and complexity of this intervention by decision makers and local funders. The primary and 
secondary target population groups for communication activities should then be defined. More specifically, 
secondary target groups are those which influence or deliver information to the primary group. 
Specific questions to consider during the planning stage include:
What behaviours and attitudes must be changed through communication activities? Examples include 
• 
the prescribing of ACTs for patients who have tested negative, and the demand of communities that all 
cases of fever should be treated with antimalarials.
15 Geneva, World Health Organization, 2011.
16 Malaria microscopy quality assurance manual, Version 1. Manila, World Health Organization: Regional Office for the Western 
Pacific, 2009.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested