Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
11
What changes are needed to ensure:
• 
personal commitment to make a change at national, district and community levels?
-
knowledge and skill acquisition to create a culture for seeking confirmatory services for malaria 
-
diagnoses?
supportive environments for health workers and the community?
-
What design or adaptation of existing messages will appeal to the target groups? Secondary target 
• 
groups should be involved in this step. The most effective communication channels and media should 
be chosen to reach the primary target audience. 
What must be in place to pre-test materials on the target group for comprehension, acceptance, 
• 
attractiveness, and to strengthen the demand for parasitological confirmation of malaria?
Monitoring and evaluation: A review of the RDT implementation programme should take place as part of 
planning for scale-up, so that lessons learned in initial implementation can influence later stages of the RDT 
roll-out. Figure 4 illustrates the critical steps along the pathway to RDT implementation. Country programmes 
will be at different stages along these timelines. Different aspects of the implementation – including the 
communication strategy and barriers and facilitators of RDT utilization, as well as the quality of the implementation 
process – should be monitored continually by the national and peripheral coordinator(s) with reference to 
the implementation plan and timeline (1). Some national malaria programmes have some of the stages 
already in place.
Documentation and records: Clear guidance must be developed on RDT-specific information to be recorded 
in patient registers (i.e. laboratory or clinic) and this must be communicated throughout the health network 
as part of routine monitoring and evaluation activities. Monitoring and evaluation units should be involved 
in final directives to ensure NMP indicators are adequately addressed and integrated within the routine HMIS 
system. Receiving accurate diagnostics information is essential for strategists and planners. 
2.1  Establish a coordinating group
The NMP or implementing agency should designate a focal person(s), bring together the coordinating group, 
identify key stakeholders and secure their commitment for the introduction of RDTs. Stakeholders should 
include: ministry of health (MoH) and non-MoH partners with overlapping activities. The NMP should also:
Ensure representation of: clinical and public health laboratory services, QA department, regulatory and 
1. 
registration authority, central medical stores, medical training institutions, policy makers in maternal and 
child health, monitoring and evaluation unit, and HIV/reproductive health departments. It is useful to 
involve recognized partners with the potential to contribute financial resources. 
Draw up the terms of reference for the coordinating group, including clear roles and responsibilities (see 
2. 
sample Terms of Reference in2). 
Align the preparatory plans and decisions for RDT introduction with relevant national policies and 
3. 
guidelines. Guidance documents for review or consideration when planning to introduce RDTs include: 
case management of fever with unknown origin, integrated management of childhood illnesses (IMCI) 
and integrated management of adult illnesses (IMAI), RDT transport and storage guidelines, supervision 
plans, training, and quality control procedures including RDT performance evaluations.
Existing policies should be studied to identify gaps and areas where policies do not align, of which the relevant 
authorities should be informed. 
An example of a more detailed list of potential stakeholders is shown in Figure 5, but each country’s list must 
reflect its own situation. The work of the coordinating group will be to ensure the activities of implementing 
agencies are part of a comprehensive plan with practical action points.
Pdf merger - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
c# merge pdf files; combine pdf files
Pdf merger - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
pdf split and merge; add pdf together one file
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
12
ACTOrS
TOOLS
ACTIVITIES
Coordination: stakeholder engagement in key decision making and roles allocation
Tool development: modify/develop implementation work plans, reporting forms, 
trainers’ guides, job aids, supervision checklists, quality control procedures. Access WHO 
guidelines and manuals on RDT implementation
ACSM: empowering media, politicians, frontline managers (regional/district/provincial) 
on mass sensitization
RDT deployment: ensuring sustained supply of RDTs, ACTs and ancillary products 
Regulation: regulating and registering RDTs on the market to ensure procurement and 
use of quality products 
Quality assurance: training national trainers, supervisors, CHWs, HWs, and quality control 
experts
Monitoring: collecting evidence to inform scale-up of RDT-based diagnosis of malaria, 
monitoring inputs and process indicators of success in deploying and integrating RDT 
use in fever case management 
Evaluation: engaging external auditors (CSOs, other national programmes, teaching 
institutions) to evaluate the RDT implementation output and outcome
Operational research considerations: community-based surveys, innovative reporting 
systems, new RDT applications
Fever/malaria case management and laboratory focal points in the national malaria 
programme
Coordinating group for implementation of the malaria parasite-based diagnosis strategy
Procurement and supply chain management experts
National regulatory body – medical devices regulation and registration expert
Disease surveillance/M&E experts
Community health experts (IMCI, IMAI, VHT strategies)
Development partners and CSOs
Malaria programme and laboratory policy guidelines: national malaria control/
elimination policy, national laboratory strengthening policy, malaria case management 
guidelines, RDT procurement and supply chain guidelines, IMCI, IMAI, iCCM guidelines, 
RDT handling, transport and storage guidelines
rDT implementation work plans: coordination strategy, criteria for RDT selection and 
procurement, phased RDT deployment and distribution strategy, QA plan (training, 
supervision, QC), ACSM plan, M&E plan
Aids: WHO-endorsed guidance on RDT procurement and supply, fever case 
management, malaria diagnostics QA, RDT transport, handling and storage, national 
policy guidelines, targets set in the national strategic plan for malaria control
ACSM - Advocacy, communication and social mobilization;  ACTs - Artemisinin combination therapies;  CHWs - Community health workers; CSO - Civil society 
organizations;  HWs - Health workers;  iCCM - Integrated community case management;  IMCI - Integrated management of childhood illness;   IMAI - Integrated 
management of adolescent and adult illness;  M&E - Monitoring & evaluation;  VHT - Village health team
Figure 5: A minimum package of actors, activities and tools to enable successful RDT implementation
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
In order to help you have a quicker and better understanding of this C#.NET PDF merger & splitter control SDK, we will illustrate the PDF document merging and
break a pdf into multiple files; add pdf files together
C# Word: .NET Merger & Splitter Control to Merge & Split MS Word
to form a larger Word file or how to divide source MS Word file into several smaller documents, RasterEdge designs this C#.NET MS Word merger & splitter
pdf merger online; pdf mail merge
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
13
2.2 Product selection and registration 
The process of selecting RDTs should start early and take into consideration registration, procurement and import 
regulations. The process of selecting and procuring RDTs is discussed in the WHO recommendations manual.
17
The national medical devices registry, the WHO-FIND product testing reports and other performance data (e.g. 
at www.finddiagnostics.org or www.wpro.who.int/sites/rdt) are also important resources to consult. 
As described in the manual for procurement and distribution of RDTs, the choice of the RDT should be based 
on (in order of their importance):
appropriateness of the RDTs for the species and epidemiology of malaria in the country or region
• 
accuracy based on panel detection score assessed by the WHO product testing programme
• 
shelf-life and stability
• 
cost
• 
procurement lead-time and availability from the manufacturers
• 
quality (lot-testing results, required transport and storage conditions, good manufacturing practice) 
• 
field experience with the product and ease-of-use.
• 
Selection and procurement of RDTs is governed by the same laws and regulations that apply to other medical 
diagnostic devices in the country. Regulations may need to be developed or adapted to control the importation 
and use of malaria RDTs.
2.3 rDT quantification and budget considerations
For RDT quantification, it will be necessary to estimate RDT requirements for national or project needs, including 
supportive ancillary products (Table 2). Consider seasonal variation and time taken for roll-out of RDTs (phased 
or nationwide). Initial estimations should be made but should be refined as the programme evolves. Generally, 
RDT introduction requires an increase in procurement over normal clinic needs to fill the supply pipeline.
Major components of a malaria diagnostics programme budget should be considered when introducing RDTs 
into a national malaria programme (Figure 6). Without adequate provision for each of these components, it is 
likely that an RDT-based diagnostics programme will fail to achieve its goals.
Table 2: RDT quantification considerations
RDT quantification considerations
Specific quantification dependent on needs  
for malaria diagnosis
Quantification of other items required  
for use of rDTs
rDT kits:
RDT
• 
blood transfer device
• 
running buffer
• 
Essential ancillary commodities:
lancets
• 
alcohol swabs
• 
gloves
• 
swabs
• 
sharps disposal containers
• 
biohazard bags
• 
clocks for health facilities or timers for CHWs
• 
RDT - Rapid diagnostic test;  CHWs - Community health workers
Note: RDT kits may be ordered already packaged with some of the items in the right-hand column. Check with the manufacturer which ancillary products are included 
in each kit prior to purchase. 
17 Good practices for selecting and procuring rapid diagnostic tests for malaria. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2011.
VB.NET TIFF: .NET TIFF Merger SDK to Combine TIFF Files
A 2: Yes, this VB.NET TIFF merger SDK allows developers to achieve We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
acrobat merge pdf; pdf combine
VB.NET Word: Merge Multiple Word Files & Split Word Document
Word processing and editing controls, this VB.NET Word merger and splitter are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
attach pdf to mail merge; pdf merge files
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
14
Figure 6: A schematic of budget components for RDT implementation
2.4 rDT procurement 
Every country has its own procurement procedures used to control spending, ensure appropriate approvals 
are in place, and reduce the risk of overspending. RDT procurement costs encompass all spending activity, 
excluding the personnel payroll. It is vital for the national programme planner to understand the duration and 
implications of the whole procurement cycle on the implementation plan. 
Guidance on procurement is well documented
18
and the basic steps involved are listed here below:
Determine the specific RDT characteristics that your programme requires (including target species and 
• 
antigen, stability and shelf-life, and ease-of-use characteristics). In addition, have specific RDTs been used 
previously in the country and, if so, do training materials already exist for them?
Publicize tender bids based on these criteria, and select suppliers. 
• 
Conduct contract negotiations.
• 
Place the order and make the payment.
• 
Expedite shipping, storage and distribution (by agent and/or central stores). The use of staggered deliveries 
• 
(i.e. every four/six months rather than once a year) is recommended in order to prevent prolonged storage 
in-country and thus risking product expiry.
The cost of the whole procurement cycle, not just the unit cost of the RDT, should be taken into consideration 
when planning and budgeting. It is important to procure ancillary items (Table 2). 
18 Good practices for selecting and procuring rapid diagnostic tests for malaria. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2011.
Procurement of RDTs
NMFI management (training, drug/supplies) 
Advocacy, communication and social mobilization
End-user training and supervision
Quality control, lot testing
M&E
Procurement of gloves, sharps disposal containers, biohazard bags
Waste disposal
Storage, handling and distribution
Coordination and planning meetings
Storage, handling and distribution
Coordination and planning meetings
NMFI management (training, drug/supplies) 
Advocacy, communication and social mobilization
End-user training and supervision
Quality control, lot-testing
M&E
Procurement of gloves, sharps disposal containers, biohazard bags
Waste disposal
Procurement of RDTs
NMFI - Non malaria febrile illness
C# PowerPoint: C# Codes to Combine & Split PowerPoint Documents
of RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK is some like PowerPoint file merger in its are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
break pdf file into multiple files; add pdf together
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
C# PDF Page Processing: Merge PDF Files - C#.NET PDF document merger APIs for combining two different PDF documents into one large PDF file.
pdf mail merge plug in; build pdf from multiple files
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
15
2.5 Supply chain management
The central coordinating committee should include logistics expertise and should liaise with the central medical 
stores and procurement unit to monitor the procurement process. 
Two pocket-guides are available on the transport and storage of malaria rapid diagnostic tests. Designed 
for malaria programme managers, clinic workers, medical stores and transport personnel, the two guides 
concentrate respectively on both central and remote storage
19
, and remote transport and storage
20
(3). 
Many of the principles are applicable to other perishable medical supplies transported to, and used in, clinics 
in tropical and sub-tropical areas. The guides are available at the following websites: 
WHO-WPRO: 
− 
http://www.wpro.who.int/sites/rdt/using_rdts/rdt_transport_storage.htm 
FIND: 
− 
http://www.finddiagnostics.org/resource-centre/reports_brochures/rdt_transport_storage.
html 
Logistics operational procedures should cover RDT storage, stock management, customs and clearance issues. 
Align these with the existing commodity supply system, i.e. accounting for whether it is a “push” or “pull” system 
and distribution calendar, and draw up the procurement and supply chain management (PSM) plan. 
Quantification
Determining the number of RDTs needed in a programme is alwayss a vital and difficult issue to resolve. This 
is dealt with in greater detail in section 3.2 Quantification and forecasting of requirements for malaria testing 
of the Universal Access to Malaria Diagnostic Testing manual . To provide the data essential to quantify needs, 
the following key questions must be addressed.
19 Transporting, Storing, and Handling Malaria Rapid Diagnostic Tests at Central and Peripheral Storage Facilities. Arlington, Va.: USAID | 
DELIVER PROJECT, Task Order 3; and Geneva: World Health Organization, 2009.
20 Transporting, Storing, and Handling Malaria Rapid Diagnostic Tests in Health Clinics. Arlington, Va.: USAID | DELIVER PROJECT, Task 
Order 3; and Geneva: World Health Organization, 2009.
Transporting, Storing, and 
Handling Malaria  
Rapid Diagnostic Tests  
in Health Clinics
Developed by the USAID | DELIVER PROJECT, Foundation for Innovative New 
Diagnostics (FIND), World Health Organization-Western Pacific Regional Office 
(WHO-WPRO), Roll Back Malaria Partnership, and UNICEF, with support from 
the President’s Malaria Initiative and Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.
Transporting, Storing, and 
Handling Malaria Rapid  
Diagnostic Tests at  
Central and Peripheral  
Storage Facilities
Developed by the USAID | DELIVER PROJECT, Foundation for Innovative New 
Diagnostics (FIND), World Health Organization-Western Pacific Regional Office 
(WHO-WPRO), Roll Back Malaria Partnership, and UNICEF, with support from 
the President’s Malaria Initiative and Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.
VB.NET TIFF: Merge and Split TIFF Documents with RasterEdge .NET
Besides TIFF document merger and splitter, RasterEdge still provides other market-leading to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
acrobat split pdf into multiple files; attach pdf to mail merge in word
VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
here is what you are looking for - RasterEdge VB.NET PPT Document Merger and Splitter Note: If you want to see more PDF processing functions in VB.NET, please
combine pdf; batch pdf merger online
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
16
Key questions: 
Detailed references to guide NMPs on quantification are provided in the good practices manual
21
and the RDT 
quantification manual
22
and should also be considered. A few key questions are listed below.
Which type of health facilities, e.g. hospital, health centre, health post will implement RDTs, according to 
• 
the national implementation plan?
Do the targeted health facilities have sufficient data to guide quantification, e.g. the number of “suspected” 
• 
malaria cases that have sought diagnosis and care across all the health facilities in the district – preferably 
two years of data? Note that, for health facilities where parasite-based diagnosis has been used (microscopy 
and/or RDTs), the number of suspected malaria cases will also include those that have been tested, as well as 
those who have not been tested.
Alternatively, does the HMIS have data on the total number of febrile cases presumptively treated as malaria 
• 
in the targeted health facilities or region/district? Note that, for health facilities where no parasite-based 
diagnosis has been previously used (either microscopy or RDT), this figure may be the same as the number of 
“reported” malaria cases from previous years.
Has the MoH decided whether to deploy RDTs with microscopy in the same health facilities? If microscopy 
• 
will continue to be used in these centres, then the number of suspected malaria cases that will be 
tested with RDTs needs to be adjusted to take into account the expected number of cases diagnosed 
by microscopy.
If RDTs will be deployed in health facilities where there is no microscopy, what is the number of health 
• 
facilities where microscopy will continue to be used and therefore RDTs will only be used on a proportion 
of the total number of patients? 
If distribution of RDTs at district level is based on a pull system, then to quantify annual needs, the following 
questions should be taken into consideration.
Will RDTs be deployed to the entire district at once, or only within a sub-district or part of a district?
• 
What are the required safety stock levels, taking into account ordering lead times, delivery schedule and 
• 
the shelf life of RDTs (generally two years)? Ideally, delivery should take place at least twice a year, but more 
frequently where there is a danger of high storage temperatures at the peripheral facility. Peaks in consumption 
due to seasonal variation in incidence of fever should be taken into account when deciding how many RDTs 
need to be delivered. For instance, larger deliveries will probably be required shortly before seasons when 
fever is more common. Calculate this according to the estimated fever incidence in previous seasons.
Has the RDT quantification been adjusted to cover expected damage, spoilage, and invalid tests (usually 
• 
10%)?
Has the NMP or regulatory and registration focal point provided information on the RDT pack size, specifying 
• 
clearly whether the number of packs or the number of individual tests is being ordered, as pack sizes can 
vary between manufacturers, e.g. 20 vs. 50 vs. 100 tests in a pack?
Limitations of the available data that may require adjustments include: changes in the number of health 
facilities using RDTs, attrition rate for community health workers using RDTs, and completeness of the data. 
Implementation of a good stock control system to monitor consumption is crucial, so that order accuracy 
can improve over time and in future years be based on actual demand rather than estimations. An essential 
component of RDT quantification is to collect accurate data on suspected cases from testing sites. 
21 Good practices for selecting and procuring rapid diagnostic tests for malaria. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2011.
22 Strengthening Pharmaceutical Systems. Manual for Quantification of Malaria Commodities: Rapid Diagnostic Tests and Artemisinin-Based 
Combination Therapy for First-Line Treatment of Plasmodium Falciparum Malaria. Submitted to the US Agency for International 
Development by the Strengthening Pharmaceutical Systems Program. Arlington, VA: Management Sciences for Health, 2011.
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
17
Waste disposal has to be carefully planned, as there are a number of different types of waste which will be 
generated, such as sharps, gloves, boxes, cotton swabs, test cassettes, etc. Separate handling is necessary for 
sharps and for general contaminated waste, and national health services will have standard procedures for these 
already in place. A disposal plan should be considered for all commodities supplied by the programme, even 
if this simply consists of disposing general waste. Further details can be found in documents on transporting, 
storing and handling RDTs.
23,24
2.6 Quality assurance plan
This guide has structured QA into three main areas – training, supportive supervision and QC – all of which are 
dealt with in the following sections of this manual and are major areas of concern in ensuring in quality RDT 
implementation. The NMP must be closely involved at all levels of the malaria diagnostic QA programme. This 
needs to be centrally coordinated – see Figure 7. A good QA plan will ensure that clinical teams have confidence 
in the RDT and that the test results are of benefit to the patient and the community. Often forgotten are key 
issues that address QA in the private health sector and post-procurement quality monitoring. 
It is important for planners to aim for a system or procedures for monitoring the quality of RDTs:
during registration and/or procurement
• 
that are already in the public and private health sector
• 
Figure 7: Central coordination is required to ensure that QA activities take place at all levels
Where both microscopy and RDTs are used in a programme, as is the case in most malaria programmes, QA 
processes for both should be integrated as far as possible (see Figure 8). This is paramount where both are used 
in the same facilities. In drawing up plans for integration, the essential components of diagnostic performance 
that result in a good diagnostic outcome should be clear to all concerned and likewise the basis for the QA 
programme. Quality assurance for microscopy is dealt with extensively elsewhere
25
and requires a structured 
approach, more resource intensive than that for RDTs. 
23 Transporting, Storing, and Handling Malaria Rapid Diagnostic Tests at the Peripheral Storage Facilities. Arlington, Va.: USAID | DELIVER 
PROJECT, Task Order 3; and Geneva: World Health Organization, 2009.
24 Transporting, Storing, and Handling Malaria Rapid Diagnostic Tests in Health Clinics. Arlington, Va.: USAID | DELIVER PROJECT, Task 
Order 3; and Geneva: World Health Organization, 2009.
25 Universal access to malaria rapid diagnostic tests – An operational manual. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2011.
Quality Assurance coordinating team
(all levels)
1. National level
RDT procurement (WHO 
procurement criteria, 
national regulatory 
requirements)
2. Post-purchase QC
Lot-testing, temperature 
monitoring
3. Clinic level
Training and instruction; 
M&E, IEC/BCC, supervision
4. Health worker
Training, utilization of  
RDT result
Transport/storage conditions control
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
18
Training
Pre-training 
assessment
Supervisor 
capacity 
building
On-site supervision and 
coaching
Competency
QC checking  
RDTs/microscope/reagents
Support network  
RDT/slide/results delivery
Supportive work  
environment
Performance
Post-training 
assessment
Provide a clear check-list for supervisor:
including above factors
• 
including check of minimum RDTs and microscopy equipment list
• 
including time to provide feedback on recent cross-checking results, and listen 
• 
to issues raised by microscopist and RDT user
Malaria diagnosis QA should be part of wider laboratory supervisory visit where 
possible (integrated)
Figure 8: Common elements impacting on performance of RDT and microscopy-based diagnosis (to be taken into 
consideration in developing supervisory plans) 
Key questions to remember when implementing an RDT QA programme:
Are manuals and operational plans for QA implementation in place?
• 
Are there opportunities for collaboration with locally-based partners to support the RDT QA–QC 
• 
programme? 
Are performance monitoring processes in place for the RDT and the technicians/health workers who will 
• 
use them?
Is a supervisory plan in place to monitor the whole process and Inform the evaluation process?
• 
Is a training schedule in place?
• 
Are guidelines for RDT transportation/storage conditions available? 
• 
Have RDT  job aids, user guides, and manuals been prepared and supplied, along with RDTs? (This requires 
• 
close collaboration with the other programs in non malarial febrile illness management and district/
province MoH leaders.)
Have the central medical stores prepared to supply ancilliary logistical needs alongside RDTs (e.g. gloves, 
• 
sharps waste boxes, timers, microscopy reagents etc)
Are there accredited districts trainers in clinical and management aspects with experience in delivering 
• 
training on RDT use and case management of fevers?
Are there procedures (or is a system in place) for obtaining feedback on any problems encountered with 
• 
RDT use?
2.7 Training 
While malaria RDTs are relatively simple, mistakes can easily be made that affect the accuracy of the result, 
and therefore the quality of management of the sick patient. Selection of suitable patients for testing with an 
RDT, and action on RDT results, is also a frequently difficult issue for a health worker, requiring wider training in 
fever case management. The use of RDTs in situations where supervision is often limited further increases the 
requirement for high-quality training and confirmation of health worker competency in RDT-based malaria case 
management, before health workers are supplied with RDTs. Training should therefore be part of wider case 
management and should be competency-based, ensuring that accurate and safe performance is demonstrated 
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
19
by the trainee before training is completed. Evidence-based training materials are available, and discussed in 
this section and in Part 3 of this manual. Materials should be developed or adapted with the end users in mind, 
ensuring they are culturally and linguistically appropriate.
Key questions about training in the use of RDTs
Is your training programme consistent with your national malaria case management policy?
• 
Does the national policy guideline clarify the training manuals and guides clarify the current malaria 
• 
epidemiology in your country? This is important both in the choice of test (e.g. combination tests are not 
necessary where mono-infections with non-falciparum malaria are rare) and for RDT stock estimates, 
which vary in different malaria transmission intensity zones.
Does the training manual reflect the definition of a malaria-like fever? RDT requirements vary depending 
• 
on decisions to test fever cases or suspected malaria cases.
Do your training plans specify the cadre of health workers who will roll out training at each subsequent level?
• 
Do the training manuals describe the QA programme for RDT implementation and trainees’ participation 
• 
in that programme, including what to do if a bad lot of tests is suspected?
Do the training manuals describe how RDT results will be recorded in patient registers and what RDT-specific 
• 
information should be collected in the register?
Based on these key questions, as a basic minimum, the following needs should be addressed. 
A work plan with defined objectives, plan for dissemination, curriculum development, participant profile, 
• 
duration and teaching methodology – see example of an implementation plan adapted from the Uganda 
MoH 
4.
A well reviewed checklist for all training requirements including  training aids, a training implementation 
• 
plan, RDT job aids, fever case management clinical algorithms, training manuals, IMCI and IMAI algorithms. 
This checklist should be prepared in collaboration with central child and maternal health units which 
should be represented on the coordinating committee.
A well laid out approach to RDT dissemination,  including: nationwide or cascaded RDT implementation 
• 
by regions;  health-facility or centrally-based training; and training of all health workers (or a representative 
number) in each facility.
Plan for an evaluation of the training programme early on, and execute it immediately after training RDT 
• 
end users. An example of such a plan is given in Table 3.
Representation from the central medical stores, including personnel in logistics and storage (handling, 
• 
transport and distribution of RDTs. 
A schedule for  remedial training activities, in the event that new staff join health facilities or trained staff 
• 
are transferred. 
A pre- and post-training assessment should be planned as part of the  post RDT implementation evaluation 
• 
program, such as the one described below.
The training “To do” list
Identify partners with experience and expertise in training to support the national programme in 
• 
coordinating the training of health workers. 
Develop a manual suitable for local users. See 
• 
5, which shows the table of contents adapted from the 
2nd Edition of a training manual produced by Uganda’s MoH as an example. 
Update national treatment/fever case management training plans and operations manuals in line with 
• 
the global malaria treatment policy guidelines. These programmes and manuals can also be adopted 
from other national programmes with documented success in RDT implementation.
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
20
Develop a generic user’s guide for the trainees or adopt what other national programmes have used 
• 
successfully. Suggested content for the guide:
how to select patients for testing with RDTs
-
performing and reading an RDT 
-
management of a patient with fever and a positive RDT and a negative RDT result recognition, referral 
-
and treatment of patients with severe illness
patient education and community sensitization 
-
reporting
-
biosafety, waste management and monitoring
-
quality control and supervision
-
RDT storage and stock management 
-
RDT record keeping/documentation
-
Develop an easy-to-follow algorithm to guide assessment, diagnosis and management of patients with 
• 
fever at the point-of-care. This should be based on national policy for febrile disease management and 
should be consistent with the existing IMAI and IMCI guidelines 6.
Involve experienced health workers to help with planning, training, and ensure local experience and 
• 
continuity in the training programme. 
Plan to equip the implementing level with skills to develop a schedule for rolling out the training package, 
• 
with details of when and where training will take place and who will train. Trainer/trainee ratio aspects 
should be addressed to ensure quality delivery of the training package. 
Where possible, plan to begin the training in a few health facilities or districts, to gain skill and quality 
• 
output before scaling up.
District trained
Group that trained 
using NMP modules
Date of training 
(month/year)
Total HWs trained
Proportion of  
laboratory staff 
trained
Proportion of 
clinicians trained
Public HWs trained? 
Y/N (If Y, proportion)
Private HWs trained? 
Y/N (If Y, proportion)
District 1
District 2
District 3
SMP
48
24
Y
Y
District 4
SMP
17
14
Y
Y
District 5
SMP
District 6
SMP
44
21
Y
Y
District 7
District 8
UMSP
April, 2011
District 9
MC
SMP
12/2009;1/2010; 
2/2011
95
44
Table 3: An example of a post RDT training evaluation form (prepared by PMI and NMP partners in Uganda) 
NMP - National Malaria Programme;  SMP - Stop Malaria Project, funded by the President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI);  UMSP - Uganda Malaria Surveillance Project; MC - Malaria  
Post-visit and follow-up
Record findings from supervisory visit
• 
Act on clinic staff needs where 
• 
possible
Act on deficiencies and plan for training 
• 
requirements
Provide formal feedback to clinic staff
• 
Plan and make recommendations for 
• 
next visit
Visit
Assess:
Personnel and management issues, 
• 
communication
Workplace (safety, physical 
• 
environment, drug and diagnostic 
supplies, other stocks)
RDT preparation, job aids and SOPs
• 
RDT interpretation and patient 
• 
management
Documentation and reporting
• 
Provide immediate feedback to clinic 
staff 
Pre-visit
District level consultations with 
• 
relevant personnel and previous 
supervisors
Review previous supervisory results
• 
Review checklists, RDT performance 
• 
quizzes and data collection forms
Figure 9: The minimum package of a supervisory plan in the RDT quality assurance programme
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested