adobe pdf viewer c# : C# merge pdf pages Library software component asp.net winforms .net mvc malaria_rdt_implementation_guide20133-part827

Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
21
Where possible, encourage the implementers to conduct the training in or near health facilities to permit 
• 
on-the-job skill building.
2.8 Supervision
Supervision needs to be “supportive”, meaning the supervisor plays a listening role to understand difficulties 
encountered by the supervisee. The supervisee needs to trust that such information will be acted upon, so 
structured debriefing of supervisors must occur after visits to ensure that findings are discussed at a more 
central level. Supervisors must also give feedback on issues raised during previous visits. This requires a 
structured supervisory checklist (7). In-country partner groups with interest and expertise in surveillance 
and supervision may also take on this role.
Remember that it is important to integrate technical and managerial supervision (Figure 11 and 7). 
Supervisory plan:
Prepare a supervisory checklist (
• 
7).
Provide guidance for the district level on the composition of the supervisory team and the different 
• 
degrees of skills required.
Develop a competency assessment system for supervisors to ensure they are technically proficient and  
• 
able to communicate information accurately to health workers.
Identify the need to train supervisors at district level on how to prepare and implement a supervision 
• 
plan that is based on local circumstances and settings. Remember, there are many factors that influence 
supervision implementation including geographical terrain, nature of transport used, number of facilities 
implementing the intervention, number of supervisors available in a given district etc. 
Provide supervisors with standardized responses and procedures for dealing with issues of supply chain, 
• 
storage and QA. 
Provide supervisors with a plan to ensure that output/reports from supervisory visits are communicated to 
• 
the relevant district level persons and that debriefing at health facility occurs. Include district supervisory 
activities when formulating budgets for RDT implementation support. 
rDT/ microscopy/ 
both?
Has there been any 
follow up supervision? 
Y/N (if Y,  frequency)
Any QC being done? 
Y/N (if Y, describe in 
Comments)
Comments
Both
Y; Apr, Sept, 2010
Y
External quality assurance (EQA) in 4 labs in the district
Both
Y; Sept, 2010
Y
Y
Both
Y; Sept, Nov, 2010
Y
External quality assurance in 4 labs in the district
Planned
Y
Both
Y; Sept, Nov, 2010
Consortium; HWs - Health workers; Y/N - Yes/No; RDT - Rapid diagnostic test; QC - Quality control
C# merge pdf pages - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
reader combine pdf; apple merge pdf
C# merge pdf pages - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
scan multiple pages into one pdf; all jpg to one pdf converter
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
22
2.9 Quality control 
Quality control involves evaluation or monitoring of the performance characteristics of the diagnostic test, to 
ensure it is performing to the specifications required for accurate diagnosis. QC should be a routine part of the 
manufacturing process, and good procurement practice will ensure that RDTs are procured from manufacturers 
who follow international standards of good manufacturing practice. At the time of purchase, RDTs should be 
checked by lot-testing, i.e. evaluating the performance of production lots (batches) before they are deployed 
to the field. This helps ensure that the RDTs delivered to the field are of adequate quality. Lot-testing is usually 
carried out in a reference laboratory, following standardized procedures. This quality control process is vital 
to planning and implementation of a safe and effective RDT-based diagnostic programme, and is therefore 
an essential task for the coordinating group to plan and implement. Requirements are detailed in the WHO 
procurement manual
26
and procedures should be based on the practices outlined there.
In certain storage and field conditions, RDTs may be damaged by environmental conditions outside the 
specifications recommended by the manufacturer. Note that poorly manufactured tests may deteriorate under 
good storage conditions, emphasizing the importance of a good procurement practice and of monitoring 
RDT quality in the field. Monitoring the performance of a sample of the tests deployed to the field, after 
typical conditions of transport and storage, can provide information on the likely performance of the batch 
and therefore the accuracy of diagnosis that may be obtained. New methods to monitor accuracy in the field 
are under development – Part 4. While quality control at time of purchase is always strongly recommended, 
in some situations QC near point-of-care may need to be limited to close monitoring of results, such as a 
highly unexpected frequency of negative or positive results in a particular context or site, and investigation of 
unexpected variations or reported concerns of clinicians. Some of the necessary actions are illustrated in Figure 12. 
A detailed discussion of different QC methods is discussed in detail later in this manual (section 3.3). 
26 Good practices for selecting and procuring rapid diagnostic tests for malaria. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2011.
Policies and standards
• 
Coordinating node
• 
Training of trainers (ToT)
• 
Tools for training, supervision and monitoring
• 
Central QC of stock
• 
Advocacy materials
• 
Coordinating node
• 
Training / re-training
• 
Supervision / corrective action
• 
Monitoring and feedback
• 
Stock supply and support
• 
Advocacy materials
• 
Reporting diagnostic outcomes within HMIS data
• 
RDT stock consumption / requirements and 
• 
ancillary needs
Supervisory outcomes and community 
• 
information
Reporting RDT related outcomes 
• 
and stock needs
Central  
(national)
regional  
(provincial/ 
district, etc.)
Quality 
control
if methods 
available
Laboratory/
clinic/health 
worker
Figure 10: The quality assurance loops: basic aspects for implementing malaria RDT quality assurance at different 
levels of the health system
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
pdf split and merge; break pdf into multiple files
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Provide C# Users with Mature .NET PDF Document Manipulating Library for Deleting PDF Pages in C#. Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET.
batch pdf merger; split pdf into multiple files
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
23
2.9.1 Monitoring quality in the field
The national coordinating team should plan for a comprehensive QA programme, with an embedded plan for 
monitoring RDT quality in the field, after deployment. A method of checking RDT results should be decided 
upon and then integrated into the health worker training and quality assurance schemes, to ensure that RDTs 
retain adequate performance to detect clinically-relevant malaria infections. This action plan will add a further 
margin of confidence to RDT deployment, and help to reassure users and clinicians that the test results are 
reliable. Current options to achieve this are limited. These methods confirm RDT capacity to detect parasite 
antigen – not the quality of use by field staff – and therefore do not replace the need for routine field supervision. 
Field monitoring methods need to be part of central level planning, so that adequate capacity to carry them 
out is put in place, and methods are standardized and adequately supported across a programme. 
While none of the currently-available methods for field quality control are ideal, they can help detect unexpected major 
deterioration in RDT quality. They complement but do not replace central quality control, i.e. good manufacturing 
and lot-testing. In the future, the use of standardized wells containing recombinant antigens is likely to make field 
QC for malaria RDTs easier (Part 4). If transport and storage of rDTs is carefully managed, quality control at 
the user level is of less importance.
Below, various field QC monitoring methods (discussed in more detail in sections 3.3.1 and 3.3.2) can be considered 
if sufficient expertise is available. Choose a method that the programme has the capacity to implement. 
a)  Cross-checking by microscopy at sentinel sites: Monitoring of RDT results at sentinel sites, where patients are tested 
on both RDT and by microscopy, is one way to ensure that results are to a certain degree concordant between these 
diagnostic modalities. In many countries, sites have already been set up for in-vivo drug efficacy monitoring and it 
may be appropriate to use these same sites for RDT monitoring. Sentinel site monitoring is useful only if the RDTs have 
been transported and stored under typical field conditions.
RDT results by comparison with microscopy can be useful in providing on-going information on test  performance as 
far as confirmatory diagnosis of malaria before treatment is concerned. It is essential to only choose sites with high-
quality microscopy service for this comparison, limiting this to very few sites where microscopy quality can be assured. 
“Quality-assured microscopy” implies that there is a structured programme in place with monitoring of technician 
performance and retraining. Poor-quality microscopy should not be used for this, as it will reduce confidence in RDT 
performance, producing a large number of apparent false positive and false negative RDT results and give the impression 
that RDTs are not performing correctly. Periodic monitoring of RDTs should be cross-checked in a laboratory setting 
where malaria expert microscopy is available. 
Periodic parallel testing using microscopy and RDTs has to be done on a sufficiently high number of malaria-positive 
patients to ensure accurate conclusions about RDT sensitivity and specificity. (Implementation issues at the clinic site 
are dealt with in more detail in section 3.3.2.) Guidelines for management of discrepant results must be written and 
disseminated as standard operating procedures (SOPs) to the sites monitoring RDT quality. These guidelines need to 
take into account the parasite density of the infections; RDTs may miss some infections below 100 parasites/µl and 
still be adequate for detecting clinically relevant malaria infections. Above 200 parasites/µl, false-negative RDT results 
are likely to have a significant impact on patient care.
27
In the sentinel sites, the microscopy result should be cross-checked to ensure reliable detection of malaria parasites. 
If RDTs are failing to detect a significant number of cases with parasite densities confirmed above 200 parasites/µl, e.g. 
over 10 out of 50, or several cases at parasite densities above 2000 parasites/µl, then the diagnostic coordinator should 
be informed and lot testing of RDTs at a centre with lot testing capabilities should be seriously considered.
In general, development of such RDT sentinel sites, if undertaken, should take the following into account.
Rapid feedback of results is essential.
• 
27 Parasitological confirmation of malaria diagnosis: Report of a WHO technical consultation. Geneva, 6–8 October 2009. Geneva, World 
Health Organization, 2010.
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C#: Convert PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress PDF; C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF
pdf mail merge plug in; apple merge pdf
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others in C#.NET Program. C#.NET Project DLLs: Copy and Paste PDF Pages.
add pdf files together; acrobat combine pdf
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
24
There must be a plan and capacity to deal with poor performance:
• 
site inspection and investigation
-
re-training if needed
-
Microscopy must be of a very high standard.
• 
Transport and storage conditions to and at the testing site, including time of storage, should be typical for RDTs 
• 
in field use.
Sufficient parasite-positive (and parasite-negative) patients must be tested to provide a valid indication of 
• 
performance (commonly 200-300 are required, more where positive rate is very low, below 10%).
A process needs to be available to investigate a high proportion (e.g. >10% of 200 samples) of discordant results 
• 
and determine the cause.
b) Comparison of stored microscopy slides and rDTs in some peripheral clinics: RDTs and slides can be made in 
parallel on a number of patients, and the slides read later by an expert microscopist. While possible in some settings, 
restrictions include the quality of stain and slide preparation at the site, and the additional logistical needs to keep 
microscopy supplies on site. It is important to remember that slides may also deteriorate before reading.
c) Comparison with PCr: Some national programmes and projects use PCR of dried blood spots for later comparison 
with RDT results. While simple to set up at the peripheral clinic, this is restricted by the availability and cost of PCR. 
The results also need careful analysis and interpretation, as PCR will be expected to detect sub-clinical parasitaemia 
not detected by RDTs, and not causing acute illness, giving a false impression that the RDTs may have insufficient 
sensitivity for case management.
d) Use of dried parasitized blood in tubes: Some national programmes and projects use wells prepared at a central 
reference laboratory containing dried parasitized blood of known parasite density, taken to the field by supervisors 
to test RDTs stored in clinics. While this method will detect very poorly-performing RDTs, the expected variability of 
antigen expressed by parasites requires careful standardization of the sample on the RDT to be quality controlled.
e) Withdrawal from the field for laboratory testing: A few programmes withdraw RDTs from the field, e.g. on supervisory 
visits, and transport them under a controlled environment to prevent further deterioration during transport (a cool box) 
for laboratory analysis. Field withdrawal of RDTs has the advantage of testing the RDTs against a standard designed to 
distinguish adequate from inadequate test performance. However, this is logistically difficult for many programmes, 
and requires ready access to a laboratory with appropriate standards for testing.
While direct monitoring of RDT quality in some field locations is desirable, it should not be considered an essential 
prerequisite for RDT use if good procurement criteria and quality control at time of purchase are in place and 
if proper transport and storage recommendations have been followed.
28
Where a method is implemented, it 
can add confidence to users of RDTs and flag early deterioration in performance. In all cases, cross-checking of 
results in a lot-testing laboratory is important, after transport under controlled conditions. A standard operating 
procedure (SOP) must be in place to guide action on poor results. Evidence of poor RDT performance should 
be rapidly addressed with lot testing, with close monitoring of field diagnostic results, and with withdrawal or 
replacement of a lot, if inadequate performance is confirmed. 
2.10 Advocacy, communication and social mobilization (ACSM)
Ensuring efficient RDT delivery under controlled transport and storage conditions, and accuracy in performance, 
result reading and interpretation are essential. However, it is not all that needs to be done. Assuring that drug 
prescription is based on the results – and that the patient accepts and follows the prescribed treatment – is 
equally important. The national planner needs to invest in behaviour change (Figure 11). The level of confidence 
of the patients and clinicians in the test results provided may be a significant facilitator or barrier to the parasite-
based diagnosis policy and therefore drug management. To have an impact, RDTs must be shown to provide 
28 Good practices for selecting and procuring rapid diagnostic tests for malaria. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2011.
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF.
add two pdf files together; pdf combine
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
you want to read the tutorial of PDF page adding in C# class, we suggest you go to C# Imaging - how Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
add pdf together one file; break a pdf into multiple files
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
25
accurate diagnosis and this can be achieved through satisfactory health worker education and widespread 
community sensitization on the cycle of health care for a patient presenting with malaria-like fever.
Figure 11: A typical non-severe fever case management algorithm
Adapted from the algorithm of the Senegal NMP. Also, see Universal Access to Malaria Diagnostic Testing: An Operational Manual, WHO, Geneva 2011, pp 27-28
Major points for communicating to the community about diagnostics for fever case management are shown 
in Figure 11. An ACSM plan should address the community’s or patients’ experience in line with a treatment 
algorithm that 
encourages consultation (including diagnostic testing, if necessary) with the health worker / clinic if 
• 
fever is present
advises on the importance of returning to the health worker / clinic for review if fever is not resolved, or 
• 
if new symptoms develop
reminds you that if you are referred for further investigation and management, you should attend to this 
• 
immediately as advised by the health worker / clinic
advises you to follow the full management course recommended by the health worker /clinician
• 
At each step, it is important to explain the reasons for the importance of the action. These explanations should 
be factual, and appropriate for the educational and cultural background of the target audience.
NO
1. Fever
(No sign of severe disease) 
“High body temperature” or axillary temperature in last 2 days 
equal to or greater than 37.5°C
Suspected malaria (no other obvious cause)
2. Treat cause
3. Fever persists after 
48 hours
Perform malaria RDT
Negative RDT
results
Positive RDT
results
2. Give appropriate treatment
(e.g. Antibiotic and/or anti-pyretic)
2. Treat for malaria
(Anti-malarial)
3. Follow-up visit 
if fever persists after 48 hours
4. refer patient 
to reference centre
5. Continue
management
YES
YES
NO
Condition not
improving
Condition
improving
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
page, it is also featured with the functions to merge PDF files using C# .NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
pdf combine two pages into one; combine pdf online
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Output.jpg"); Following demo code will show how to convert all PDF pages to Jpeg images with C# .NET. // Load a PDF file. String
scan multiple pages into one pdf; acrobat reader merge pdf files
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
26
Key actions for advocacy, communication and social mobilization
It is vital to plan for all of the following:
A strategy for ACSM addressing clinicians and health workers, and also local communities and key opinion 
• 
leaders, including messaging strategy and materials, in order to enhance confidence in the RDTs.
Develop community messages to encourage the preferential use of private providers who diagnose 
• 
before treating, ensuring that diagnosis therefore benefits both the patient and the provider. 
Developing, producing and disseminating key messages.
• 
M&E: Inclusion of process, outcome and output indicators to measure ACSM in line with national M&E 
• 
planning, the RDT policy and guidelines available to pre-service training institutions, e.g. medical schools, 
nursing schools, laboratory training schools. This will ensure tutors and students are aware and informed 
of these new technological developments, their applications and behavioural change strategies. 
In order to prepare for the key ACSM actions listed above, the following must be planned and undertaken:
Preparing communication and/or media materials.
• 
Identifying reviewers to revise communication materials and media possibilities.
• 
Pre-testing final draft communication materials and media ideas. This can be done alongside RDT 
• 
deployment.
2.11 Monitoring and evaluation plan (M&E) 
RDT programme monitoring should be viewed as an integral part of the national fever case management 
programme – as a tool for both learning and accountability. Programmes should therefore set parameters for 
trends requiring further investigation, based on current and historical local data. Opinions of various programme 
stakeholders need to be incorporated in this process through a national self-assessment workshop or electronic 
based questionnaire that aims at answering questions such as those in Table 4.
Table 4: M&E stakeholder discussion points on malaria case management
Sample programmatic questions 
M&E indicators
What is needed to give the desired outcome? 
Who will be involved?
• 
What skill set is required?
• 
What tools and resources are required?
• 
Input indicators
What route/procedure will be undertaken to achieve the outcome? 
Is the national malaria treatment policy and guideline updated?
• 
Is there a qualified team to coordinate implementation of RDTs with quality assurance?
• 
Is training scheduled and are the trainers equipped?
• 
Is the RDT procurement, storage, and distribution well coordinated?
• 
Process indicators: direct measures 
of quality of care
How many guides/items/procedures will be produced?
How many workshops/meetings will be held, where?
• 
How many RDTs and associated products will be procured and supplied? 
• 
How many districts will be trained for RDT deployment, and when?
• 
Output indicators
What is the extent to which the interventions will be implemented?
What is the expected achievement?
• 
What geographical area will be covered?
• 
What is the expected level of utilization and access of the intervention?
• 
How many fever cases have been confirmed to be malaria with the intervention? 
• 
Outcome indicators: evidence 
collected to measure progress
M&E - Monitoring and evaluation
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
27
Monitoring: WHO is currently revising the indicators for malaria case management evaluation, of which some 
directly addressed monitoring of a programme for parasitological confirmation of malaria diagnosis
29
(8). The 
RDT implementation coordinators should utilize guidance provided to plan for immediate follow-up after RDT 
deployment. Seasonal variation is common in malaria-endemic settings, and may affect both the rate of patients 
tested for malaria, and the test-positive (confirmed) malaria rate. Interventions such as bednet distribution may 
also have an effect on true malaria incidence. Such variations need to be taken into account (triangulating 
data) when assessing the significance of changes in malaria RDT results. Programmes should therefore use 
current and historical local data to set parameters for trends requiring further investigation. Detailed guidance 
is provided annually by WHO on collecting and applying various indicators in malaria programming.
30
Electronic reporting: The introduction of electronic reporting is worth considering, because it enables near 
real-time monitoring of essential stocks and data on certain notifiable or outbreak diseases, e.g. dengue shock 
syndrome at national level (see Part 4 of this manual). Report forms may require modification to facilitate 
prioritization of data that are useful to obtain on a regular basis, and which may assist with a timely response 
to point-of-care needs, e.g. weekly HMIS data reported by internet or mobile phone 9.
Evaluation: This is important for sustained follow-up and review of past activities. Internal and external 
evaluations should be planned for, after a given period of time following RDT deployment. In collaboration 
with stakeholders, the national programme should develop evaluation indicators that describe the expected 
changes in behaviour and practice after a given period of RDT use. 
It is important to review the rationale for the RDT programme periodically to ensure that it remains relevant. 
Based on practical experience, the programme should look at whether new partners with expertise in and 
resources for M&E have come on board; whether others have been dropped; and whether the vision, mission, 
outcome challenges, progress markers and monitoring system are still appropriate and relevant. 
Practical sources of monitoring information, include, but are not limited to the following:
Routine data sourcing: HMIS summary reporting forms with fields for collecting parasitological confirmation 
• 
of malaria diagnosis data:
updated or available stock cards and health facility record forms, with a field for RDT-related data 
-
recording
updated or available data record forms for malaria cases tested and treated at community level
-
checklists for malaria case management supervision reflecting RDT specific issues for investigating 
-
the quality of parasitological confirmation of malaria diagnosis at the facility.
Special surveys: generic guidance on how to interview patients or care givers on the quality of case 
• 
management at the health facility, including parasitological confirmation of malaria diagnosis, through 
disease surveillance systems, demographic health surveys, health facility reports and community 
surveys.
From experience, the minimum periodicity of data collection in special surveys is:
continuous
• 
– disease surveillance system and routine HMIS
five years
• 
– demographic health surveys
two to three years
• 
– health facility survey
two to three years
• 
– community survey
two to three years - Malaria Indicator Surveys
• 
29 Malaria case management: operations manual. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2009
30 World Malaria Report 2011; p 10. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2011. 
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
28
Part 3
RDT implementation at district  
and community level
Part 3 of this manual outlines the practical steps of RDT implementation below central level. It is designed to 
provide specific guidance and basic minimum standards for assuring quality implementation of malaria RDTs. 
While planning for overall implementation of the national case management strategy is determined at central 
level (addressed in Part 2) with major input from the implementing managers, health service personnel beyond 
central level are charged with the task of providing information for the development, as well as translation, of 
these plans and processes into the activities impacting patient care. This part of the guide, therefore, provides 
the relevant information and tools required for practical implementation of RDTs. Good coordination at this 
level will ensure a well-managed implementation process and avoid inconsistent and erratic coverage that 
will reduce the effectiveness of case management and damage the credibility of the programme.  
Moving from symptom- to parasite-based diagnosis involves a major and difficult shift in thinking for health 
service personnel and the community. Success will depend very much on consistent delivery of programme 
inputs and effective implementation, the messages that are passed down, and the engagement that health 
personnel has in the plan and in its monitoring and outcomes.  
Once the national malaria programme has formulated, endorsed and disseminated the policy guidelines for 
including RDT-based parasitological confirmation of malaria diagnosis, these must be translated into practical 
implementation tools and activities at the various levels of the health system – from laboratory and clinic all 
the way to the village health worker. While the plan must be adapted to suit conditions and needs at each 
level and in each geographical area, a high degree of uniformity is also important to ensure standards are 
maintained and outcomes can be monitored. The outline provided here, and the example of implementation 
timelines and plans in 1, 4 are intended to assist personnel tasked with translating the national plan into 
action in each area of RDT implementation. The guidance in this section is dependent on a solid national plan 
being in place, as outlined in Part 2.
3.1 Coordination
Once plans to deploy malaria RDTs in specified regions have been approved by the national authorities (in a 
centralized health system), the authorities at provincial and district levels will need to adapt the central 
deployment plans to take into account district-specific issues; for example, frequency of supervisory visits, 
restocking during different seasons, and local variations in rates of consumption. It is important to identify or 
appoint a laboratory focal person at sub-national level – depending on the existing health system structure 
– to coordinate local implementation. A group of supporting partners with relevant expertise will be needed. 
If RDTs are to be deployed at community level, for example, a district-based representative with experience in 
implementing community based health initiatives should be included. Clear lines of communication with the 
national coordinating structure must be in place. 
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
29
3.1.1 The role of a coordinator 
The coordinator described above will be expected to supervise and support implementation of a wide range 
of activities and to do so according to specific policies and performance standards set out at national level. 
Coordination will involve:
keeping a relevant mix of stakeholders all committed to collaborative efforts towards implementing 
• 
RDTs 
disseminating RDT implementation plans, outlining the method of deployment, expected output and 
• 
outcomes of deployment 
assigning responsibilities and identifying deliverables: where, how, when, who is involved
• 
implementing the community sensitization plan through channels that reach out to political and opinion 
• 
leaders, schools, and the community at large.
The minimum required actors, actions and tools involved (Figure 12) require coordinated efforts to translate 
them into point-of-care health benefits.
Figure 12: Getting to the point of use: converting central strategy to action at point-of-care 
ACTOrS
TOOLS
ACTIVITIES
Health team leaders: programme planners, surveillance and case management 
experts, health educators, medical supplies distributors
Communication experts: e.g. health educators, specialized community groups
Local opinion leaders: e.g. community health workers, women, youth, faith group 
leaders
Community based organizations
Coordination: e.g. communication, assignment of roles amongst RDT implementing 
stakeholders
ASCM: rolling out advocacy, community sensitization and education messages)
rDT deployment: stocktaking, storing and distributing RDTs under controlled 
conditions
Quality assurance implementation
-  training 
-  support supervision 
-  tracking positivity rates for unusual trends
-  QC where an appropriate methodology is in place
Monitoring and reporting: e.g. follow up of health workers after training, recording 
RDT results in HMIS data forms, giving feedback to RDT users
Health policy guidelines: laboratory strengthening, clinical case management, 
malaria control and prevention, RDT transport and storage
Materials: RDT job aids, supervisory checklists and training manuals; RDT quantification 
and ordering procedures; fever case management clinical algorithms, transportation 
and storage procedures, data monitoring and reporting forms
Aids: RDTs, clocks, sharps and non-sharps boxes, gloves, stationery, data forms
ACSM - Advocacy, communication and social mobilization;  HMIS - Health management information system;  RDT - Rapid diagnostic test
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
30
3.2 Supply chain management: quantification of rDTs at point-of-care facilities
In a centralized supply system, the annual needs for RDTs will have been estimated at national level, taking 
into consideration factors such as: the planned geographical coverage of RDT implementation; the level of 
care and types of health care facilities where RDTs will be deployed (i.e. hospitals, health centres, dispensaries, 
health posts and community-based providers); the national diagnostic algorithm for managing suspected 
malaria cases; and the continued use of microscopy services for malaria diagnosis. Guidance for RDT quantification 
and logistics is described in detail in the manual for malaria RDT selection and procurement
31
and in the 
operational manual on access to malaria diagnostic testing.
32
At point-of-care level, it is important to be aware both of the national implementation plan and of the 
responsibilities of those working at district and community levels for determining annual needs for RDTs and 
ordering RDTs at that level. This level supports the national quantification exercise and the distribution process 
in both a centralized and decentralized supply system, through gathering basic data as summarized in Table 5. This 
exercise is outlined in Section 2 and is detailed in the Quantification manual.
Table 5: Minimum quantification needs required from the level of RDT use to inform stock supply process
Quantification issues beyond the central level
Specific quantification dependent on needs for malaria diagnosis
Number of health facilities targeted for RDTs and/or microscopy
• 
Proportion or number of community health workers to perform RDTs and stock required.
• 
Proportion of health facilities with functional microscopy
• 
Number of blood films examined for malaria
• 
Estimated number of suspected malaria cases in targeted health facilities (at least 2 years of data)
• 
Required safety stock levels and ordering lead time 
• 
Specific items to consider during quantification for rDT implementation
Current RDT kits
RDT
• 
blood transfer device
• 
buffer
• 
Essential ancillary commodities
lancets 
• 
alcohol swabs
• 
gloves
• 
swabs
• 
sharps disposal containers
• 
multi-task timers for all health workers
• 
Note: 
- RDT kits may include some items in column on the right or may require separate procurement. 
- RDT introduction may require increase in procurement over basic clinic needs in some settings. 
It is essential that health workers using malaria RDTs should understand that the logistics unit at national level 
relies on the availability of accurate information from where RDTs are actually used. It is therefore important 
that health facilities in which RDTs are deployed keep accurate and complete  data to inform the quantification 
process in a timely manner, to ensure re-stocking, and to provide information needed for planning the overall 
malaria budget in future years. Paper-based information systems are frequently inadequate to achieve reliable 
data transfer. Systems based on electronic messaging (e.g. SMS-based messaging) should be considered. If 
paper-based systems have to be used, immediate/timely transfer of data into electronic databases is critical 
for accuracy and prompt reporting. 
31 Good practices for selecting and procuring rapid diagnostic tests for malaria. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2011.
32 Universal access to malaria diagnostic testing - An operational manual. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2011.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested