Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
31
3.3 Quality assurance: ensuring accurate and safe results 
Ensuring good quality results from malaria RDTs depends on more than maintaining a high degree of precision 
and accuracy in the analytical performance of the test. Quality cannot be achieved by purely administrative 
and regulatory means; it requires commitment from all concerned. 
Quality assurance is defined as a total process, both inside and outside the laboratory/testing unit, including 
human and test performance standards, good laboratory practice, and the management skills to achieve and 
maintain a quality service. The purpose of QA is to ensure that test results are reliable, relevant and timely. QA 
requires a system that encompasses organization, management, processing and reporting of RDT and microscopy 
results in an integrated manner (see Figure 7 and 10). 
3.3.1 Quality control in the field
Quality control describes the monitoring of performance of a test, to ensure that it performs correctly and 
results are accurate and precise. RDTs will have gone through rigorous QC at time of purchase or after shipping 
(i.e. lot testing) to ensure the RDTs delivered to the implementer have adequate performance, and that the 
RDTs chosen are stable enough for the anticipated storage conditions. The implementation team at the 
peripheral level should ensure ambient conditions for RDT storage, with guidance from the district level. The 
method of any further checking of RDT quality will be decided at a national level, but implemented locally. 
Monitoring the effectiveness of RDTs at peripheral level, where they are used, should be integrated as far as 
possible into existing health worker training and QA schemes. 
Quality control of malaria RDTs in the field aims to ensure that RDTs have retained adequate performance 
to detect clinically-relevant malaria infections. This adds a further margin of confidence to RDT deployment, 
and helps to reassure users and clinicians that the results are reliable. These methods confirm RDT capacity 
to detect parasite antigen – not the quality of use in general by field staff – and therefore do not replace the 
need for routine field supervision. New methods and tools for QC are expected to become available in the 
future (Part 4).
In addition to reporting on the quality of diagnostic test performance, reporting should include observations 
of the ancillary products deployed with RDTs including dry alcohol swabs, discoloured desiccant in humid 
conditions, broken or misshaped blood transfer devices (BTDs), discoloured or dry buffer bottles, and status of 
other commodities provided with the RDTs.
3.3.2 Monitoring of results of RDT procedure
All RDT results should be reported in the HMIS, or temporarily in a parallel malaria surveillance system (e.g. 
NMP-specific database) until the HMIS can include them. It is essential that these statistics are accessible to 
district planning teams to support monitoring of trends for planning processes. At a central level, these data 
should form the basis for performance indicators to monitor programme effectiveness. Where large changes 
in the reported rate of positive and negative results (confirmed malaria) occur, and these are not readily 
explained by seasonality or the impact of changes in interventions, they should be specifically investigated 
and reported to the NMP through the supervisors (regional or district),  coordinators or reference laboratory. 
This may include, for example, changes in positivity rates of tested patients that are not consistent with seasonal 
variation, differ widely from preceding years, or differ markedly from surrounding facilities. This investigation 
should include:
evaluation of health worker performance in RDT preparation, and confirmation that manufacturers’ 
• 
instructions were followed
assessment of storage and transport conditions 
• 
withdrawal of RDTs for lot-testing.
• 
Monitoring of RDT results should also include a record of:
invalid rates: no control line, RDT repeated
• 
Combine pdf online - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
append pdf; .net merge pdf files
Combine pdf online - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
pdf combine files online; reader merge pdf
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
32
spoilt tests: damaged packages, etc. 
• 
other major abnormalities such as very poor blood clearance, lack of blood flow within the RDT, abnormalities 
• 
in BTD, etc.
Data from the monitoring should be noted in record books and stored at the clinic, so that they can be presented 
and discussed during supervisory visits. A clear reporting channel should be available to the health worker to 
report increased levels of invalid tests, damaged packaging, or any unexpected results or concern over tests 
not functioning correctly. This is part of training. 
Where periodic sentinel site monitoring is in place (this may be routine at a site, or intermittent when a supervisor 
with proven competency in malaria microscopy is present), clear guidelines must be developed centrally to 
address discrepancies (e.g. a patient who is RDT-negative but has a positive test result with microscopy) and 
indicate the action that should be taken in response. These guidelines should be closely followed, with rapid 
communication of results and follow up to ensure that feedback and guidance from supervisory levels is 
received. Guidelines for management of discrepant results need to take into account the parasite density of 
the infections (RDTs may miss some infections below 100 parasites/μl and still be adequate for most general 
field use. Above 200 parasites/µl, false negative results are likely to have a significant impact on patient care.
33
Other issues that require consideration are “human error”, safety and disposal of contaminated waste.
3.3.3 Human error in QA
While malaria RDTs are easy to perform and can produce very high quality results when used appropriately, 
mistakes are still relatively common. However, this can be addressed by good, standardized training and 
supervision. Training should be practical, and users must demonstrate proficiency before being allowed to use 
RDTs for case management. Experience suggests that this training aspect of RDT QA is often ignored. National 
malaria programmes should consider this to be a critical component of RDT rollout. Training and supervision 
are covered in detail in section 3.4. From previous experience with RDTs used in routine conditions at health 
facilities, several common problems have been identified. 
Inaccurate blood volume collected and/or applied to the test, often due to difficulties in using the BTD 
1. 
or failure to use the device. 
Wrong buffer used or wrong volume applied. Only the buffer supplied with the RDT lot should be used 
2. 
for that particular lot; buffer is not interchangeable between products or between production lots of a 
product. Using the wrong buffer could produce false positive or false negative results. Check product 
information guide to check the number of drops that need to be dispensed.
Blood and buffer placed in wrong wells. Placing the blood and buffer in the wrong wells will produce 
3. 
only negative or invalid results, because only the buffer moves towards the test and control lines.
Failure to wait the specified time before reading negative results. Weak test lines may appear late in the 
4. 
reading period, when the blood staining has cleared. However, RDTs should not be read after the maximum 
specified reading time.
Inadequate light for reading test results. In order to read RDT results and not to miss faint positives, RDTs 
5. 
must be read in bright light. During daylight hours an open window may provide sufficient light, but at 
night a bright flashlight/torch is necessary; penlights and kerosene lamps are usually not sufficient.
Failure to interpret faint lines as positive (any line in the test line area should be considered evidence of 
6. 
malaria infection). 
RDTs vary in design, in buffer and blood volume required, and in reading time. Clear job aids in a locally-
appropriate language should be produced. Manufacturer’s instructions and aids should never be ignored. 
It is essential to ensure that NMP RDT job aids are consistent with the RDT manufacturer’s instructions. It is 
33 Parasitological confirmation of malaria diagnosis: Report of a WHO technical consultation Geneva, 6–8 October 2009. Geneva, World 
Health Organization, 2010. 
Online Merge PDF files. Best free online merge PDF tool.
Online Merge PDF, Multiple PDF files into one. Then press the button below and download your PDF. Also you can add more PDFs to combine them and merge them into
attach pdf to mail merge in word; best pdf merger
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
Merge and Split Document(s). "This online guide content Splitting Application. This C#.NET PDF document merger to help .NET developers combine PDF document files
pdf merge; add pdf pages together
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
33
important to have job aids and actual examples or pictures of the different types of RDTs and BTDs that may 
be encountered in the country (Figure 13).
Figure 13: RDT blood transfer devices, RDT types and job aids that are worth mentioning or displaying during health 
worker training sessions
Range of malaria RDT products
3.3.4 Safety and contaminated waste handling
RDT use raises issues of blood safety and waste disposal that may have not been encountered before on a 
routine basis by village health workers or at small clinics. This must be a major part of training in RDT use, and 
practices must comply with national guidelines on management of laboratory waste. International guidance 
is available to shape this area of training and support supervision (Figure 8).
34
There are a number of different 
types of waste which will be generated by the RDT programme (such as gloves, sharps, boxes, cotton wool, etc.) 
that need to be addressed during training and support supervision. Further details can be found in documents 
on transporting, storing and handling RDTs in health facilities. 
Key blood safety principles:
consider every blood sample as potentially infectious
• 
you should ALWAYS wear gloves when handling blood
• 
NEVER reuse lancets
• 
do not leave lancets in places accessed by children
• 
once used, be sure to place them in contaminated waste materials box
• 
These instructions are especially relevant for lower level HWs who are now being asked to do these tests rather 
than just examine patients. . 
Key safe disposal principles:
ensure that sharps containers are available and that they are within reach, so that the lancet or needle 
• 
may be disposed of immediately after the patient is tested
34 Transporting, Storing, and Handling Malaria Rapid Diagnostic Tests at the Peripheral Storage Facilities. Arlington, Va.: USAID | DELIVER 
PROJECT, Task Order 3; and Geneva, World Health Organization, 2009.
These antigen products are available  
in cassette formats e.g.:
HRP2, pLDH pan 
• 
HRP2
• 
HRP2 and aldolase
• 
pLDH Pf and pan
• 
Hybrid (dipstick)
Dipstick
Card
These antigen products are available in dipstick 
and card formats:
HRP2, pLDH-pan, pLDH-Pv, pLDH-Pf,  
• 
pLDH VOM
aldolase
• 
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Also able to combine generated split PDF document files Advanced component for splitting PDF document in preview Free download library and use online C# class
attach pdf to mail merge; reader create pdf multiple files
VB.NET PDF: Use VB.NET Code to Merge and Split PDF Documents
Merge and Split Document(s). "This online guide content is destn As [String]) Implements PDFDocument.Combine End Sub. APIs for Splitting PDF document in VB Class
pdf merger online; c# combine pdf
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
34
How To Use a  
Rapid Diagnostic Test 
(RDT)
A guide for training at a village  
and clinic level
Modified for training in the use of the Generic Pan-Pf Test for falciparum and non-falciparum malaria
MALARIA
Pan -Pf
Generic Pan-Pf
Prepared on February 11, 2010. V1.2
Disposable gloves
A line near letter “C” followed by one or two lines near letter “t” 
means the patient is positive for malaria as shown below. (Test is positive 
even if the test lines are faint.)
2. Put on the gloves. Use new gloves 
for each patient.
1. Check the expiry date on the test 
packet.
3. Open the packet and remove:
4. Write the patient’s name on the test.
a. Test
b. Capillary tube
c. Desiccant sachet
5. Open the alcohol swab. Grasp the  
4th finger on the patient’s left hand. 
Clean the finger with the alcohol swab. 
Allow the finger to dry before pricking.
8. Use the capillary tube to collect the 
drop of blood.
9. Use the capillary tube to put the 
drop of blood into the square hole 
marked “A.”  
Test packet
12. Wait 15 minutes after adding buffer.
13. Read test results.  
(note: Do not read the test sooner 
than 15 minutes after adding the 
buffer. You may get FAlse results.)
Count correct 
number of drops
14. How to read the test results:
A line near letter “C” followed by no 
lines near letter “t” means the patient 
Does not have either falciparum malaria 
or non-falciparum malaria.
PositiVe
inVAliD resUlt
neGAtiVe
no line near letter “C” and one or two 
lines or no line near letter “t” means the 
test is INVALID.
If no line appears near the letter “C,” repeat the test using a new unopened test packet and a new unopened lancet.
note: Each test can be used onlY one tiMe 
Do not try to use the test more than once.
READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS CAREFULLY BEFORE YOU BEGIN.
Collect:
a. new unopened test packet
b. new unopened alcohol swab
c. new unopened lancet
d. new pair of disposable gloves
e. Buffer
f. Timer
g. Sharps box
h. Pencil or pen
How to Do the rapid test for Malaria
7. Discard the lancet 
in the Sharps Box 
immediately  
after pricking 
finger.  
Do not set  
the lancet 
down  
before  
discarding  
it.
16. Record the test results in your 
CHW register. Dispose of cassette 
in non-sharps waste container.
10. Discard the capillary tube in the  
Sharps Box.
Modified for training in the use of the Generic Pan-Pf test for falciparum and non-falciparum malaria
P. falciparum
P. falciparum monoinfection 
or mixed infection
Non-falciparum (P. vivaxP. ovale
P. malariae or a mixed infection of these)
Repeat the test using a new RDT if no 
control line appears.
Negative
15. Dispose of the gloves, alcohol swab, 
desiccant sachet and  
packaging in a  
non-sharps waste  
container.
MALARIA
Pan-Pf
expiry 
date
Pan
Pf
11. Add buffer into the round hole 
marked “B.”
Pan
Pf
Pan
Pf
Pan
Pf
Pan
Pf
Pan
Pf
Alcohol swab
Buffer
Timer
Pencil
Lancet
6. Open the lancet. Prick patient’s 
finger to get a drop of blood. Do 
not allow the tip of the lancet to 
touch anything before pricking the 
patient’s finger.
Prepared on December 22, 2009. V1.0. Since manufacturers’ instructions may have changed after this job aid was produced, all details should be cross-checked against manufacturer instructions in the product insert of the test in use. 
Top: Generic Pan-Pf training manual: A 
guide for training at a village and clinic level
Generic Pan-Pf job aid, available for RDTs using:
capillary tube 
• 
loop
• 
using pipette
• 
Malaria generic Pan-Pf training RDT results 
guide
Job aids and training materials:
Training materials and job aids - instructions and high quality training for community health workers on RDT 
use - have been developed to improve the accuracy of RDTs, as well as user safety. They are part of the training 
requirements for use of RDTs at community and small clinic level. These materials can be adapted to local 
contexts. 
In addition, RDT users should be fully trained in the national post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) for HIV protocols 
and have access to the necessary drugs and supplies.
place RDTs, gloves, blood transfer devices and other potentially contaminated material in bags specifically 
• 
for this purpose, separated from non-contaminated waste
keep sharps boxes and contaminated waste bags in a safe place, away from children and the public
• 
have an acceptable practice in place for permanent disposal of sharps and contaminated waste, on site 
• 
or through safe return to a higher level.
C# PowerPoint - Merge PowerPoint Documents in C#.NET
Combine and Merge Multiple PowerPoint Files into One Using C#. This part illustrates how to combine three PowerPoint files into a new file in C# application.
combine pdf files; reader combine pdf pages
C# Word - Merge Word Documents in C#.NET
Combine and Merge Multiple Word Files into One Using C#. This part illustrates how to combine three Word files into a new file in C# application.
merge pdf; c# merge pdf files into one
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
35
3.4 Quality assurance: training and supervision
Training and supervision are essential parts of QA. The apparent simplicity of the RDT must not lead to shortcuts 
in a training programme that could result in serious defects in quality. RDTs are easy to perform but it is also 
very easy to make errors while using them.
3.4.1 Training 
Trainers of health workers at point-of-care should be carefully selected based on their knowledge, field 
experience and good interpersonal skills. Training activities beyond the central level should include messages 
that not only promote accuracy in performing and reading the RDT, but should also promote mutual respect 
and confidence amongst end users. While training curricula, guides and materials are typically developed at 
national level, they will be largely implemented at district level. The content should therefore be field tested 
at local or community level and feedback then sent to national level, to improve the training materials in the 
light of experience 5-8, 10.
Training should be competency-based, deriving its schedule from a training plan. An assessment during training 
should take place to ensure that all trainees are observed to successfully prepare an RDT, and correctly interpret 
a panel of RDTs (or photos of results) including all the results that may be encountered using that product. 
When training health workers and volunteers at community level, the following points are important.
Make sure that all materials are easy to use or read and are available in sufficient quantities. They should 
• 
be specific for the product in use and in an appropriate language. Provide trainees with a solid rationale 
for the importance of parasitological diagnosis, especially the use of RDTs, as their previous experience 
may be symptom-based. Also address the consequences of common errors in performing RDTs.
Limit the size of training groups (ideally not more than about 15 people per trainer) and have sufficient 
• 
additional trainers or assistants to enable small group or individual training on blood sampling and safety, 
with additional facilitators for practical sessions (e.g. three or four trainees per facilitator).
Ensure that guidance on waste management/disposal is suited to the particular circumstances.
• 
Reinforce the reasons for taking universal precautions for drawing and handling blood.
• 
Certify that participants are well-versed in the other aspects of case management and diagnostics 
• 
management, including:
the different QA/QC methods that will be employed at various levels of the health network;
-
reporting, especially in cases where laboratory registers do not currently have a space allocated for 
-
RDT results;
communications with the community/patients on the need to diagnose before treatment.
-
Practical session on test result scenarios (positive, negative, inconclusive and why)
• 
Arrange for on-the-job training to take place during the first supervisory visits, to equip staff who may 
• 
not have had the opportunity to attend the training session.
Practical sessions should be held during training or during a supervisory visit at a health facility, to clarify 
difficulties encountered in fever case management and patient communication. Different scenarios should be 
arranged through role play, interactive discussions, and case studies, to better understand how to use RDTs and 
utilize test results (Figure 14). A guide for training and several training tools in the use of RDTs at community 
and clinic level
35
has been published by WHO and partners on which specific national training materials can 
be based 12. 
35 How to use a rapid diagnostic test (RDT): A guide for training at a village and clinic level. 2008. The USAID Health Care Improvement 
(HCI) Project and the World Health Organization (WHO), Bethesda, MD, and Geneva.
VB.NET TIFF: Merge and Split TIFF Documents with RasterEdge .NET
String], docList As [String]()) TIFFDocument.Combine(filePath, docList In our online VB.NET tutorial, users & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
pdf merger; pdf merge documents
VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
Just like we need to combine PPT files, sometimes, we also want to separate a Note: If you want to see more PDF processing functions in VB.NET, please follow
reader combine pdf; c# merge pdf
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
36
Figure 14: Generic guidance on the use of RDT results in fever case management 
Use of RDT Results
Basic management of febrile illness (to be adjusted according to national guidelines)
Negative
2
Fever, suspected to be malaria
Non-severe illness
1
P. falciparum
Non-P. falciparum
Appropriate antimalarial drugs 
and management for non-severe 
or severe malaria 
Appropriate management for non-malarial febrile 
illness. This may include further investigation, 
antibiotics or other medicine, or no specific 
intervention, depending on findings
rDT or microscopy
1 Where signs of severe illness exist, WHO guidelines recommend that anti-malarial drugs and antibiotics be given, and the patient 
referred immediately. RDT should only be used if this does not delay the course of this management.
The use of RDTs during follow-up visits will depend on national guidelines.
3.4.2 Supervision
The national programme will have prepared and disseminated standard supervisory checklists and guidelines 
to enable RDT supervision and quality assurance 7, 8, 11. This section of the guide is intended to provide 
practical advice on how to conduct a malaria diagnostics QA visit and how to solve commonly encountered 
problems in the field. However, it is important to maintain regular contact with colleagues at the national public 
health laboratory so they may help solve additional problems encountered in the field. These problems and 
responses can inform future plans for RDT scale-up. 
Following RDT training and deployment, immediate and sustained follow-up is important, to facilitate and 
support health workers to integrate RDTs into routine case management and record keeping. Support from 
surveillance sentinel sites and other partners who are specialized in M&E are instrumental in ensuring that the 
right tools and schedules are set for regular supportive supervision and overall post-implementation programme 
review. All aspects of RDT implementation should be reviewed in the training curriculum, including QA/QC, 
training and communication, the RDT supply chain, and the national coordinating mechanism that oversees 
the programme. In decentralized health systems, malaria control is conducted by regional or district health 
authorities. Field visits allow the authorities to observe how malaria control activities are being delivered and 
to mentor the implementers. 
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
37
Supervision plan
Determine the objective of the supervision and balance it with the required human and logistic resources: 
• 
e.g. malaria or case management-specific supervision may require a different set of resources from 
integrated health systems supervision. 
It is cost-effective to schedule the RDT-specific supervision visits to other health services-related supervisory 
• 
visits, or community outreach programmes. If this procedure is used, combine the RDT supervision 
schedule with that of another related supervisory programme. 
Checklists should be well adapted to improve cost effectiveness. Align supervisory plans with other clinical 
• 
and laboratory supervision checklists, and QA schemes. A national supervisory checklist will help ensure 
that all supplies and requirements for a successful supervisory visit are available.
Equip frontline health facility managers with supervisory skills specific to performing RDTs and conducting 
• 
quality control procedures.
Plan for feedback on the spot, to ensure corrective action is taken on pertinent implementation issues 
• 
that may call for improvement at the point of RDT use.
Plan to utilize the skill set of different expertise among implementing partners to address specific speciality 
• 
needs, e.g. stock control, storage conditions and temperature control, health data management and 
feedback, RDT performance, clinical case management, and community sensitization.
Ensure that the checklists address all areas of infection prevention and control, RDT and gloves stock 
• 
availability, waste disposal facilities and water supply.
Evaluation:
• 
supervisors must have an opportunity to discuss their experiences with other supervisors and at 
-
central level, in order to make systematic improvements to the programme
supervisors should frequently participate in provincial or district health meetings to present findings, 
-
and as a means to troubleshoot issues with the local health community.
The supervisor’s terms of reference: Among the skill sets necessary for supervision, competent supervisors 
should help RDT users to initiate corrective measures, improve efficiency by increasing their knowledge and 
perfecting their skills, and maintain motivation despite existing challenges. Many factors have to be considered 
in choosing an appropriate person to take on this role.
In addition, supervisors are responsible for the well-being and safety of their team, overseeing the completion 
of the workload and the maintenance of data quality. Since it is often difficult to sustain adequate levels of 
supervision in malaria programmes due to travel and staff shortages, it is important that supervision of RDT 
use include other aspects of malaria case management. For example, malaria health workers often handle 
related matters such as vaccinations, maternal and infant health, IMAI and IMCI, and other febrile illnesses, 
which are not due to malaria.
3.4.3 Developing a supervision plan
The recommended approach to supervision of health workers engaged in RDT-based diagnosis is described 
below. Matching checklists are provided in 7. RDT-specific supervisory plans should be added to the existing 
supervisory plans for other aspects of malaria case management and the health workers’ role. The structure of 
visits will also vary depending on whether the visit is to a clinic or to a single health worker. It is important that 
supervisory visits occur at the actual workplace wherever possible, rather than at a central point which health 
workers must attend in order that issues such as waste disposal, safe work environment and storage of 
commodities and records can be assessed.
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
38
Supervisors should record results of visits in a standard manner, including use of checklists with recommendations 
documented where appropriate. These should be accessible to future supervisors before further visits, but 
otherwise considered confidential and not available to colleagues of the supervised staff. A process should be 
put in place at the management, e.g. district level to ensure this.
The tasks that should be Included in a supervisory visit can be divided into the following five areas:
Task one: Personnel and management issues 
It is important that health workers are free to raise any issues connected with their work, and that they are 
updated on personnel and policy issues concerning the health service; if they hear from their managers directly 
rather than second-hand, they will feel they are valued and morale will be supported.
However, supervisors should also have a checklist of points to discuss with the health worker, including the 
following:
Recent or future retraining and updates
• 
Planned health service policy or strategy changes
• 
Clinic/workplace operations:
• 
concerns over outcomes and disease prevalence 
-
workload
-
community relations
-
issues concerning clinic-community relationships that affect the workplace
sensitization of the community to parasite-based diagnosis and case management needs
patient response to management
-
storage and handling of RDTs and other commodities documentation and reporting issues
-
receipt of feedback on results sent
-
Task two: Workplace assessment
The expectations for the workplace will vary widely, depending on whether the supervised staff are working 
in an established laboratory, or in a clinic or village setting. However, certain fundamental standards, discussed 
below, should be in place in all settings where patient samples are collected and tested. Most countries have 
established laboratory standards and manuals to guide the implementation of these; these documents should 
form the basis of the workplace assessment 7, Task 2
At a minimum, the workplace assessment should include confirmation of the following:
Adequate working space and availability of necessary utilities:
• 
clean water supply
-
washing and toilet facilities
-
lighting
-
bench space
-
patient waiting space and adequate privacy where required
-
Cleanliness
• 
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
39
Adequate disposal facilities:
• 
secure, safe sharps storage and disposal
-
secure safe contaminated waste storage and disposal
-
adequate general waste storage and disposal
-
36
Adequate secure storage:
• 
for RDTs, drugs and other commodities
-
for documents,  manuals, and records
-
for community education materials
-
Clear visibility of RDT job aids and results guides to health workers and patients 
• 
Task three: RDT preparation
It is essential to observe preparation of malaria RDTs during a supervisory visit. The visit should take place during 
a time when patients attend the clinic. If observation cannot be done with a real patient, the procedure should 
be observed on a volunteer. In case there are no patients, or in the case of stock-outs, supervisors should 
hand-carry a few RDTs so that observations can still take place. It is important to observe the whole process, 
including finger-pricking, to ensure that blood safety practices are being followed. The supervisor should 
observe and not intervene, unless practices are considered to be of direct danger to the patient or health 
worker. A standard checklist (7, Task 3) should be used. Feedback should then be given to the health worker 
when the patient is not present. It may be necessary to observe additional tests if major deficiencies are 
identified.
Task four: RDT interpretation
Checking RDT interpretation can be accomplished with a pre-prepared set of used RDTs, or with photographic 
quizzes with clear interpretive guides12. Health workers should be tested on each visit. They should be 
shown and asked to interpret examples of the following:
Strong positive results
• 
Weak positive results, often missed by health workers; if missed, then the health worker should be advised 
• 
to have his/her vision checked
Negative results
• 
Invalid results; RDTs can be prepared to show such results by opening a used RDT cassette, turning the 
• 
test strip around (so that the control line is now where the test line was) and adding buffer only to the 
well, if actual invalid tests are unavailable
36 Transporting, Storing, and Handling Malaria Rapid Diagnostic Tests at the Peripheral Storage Facilities. Arlington, VA: USAID | DELIVER 
PROJECT, Task Order 3; and Geneva, World Health Organization, 2009.
Malaria rapid diagnostic tests 
– 
an implementation guide
40
Task five: Documentation and reporting
A formal review should be conducted of the documentation in the clinic, including the following:
Laboratory registers – ensure that this new data is being recorded correctly
• 
HMIS data including patient attendance, results, and management
• 
Management of commodities:
• 
stock received
-
consumption
-
stock-take records
-
requests for stock
-
where appropriate, temperature and other storage monitoring
-
Records of quality control and internal and external quality assurance activities.
• 
Examples of data from the monitoring of RDT results should be stored in the clinic and in record books, so that 
they can be presented and discussed during supervisory visits 11.
3.5 Advocacy, communication and social mobilization (ACSM)
In order to encourage the target population to adopt appropriate behaviour towards the national policy of 
parasite-based confirmation of malaria diagnosis, it is important to include a communication plan in the RDT 
implementation strategy (see Figure 15). Implementation of RDTs offers a good opportunity for supervisors 
and community educators to equip the target population with information on parasite-based diagnosis, so 
that they are more likely to request a test when seeking care for malaria-like infections. The plan should reinforce 
improved access, affordability, consistent supply/availability of RDTs, and trust in policy decisions as well as 
interventions. For the following reasons the strategy should involve the community, village leaders, village 
health volunteers, private health care providers, youth and women’s groups, as well as community-based 
organizations. 
Although services for malaria prevention and treatment may be available, many communities are unaware 
• 
of the need for diagnostic services to identify the true cause of fevers. 
In the process of trying out RDTs, communities may gain better understanding and experience, which 
• 
could nurture acceptance and the adoption of parasite-based diagnosis of malaria.
A well-planned ACSM strategy will improve the level of knowledge about when and where to access 
• 
health services, when to use a diagnostic test and what management should be undertaken based on 
those results.  
It will emphasize the importance of good quality RDTs in the private health sector, and demand for 
• 
parasite-based diagnosis, within 24 hours of onset of fever.
Above all it should emphasize adherence to a full course of ACTs following parasitological confirmation 
• 
of malaria.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested