adobe pdf viewer c# : Acrobat merge pdf Library software class asp.net winforms windows ajax managingsharing3-part835

27
ETHICS AND CONSENT
ACCESS CONTROL 
Under certain circumstances, sensitive and confidential
data can be safeguarded by regulating use of or
restricting access to such data, while at the same time
enabling data sharing for research and educational
purposes. 
Data held at data centres and archives are not generally in
the public domain. Their use is restricted to specific
purposes after user registration. Users sign an End User
Licence in which they agree to certain conditions, e.g. not
to use data for commercial purposes or identify any
potentially identifiable individuals. 
Data centres may impose additional access regulations for
confidential data such as:
• needing specific authorisation from the data owner to
access data 
• placing confidential data under embargo for a given
period of time until confidentiality is no longer pertinent
• providing access to approved researchers only
• providing secure access to data through enabling
remote analysis of confidential data but excluding the
ability to download data
Mixed levels of access regulations may be put in place for
some data collections, combining regulated access to
confidential data with user access to non-confidential data. 
Data centres typically liaise with the researchers who own
the data in selecting the most suitable type of access for
data. Access regulations should always be proportionate
to the kind of data and confidentiality involved.
OPEN ACCESS 
The digital revolution has caused a strong drive towards
open access of information, with the internet making
information sharing fast, easy, powerful and empowering. 
Scholarly publishing has seen a strong move towards open
access to increase the impact of research, with e-journals,
open access journals and copyright policies enabling the
deposit of outputs in open access repositories. The same
open access movement also steers towards more open
access to the underlying data and evidence on which
research publications are based. A growing number of
journals require for data that underpin research findings to
be published in open access repositories when
manuscripts are submitted. 
ACCESS RESTRICTIONS VS. OPEN
ACCESS
Working with data owners, the
Secure Data Service provides
researchers with secure access to
data that are too detailed, sensitive or
confidential to be made available under
the standard licences operated by its sister service, the
Economic and Social Data Service (ESDS).31 The
service’ssecurity philosophy is based upon training and
trust, leading-edge technology, licensing and legal
frameworks (including the 2007 Statistics Act), and strict
security policies and penalties endorsed by both the
ONS and the ESRC.
The technical model shares many similarities with the
ONS Virtual Microdata Laboratory32 and the NORC
Secure Data Enclave.33 It is based around a Citrix
infrastructure which turns the end user’s computer into a
remote terminal. All data processing is carried out on a
central secure server; no data travels over the network.
Outputs for publication are only released subject to
Statistical Disclosure Control checks by trained Service
staff.
Secure Data Service data cannot be downloaded.
Researchers analyse the data remotely from their home
institution at their desktop or in a safe room. The Service
provides a ‘home away from home’ research facility with
familiar statistical software and MS Office tools to make
remote collaboration and analysis secure and convenient.
The clearing-house mechanism established following the
Convention on Biological Diversity to promote
information sharing, has resulted in an exponential
increase in openly accessible biodiversity and ecosystem
data since 1992.
The Forest Spatial Information Catalogue is a web-based
portal, developed by the Center for International Forestry
Research (CIFOR), for public access to spatial data and
maps.34 The catalogue holds satellite images, aerial
photographs, land usage and forest cover maps, maps of
protected areas, agricultural and demographic atlases
and forest boundaries. For example, forest cover maps
for the entire world, produced by the World
Conservation Monitoring Centre in 1997 can be
downloaded freely as digital vector data. 
The Global Biodiversity Information Framework (GBIF)
strives to make the world’s biodiversity data accessible
everywhere in the world.35 The framework holds millions
of species occurrence records based on specimens and
observations, scientific and common names and
classifications of living organisms and map references for
species records. Data are contributed by numerous
international data providers. Geo-referenced records can
be mapped to Google Earth. 
CASE 
STUDY
Acrobat merge pdf - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
all jpg to one pdf converter; combine pdf online
Acrobat merge pdf - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
c# merge pdf; build pdf from multiple files
28
COPYRIGHT 
KNOW
HOW DATA
COPYRIGHT
WORKS
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Merge, split PDF files. Insert, delete PDF pages. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF.
pdf split and merge; acrobat combine pdf
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
acrobat merge pdf files; pdf merge files
COPYRIGHT
29
WHO OWNS COPYRIGHT?
Researchers creating data typically hold copyright in their
data. Most research outputs – including spreadsheets,
publications, reports and computer programs – fall under
literary work and are therefore protected by copyright.
Facts, however, cannot be copyrighted. The creator is
automatically the first copyright owner, unless there is a
contract that assigns copyright differently or there is
written transfer of copyright signed by the copyright owner.
If information is structured in a database, the structure
acquires a database right, alongside the copyright in the
content of the database. A database may be protected by
both copyright and database right. For database right to
apply, the database must be the result of substantial
intellectual investment in obtaining, verifying or
presenting the content. 
For copyright to apply, the work must be original and
fixed in a material form, e.g. written or recorded. There is
no copyright in ideas or unrecorded speech. If researchers
collect data using interviews and make recordings or
transcriptions of the interviewee’s words, then the
researcher holds the copyright of those recordings. In
addition, each speaker is an author of his or her recorded
words in the interview.36
In the case of collaborative research or derived data,
copyright may be held jointly by various researchers or
institutions. Copyright should be assigned correctly,
especially if datasets have been created from a variety of
sources; for example those which have been bought or
‘lent’ by other researchers. When digitising paper-based
materials or images, or analogue recordings, attention
needs to be paid to the copyright of the original material.
In academia, in theory the employer is the owner of the
copyright in a work made during the employee’s
employment. Many academic institutions, however, assign
copyright in research materials, data and publications to
the researchers. Researchers should check how their
institutions assign copyright. 
RE-USE OF DATA AND COPYRIGHT
Secondary users of data must obtain copyright clearance
from the rights holder before data can be reproduced.
Data can be copied for non-commercial teaching or
research purposes without infringing copyright, under the
fair dealing concept, providing that the owner of the data
is acknowledged. An acknowledgement should give credit
to the data source used, the data distributor and the
copyright holder.
When data are shared through a data centre, the
researcher or data creator keeps the copyright over data
and licences the centre to process and provide access to
the data. A data centre cannot effectively hold data unless
all the rights holders are identified and give their
permission for the data to be archived and shared. Data
centres typically specify how data should be
acknowledged and cited, either within the metadata
record for a dataset or in a data use licence. 
COPYRIGHT IS AN INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHT ASSIGNED AUTOMATICALLY TO THE
CREATOR, THAT PREVENTS UNAUTHORISED COPYING AND PUBLISHING OF AN ORIGINAL
WORK. COPYRIGHT APPLIES TO RESEARCH DATA AND PLAYS A ROLE WHEN CREATING,
SHARING AND RE-USING DATA.
COPYRIGHT OF MEDIA SOURCES 
A researcher has collated articles
about the Prime Minister from The
Guardianover the past ten years,
using the LexisNexis newspaper
database to source articles. They are
then transcribed/copied by the
researcher into a database so that content analysis can
be applied. The researcher offers a copy of the database
together with the original transcribed text to a data
centre. 
Researchers cannot share either of these data sources as
they do not have copyright in the original material. A
data centre cannot accept these data as to do so would
be breach of copyright. The rights holders, in this case
The Guardianand LexisNexis, would need to provide
consent for archiving. 
USING THIRD PARTY DATA 
The Stockholm Environmental Institute (SEI) has created
an integrated spatial database, Social and Environmental
Conditions in Rural Areas (SECRA).37 This contains a wide
range of socio-economic and environmental
characteristics for all rural Census 2001 Super Output
Areas (SOAs) for England. 
Multiple third party data sources were used, such as
Census 2001 data, Land Cover Map data and data from
the Land Registry, Environment Agency, Automobile
Association, Royal Mail and British Trust for Ornithology.
Derived data have been calculated and mapped onto
SOAs. The researchers would like to distribute the
database for wider use.
Whilst the database contains no original third party data,
only derived data, there is still joint copyright shared
between the SEI and the various copyright holders of the
third party data. The researchers have sought permission
from all data owners to distribute the data and the
copyright of all third party data is declared in the
documentation. The database can therefore be distributed.
CASE 
STU
DY
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
apple merge pdf; .net merge pdf files
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
attach pdf to mail merge; add two pdf files together
30
When research data are submitted to a journal to
supplement a publication, researchers need to verify
whether the publisher expects copyright transfer of 
the data.
Some researchers may have come across the concept of
Creative Commons licences which allow creators to
communicate the rights which they wish to keep and the
rights which they wish to waive in order for other people
to make re-use of their intellectual properties more
straightforward. The Creative Commons licence is not
usually suitable for data. Other licences with similar
objectives are more appropriate, such as the Open Data
Commons Licence or the Open Government Licence.38
COPYRIGHT
COPYRIGHT OF INTERVIEWS WITH
‘ELITES’ 
A researcher has interviewed five
retired cabinet ministers about their
careers, producing audio recordings
and full transcripts. The researcher then
analyses the data and offers the
recordings and transcripts to a data centre for
preserving. However the researcher did not get signed
copyright transfers for further use of the interviewees’
words. 
In this case it would be problematic for a data centre to
accept the data. Large extracts of the data cannot be
quoted by secondary users. To do so would breach the
interviewees’ copyright over their recorded words. This is
equally a problem for the primary researcher. The
researcher should have asked for transfer of copyright or
a licence to use the data obtained through interviews, as
the possibility exists that the interviewee may at some
point wish to assert the right over their words, e.g. when
publishing memoirs. 
COPYRIGHT OF LICENSED DATA 
A researcher subscribes to access spatial AgCensus data
from the data centre EDINA. These data are then
integrated with data collected by the researcher. As part
of the ESRC research award contract the data has to be
offered for archiving at the UK Data Archive. Can such
integrated data be offered? 
The subscription agreement on accessing AgCensus data
states that data may not be transferred to any other
person or body without prior written permission from
EDINA. Therefore, the UK Data Archive cannot accept the
integrated data, unless the researcher obtains permission
from EDINA. The researcher’s partial data, with the
AgCensus data removed, can be archived. Secondary users
could then re-combine these data with the AgCensus data,
if they were to obtain their own AgCensus subscription. 
CASE 
STUDY
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
best pdf combiner; batch pdf merger
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
logo) on any desired PDF page. And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat.
add multiple pdf files into one online; pdf mail merge
PROVIDE A DATA MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK FOR RESEARCHERS
31
STRATEGIES FOR
CENTRES
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
break a pdf into multiple files; pdf combine pages
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
as a kind of compensation for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS on slide with no more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe
pdf combine files online; batch pdf merger online
32
During 2010, the UK Data Archive worked closely with
selected ESRC research centres and programmes to
evaluate existing data management practices and develop
data management planning strategies. The
recommendations contained in this guide are based on
those real-case experiences.
Research hubs may operate a centralised or devolved
approach to data management, co-ordinating how data
are handled and organised or giving researchers all
authority and responsibility for handling their research
data. Factors that may influence which approach is taken
include the size of the research hub, whether it is a single
or cross-institutional entity and how much methodological
and discipline diversity the data exhibit. 
Advantages of a centralised approach to data
management include:
• researchers can share good practice and data
management experiences, thereby building capacity for
the centre
• a uniform approach to data management can be
established as well as relevant central data policies 
• data ownership can be identified and kept track of over
time, especially useful when researchers move 
• data can be stored at a central location
• assurance that all researchers and staff are aware of
duties, responsibilities and funder requirements
regarding research data, with easy access to relevant
information
At the same time, researchers need to take responsibility
for managing their own data and a devolved approach to
data management may give more flexibility to adapt to
discipline requirements or may be needed to adapt data
management according to research methods.
Centralised data management is especially beneficial for
data formatting, storage and back-up. It also helps to
govern data sharing policies, establish copyright and IPR
over data and assign roles and responsibilities.
DATA MANAGEMENT RESOURCES LIBRARY 
A research hub can centralise all relevant data
management and sharing resources for researchers and
staff in a single location: on an intranet site, website, wiki,
shared network drive or within a virtual research
environment.
This resources library may contain relevant data policy
and guidance documents, templates, tools and exemplars
developed by the centre, as well as external policy and
guidance resources or links to such resources. Resources
can be developed by the centre. Good practices used by
particular researchers or projects can be used as
exemplars for others, so that these good practices can be
shared. 
A resources library might contain both locally created and
external documents.
Locally created documents:
• declaration on copyright of research data and outputs
• declaration of institutional IT data management and
existing back-up procedures
• statement on data sharing
• statement on retention and destruction of data
• file naming convention guidance
• version control guidance
• data inventory for individual projects
• template consent forms and information sheets which
take data sharing into account
• example ethical review forms
• data anonymisation guidelines
• transcription guidance 
External documents:
• research funder data policies
• research ethics guidance of professional bodies
• codes of practice or professional standards relevant to
research data
• JISC Freedom of Information and research data:
Questions and answers (2010)
39
• Data Protection Act 1998 guidance
• Environmental Information Regulations 2004
information 
• UK Data Archive’s Guidance on Managing and Sharing
Data
• Data Handling Procedures in Government
40
STRATEGIES FOR CENTRES
RESEARCH CENTRES AND PROGRAMMES CAN SUPPORT RESEARCHERS THROUGH A 
CO-ORDINATED DATA MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK OF SHARED BEST PRACTICES. THIS CAN
INCLUDE LOCAL GUIDANCE, TEMPLATES AND POINTERS TO KEY POLICIES. 
To provide a data management framework, research
hubs can develop:
• the assignment of data management responsibilities
to named individuals
• standardised forms, e.g. for consent procedures,
ethical review, data management plans
• standards and protocols, e.g. data quality control
standards, data transcription standards,
confidentiality agreements for data handlers
• file sharing and storage procedures
• a security policy for data storage and transmission
• a data retention and destruction policy
• data copyright and ownership statements for the
centre and for individual researchers
• standard data format recommendations
• version control and file naming guidelines
• information on funder requirements or policies on
managing and sharing data that apply to projects or
the centre
• a research data sharing strategy, e.g. via an
institutional repository, data centre, website
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
merge pdf; merge pdf online
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
PDF to Word Converter has accurate output, and PDF to Word Converter doesn't need the support of Adobe Acrobat & Microsoft Word.
merge pdf online; add multiple pdf files into one online
DATA INVENTORY
A research centre can develop a data inventory to keep
track of all data that are being created or acquired by
various researchers within the centre. 
The inventory can record what the data mean, how they
are created, where they were obtained, who owns them,
who has access, use and editing rights and who is
responsible for managing them. 
It can at the same time be used as a data management
tool to plan management when research starts and then
keep track of management implementation during the
research cycle via a regular update strategy. The inventory
can record storage and back-up strategies, keep track of
versions and record quality control procedures. Data
management can be reviewed annually or alongside
research review such as during project progress meetings. 
An inventory facilitates data sharing as it records data
ownership, permissions for data sharing and contains
basic descriptive metadata. It can be combined with the
recording of research outputs for research excellence
tracking purposes.
33
STRATEGIES FOR CENTRES
DATA MANAGING AND SHARING
STRATEGIES
ESRC centres and programmes have
a contractual responsibility to
manage and share their research data.
The Rural Economy and Land Use (Relu)
Programme undertakes interdisciplinary research
between social and natural sciences. When it started it
developed a programme-specific data management
policy and set up a cross council data support service. 
The Relu data policy takes the view that publicly-funded
research data are a valuable, long-term resource with
usefulness both within and beyond the Relu programme. 
Award holders are responsible for managing data
throughout their research and making them available for
archiving at established data centres after research.
Preparing a data management plan at the start of a
project helps in this respect, with pro-active advice and
training given by the data support service. 
The research councils are responsible for the long-term
preservation and dissemination of the resulting data.
The Third Sector Research Centre (TSRC) is an ESRC-
funded centre primarily shared between the Universities
of Birmingham and Southampton. 
The TSRC employs a centre manager to provide an
organisational lead in its operation, including data
management aspects such as co-ordinating ethical
review of research, consent procedures and data re-use. 
The centre has a data management committee of deputy
director, selected research staff and centre manager, to
devise and implement administrative aspects of data
management throughout the centre’s research.
Administration staff help implement data management
by providing transcription management services and
data organisation support to projects.
CASE 
STUDY
REFERENCES
All online literature references retrieved 8 April 2011. 
1Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
(2007) OECD principles and guidelines for access to research data
from public funding. www.oecd.org/dataoecd/9/61/38500813.pdf 
2
Rural Economy and Land Use Programme (2004) Relu data
management policy
relu.data-archive.ac.uk/relupolicy.asp
Publishing Network for Geoscientific and Environmental Data
(2005) Policy for the data library PANGAEA.
www.pangaea.de/curator/files/pangaea-data-policy.pdf
4Nature Publishing Group (2009) Nature journals’ policy on
availability of materials and data.
www.nature.com/authors/policies/availability.html 
5
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (2010)
BBSRC data sharing policy.
www.bbsrc.ac.uk/organisation/policies/position/policy/data-
sharing-policy.aspx
Economic and Social Research Council (2010) ESRC research
data policy
www.esrc.ac.uk/about-esrc/information/data-policy.aspx
7
Medical Research Council (n.d.) MRC policy on data sharing and
preservation
www.mrc.ac.uk/Ourresearch/Ethicsresearchguidance/Datasharin
ginitiative/Policy/index.htm
Natural Environment Research Council (2011) NERC data policy.
www.nerc.ac.uk/research/sites/data/policy.asp
Wellcome Trust (2010) Wellcome Trust policy on data
management and sharing. www.wellcome.ac.uk/About-
us/Policy/Policy-and-position-statements/WTX035043.htm
10
Van den Eynden, V., Bishop, L., Horton, L. and Corti, L. (2010)
Data management practices in the social sciences. www.data-
archive.ac.uk/media/203597/datamanagement_socialsciences.pdf
11 Rural Economy and Land Use Programme (n.d.). Project
communication and data management plan. relu.data-
archive.ac.uk/DMP2010.doc
12 Rural Economy and Land Use Programme Data Support Service
(2011) Example data management plans. relu.data-
archive.ac.uk/DMPexample.asp
13
UK Data Archive (2011) Activity-based data management
costing tool for researchers. www.data-
archive.ac.uk/media/257647/ukda_jiscdmcosting.pdf 
14 Digital Curation Centre (2010) DMP Online.
www.dcc.ac.uk/dmponline
15 SomnIA (n.d.) www.somnia.surrey.ac.uk/
16
EDINA (n.d.) Go-Geo! GeoDoc metadata creator tool.
www.gogeo.ac.uk/cgi-bin/cauth.cgi?context=editor
17
UK Location (2011) UK Location Metadata Editor. 
location.defra.gov.uk/resources/discovery-metadata-
service/metadata-editor/
18 Association for Geographic Information (2010) UK GEMINI
specification for discovery metadata for geospatial data
resources,v.2.1, Cabinet Office, London. 
www.agi.org.uk/storage/standards/uk-
gemini/GEMINI2_1_published.pdf
19 Li, C. et al. (2010) ‘BioModels Database: a database of
annotated published models’, BMC Systems Biology, 4(92).
www.ebi.ac.uk/biomodels-main/ 
20
Grimm, J. (2008) Wessex Archaeology Metric Archive Project
(WAMAP).
ads.ahds.ac.uk/catalogue/resources.html?abmap_grimm_na_2008 
21 Avondo, J. (2010) BioformatsConverter.
cmpdartsvr1.cmp.uea.ac.uk/wiki/BanghamLab/index.php/Bioform
atsConverter
22 Defra, ODPM, NAW, ONS and Countryside Agency (2004) Rural
and Urban Area Classification 2004.
www.statistics.gov.uk/geography/rudn.asp 
23
The London School of Economics and Political Science Library
(2008) Versions Toolkit for authors, researchers and repository
staff.
http://www2.lse.ac.uk/library/versions/VERSIONS_Toolkit_v1_fina
l.pdf
24
Finch, L. and Webster, J. (2008) Caring for CDs and DVDs. NPO
Preservation Guidance, Preservation in Practice Series, London:
National Preservation Office. www.bl.uk/blpac/pdf/cd.pdf
25 JISC (2004) Virtual research environment programme.
www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/vre.aspx
26 UK Data Archive (2009) Research ethics and legislation
relevant to data sharing. www.data-archive.ac.uk/create-
manage/consent-ethics/legal
27 UK Data Archive (2009) Consent forms. www.data-
archive.ac.uk/create-manage/consent-ethics/consent
28 Biological Records Centre (n.d.) www.brc.ac.uk 
29 UK Data Archive (2009) Anonymisation. www.data-
archive.ac.uk/create-manage/consent-ethics/anonymisation
30 UK Biobank (2007) UK Biobank ethics and governance
framework. www.ukbiobank.ac.uk/docs/EGFlatestJan20082.pdf 
31 Secure Data Service (n.d.) securedata.data-archive.ac.uk/ 
32
Office for National Statistics (n.d.). Virtual Microdata
Laboratory. www.ons.gov.uk/about/who-we-are/our-services/vml
33 
National Opinion Research Center (n.d.).. Technical assistance
on metadata documentation. www.norc.org/DataEnclave 
34
CIFOR (2005). Forest Spatial Information Catalogue. Available
at gislab.cifor.cgiar.org/fsic/index.htm
35
Global Biodiversity Information Framework (n.d.) GBIF Data
Portal. data.gbif.org/welcome.htm 
36
Padfield, T (2010) Copyright for archivists and records
managers,4th ed., London: Facet Publishing.
37
Social and Environmental Conditions in Rural Areas (SECRA)
(n.d.) www.sei.se/relu/secra/
38
Ball, A (2011) How to Licence Research data. Digital Curation
Centre. www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/how-guides/license-research-
data
39 Charlesworth, A. and Rusbridge, C. (2010) Freedom of
Information and research data: questions and answers.
www.jisc.ac.uk/publications/programmerelated/2010/foiresearch
data.aspx
40
Cabinet Office (2008) Data handling procedures in
Government: final report.
www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/sites/default/files/resources/final-
report.pdf
DATA MANAGEMENT CHECKLIST
Are you using standardised and consistent procedures to collect, process, check, validate
and verify data?
Are your structured data self-explanatory in terms of variable names, codes and
abbreviations used?
Which descriptions and contextual documentation can explain what your data mean,
how they were collected and the methods used to create them?
How will you label and organise data, records and files?
Will you apply consistency in how data are catalogued, transcribed and organised, e.g.
standard templates or input forms?
Which data formats will you use? Do formats and software enable sharing and long-term
validity of data, such as non-proprietary software and software based on open
standards?
When converting data across formats, do you check that no data or internal metadata
have been lost or changed?
Are your digital and non-digital data, and any copies, held in a safe and secure location?
Do you need to securely store personal or sensitive data?
If data are collected with mobile devices, how will you transfer and store the data?
If data are held in various places, how will you keep track of versions?
Are your files backed up sufficiently and regularly and are back-ups stored safely?
Do you know what the master version of your data files is?
Do your data contain confidential or sensitive information? If so, have you discussed data
sharing with the respondents from whom you collected the data?
Are you gaining (written) consent from respondents to share data beyond your
research?
Do you need to anonymise data, e.g. to remove identifying information or personal data,
during research or in preparation for sharing?
Have you established who owns the copyright of your data? Might there be joint
copyright?
Who has access to which data during and after research? Are various access regulations
needed?
Who is responsible for which part of data management?
Do you need extra resources to manage data, such as people, time or hardware?
UK Data Archive
University of Essex
Wivenhoe Park
Colchester, CO4 3SQ
Email: datasharing@data-archive.ac.uk
Telephone: +44 (0)1206 872974
www.data-archive.ac.uk/create-manage
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested