adobe pdf viewer c# : Asp.net merge pdf files control SDK platform web page wpf winforms web browser manual2-part889

In[13]:=
triplot!10, Frame+True, GridLines+Automatic#
From In[13]:=
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1
4
8
2
9
3
7
10
5
6
Errors
When you are developing a function that will be used in Excel, you should consider returning the symbol $Failed if
something goes wrong in your function. You can do this using the Check function.
In[14]:=
triplot!n", opts"""Rule#:$
Check!Module!%data,g, rules&,
data$Table!Random!#,%n&,%2&#;
rules$Sequence00Join!%opts&, Options!triplot##;
PlanarGraphPlot!data, rules#
#, $Failed#
The symbol $Failed is converted to a #VALUE! error in Excel that will suppress further dependent calculations.
In[15]:=
triplot!"hello"#
Table::iterb: Iterator #hello$ does not have e appropriate bounds. . More(
Out[15]=
$Failed
To be complete, you should also create a catch-all function definition that will handle the case where users provide argu-
ments that do not match the pattern you specified. By default, the function returns unevaluated.
In[16]:=
triplot!1, 2, 3#
Out[16]=
triplot$1, 2, 3%
This traps the error.
In[17]:=
triplot!"""#:$$Failed
In[18]:=
triplot!1, 2, 3#
Out[18]=
$Failed
You can also create your own error messages to inform the user about what went wrong.
In[19]:=
triplot!"""#:$
Module!%&,
Message!triplot::"args"#;
$Failed
#
In[20]:=
triplot::"args"$"Arguments are incorrect"
Out[20]=
Arguments are e incorrect
ExcelLink
17
Asp.net merge pdf files - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
build pdf from multiple files; pdf merger
Asp.net merge pdf files - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
.net merge pdf files; pdf mail merge plug in
In[21]:=
triplot!1, 2, 3#
triplot::args: Arguments s are incorrect
Out[21]=
$Failed
Code Box Deployment
Once you have developed a set of Mathematica functions you would like to use in Excel, you can collect cells that define
the functions in one place to make it easier to transfer the code to Excel.
In[1]:=
If!$VersionNumber/$6, Needs!"ComputationalGeometry`"#, Needs!"DiscreteMath`ComputationalGeometry`"##
In[2]:=
Clear!triplot#
In[3]:=
triplot::"usage"$"triplot!n# plots s a a random m triangulation of n n points.";
In[4]:=
Options!triplot#$%Frame+False, GridLines+None&;
In[5]:=
triplot!n", opts"""Rule#:$
Check!Module!%data,g, rules&,
data$Table!Random!#,%n&,%2&#;
rules$Sequence00Join!%opts&, Options!triplot##;
PlanarGraphPlot!data, rules#
#, $Failed#
In[6]:=
triplot!"""#:$
Module!%&,
Message!triplot::"args"#;
$Failed
#
In[7]:=
triplot::"args"$"Arguments are incorrect";
To deploy this code as an Excel function, you will need to copy the contents of the notebook cells that define the function
to an initialization code box in an Excel workbook.
Here is how to do this.
1. Create an initialization code box in Excel:
! Click Macros on the Mathematica Toolbar.
! Click New... and name the macro Initialization. This is the default if no other macros exist in your workbook.
! Select a location for the code box and click OK.
2. Copy the code from Mathematica:
! Use Kernel  Show In/Out Names to temporarily hide input labels.
! Select the Input cells to copy. To select noncontiguous cells, hold down the 
Ctrl
key.
! Press 
Ctrl
+
C
or choose Edit  Copy.
3. Paste the Mathematica code into the Excel code box:
! Click and drag inside the code box to select all existing contents.
! Press 
Delete
to delete the previous contents.
! Press 
Ctrl
+
V
or choose Edit  Paste.
18
ExcelLink
VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. FREE TRIAL: HOW TO: XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for C#▶: C# ASP.NET:
pdf split and merge; batch pdf merger
Online Merge PDF files. Best free online merge PDF tool.
Thus, C#.NET PDF document merge library control can Download and try RasterEdge.XDoc. PDF for .NET and imaging solutions, available for ASP.NET AJAX, Silverlight
pdf merge comments; split pdf into multiple files
You can now use the Mathematica function you created inside Excel. 
Notes
Using the code box approach, you can create workbooks that have no dependencies on other files.
Package Deployment
Mathematica notebooks can automatically generate an associated package file. This provides an easy way for you to
export a set of Mathematica function definitions you would like to use in an Excel workbook.
With this in mind, on the Excel side, the MathematicaLink add-in checks for a package file with the same name in the
same directory when initializing a workbook. If one is found, the code in the file is considered the initialization code for the
workbook.
Here is how to create a package file from a notebook, then use the contents of the package file as initialization code in a
workbook:
! Create .nb and .xls files with the same name in the same directory.
! Select the cells that contain code that will be used in the workbook.
! Click Cell  Cell Properties  Initialization Cell to specify the selected cells as initialization cells.
! Save the notebook. When you do this, you will be prompted to create a package file with the contents of the
initialization cells.
! Click Create Auto Save Package.
ExcelLink
19
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Embed converted html files in html page or iframe. Export PDF form data to html form in .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Turn PDF images to HTML images in VB.NET.
pdf merge documents; all jpg to one pdf converter
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. FREE TRIAL: HOW TO: XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for C#▶: C# ASP.NET:
batch pdf merger online; pdf merger online
You should now have .nb, .m, and .xls files in the same directory with the same name. In the future, every time you save
changes to the notebook, the package file is automatically updated. In turn, the next time you evaluate in Excel, the new
set of function definitions will be automatically loaded and used.
Notes
Using the package approach, you can easily develop and update function definitions for a workbook. However, you must remember 
to send the package file along with the workbook to enable others to interact with the workbook.
During development, be sure to save changes to your Mathematica notebook in order to update the package file before using it 
from the Excel side.
20
ExcelLink
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF file into two or multiple files in ASP.NET webpage online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files in .NET WinForms.
combine pdf files; pdf combine files online
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
HTML5 Viewer for C# .NET. Related Resources. To view, convert, edit, process, protect, sign PDF files, please refer to XDoc.PDF SDK for .NET overview.
add pdf pages together; pdf mail merge plug in
Creating Excel Macros
Developing Macros
Setting Up a New Notebook
When developing Mathematica code, it is best to separate input and output definitions from the main analysis portion of
the routine. This way your analysis code can be easily adapted to obtain inputs and send outputs anywhere.
Here is a sequence of Mathematica commands that performs some analysis.
This section defines inputs.
In[1]:=
m$%%1.,2.&,%3.,4.&&;
This section performs your analysis.
In[2]:=
m$Inverse!m#;
This section displays outputs.
In[3]:=
m
Out[3]=
!!#2., 1.", !1.5, #0.5""
To use this code as an Excel macro, you only need to load the ExcelLink package to modify the input and output sections.
Before doing this, open Excel and type in the same inputs into the workbook locations indicated in the following. 
This section loads required packages.
In[4]:=
Needs!"ExcelLink`"#
This section defines inputs from Excel.
In[5]:=
m$Excel!"B3:C4"#;
This section performs your analysis.
In[6]:=
m$Inverse!m#;
This section returns outputs to Excel.
In[7]:=
Excel!"B3:C4"#$m
In this example, the input and output range is the same. This is a way of performing in-place evaluation.
Modifying an Existing Notebook
To convert an existing Mathematica notebook to be used as an Excel macro:
! Locate the cells in your notebook that define inputs to your analysis.
! Modify those cells to use values contained in Excel.
! Likewise, locate the cells in the notebook that display outputs of your analysis.
! Modify those cells to return results to Excel.
For more information, see Code Box Deployment.
ExcelLink
21
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. FREE TRIAL: HOW TO: XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for C#▶: C# ASP.NET:
reader merge pdf; merge pdf online
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
Instantly convert all PDF document pages to SVG image files in C#.NET class application. Perform high-fidelity PDF to SVG conversion in both ASP.NET web and
attach pdf to mail merge; scan multiple pages into one pdf
Special Considerations
Status
If your analysis takes a while to complete, you may want to provide some feedback to the user on how the analysis is
proceeding. You can do this by using the ExcelStatus function.
In[1]:=
Needs!"ExcelLink`"#
In[2]:=
ExcelStatus!"Processing data..."#;
Pause!3#;
ExcelStatus!"Analyzing data..."#;
Pause!5#;
ExcelStatus!"Generating report..."#;
Pause!1#;
ExcelStatus!#;
This writes status information to the status bar at the bottom left-hand side of the Excel window. In the final line
ExcelStatus is called without arguments in order to return the status bar to its default state.
Notes
Writing status messages makes the analysis section of your notebook Excel specific. However, this may be required for longer 
routines.
Writing status messages can also be a good way to see which part of your analysis is taking up the most time.
Dialogs
If you would like to ask the user to select a range or specify a file name during a macro, you can do so using the
ExcelDialog function. The symbol $ExcelDialogs gives a list of available dialogs.
In[9]:=
$ExcelDialogs
Out[9]=
!Range, Open, Save,Files, Folder"
This displays the "Range" dialog.
In[10]:=
ExcelDialog!"Range"#
Out[10]=
#Range: B3:C4#
Notes
When running code from Mathematica, you need to activate Excel first to interact with an Excel dialog.
Notebook Deployment
When developing Excel macros, you do not need to transfer code to a workbook. The Mathematica code can remain stored
in a notebook file. In this case, any time you want to run a macro on a particular Excel workbook, open the notebook that
contains the macro and, with the workbook open in Excel, evaluate the code from the notebook.
Code Box Deployment
To create a standalone workbook interface, you can transfer the Mathematica macros you have developed in a notebook to
code boxes in the Excel workbook. Once this is done you can create buttons for the macros.
To deploy Mathematica code as an Excel macro you will need to copy the notebook cells that define the macro to a code
box in an Excel workbook.
22
ExcelLink
Here are the notebook cells that contain the code you want to use as a macro.
In[1]:=
Needs!"ExcelLink`"#
In[2]:=
m$Excel!"B3:C4"#;
In[3]:=
m$Inverse!m#;
In[4]:=
Excel!"B3:C4"#$m
Here is how to transfer the code to Excel.
1. Create a code box for the macro in Excel:
! Click Macros on the Mathematica Toolbar.
! Click New... and name the macro whatever you like. Spaces in the macro name are permitted.
! Select a location for the code box and click OK.
2. Copy the code from Mathematica:
! Use Kernel  Show In/Out Names to temporarily hide input labels.
! Select the cells to copy. To select noncontiguous cells, hold down the Control key.
! Press 
Ctrl
+
C
or choose Edit  Copy.
3. Paste the Mathematica code into the Excel code box:
! Click inside the code box you just created.
! Click and drag to select all existing contents of the code box. 
! Press Delete to delete the previous contents.
! Press 
Ctrl
+
V
or choose Edit  Paste.
ExcelLink
23
To create a button for the Mathematica macro:
! Select the name of the macro from the Available Macros list.
! Click Button... .
! Select a location for the button and click OK.
For more information on using macros you create in Excel, see Working with Macros.
Notes
When running macro code from inside Excel, it is not necessary to load the ExcelLink package. However, you can still include the 
line in your macro.
Using the code box approach, you can create workbooks that have no dependencies on other files.
Package Deployment
Mathematica notebooks can automatically generate an associated package file. This provides an easy way to export a set
of Mathematica commands that can be used as a one-click workbook processing macro.
To create a package file, follow the steps outlined for creating a package file outlined in the "Package Deployment" section
of Creating Excel Functions. The only difference is, in this case, you will save a sequence of macro commands to the
package file instead of a set of function definitions. 
You should now have .nb, .m, and .xls files in the same directory with the same name. In the future, every time you save
changes to the notebook, the package file is automatically updated. In turn, the next time you click Evaluate in Excel, the
new workbook processing macro will be used.
Notes
If you would like the kernel to close after workbook processing is complete, include 
Quit!"
as the last line of your macro.
24
ExcelLink
Working in Excel: Getting Started
Loading the Add-in
After installing the link, you will see a Mathematica Link for Excel folder in your Start  All Programs menu. The add-in in
this folder is required if using the link from the Excel side or when copying and pasting data between programs.
The Mathematica Link for Excel start menu folder.
If you did not install the add-in when you installed the software, click Mathematica Link Add-In to do so now. The add-
in will install itself when it is loaded the first time. This may take a moment depending on your anti-virus/ security settings.
If you are prompted to do so, choose to Enable Macros in the security warning dialog. If no dialog appears and nothing
works, you may need to adjust your Excel macro security settings to permit the macros in the add-in to run. Refer to the
Help menu in your version of Excel regarding how to change your macro security settings. Once you have adjusted your
security settings, close Excel and try loading the add-in again.
Once the add-in is loaded, the Mathematica toolbar will appear.
! In Excel 2007 or later, the Mathematica toolbar can be found under the Add-Ins ribbon tab.
The Mathematica toolbar.
If you would like a Mathematica menu instead, you can click the Options button on the toolbar. All commands in the
Mathematica menu are identical to those on the Mathematica toolbar. The Mathematica menu can be useful if you would
like to use the 
Alt
key to access menu-based commands.
Once you have installed the add-in the first time, you no longer need to use the Start menu shortcut. Instead, you can
use Tools  Add-ins dialog to load or unload the Mathematica Link add-in. Excel checks the settings in this dialog each
time it starts and automatically loads any checked add-ins.
The Excel add-ins manager.
! To access the add-ins manager in Excel 2007 or later, click the Office button / File menu to the upper-left
corner, click Excel Options, then under Add-ins, next to the Manage: Excel Add-ins dropdown box, click
Go....
ExcelLink
25
Entering a Function
Once the Mathematica Link add-in is loaded, you are ready to perform Mathematica calculations inside Excel. One way of
doing this is using the EVAL worksheet function. This worksheet function allows you to call any Mathematica function from
within an Excel formula.
Try entering the simple Mathematica function Prime in an empty worksheet cell. This is done as shown.
Formula
Result
#EVAL$"Prime",100%
541
The value returned is the 100th prime number.
! International verisons of Excel may require semicolon-separated formulas such as =EVAL("Prime"; 100).
! During your first calculation, a Mathematica kernel will be launched as a computation server for Excel. This new
process may appear in your Windows task bar.
Now, try creating an interactive prime number calculator by specifying a cell reference as an argument.
Formula
Result
#EVAL$"Prime",A1%
(N)A
Unless you have already entered a value in cell A1, the function returns unevaluated and displays an error code. The #N/A
error code indicates that one or more inputs to the formula are not available.
Type any integer you choose in cell A1, and a prime number will be calculated for you. 
Here are some other examples.
Formula
Result
#EVAL$"Factorial",10%
3628800
#EVAL$"Det",A1:C3%
determinate of matrix in cells A1:C3
#EVAL$"Expand","$x*1%^3"%
1 * 3 + x * 3 + x ^ 2 * x ^ 3
#EVAL$"Plot","x^2",",x,0,5-"%
ExcelGraphic!1"
Mathematica contains thousands of functions. If you know precisely which Mathematica function you wish to use and the
arguments it takes, you can type it directly into your spreadsheet, as shown.
If you are unsure of the name of a Mathematica function or how to use it, or want to explore the functions Mathematica
has to offer, click Functions on the Mathematica toolbar. This will launch the Mathematica Function Wizard.
26
ExcelLink
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested