asp net mvc 5 pdf viewer : Break password on pdf software application dll winforms html azure web forms NGAC%20Report%20-%20The%20Changing%20Geospatial%20Landscape0-part104

The 
Changing 
Geospatial
Landscape
A Report of the 
National Geospatial Advisory Committee
January 2009
Break password on pdf - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break pdf into pages; acrobat split pdf pages
Break password on pdf - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
how to split pdf file by pages; break pdf file into parts
The Changing 
Geospatial 
Landscape
2
Preface
In January of 2008, the Secretary of the Interior formed the National Geospa-
tial Advisory Committee to provide advice and recommendations related to 
the management of Federal and national geospatial programs.  This diverse 
committee is comprised of 28 experts from all levels of government, academia 
and the private sector.  
In our first year of deliberations we have endeavored to create a common 
level of understanding as it relates to geospatial technology, policy and pro-
grams that exist in the public and private sector. Many of our discussions have 
revolved around the need for a common sense of history – where we have 
come from – and the need for a common vision – for where we hope to go.   
The committee has developed this white paper to describe the changes and 
advancements the community has witnessed over the past three-plus decades 
and to set a context from which in part we will base our future deliberations.  
While this paper is not meant to be all-inclusive in chronicling the growth 
of the industry, we do believe it captures the major milestones and identifies 
several of the major issues that lie ahead. We encourage the reader of interest 
to follow our deliberations and progress at www.fgdc.gov/ngac.
Anne Hale Miglarese
Chair, National Geospatial Advisory Committee
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Success"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
break pdf password online; break pdf into single pages
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. FileType.IMG_JPEG); switch (result) { case ConvertResult. NO_ERROR: Console.WriteLine("Success"); break; case ConvertResult
split pdf into individual pages; break apart pdf pages
The Changing 
Geospatial 
Landscape
3
P
rACTICAlly overNIGhT, access to terabytes of geographical information, 
much of it in three dimensions, has changed the way people work, live and play. We 
rely on a host of location-based technologies via our desktop computers, PDAs and even 
our cell phones. These services fuel a market estimated at $30 billion per year and rep-
resent a major information technology growth sector. The primary reasons mainstream 
commercial applications have emerged are  that a wide variety of businesses have taken 
advantage of investments and policy decisions made by the United States government 
during the past thirty years, and burgeoning technology innovations. These innovations 
include the Internet, communications infrastructure, detailed digital mapping, robust 
data management systems, advancements in modeling the earth’s sphere, the creation of a 
constellation of global positioning system (GPS) satellites, and more.   
enlightened public policies now support shared geospatial technology, thereby fos-
tering a strong international commercial market. For continued benefit to society, it is 
incumbent upon the nation’s policy leaders to understand these points: the government’s 
role in creating and developing these services, how much the landscape has changed 
during the past 30 years, and what leaders must do to ensure continued advancement in 
geospatial technology in the future.
The detailed street maps that support Web-based mapping applications and in-car naviga-
tion systems can be traced to the innovations made by the Census Bureau approximately 
forty years ago.  Since the initial creation of digital street maps, designed to support the 
1970 Decennial Census, the street map data industry has evolved into two multibillion-
dollar european companies.
The initial experiments were expanded in the mid 1980s when the Census Bureau 
teamed up with the US Geological Survey to generate the first nationwide digital street 
map with address ranges. This became the TIGer system that supported the 1990 Census 
and forever changed the way we interact with maps. In 1996, MapQuest leveraged these 
intelligent street maps to build a Web-based system that could determine the geographic 
location of a street address and display it on a map. MapQuest was an overnight sensation 
that received 1 million hits in its first 30 days (now 40 million per month). The sale of 
TIGER data (above); 
early MapQuest
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Forms. Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free SDK library for Visual Studio .NET. Independent
pdf print error no pages selected; break a pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
can print pdf no pages selected; c# print pdf to specific printer
The Changing 
Geospatial 
Landscape
4
MapQuest to Aol for $1.1 billion in 1999 represents a landmark in the evolution of the 
geospatial technology and marks the date when location-based services officially became 
part of mainstream Internet business.
The need to keep street map and address data current resulted in the creation of Geo-
graphic Data Technology (GDT) and Navteq, which have recently been acquired by euro-
pean companies. GDT was initially purchased by the Belgium company TeleAtlas in 2004, 
and is now being acquired by TomTom, a Dutch personal navigation supplier. Navteq has 
been purchased by the Finnish telecom giant Nokia for eight billion dollars.  The fact that 
a major telecom company would place that kind of price tag on geospatial data and tech-
nology demonstrates the value of these assets and points toward further vertical integra-
tion of location-based services, especially on cell phones and PDAs.
even though detailed digital street maps provide the basis for spatial search and 
navigation, they do not actually show consumers their immediate locations. This task is 
handled by another American innovation: the global positioning system, or GPS. GPS was 
designed in the mid 1970s to support U.S. Department of Defense missions.  In the mid 
1990s, the 24 satellites that formed the GPS operational Constellation made it possible to 
locate geographic coordinates without reference to any landmarks or features on earth.  
By recording signals from at least four of the satellites, these GPS receivers were able to 
determine the X, y and Z coordinates of the receiver anywhere on the earth’s surface or on 
an aircraft.  Since 2000 almost any GPS receiver is able fix a location within a few meters 
of its actual location.
The accuracy of GPS can be enhanced by a network of land-based survey stations that 
provide precise coordinates required for surveying. This precision is made possible by 
the development of a highly accurate model of the earth’s shape. A series of enlightened 
federal policy decisions opened this military system to commercial applications and has 
spurred a huge new international commercial market. Consequently, creative entrepre-
neurs have coupled these incredible and inexpensive tools to build hundreds of applica-
tions that support the public’s insatiable appetite for location-based information.
As the cost of GPS receivers has plummeted, the range of applications has skyrocketed. 
Personal navigation systems manufactured by GPS technology companies such as Garmin 
and TomTom represent the integration of digital maps and GPS technology.  The demand 
for navigational assistance has been at the forefront of this trend and has been a major 
boon to car rental agencies. Furthermore, inexpensive personal navigation systems that 
cost a few hundred dollars have become popular consumer items.
Some models provide users with task status as well as real-time location information 
such as traffic conditions, and can even track other people and assets.  This tracking capa-
bility is now widely deployed to follow the movement of children, employees, criminals, 
vehicles and even fish. A pet products company sells a GPS dog collar; for a monthly fee, 
owners can track their pets’ locations. The fact that other people can follow your move-
ments (geo-tracking) with or without your permission or knowledge elicits a variety of 
reactions ranging from comfort to reluctant acceptance to outrage. In fact, some academ-
ics have labeled geo-tracking “geo-slavery.”
Telecom companies such as Nokia join in a vision of the future that places a high 
value on accurate geographic information. They plan to embed geospatial technology in 
the next generation’s social psyche in the same way email has become ubiquitous to this 
generation. An example of such innovation is the Apple iPhone, whose embedded GPS re-
ceiver wirelessly accesses the Internet anywhere in the world and integrates its location co-
ordinates with both self-contained and Web-accessible applications. Imagine a MapQuest 
application on a cell phone that shows the current location of the device. once people can 
fix their locations and transmit these coordinates to other devices, a full range of applica-
tions is possible. These include location-based services (find the closest automatic teller 
Personal navigation device
The Global Positioning System 
satellite network
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's not supported tell stop.
split pdf into multiple files; break pdf file into multiple files
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's
break pdf into separate pages; split pdf files
The Changing 
Geospatial 
Landscape
5
machine), advertising (get a coupon for a discount at a fast food restaurant around the 
corner) or social networking (find nearby friends). 
The ability of individuals to accurately determine and record locations in the field 
is also revolutionizing the way geographic data is collected and compiled. Using GPS-
enabled devices, thousands of amateur users act as citizen sensors that routinely create 
volumes of volunteered geographic information (vGI). For example, citizens in New 
Jersey are locating and reporting wetland features.  People can use personal navigation 
systems to send data to vendors about changes in road features and points of interest.  For 
example, openStreetMap has fostered a worldwide phenomenon in which thousands of 
participants freely form mapping parties to create their own street maps.
Social mapping capabilities are changing long-held constructs of map production and 
use.  In many parts of the world maps have long been hoarded as military intelligence 
property. In these regions, map data is now being captured in the field by volunteers rid-
ing bicycles or walking. organizations such as openStreetMap process this community 
data to create maps. Some of these maps may be the only available map for an area. The 
availability of these maps on the Web puts geography in the hands of everyone.
The Evolution of GIS: from Institutions to Virtual Globes
The development of digital mapping software began in earnest in the 1970s with the 
advent of the first software programs that could convert existing maps into digital data.  
These early systems ran on large mainframe computers that only existed in large public 
organizations. In the US, the period was dominated by federal agencies such as the USGS 
and the Census Bureau that developed their own mapping software to create and main-
tain digital representations of their existing paper maps. In addition to map generation, 
these systems were used to conduct inventories of land use and limited integration with 
other data layers. The Census Bureau developed a system called geocoding to automati-
cally assign coordinates to a street address. These agencies now have employ commercial 
software for their enterprise-wide geographic information systems (GIS). After a decade, 
some innovative industries such as timber and utilities, along with a few state agencies and 
large local governments, were operating their systems on dedicated minicomputers.  In a 
1983 report the National research Council suggested that the creation of an integrated, 
nationwide GIS could conceivably manage millions of tax parcels. This foresight was an 
Early GIS
OpenStreetMap’s 
website
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
foreach (TwainStaticFrameSizeType frame in frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
pdf link to specific page; break a pdf into separate pages
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. if (device.Compression != TwainCompressionMode.Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
break pdf into multiple documents; acrobat split pdf into multiple files
The Changing 
Geospatial 
Landscape
6
inkling of GIS’s potential for managing vast spatial data infrastructures.
The decade of the 1980s represented a migration of geographic information technol-
ogy to affordable integrated graphics workstations and client-server environments, which 
facilitated the sharing of data across a network. This enabled the technology to be adopted 
by hundreds of midsized organizations and agencies. These organizations often relied 
on medium-scale digital databases that had been created by federal agencies. These data 
sources supported applications based on relatively crude scales such as street centerlines 
and administrative areas and land use. Tremendous inroads were made in the use of 
multiple layers of data for planning applications, suitability analysis, reapportionment and 
other census-based data.
Using commercially available software tools from GIS companies such as eSrI and 
Intergraph, organizations began to create and maintain extensive geographical databases 
of corporate and public assets. Most of the analysis consisted of projects that addressed 
specific issues rather than the daily business activities of an organization. These projects 
were performed by skilled technicians who knew how to find and use the proper set of 
software tools and the output was often a printed report with tables and maps. Dramatic 
advancements were made in tools to manage images and model terrain. Commercial 
digital image processing tools from companies such as erDAS could convert aerial photo-
graphs into geographic data. At that time, digital photography technology was limited and 
satellite data was only useful for large-scale reconnaissance of activities such as agricul-
tural production.
By the 1990s, improvements in computer hardware and software provided a watershed 
for the democratization of computing and GIS software. Agencies migrated their GIS 
from UNIX to Microsoft Windows operating systems and from specialized workstations 
to common personal computers. Software was accessed through easy-to-use graphical 
user interfaces (GUIs). Performance improved as the industry provided faster and cheaper 
processors, graphics cards and storage systems. These advancements meant that powerful 
GIS software could be used both by technical “chauffeurs” who created projects and by 
non-technological professionals such as decision makers, planners, scientists and students. 
Consequently, GIS was successfully adopted by thousands of local government and busi-
ness users.
GIS for emergency 
response
Workstation GIS
The Changing 
Geospatial 
Landscape
7
other events improved the level of common user adoption. ready and free access to 
digital versions of Census TIGer files and US Geological Survey topographic quadrangles 
provided a fundamental base map of the nation that could be added to GIS mapping proj-
ects. Universities established teaching labs and helped to train a labor force familiar with 
geospatial science and applications. By the end of the decade, personal computers were 
linked to internal networks and the Internet. These advancements allowed for free online 
Web mapping services that could be easily accessed and used by average citizens. The era 
of location-based advertising emerged. Commercial GIS software expanded to include 
hundreds of tools to integrate different kinds of information, process images, perform site 
analysis, support decisions and generate high-quality cartography.
GIS software could incorporate digital imagery and computer aided design (CAD) and 
it could generate publication-quality maps. Satellite imagery with 15-meter resolution was 
also widely available and GPS technology was changing the way surveying and earth mea-
surements were performed. It should also be noted that during this period the traditional 
paper map-based National Mapping Program operated by the US Geological Survey was 
all but eliminated. This topographic map series had provided the blueprint for the devel-
opment of much of the nation and provided critical information for development of our 
natural resources. It can be argued that the reduction of this program has greatly dimin-
ished the federal role as authoritative source of geospatial information.
In the 21st century there has been steady increase in the number of commercial desk-
top software users who are able to create, maintain and analyze an extraordinary range of 
geographic information. Moreover, the emergence of the complementary, new generation 
of Web-based GIS has made it often  irrelevant as to  whether an application is running on 
a desktop or across the Internet. This new computing environment has essentially enabled 
the integration of a geographic perspective within almost every possible information 
domain.
GIS professionals rely on desktop software to develop tools, and they use the Internet 
to deploy them to a vast array of consumers. These people are producing a seemingly 
limitless range of applications such as realistic three-
dimensional visualizations and tools for integrating 
geospatial technologies with spreadsheets and other 
standard databases. This transparency has been fos-
tered by open systems and open data standards that 
result in enterprise environments, which provide ser-
vices on the open Web. From a technical viewpoint, it 
is important these applications be built with reusable 
software components that have been developed with 
object-oriented and scripting languages.
Many traditional barriers to participation in the 
geospatial data environment have disappeared.  rather 
than maintaining large staffs and infrastructure, or-
ganizations can now build entire applications without 
purchasing or storing any data or large toolkits. These 
capabilities have opened the door for GIS professionals to serve an exciting new market 
with customized applications, support for executive decision-making, and simplified tools 
that meet the needs of the task-specific or casual user.
The ability of networks to link to remote servers has empowered a new breed of knowl-
edge experts and mobile and location based services, as well as traditional GIS profession-
als. The creation of huge server farms spread across extensive broadband networks has 
eliminated the need for users to acquire, download and store massive volumes of data and 
imagery. often, images and pre-rendered maps are accessed for geographical context and 
GIS on mobile 
devices
The Changing 
Geospatial 
Landscape
8
the spatial search or analysis is conducted on a remote server.
Applications that once were performed by an application specialist on a desktop are 
now pushed to a server and quickly and seamlessly accessed by a host of users on a wide 
range of devices. This has enabled handheld devices to become powerful tools.  Thou-
sands of GIS professionals employed by the Census Bureau and hundreds of other organi-
zations can go into the field with an inexpensive handheld device to capture new attri-
butes or update existing ones and wirelessly transmit this data back to the office. Similarly, 
average citizens can now access Google earth on their iPhones to determine their current 
location or to find a good restaurant.
Some experts suggest that emphasis should shift toward the technical and institutional 
infrastructure to support the distribution of geographic information throughout society. 
These spatial data infrastructures (SDI) are frameworks that incorporate technologies, 
policies, standards and human resources to store, process and distribute vast amounts 
of data across many organizations and among governments. In the United States, the 
development of SDIs began in 1994 when President Clinton issued an executive order to 
create the National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI) and form the Federal Geographic 
Data Committee (FGDC).  This mandate validated the essential role geographic infor-
mation plays in modern society. The order drove systems to be better coordinated and 
less redundant. less emphasis was placed on products and more attention was given to 
processes, knowledge infrastructure, capacity building, communication and coordination.  
In an Internet-based world, value reaches beyond simply sharing data, and extends to 
judging data quality and to determining data fitness for consumption. With this, came the 
necessity to document data in a manner similar to documenting a library’s book catalog. 
Database quality and content took on a different meaning as public agencies published 
their data via Web browser-based applications that allowed average citizens to query and 
view detailed information about their property.
Much emphasis in the 21st century has been placed on providing accurate data to sup-
port decision-making.  In the public and commercial arena, these decisions are diverse. 
organizations want to know how to pursue an enemy on a battlefield; what are the best 
land use alternatives for combating global warming; where should police be assigned to 
reduce crime; what areas are at risk for West Nile virus; what is the best site to build new 
schools; or what are the route logistics for efficient delivery truck fleet management. At 
a personal level, people want to know how to get to a party, where to vote, what neigh-
borhood is a good location to buy a house, where to find their friends, and how will an 
ambulance find them when they call 911.
Today’s citizens, taxpayers, and homeowners have an entirely different set of geographic 
information needs and expectations than people did thirty, twenty or even eight years 
ago. They want to access geographic information from home through powerful, inexpen-
sive personal computers by means of broadband networks. People accustomed to social 
Internet structures are as interested in publishing as they are in consuming information. 
They will readily participate in Facebook’s “what are you doing now” dialog. Today’s 
generation of Internet users are often armed with their personal navigation system, are 
repeat consumers of Google earth data, and expect easy-to-use applications such as seeing 
their homes and relational values. They flock to sites such as Zillow.com and Cyberhomes.
com to view the value of their property and observe the trends in their neighborhoods. 
This cyberspace generation has high expectations of geographic technologies. They expect 
to link to their local assessor’s records. They expect detailed, recent aerial photography, 
and, even better, with bird’s-eye views at four different oblique angles. In reaction to these 
demands, local governments are incorporating GIS into their enterprise-wide IT environ-
ments. Waukesha, Wisconsin, for instance, reports that scores of business decisions relat-
ing to everything from e911 to school zoning are driven from a parcel-based GIS because 
Google Earth 
application 
on iPhone
The Changing 
Geospatial 
Landscape
9
it is the expected norm.
Development approaches change dramatically when designing systems that meet the 
needs of users who are homeowners and taxpayers.  Governor o’Malley of Maryland 
recently stated,
…I’d like you to consider the answer to this question – why is it that virtually any 
display of GIS technology quickly inspires someone one to ask the timeless question, 
“…Can you show me my house?…”  Through the power of mapping, we were able to 
create our city’s [Baltimore] first-ever complete inventory of housing stock including 
the ownership information that could be used and accessed by mangers of boarding 
and cleaning crews, by those responsible for policing, those responsible for inspections, 
those responsible for filing the lien on the property after cleaning, those in the city’s 
housing department responsible for clearing title, and taking title, and those respon-
sible for disposing of title so the property could be redeveloped and returned to the tax 
rolls.
To meet the expectations of these new users that include citizens, public employees, and 
real estate-associated professionals, a unified approach is required. Property lines must be 
accurately depicted, images must display fine details (new additions and renovations), and 
3D terrain models must model the flow of water through a neighborhood. These needs 
can only be met by investments in new data and geographic information tools that inte-
grate vast amounts of very high-resolution data that is often measured in terabytes.
The Evolution of GIS: the new white board
The previous discussion suggests that the evolution of geographic information technol-
ogy into mainstream consumer applications had its origins in investments and innova-
tions made by the federal government. At the beginning of this transformation, a single 
individual or sometimes a small group of scientists could post information into a single 
computer and see limited results. But barriers still existed for that group to publish results 
to a wider audience. Now, current IT infrastructure encompasses federated, Web-based, 
and private-sector approaches. This changing landscape affects and is affected by the 
federal government as well as multi-collaborative stakeholders. Significant advances in 
technology have changed the relative roles of different stakeholders as well as the markets’ 
environment. It is hard to ignore the importance of the recognition by Microsoft, Apple 
and Google of the business case for location-based searches and applications in changing 
a field that was once dominated by the public sector GIS professionals. Now the result-
ing data and software generated by the dedicated GIS community can be leveraged by the 
exploding group of casual GIS consumers.
The earth is a huge study area. It can be divided into pieces of various sizes and studied 
at macro or micro scales. For some applications, such as tracking hurricanes, scientists can 
rely on relatively coarse-grained information but need it updated in real time. Conversely, 
a civil engineer may require centimeter-level precision when constructing a new bridge. 
The history of geographic information applications has been one of making trade-offs. A 
person could either study large areas at crude levels of detail or small areas in fine detail. 
As we approach the end of the first decade of the 21st century, these trade-offs no longer 
apply. Perhaps no application exemplifies the success of this better than Google earth. 
When released in June 2005, Google earth represented a paradigm shift that shook many 
of our established perceptions about geospatial data. It offered multi-scale, full earth vi-
sualization that was free, easy to use and provided a dynamic sense of travel. even though 
several examples of large-scale, robust geospatial databases existed, none could match 
Google earth’s ability to fly virtually to any place on earth and visualize information at 
fine detail. Because it is free and easy to use, its success has skyrocketed over the past three 
GIS application calculates solar 
energy potential in Boston
The Changing 
Geospatial 
Landscape
10
years. Content from scores of sources (National Geographic, New york Times, youTube 
etc.) has been geographically tagged.
A recent article, “Armchair Archaeology” in The economist, describes how Google 
earth is changing the way archaeologists “make discoveries, develop theories and plan 
expeditions.” The archeologist states, “Google earth gives you free access to imagery that 
would otherwise cost a fortune and require specialist training to make use of.” A conser-
vative estimate of the number of Google earth users is more than 100 million. The net 
result is that in just three decades, the number of geographic data users has grown from 
tens of thousands, to a few hundred thousand and then almost instantaneously jumped 
to hundreds of millions. Its impact has been widely documented in the popular press by 
experts such as James Fallows of Atlantic Monthly who considers Google earth to be the 
fourth major innovation in popular computing (along with text editing, the Internet, 
and the Web). It is so mainstream that it has been the subject of New yorker cartoons 
and Google earth for Dummies is now a popular reference. More importantly, Google 
earth has actually become a common platform for hosting and sharing geographically 
referenced content of all kinds. In many ways, the mapping service has emerged as the 
new geographic whiteboard, with hundreds of millions of users posting, consuming and 
comparing data collaboratively on a common earth study area. This simple-to-use visual-
ization tool is valuable complement to the professional GIS tools that continue to be used 
to develop content, execute spatial analysis and perform modeling to support businesses 
and governments across the country. The value of spatial data and visualization is being 
realized simultaneously by casual users and professionals.
Considerations amidst the sea change
The demonstrated public appetite for spatial information will require a substantial, edu-
cated GIS workforce to meet the demand. The Geospatial Information and Technology 
Association reported that the geospatial sector has steadily increased by 35% a year, with 
the commercial side growing at an incredible rate of 100% annually. The US Department 
of labor predicted that geospatial was one of the three technology areas that would create 
the most jobs in the coming decade and importantly these are high tech and good paying 
jobs. All of these changes in terms of users and expectations have turned the traditional 
governmental and commercial relationships upside down. Most noteworthy has been the 
dramatic shift of the federal government from being the primary provider of geographic 
data to that of a major consumer. With a few exceptions for administrative regulations 
such as the decennial census and flood plain boundaries, local governments create their 
Google 
Earth
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested