"Will you speak for him?" asked Jakt, as the car skimmed over the capim. He had heard Ender 
speak for the dead once on Trondheim. 
"No," said Ender. "I don't think so." 
"Because he's a priest?" asked Jakt. 
"I've spoken for priests before," said Ender. "No, I won't speak for Quim because there's no reason 
to. Quim was always exactly what he seemed to be, and he died exactly as he would have have 
chosen-- serving God and preaching to the little ones. I have nothing to add to his story. He 
completed it himself." 
Chapter 11 -- THE JADE OF MASTER HO 
<So now the killing starts.> 
<Amusing that your people started it, not the humans.> 
<Your people started it, too, when you had your wars with the humans.> 
<We started it, but they ended it.> 
<How do they manage it, these humans-- beginning each time so innocently, yet always ending up 
with the most blood on their hands?> 
Wang-mu watched the words and numbers moving through the display above her mistress's 
terminal. Qing-jao was asleep, breathing softly on her mat not far away. Wang-mu had also slept 
for a time, but something had wakened her. A cry, not far off; a cry of pain perhaps. It had been 
part of Wang-mu's dream, but when she awoke she heard the last of the sound in the air. It was not 
Qing-jao's voice. A man perhaps, though the sound was high. A wailing sound. It made Wang-mu 
think of death. 
But she did not get up and investigate. It was not her place to do that; her place was with her 
mistress at all times, unless her mistress sent her away. If Qing-jao needed to hear the news of what 
had happened to cause that cry, another servant would come and waken Wang-mu, who would then 
waken her mistress-- for once a woman had a secret maid, and until she had a husband, only the 
hands of the secret maid could touch her without invitation. 
So Wang-mu lay awake, waiting to see if someone came to tell Qing-jao why a man had wailed in 
such anguish, near enough to be heard in this room at the back of the house of Han Fei-tzu. While 
Pdf will no pages selected - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
pdf split and merge; break apart a pdf in reader
Pdf will no pages selected - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf password; can print pdf no pages selected
she waited, her eyes were drawn to the moving display as the computer performed the searches 
Qing-jao had programmed. 
The display stopped moving. Was there a problem? Wang-mu rose up to lean on one arm; it 
brought her close enough to read the most recent words of the display. The search was completed. 
And this time the report was not one of the curt messages of failure: NOT FOUND. NO 
INFORMATION. NO CONCLUSION. This time the message was a report. 
Wang-mu got up and stepped to the terminal. She did as Qing-jao had taught her, pressing the key 
that logged all current information so the computer would guard it no matter what happened. Then 
she went to Qing-jao and laid a gentle hand on her shoulder. 
Qing-jao came awake almost at once; she slept alertly. "The search has found something," said 
Wang-mu. 
Qing-jao shed her sleep as easily as she might shrug off a loose jacket. In a moment she was at the 
terminal taking in the words there. 
"I've found Demosthenes," she said. 
"Where is he?" asked Wang-mu, breathless. The great Demosthenes-- no, the terrible 
Demosthenes. My mistress wishes me to think of him as an enemy. But the Demosthenes, in any 
case, the one whose words had stirred her so when she heard her father reading them aloud. "As 
long as one being gets others to bow to him because he has the power to destroy them and all they 
have and all they love, then all of us must be afraid together." Wang-mu had overheard those words 
almost in her infancy-- she was only three years old-- but she remembered them because they had 
made such a picture in her mind. When her father read those words, she had remembered a scene: 
her mother spoke and Father grew angry. He didn't strike her, but he did tense his shoulder and his 
arm jerked a bit, as if his body had meant to strike and he had only with difficulty contained it. And 
when he did that, though no violent act was committed, Wang-mu's mother bowed her head and 
murmured something, and the tension eased. Wang-mu knew that she had seen what Demosthenes 
described: Mother had bowed to Father because he had the power to hurt her. And Wang-mu had 
been afraid, both at the time and again when she remembered; so as she heard the words of 
Demosthenes she knew that they were true, and marveled that her father could say those words and 
even agree with them and not realize that he had acted them out himself. That was why Wang-mu 
had always listened with great interest to all the words of the great-- the terrible-- Demosthenes, 
because great or terrible, she knew that he told the truth. 
"Not he," said Qing-jao. "Demosthenes is a woman." 
The idea took Wang-mu's breath away. So! A woman all along. No wonder I heard such sympathy 
in Demosthenes; she is a woman, and knows what it is to be ruled by others every waking moment. 
She is a woman, and so she dreams of freedom, of an hour in which there is no duty waiting to be 
done. No wonder there is revolution burning in her words, and yet they remain always words and 
never violence. But why doesn't Qing-jao see this? Why has Qing-jao decided we must both hate 
Demosthenes? 
VB.NET TWAIN: TWAIN Image Scanning in Console Application
First, there is no SelectSourceDialog in VB.NET TWAIN console Here we will illustrate the benefits of this VB.NET how to scan multiple pages to one PDF or TIFF
pdf split file; acrobat split pdf pages
VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
on and VB.NET PDF editing add-on will be used. As our VB.NET PowerPoint to PDF conversion add-on and edit .pptx document file independently, no other external
pdf rotate single page; pdf file specification
"A woman named Valentine," said Qing-jao; and then, with awe in her voice, "Valentine Wiggin, 
born on Earth more than three-- more than three thousand years ago." 
"Is she a god, to live so long?" 
"Journeys. She travels from world to world, never staying anywhere more than a few months. 
Long enough to write a book. All the great histories under the name Demosthenes were written by 
that same woman, and yet nobody knows it. How can she not be famous?" 
"She must want to hide," said Wang-mu, understanding very well why a woman might want to 
hide behind a man's name. I'd do it too, if I could, so that I could also journey from world to world 
and see a thousand places and live ten thousand years. 
"Subjectively she's only in her fifties. Still young. She stayed on one world for many years, 
married and had children. But now she's gone again. To--" Qing-jao gasped. 
"Where?" asked Wang-mu. 
"When she left her home she took her family with her on a starship. They headed first toward 
Heavenly Peace and passed near Catalonia, and then they set out on a course directly toward 
Lusitania!" 
Wang-mu's first thought was: Of course! That's why Demosthenes has such sympathy and 
understanding for the Lusitanians. She has talked to them-- to the rebellious xenologers, to the 
pequeninos themselves. She has met them and knows that they are raman! 
Then she thought: If the Lusitania Fleet arrives there and fulfills its mission, Demosthenes will be 
captured and her words will end. 
And then she realized something that made this all impossible. "How could she be on Lusitania, 
when Lusitania has destroyed its ansible? Wasn't that the first thing they did when they went into 
revolt? How can her writings be reaching us?" 
Qing-jao shook her head. "She hasn't reached Lusitania yet. Or if she has, it's only in the last few 
months. She's been in flight for the last thirty years. Since before the rebellion. She left before the 
rebellion." 
"Then all her writings have been done in flight?" Wang-mu tried to imagine how the different 
timeflows would be reconciled. "To have written so much since the Lusitania Fleet left, she must 
have--" 
"Must have been spending every waking moment on the starship, writing and writing and 
writing," said Qing-jao. "And yet there's no record of her starship having sent any signals 
anywhere, except for the captain's reports. How has she been getting her writings distributed to so 
C# Image: Create C#.NET Windows Document Image Viewer | Online
C# Windows Document Image Viewer Features. No need for viewing multiple document & image formats (PDF, MS Word The following list will give you a broad overview
break a pdf into smaller files; split pdf
VB.NET Word: Use VB.NET Code to Convert Word Document to TIFF
VB.NET Word to TIFF image converting application, no external Word free to contact us and we will offer you more user guides with RasteEdge .NET PDF SDK using
cannot print pdf no pages selected; break pdf password online
many different worlds, if she's been on a starship the whole time? It's impossible. There'd be some 
record of the ansible transmissions, somewhere." 
"It's always the ansible," said Wang-mu. "The Lusitania Fleet stops sending messages, and her 
starship must be sending them but it isn't. Who knows? Maybe Lusitania is sending secret 
messages, too." She thought of the Life of Human. 
"There can't be any secret messages," said Qing-jao. "The ansible's philotic connections are 
permanent, and if there's any transmission at any frequency, it would be detected and the computers 
would keep a record of it." 
"Well, there you are," said Wang-mu. "If the ansibles are all still connected, and the computers 
don't have a record of transmissions, and yet we know that there have been transmissions because 
Demosthenes has been writing all these things, then the records must be wrong." 
"There is no way for anyone to hide an ansible transmission," said Qingjao. "Not unless they were 
right in there at the very moment the transmission was received, switching it away from the normal 
logging programs and-- anyway, it can't be done. A conspirator would have to be sitting at every 
ansible all the time, working so fast that--" 
"Or they could have a program that did it automatically." 
"But then we'd know about the program-- it would be taking up memory, it would be using 
processor time." 
"If somebody could make a program to intercept the ansible messages, couldn't they also make it 
hide itself so it didn't show up in memory and left no record of the processor time it used?" 
Qing-jao looked at Wang-mu in anger. "Where did you learn so many questions about computers 
and you still don't know that things like that can't be done!" 
Wang-mu bowed her head and touched it to the floor. She knew that humiliating herself like this 
would make Qing-jao ashamed of her anger and they could talk again. 
"No," said Qing-jao, "I had no right to be angry, I'm sorry. Get up, Wang-mu. Keep asking 
questions. Those are good questions. It might be possible because you can think of it, and if you 
can think of it maybe somebody could do it. But here's why I think it's impossible: Because how 
could anybody install such a masterful program on-- it would have to be on every computer that 
processes ansible communications anywhere. Thousands and thousands of them. And if one breaks 
down and another one comes online, it would have to download the program into the new computer 
almost instantly. And yet it could never put itself into permanent storage or it would be found there; 
it must keep moving itself all the time, dodging, staying out of the way of other programs, moving 
into and out of storage. A program that could do all that would have to be-- intelligent, it would 
have to be trying to hide and figuring out new ways to do it all the time or we would have noticed it 
by now and we never have. There's no program like that. How would anyone have ever 
programmed it? How could it have started? And look, Wang-mu-- this Valentine Wiggin who 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK deployment on IIS in .NET
This page will navigate users how to deploy HTML5 PDF to the place where you store XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer The site configured in IIS has no sufficient authority
break pdf file into parts; break password pdf
VB.NET PDF - VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer Deployment on IIS
This page will navigate users how to deploy HTML5 PDF to the place where you store XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer The site configured in IIS has no sufficient authority
break apart pdf pages; break apart a pdf in reader
writes all of the Demosthenes things-- she's been hiding herself for thousands of years. If there's a 
program like that it must have been in existence the whole time. It wouldn't have been made up by 
the enemies of Starways Congress because there wasn't a Starways Congress when Valentine 
Wiggin started hiding who she was. See how old these records are that gave us her name? She 
hasn't been openly linked to Demosthenes since these earliest reports from-- from Earth. Before 
starships. Before ..." 
Qing-jao's voice trailed off, but Wang-mu already understood, had reached this conclusion before 
Qing-jao vocalized it. "So if there's a secret program in the ansible computers," said Wang-mu, "it 
must have been there all along. Right from the start." 
"Impossible," whispered Qing-jao. But since everything else was impossible, too, Wang-mu knew 
that Qing-jao loved this idea, that she wanted to believe it because even though it was impossible at 
least it was conceivable, it could be imagined and therefore it might just be real. And I conceived of 
it, thought Wang-mu. I may not be godspoken but I'm intelligent too. I understand things. 
Everybody treats me like a foolish child, even Qing-jao, even though Qing-jao knows how quickly 
I learn, even though she knows that I think of ideas that other people don't think of-- even she 
despises me. But I am as smart as anyone, Mistress! I am as smart as you, even though you never 
notice that, even though you will think you thought of this all by yourself. Oh, you'll give me credit 
for it, but it will be like this: Wang-mu said something and it got me thinking and then I realized 
the important idea. It will never be: Wang-mu was the one who understood this and explained it to 
me so I finally understood it. Always as if I were a stupid dog who happens to bark or yip or 
scratch or snap or leap, just by coincidence, and it happens to turn your mind toward the truth. I am 
not a dog. I understood. When I asked you those questions it was because I already realized the 
implications. And I realize even more than you have said so far-- but I must tell you this by asking, 
by pretending not to understand, because you are godspoken and a mere servant could never give 
ideas to one who hears the voices of the gods. 
"Mistress, whoever controls this program has enormous power, and yet we've never heard of them 
and they've never used this power until now." 
"They've used it," said Qing-jao. "To hide Demosthenes' true identity. This Valentine Wiggin is 
very rich, too, but her ownerships are all concealed so that no one realizes how much she has, that 
all of her possessions are part of the same fortune." 
"This powerful program has dwelt in every ansible computer since starflight began, and yet all it 
ever did was hide this woman's fortune?" 
"You're right," said Qing-jao, "it makes no sense at all. Why didn't someone with this much power 
already use it to take control of things? Or perhaps they did. They were there before Starways 
Congress was formed, so maybe they... but then why would they oppose Congress now?" 
"Maybe," said Wang-mu, "maybe they just don't care about power." 
"Who doesn't?" 
VB.NET TIFF: .NET TIFF Printer Control; Print TIFF Using VB.NET
TIFF document printing add-on has no limitation on VB.NET TIFF printing API will automatically send powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
break pdf into separate pages; break pdf documents
C# Word: C#.NET Word Rotator, How to Rotate and Reorient Word Page
Remarkably, no other external products, including Microsoft page rotation control SDK will integrate the & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
cannot select text in pdf; break pdf into multiple files
"Whoever controls this secret program." 
"Then why would they have created the program in the first place? Wangmu, you aren't thinking." 
No, of course not, I never think. Wang-mu bowed her head. 
"I mean you are thinking, but you're not thinking of this: Nobody would create such a powerful 
program unless they wanted that much power-- I mean, think of what this program does, what it 
can do-- intercept every message from the fleet and make it look like none were ever sent! Bring 
Demosthenes' writings to every settled planet and yet hide the fact that those messages were sent! 
They could do anything, they could alter any message, they could spread confusion everywhere or 
fool people into thinking-- into thinking there's a war, or give them orders to do anything, and how 
would anybody know that it wasn't true? If they really had so much power, they'd use it! They 
would!" 
"Unless maybe the programs don't want to be used that way." 
Qing-jao laughed aloud. "Now, Wang-mu, that was one of our first lessons about computers. It's 
all right for the common people to imagine that computers actually decide things, but you and I 
know that computers are only servants, they only do what they're told, they never actually want 
anything themselves." 
Wang-mu almost lost control of herself, almost flew into a rage. Do you think that never wanting 
anything is a way that computers are similar to servants? Do you really think that we servants do 
only what we're told and never want anything ourselves? Do you think that just because the gods 
don't make us rub our noses on the floor or wash our hands till they bleed that we don't have any 
other desires? 
Well, if computers and servants are just alike, then it's because computers have desires, not 
because servants don't have them. Because we want. We yearn. We hunger. What we never do is 
act on those hungers, because if we did you godspoken ones would send us away and find others 
more obedient. 
"Why are you angry?" asked Qing-jao. 
Horrified that she had let her feelings show on her face, Wang-mu bowed her head. "Forgive me," 
she said. 
"Of course I forgive you, I just want to understand you as well," said Qing-jao. "Were you angry 
because I laughed at you? I'm sorry-- I shouldn't have. You've only been studying with me for these 
few months, so of course you sometimes forget and slip back to the beliefs you grew up with, and 
it's wrong of me to laugh. Please, forgive me for that." 
"Oh, Mistress, it's not my place to forgive you. You must forgive me. 
"No, I was wrong. I know it-- the gods have shown me my unworthiness for laughing at you." 
Then the gods are very stupid, if they think that it was your laughter that made me angry. Either 
that or they're lying to you. I hate your gods and how they humiliate you without ever telling you a 
single thing worth knowing. So let them strike me dead for thinking that thought! 
But Wang-mu knew that wouldn't happen. The gods would never lift a finger against Wang-mu 
herself. They'd only make Qing-jao-- who was her friend, in spite of everything-- they'd make 
Qing-jao bow down and trace the floor until Wang-mu felt so ashamed that she wanted to die. 
"Mistress," said Wang-mu, "you did nothing wrong and I was never offended." 
It was no use. Qing-jao was on the floor. Wang-mu turned away, buried her face in her hands-- 
but kept silent, refusing to make a sound even in her weeping, because that would force Qing-jao to 
start over again. Or it would convince her that she had hurt Wang-mu so badly that she had to trace 
two lines, or three, or-- let the gods not require it! --the whole floor again. Someday, thought 
Wang-mu, the gods will tell Qing-jao to trace every line on every board in every room in the house 
and she'll die of thirst or go mad trying to do it. 
To stop herself from weeping in frustration, Wang-mu forced herself to look at the terminal and 
read the report that Qing-jao had read. Valentine Wiggin was born on Earth during the Bugger 
Wars. She had started using the name Demosthenes as a child, at the same time as her brother 
Peter, who used the name Locke and went to on to be Hegemon. She wasn't simply a Wiggin-- she 
was one of the Wiggins, sister of Peter the Hegemon and Ender the Xenocide. She had been only a 
footnote in the histories-- Wang-mu hadn't even remembered her name till now, just the fact that 
the great Peter and the monster Ender had a sister. But the sister turned out to be just as strange as 
her brothers; she was the immortal one; she was the one who kept on changing humanity with her 
words. 
Wang-mu could hardly believe this. Demosthenes had already been important in her life, but now 
to learn that the real Demosthenes was sister of the Hegemon! The one whose story was told in the 
holy book of the speakers for the dead: the Hive Queen and the Hegemon. Not that it was holy only 
to them. Practically every religion had made a space for that book, because the story was so strong-
- about the destruction of the first alien species humanity ever discovered, and then about the 
terrible good and evil that wrestled in the soul of the first man ever to unite all of humanity under 
one government. Such a complex story, and yet told so simply and clearly that many people read it 
and were moved by it when they were children. Wang-mu had first heard it read aloud when she 
was five. It was one of the deepest stories in her soul. 
She had dreamed, not once but twice, that she met the Hegemon himself-- Peter, only he insisted 
that she call him by his network name, Locke. She was both fascinated and repelled by him; she 
could not look away. Then he reached out his hand and said, Si Wang-mu, Royal Mother of the 
West, only you are a fit consort for the ruler of all humanity, and he took her and married her and 
she sat beside him on his throne. 
Now, of course, she knew that almost every poor girl had dreams of marrying a rich man or 
finding out she was really the child of a rich family or some other such nonsense. But dreams were 
also sent from the gods, and there was truth in any dream you had more than once; everyone knew 
that. So she still felt a strong affinity for Peter Wiggin; and now, to realize that Demosthenes, for 
whom she had also felt great admiration, was his sister-- that was almost too much of a coincidence 
to bear. I don't care what my mistress says, Demosthenes! cried Wang-mu silently. I love you 
anyway, because you have told me the truth all my life. And I love you also as the sister of the 
Hegemon, who is the husband of my dreams. 
Wang-mu felt the air in the room change; she knew the door had been opened. She looked, and 
there stood Mu-pao, the ancient and most dreaded housekeeper herself, the terror of all servants-- 
including Wang-mu, even though Mu-pao had relatively little power over a secret maid. At once 
Wang-mu moved to the door, as silently as possible so as not to interrupt Qing-jao's purification. 
Out in the hall, Mu-pao closed the door to the room so Qing-jao wouldn't hear. 
"The Master calls for his daughter. He's very agitated; he cried out a while ago, and frightened 
everyone." 
"I heard the cry," said Wang-mu. "Is he ill?" 
"I don't know. He's very agitated. He sent me for your mistress and says he must talk to her at 
once. But if she's communing with the gods, he'll understand; make sure you tell her to come to 
him as soon as she's done." 
"I'll tell her now. She has told me that nothing should stop her from answering the call of her 
father," said Wang-mu. 
Mu-pao looked aghast at the thought. "But it's forbidden to interrupt when the gods are--" 
"Qing-jao will do a greater penance later. She will want to know her father is calling her." It gave 
Wang-mu great satisfaction to put Mu-pao in her place. You may be ruler of the house servants, 
Mu-pao, but I am the one who has the power to interrupt even the conversation between my 
godspoken mistress and the gods themselves. 
As Wang-mu expected, Qing-jao's first reaction to being interrupted was bitter frustration, fury, 
weeping. But when Wang-mu bowed herself abjectly to the floor, Qing-jao immediately calmed. 
This is why I love her and why I can bear serving her, thought Wang-mu, because she does not love 
the power she has over me and because she has more compassion than any of the other godspoken I 
have heard of. Qing-jao listened to Wang-mu's explanation of why she had interrupted, and then 
embraced her. "Ah, my friend Wang-mu, you are very wise. If my father has cried out in anguish 
and then called to me, the gods know that I must put off my purification and go to him." 
Wang-mu followed her down the hallway, down the stairs, until they knelt together on the mat 
before Han Fei-tzu's chair. 
Qing-jao waited for Father to speak, but he said nothing. Yet his hands trembled. She had never 
seen him so anxious. 
"Father," said Qing-jao, "why did you call me?" 
He shook his head. "Something so terrible-- and so wonderful-- I don't know whether to shout for 
joy or kill myself." Father's voice was husky and out of control. Not since Mother died-- no, not 
since Father had held her after the test that proved she was godspoken-- not since then had she 
heard him speak so emotionally. 
"Tell me, Father, and then I'll tell you my news-- I've found Demosthenes, and I may have found 
the key to the disappearance of the Lusitania Fleet." 
Father's eyes opened wider. "On this day of all days, you've solved the problem?" 
"If it is what I think it is, then the enemy of Congress can be destroyed. But it will be very hard. 
Tell me what you've discovered!" 
"No, you tell me first. This is strange-- both happening on the same day. Tell me!" 
"It was Wang-mu who made me think of it. She was asking questions about-- oh, about how 
computers work-- and suddenly I realized that if there were in every ansible computer a hidden 
program, one so wise and powerful that it could move itself from place to place to stay hidden, then 
that secret program could be intercepting all the ansible communications. The fleet might still be 
there, might even be sending messages, but we're not receiving them and don't even know that they 
exist because of these programs." 
"In every ansible computer? Working flawlessly all the time?" Father sounded skeptical, of 
course, because in her eagerness Qing-jao had told the story backward. 
"Yes, but let me tell you how such an impossible thing might be possible. You see, I found 
Demosthenes." 
Father listened as Qing-jao told him all about Valentine Wiggin, and how she had been writing 
secretly as Demosthenes all these years. "She is clearly able to send secret ansible messages, or her 
writings couldn't be distributed from a ship in flight to all the different worlds. Only the military is 
supposed to be able to communicate with ships that are traveling near the speed of light-- she must 
have either penetrated the military's computers or duplicated their power. And if she can do all that, 
if the program exists to allow her to do it, then that same program would clearly have the power to 
intercept the ansible messages from the fleet." 
"If A, then B, yes-- but how could this woman have planted a program in every ansible computer 
in the first place?" 
"Because she did it at the first! That's how old she is. In fact, if Hegemon Locke was her brother, 
perhaps-- no, of course-- he did it! When the first colonization fleets went out, with their philotic 
double-triads aboard to be the heart of each colony's first ansible, he could have sent that program 
with them." 
Father understood at once; of course he did. "As Hegemon he had the power, and the reason as 
well-- a secret program under his control, so that if there were a rebellion or a coup, he would still 
hold in his hands the threads that bind the worlds together." 
"And when he died, Demosthenes-- his sister-- she was the only one who knew the secret! Isn't it 
wonderful? We've found it. All we have to do is wipe all those programs out of memory!" 
"Only to have the programs instantly restored through the ansible by other copies of the program 
on other worlds," said Father. "It must have happened a thousand times before over the centuries, a 
computer breaking down and the secret program restoring itself on the new one." 
"Then we have to cut off all the ansibles at the same time," said Qing-jao. "On every world, have a 
new computer ready that has never been contaminated by any contact with the secret program. Shut 
the ansibles down all at once, cut off the old computers, bring the new computers online, and wake 
up the ansibles. The secret program can't restore itself because it isn't on any of the computers, 
Then the power of Congress will have no rival to interfere!" 
"You can't do it," said Wang-mu. 
Qing-jao looked at her secret maid in shock. How could the girl be so ill-bred as to interrupt a 
conversation between two of the godspoken in order to contradict them? 
But Father was gracious-- he was always gracious, even to people who had overstepped all the 
bounds of respect and decency. I must learn to be more like him, thought Qing-jao. I must allow 
servants to keep their dignity even when their actions have forfeited any such consideration. 
"Si Wang-mu," said Father, "why can't we do it?" 
"Because to have all the ansibles shut off at the same time, you would have to send messages by 
ansible," said Wang-mu. "Why would the program allow you to send messages that would lead to 
its own destruction?" 
Qing-jao followed her father's example by speaking patiently to Wang-mu. "It's only a program-- 
it doesn't know the content of messages. Whoever rules the program told it to hide all the 
communications from the fleet, and to conceal the tracks of all the messages from Demosthenes. It 
certainly doesn't read the messages and decide from their contents whether to send them." 
"How do you know?" asked Wang-mu. 
"Because such a program would have to be-- intelligent!" 
"But it would have to be intelligent anyway," said Wang-mu. "It has to be able to hide from any 
other program that would find it. It has to be able to move itself around in memory to conceal itself. 
How would it be able to tell which programs it had to hide from, unless it could read them and 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested