asp net mvc show pdf in div : Break pdf into pages SDK application API .net windows wpf sharepoint p25_training_guide0-part1326

P25 Radio 
Systems
www.danelec.com
Training Guide
Break pdf into pages - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
pdf insert page break; pdf split pages
Break pdf into pages - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break a pdf password; break pdf file into parts
TG-001 P25 Radio Systems
www.danelec.com
ii
Training
Guide
Copyright 
©
2004 Daniels Electronics Ltd. All rights reserved. No part 
of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system 
or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, 
photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written consent 
of Daniels Electronics Ltd.
DE™ is a registered trademark of Daniels Electronic Ltd. registered in 
the U.S. Patent and Trademark Offi ce.
IMBE™ and AMBE+2™ are trademarks of Digital Voice Systems, Inc.
EDACS® is a registered trademark of M/A-COM, Inc.
Aegis™ is a trademark of M/A-COM, Inc.
iDEN™ is a trademark of Motorola, Inc.
GSM™ is a trademark of GSM Association.
ANSI®   is a registered trademark of the American National Standards 
Institute
NOTE
Daniels Electonics Ltd. utilizes a three-level revision system. This system 
enables Daniels to identify the signifi cance of a revision. Each element 
of the revision number signifi es the scope of change as described in the 
diagram below.
DOCUMENT REVISION 
DEFINITION
Major Revisions: The result of a major 
change to product function, process or 
requirements.
Minor Revisions: The result of a 
minor change to product, process or 
requirements.
Editorial Revisions: The result of typing 
corrections or changes in formatting, 
grammar or wording.
1-0-0
Three-level revision numbers start at 1-0-0 for the fi rst release. The 
appropriate element of the revision number is incremented by 1 for each 
subsequent revision, causing any digits to the right to be reset to 0.
For example:
If the current revision = 2-1-1  Then the next major revision = 3-0-0
If the current revision = 4-3-1  Then the next minor revision = 4-4-0
If the current revision = 3-2-2  Then the next editorial revision = 3-2-3
Daniels Electronics Ltd.
43 Erie Street, Victoria, BC
Canada V8V 1P8
www.danelec.com
sales@danelec.com
Toll Free Canada and USA:
phone: 1-800-664-4066
fax: 
1-877-750-0004
International:
phone: 250-382-8268
fax: 
250-382-6139
PRINTED IN CANADA
Document Number:
Revision:
Revision Date:
TG-001
1-0-0
Sept 2004
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class.
acrobat split pdf; cannot print pdf file no pages selected
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Offer PDF page break inserting function. PDF document editor library control, RasterEdge XDoc.PDF, offers easy to add & insert an (empty) page into an existing
break a pdf file; pdf no pages selected to print
TG-001 P25 Radio Systems
www.danelec.com
iii
Training
Guide
Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction To P25 ..............................................
1
What is Project 25? ....................................................................................
1
P25 Phases ................................................................................................
2
Conventional vs. Trunked ..........................................................................
3
How does P25 work? .................................................................................
4
P25 Radio System Architecture .................................................................
5
Benefi ts of P25 ...........................................................................................
8
Other Digital Standards ............................................................................
12
P25 Participants .......................................................................................
14
Chapter 2: P25 Interface Standards ....................................
17
P25 Standards – General System Model .................................................
17
RF Sub-System ........................................................................................
19
Common Air Interface ..............................................................................
19
Inter-System Interface ..............................................................................
20
Telephone Interconnect Interface .............................................................
21
Network Management Interface ...............................................................
21
Data Host or Network Interface ................................................................
21
Data Peripheral Interface .........................................................................
22
Fixed Station Interface .............................................................................
22
Console Sub-System Interface ................................................................
23
Chapter 3: P25 Practical Applications ..................................
25
Analog to P25 Transition ..........................................................................
25
P25 Frequency Bands .............................................................................
25
P25 Digital Code Defi nitions ....................................................................
26
P25 Voice Message Options ....................................................................
34
P25 Encryption .........................................................................................
37
Analog vs. P25 Digital Coverage .............................................................
38
P25 Radio System Testing .......................................................................
41
P25 vs. Analog Delay Times ....................................................................
43
Chapter 4: Anatomy of the Common Air Interface ...............
47
Voice ........................................................................................................
47
Data .........................................................................................................
48
Frame Synchronization and Network Identifi er ........................................
48
Status Symbols ........................................................................................
49
Header Data Unit .....................................................................................
49
Voice Code Words ...................................................................................
50
Logical LINK Data Unit 1 ..........................................................................
51
Logical LINK Data Unit 2 ..........................................................................
52
Low Speed Data ......................................................................................
53
Terminator Data Unit ................................................................................
53
Packet Data Unit ......................................................................................
55
Chapter 5: IMBE™ And AMBE+2™ Vocoders .....................
57
Chapter 6: P25 Glossary of Terms .......................................
59
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Success"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
acrobat split pdf into multiple files; pdf splitter
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. is not a document"); default: Console.WriteLine("Fail: unknown error"); break; }. This demo code convert word file all pages to Jpeg
split pdf files; cannot print pdf no pages selected
TG-001 P25 Radio Systems
www.danelec.com
iv
Training
Guide
This Page Intentionally Left Blank
Many references were used in the creation of this document.  
Following is a list of references for P25 information:
Aerofl ex, Inc.
Aerofl ex Incorporated is a multi-faceted high-technology company 
that designs, develops, manufactures and markets a diverse range 
of microelectronic and test and measurement products.  Aerofl ex is 
the manufacturer of the IFR 2975 P25 Radio Test Set.
www.P25.com 
www.ifrsys.com
APCO International
The Association of Public-Safety Communications Offi cials - 
International, Inc. is the world’s oldest and largest not-for-profi t 
professional organization dedicated to the enhancement of public 
safety communications
www.apcointl.org
DVSI
Digital Voice Systems, Inc., using its proprietary voice compression 
technology, specializes in low-data-rate, high-quality speech 
compression products for wireless communications, digital storage, 
and other applications.  DVSI is the manufacturer of the IMBE and 
AMBE+2 vocoders.
www.dvsinc.com
PTIG
The Project 25 Technology Interest Group (PTIG) is a group 
composed of public safety professionals and equipment 
manufacturers with a direct stake in the further development of, and 
education on, the P25 standards.  PTIG’s purpose is to further the 
design, manufacture, evolution, and effective use of technologies 
stemming from the P25 standardization process.
www.project25.org
TIA
The Telecommunications Industry Association is the leading U.S. 
non-profi t trade association serving the communications and 
information technology industry, with proven strengths in market 
development, trade shows, domestic and international advocacy, 
standards development and enabling e-business.
www.tiaonline.org
REFERENCES
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
can set and integrate this duplex scanning feature into your C# device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device
break a pdf into parts; break a pdf
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
how to install XImage.Twain into visual studio RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device. TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE
combine pages of pdf documents into one; break pdf
TG-001 P25 Radio Systems
www.danelec.com
Chapter 1: Introduction To P25
1
Training
Guide
This document is written with the intention of supplying the reader 
with a simple, concise and informative description of Project 25.  The 
document assumes the reader is familiar with conventional Two-Way 
Radio Communications systems.
Project 25 is a standards initiative, to be amended, revised, and added 
to as the users identify issues, and as experience is gained.
WHAT IS PROJECT 25?
Project 25 (P25) is a set of standards produced through the 
joint efforts of the Association of Public Safety Communications 
Offi cials International (APCO), the National Association of State 
Telecommunications Directors (NASTD), selected Federal Agencies 
and the National Communications System (NCS), and standardized 
under the Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA).  P25 
is an open architecture, user driven suite of system standards that 
defi ne digital radio communications system architectures capable of 
serving the needs of Public Safety and Government organizations.  
The P25 suite of standards involves digital Land Mobile Radio (LMR) 
services for local, state/provincial and national (federal) public safety 
organizations and agencies.  P25 open system standards defi ne the 
interfaces, operation and capabilities of any P25 compliant radio 
system.  In other words, a P25 radio is any radio that conforms to 
the P25 standard in the way it functions or operates.  P25 compliant 
radios can communicate in analog mode with legacy radios and in 
either digital or analog mode with other P25 radios.  The P25 standard 
exists in the public domain, allowing any manufacturer to produce a 
P25 compatible radio product.
P25 is applicable to LMR equipment authorized or licensed in the U.S. 
under the National Telecommunications and Information Administration 
(NTIA) or Federal Communications Commission (FCC) rules and 
regulations.
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION TO P25
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
you want to acquire an image directly into the C# RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
break apart a pdf in reader; break a pdf into separate pages
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
foreach (TwainStaticFrameSizeType frame in frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
break pdf into separate pages; pdf file specification
TG-001 P25 Radio Systems
www.danelec.com
Chapter 1: Introduction To P25
2
Training
Guide
Although developed primarily for North American public safety services, 
P25 technology and products are not limited to public safety alone 
and have also been selected and deployed in other private system 
applications, worldwide.  The Project 25 users’ process is governed by 
an eleven-member steering committee made up of nine U.S. federal, 
state and local government employees and two co-directors.  From its 
inception, Project 25 has had four main objectives:
• ensure competition in system life cycle procurements through 
Open Systems Architecture
• allow effective, effi cient and reliable intra-agency and inter-
agency communications
• provide enhanced functionality and capabilities with a focus on 
public safety needs
• improve radio spectrum effi ciency
TIA (Telecommunications Industry Association) is a national trade 
organization of manufacturers and suppliers of telecommunications 
equipment and services. It has substantial experience in the 
technical aspects of radio communications and in the formulation of 
standards with reference thereto. TIA is accredited by the American 
National Standards Institute (ANSI
®
) as a Standards Developing 
Organization.
P25 PHASES
P25-compliant technology is being deployed in several phases.  
Phase 1
Phase 1 radio systems operate in 12.5 KHz analog, digital or mixed 
mode.  Phase 1 radios use Continuous 4 level FM (C4FM) non-linear 
modulation for digital transmissions.  Phase 1 P25-compliant systems 
are backward compatible and interoperable with legacy systems, 
across system boundaries, and regardless of system infrastructure.  
In addition, the P25 suite of standards provide an open interface to 
the radio frequency (RF) subsystem to facilitate interlinking of different 
vendors’ systems.
Phase 2
Phase 2 is currently under development with the goal of defi ning 
either FDMA and/or TDMA standards to achieve one voice channel or 
a minimum 4800 bps data channel per 6.25 kHz bandwidth effi ciency.  
P25 Phase 2 implementation involves time and frequency modulation 
schemes (e.g., TDMA and FDMA), with the goal of improved spectrum 
utilization.  Also being stressed are such features as interoperability 
with legacy equipment, interfacing between repeaters and other 
subsystems, roaming capacity and spectral effi ciency/channel reuse.
TG-001 P25 Radio Systems
www.danelec.com
Chapter 1: Introduction To P25
3
Training
Guide
Phase 3
Implementation of Phase 3 will address the need for high-speed 
data for public-safety use.  Activities will encompass the operation 
and functionality of a new aeronautical and terrestrial wireless digital 
wideband/broadband public safety radio standard that can be used 
to transmit and receive voice, video and high-speed data in wide-
area, multiple-agency networks.  The European Telecommunications 
Standards Institute (ETSI) and TIA are working collaboratively 
on Phase 3, known as Project MESA (Mobility for Emergency and 
Safety Applications).  Current P25 systems and future Project 
MESA technology will share many compatibility requirements and 
functionalities.
This document deals almost exclusively with P25 Phase 1.  Phase 2 
and Phase 3 standards are under development.
CONVENTIONAL VS. TRUNKED
In general, radio systems can be separated into conventional and 
trunked systems. A conventional system is characterized by relatively 
simple geographically fi xed infrastructure (such as a repeater network) 
that serves to repeat radio calls from one frequency to another. A 
trunked system is characterized by a controller in the infrastructure 
which assigns calls to specifi c channels.  P25 supports both trunked 
and conventional radio systems.  This document, however, deals 
primarily with conventional radio systems.
TG-001 P25 Radio Systems
www.danelec.com
Chapter 1: Introduction To P25
4
Training
Guide
HOW DOES P25 WORK?
P25 radios operate very similar to conventional analog FM radios.  In 
fact, P25 radios will operate in conventional analog mode, making them 
backwards compatible with existing analog radio systems.  When the 
P25 radio operates in digital mode, the carrier is moved to four specifi c 
frequency offsets that represent four different two-bit combinations.  
This is a modifi ed 4 level FSK used in analog radio systems.
In analog mode, the P25 radio will operate exactly the same as 
conventional analog systems, with the capability for CTCSS, DCS, 
pre-emphasis and de-emphasis, wideband or narrowband operation 
and other standard analog features.
In P25 digital mode, the P25 transmitter will convert all analog audio 
to packets of digital information by using an IMBE™ vocoder, then 
de-vocode the digital information back to analog audio in the receiver.  
Error correction coding is added to the digital voice information as well 
as other digital information.  Analog CTCSS and DCS are replaced by 
digital NAC codes (as well as TGID, Source and Destination codes for 
selective calling).  Encryption information can be added to protect the 
voice information, and other digital information can also be transmitted 
such as a user defi ned low speed data word or an emergency bit.
P25 systems use the Common Air Interface (CAI). This interface 
standard specifi es the type and content of signals transmitted by 
P25 compliant radios.  A P25 radio using the CAI should be able to 
communicate with any other P25 radio using the CAI, regardless of 
manufacturer. 
Current P25 radios are designed to use 12.5 kHz wide channels, 
allowing two conversations to take place where only one used to fi t (on 
a 25 kHz channel). In Phase 2, P25 radios will use 6.25 kHz channels, 
allowing four times as many conversations compared to analog.  P25 
radios must also be able to operate in analog mode on 25 kHz or 
12.5 kHz channels. This backward compatibility allows P25 users to 
gradually transition to digital while continuing to use older equipment. 
P25 transmissions may be protected by digital encryption. The P25 
standards specify the use of the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) 
algorithm, U.S. Data Encryption Standard (DES) algorithm, and other 
encryption algorithms. There is an additional specifi cation for over-
the-air rekeying (OTAR) to update encryption keys in the radios using 
the radio network. 
P25 channels that carry voice or data operate at 9600 bits per second 
(bps). These voice or data channels are protected by a substantial 
amount of forward error correction, which helps receivers to 
compensate for poor RF conditions and improves useable range. 
P25 supports data transmission, either piggybacked with voice (low 
speed data), or in several other modes up to the full traffi c channel 
rate of 9600 bps.
TG-001 P25 Radio Systems
www.danelec.com
Chapter 1: Introduction To P25
5
Training
Guide
P25 RADIO SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
Figure 1-1: P25 Radio System Architecture
Figure 1-1 represents a typical transceiver for digital signals and 
has been reduced to the basic elements which are specifi c to digital 
technology.  Hence, things such as multiple stages of IF have been 
omitted as they are not really relevant to any of the digital technology 
employed.
The P25 Radio System Architecture can be broken down into three 
main areas.
A to D / D to A and Speech Coding / Decoding
P25 uses a specifi c method of digitized voice (speech coding) called 
Improved Multi-Band Excitation (IMBE™). The IMBE™ voice encoder-
decoder (vocoder) listens to a sample of the audio input and only 
transmits certain characteristics that represent the sound. The receiver 
uses these basic characteristics to produce a synthetic equivalent of 
the input sound. IMBE™ is heavily optimized for human speech and 
doesn’t do very well in reproducing other types of sounds, including 
dual-tone multifrequency (DTMF) tones.
The IMBE™ vocoder samples the microphone input  producing 88 
bits of encoded speech every 20 milliseconds. Therefore, the vocoder 
produces speech characteristics at a rate of 4400 bits per second.
A to D
Speech
Coder
Channel
Coder
Modulator
TxAmplifier
D to A
Speech  
Decoder
Channel  
Decoder
Demod--
ulator
Rx 
Amplifier
Filters & 
Equalizer
Baseband
filters
Duplexer
V.C.O.
TG-001 P25 Radio Systems
www.danelec.com
Chapter 1: Introduction To P25
6
Training
Guide
Channel Coding / Decoding
Channel Coding is the method in which digital RF systems utilize 
error correction and data protection techniques to ensure that the 
data (voice or control) arrives and is recovered correctly.  The error 
correction and data protection are designed to improve the system 
performance by overcoming channel impairments such as noise, 
fading and interference.
Types of P25 channel coding include interleaving and linear block 
codes such as Hamming codes, Golay codes, Reed-Solomon codes, 
Primitive BCH, and shortened cyclic codes.
Modulating / Demodulating and Filtering
In Phase 1,  a 12.5 KHz channel is used to transmit C4FM modulated 
digital information.   C4FM modulation is a type of differential 
Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (QPSK) where each symbol is shifted 
in phase by 45 degrees from the previous symbol.  Although the phase 
(frequency) is modulated for C4FM,  the amplitude of the carrier is 
constant, generating a constant envelope frequency modulated 
waveform.
In Phase 2, digital information is transmitted over a 6.25 KHz channel 
using the CQPSK modulation format.  CQPSK modulates the phase 
and simultaneously modulates the carrier amplitude to minimize 
the width of the emitted spectrum which generates an amplitude 
modulated waveform.
The modulation sends 4800 symbols/sec with each symbol conveying 
2 bits of information. The mapping between symbols and bits is shown 
below:
Information Bits 
Symbol 
C4FM Deviation (Phase 1) 
CQPSK Phase Change (Phase 2)
01 
+3 
+1.8kHz 
+135 degrees
00 
+1 
+0.6kHz 
+45 degrees
10 
-1 
-0.6kHz 
- 45 degrees
11 
-3 
-1.8kHz 
-135 degrees
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested