U.S. Department of 
Health and Human Services
Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Midcourse Report
Strategies to Increase   
Physical Activity Among Youth
www.health.gov/paguidelines
Pdf specification - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
reader split pdf; break a pdf into separate pages
Pdf specification - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
split pdf by bookmark; break a pdf file into parts
The findings of this report are those of the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Midcourse Report Subcommittee of 
the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & 
&
Nutrition, or the U.S. Department of Health 
and Human Services.
Suggested citation: Physical A 
Fitness, Sports & Nutrition.  Physical Activity 
Among Youth. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2012.
C# Word: How to Generate Barcodes in C# Word with .NET Library
123456789"; linearBarcode.Resolution = 96; linearBarcode.Rotate = Rotate.Rotate0; // load Word document and you can also load documents like PDF, TIFF, Excel
split pdf into individual pages; break a pdf
C# Imaging - C# Code 128 Generation Guide
Automatically add minimum left and right margins that go with specification. Create Code 128 on PDF, Multi-Page TIFF, Word, Excel and PPT.
cannot select text in pdf file; acrobat split pdf pages
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES  
Office of the Secretary
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health
Washington DC 20201
December 31, 2012
The Honorable Kathleen Sebelius 
Secretary of Health and Human Services 
200 Independence Avenue, S.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20201
Dear Secretary Sebelius, 
On behalf of the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition (PCFSN) and the entire Physical Activity 
Physical Activity Guidelines for 
Americans Midcourse Report: Strategies to Increase Physical Activity Among Youth.
young Americans increase physical activity across a variety of settings. 
group as presented in the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Rather, this report highlights physical activity 
communities. For example, Healthy P 
Let’s Move! 
initiative and the White House Childhood Obesity Task Force Report are built. Similarly, the purpose of the National 
Physical A 
Americans achieve the Guidelines. W 
intervention strategies to achieve the Guidelines among youth. 
recognition goes to Katrina Butner 
successful completion of this project.  We also appreciate the support of Don Wright, Richard Olson, and Amber 
, and 
Jane W 
us present information that is useful and readable.
TIFF Image Viewer| What is TIFF
The TIFF specification contains two parts: Baseline TIFF (the core of TIFF) and TIFF and other popular formats, such as Bitmap, Png, Gif, Tiff, PDF, MS-Word
pdf file specification; cannot select text in pdf
Generate and Print 1D and 2D Barcodes in Java
linear barcode industry specification with barcode generator for Java. Error correction is valid for all 2D barcodes like QR Code, Data Matrix and PDF 417 in
pdf split; break pdf into multiple files
stakeholders, including transportation, urban planning, and public safety, as well as health, have an interest in 
Sincerely,
Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, MBA 
Chair, Physical Activity Guidelines Midcourse Report Subcommittee 
Member, President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition 
President and CEO, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
DocImage SDK for .NET: Web Document Image Viewer Online Demo
Microsoft PowerPoint: PPTX, PPS, PPSX; PDF: Portable Document Format; TIFF: Tagged Image XPS: XML Paper Specification. Supported Browers: IE9+; Firefox, Firefox
pdf rotate single page; break pdf documents
.NET PDF Generator | Generate & Manipulate PDF files
archival records creation; Support for template PDF creation; Easy to use, no need to know PDF specification; Fast Document creation
break pdf into multiple pages; pdf split pages
iii
Contents
Contents
Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Midcourse Report Membership .......................................................iv
Executive Summary and Key Messages 
vii
1. Introduction .......................................
1
Current Levels of Physical Activity Among Youth 
1
The 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans 
2
The Midcourse Report: Building on the Physical Activity Guidelines ...................................................................3
Organization of the Report ............
3
2. Methods ..............................................
5
Conceptual Framework ...................
5
Literature Review .............................
6
Report Development and Review ..
7
3. Results by Intervention Setting ....
9
School Setting ..................................
9
Multi-component School-based Interventions 
9
Physical Education ...............
10
Active Transportation to School 
11
Activity Breaks .....................
12
School Physical Environment 
13
After-school Interventions .
13
Preschool and Childcare Center Setting 
15
Community Setting ......................
16
Built Environment ...............
16
Camps and Youth Organizations
17
Other Community-based Programs  
18
Family and Home Setting ...........
19
Primary Health Care Setting .......
20
4. Additional Approaches to Consider 
23
Policy ..............................................
23
VERB ...............................................
25
Technology-based Approaches ...
25
Playing Outdoors ..........................
26
References .............................................
28
GS1-128 Web Server Control for ASP.NET
Microsoft Visual Studio 2005/2008/2010 is supported. GS1-128 is actually a barcode application standard, rather than a barcode specification standard.
can print pdf no pages selected; a pdf page cut
VB.NET TWAIN: Overview of TWAIN Image Scanning in VB.NET
It includes the specification, data source manager and sample code implement console based TWAIN scanning and scan multiple pages into a single PDF document in
break pdf file into parts; break apart pdf
Physical Activity Guidelines for 
Americans Midcourse Report Membership
President’s Council on Fitness, Sports 
&
Nutrition 
Co-Chairs
Drew Brees
Dominique Dawes
Members
Dan Barber
Carl Edwards
Allyson Felix
Jayne Greenberg, EdD
Grant Hill
Billie Jean King
Michelle Kwan
Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, MBA
Cornell McClellan
Stephen McDonough, MD
Chris Paul
Curtis Pride
Donna Richardson Joyner
Ian Smith, MD 
Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Midcourse Report Subcommittee
Chair
Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, MBA
Member, President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & 
Nutrition
President and CEO, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Members
Joan M. Dorn, PhD
Chief, Physical Activity and Health Branch
Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 
Janet E. Fulton, PhD
Lead Epidemiologist
Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Kathleen F. Janz, EdD
Professor, Department of Health and Human 
Physiology
Department of Epidemiology
University of Iowa
Sarah M. Lee, PhD
Lead Health Scientist
Division of Population Health
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Robin A. McKinnon, PhD, MPA
Health Policy Specialist
National Cancer Institute
National Institutes of Health 
Russell R. Pate, PhD
Professor, Department of Exercise Science
University of South Carolina
Karin Allor Pfeiffer, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Kinesiology
Michigan State University
Deborah Rohm Young, PhD
Research Scientist, Department of Research and 
Evaluation
Kaiser Permanente Southern California
Richard P. Troiano, PhD
Captain, U.S. Public Health Service
National Cancer Institute
National Institutes of Health 
iv
XImage.Barcode Generator for .NET, Technical Information Details
View & Process. XImage.Raster. Adobe PDF. XDoc.PDF. Scanning. XImage.OCR. Microsoft Office. View & Process. XImage.Raster. Adobe PDF. XDoc.PDF. Scanning. XImage.
split pdf into multiple files; pdf split and merge
XImage.Twain for .NET, Technical Information Details
View & Process. XImage.Raster. Adobe PDF. XDoc.PDF. Scanning. XImage.OCR. Microsoft Office. View & Process. XImage.Raster. Adobe PDF. XDoc.PDF. Scanning. XImage.
cannot print pdf file no pages selected; pdf split pages in half
v
Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Midcourse Report Membership
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Federal Steering Committee
Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion 
Don Wright, MD, MPH
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health
Director
Katrina L. Butner, PhD, RD, ACSM CES
Coordinator, Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans 
Midcourse Report 
Physical Activity and Nutrition Advisor
Amber Mosher, MPH, RD
Prevention Science Fellow
Richard D. Olson, MD, MPH
Director, Prevention Science Division
President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition
Shellie Y. Pfohl, MS 
Executive Director
Megan Nechanicky, MS, RD
Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Fellow
Jane D. Wargo, MA
Program Analyst 
National Institutes of Health  
Richard P. Troiano, PhD
Captain, U.S. Public Health Service
National Cancer Institute
National Institutes of Health
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Rosemary Bretthauer-Mueller
Lead Health Communication Specialist 
Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity
William H. Dietz, MD, PhD
Former Director 
Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity
Joan M. Dorn, PhD
Chief, Physical Activity and Health Branch 
Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity
Janet E. Fulton, PhD
Lead Epidemiologist 
Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health 
Rosie Henson, MSSW, MPH
Senior Advisor
Penelope Slade-Sawyer, PT, MSW
Rear Admiral, U.S. Public Health Service 
Senior Advisor
Literature Review Team: Washington University in St. Louis and Universidad de los Andes
Ross Brownson, PhD
Professor and co-director, Prevention Research Center 
in St. Louis
Washington University in St. Louis
Amy A. Eyler, PhD
Prevention Research Center in St. Louis 
Assistant Professor, Washington University in St. Louis
Rachel Tabak, PhD
Prevention Research Center in St. Louis
Research Assistant Professor, Washington University
Olga L. Sarmiento, MD, MPH, PhD 
Associate Professor
Department of Public Health, School of Medicine
Universidad de los Andes
Bogotá, Colombia
Technical Writer and Editor
Anne Brown Rodgers
Reviewers
William H. Dietz, MD, PhD
Former Director 
Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
James F. Sallis, PhD
Distinguished Professor of Family and Preventive 
Medicine
Chief, Division of Behavioral Medicine
University of California, San Diego
Dianne S. Ward, PhD
Professor
Department of Nutrition
University of North Carolina
vi
vii
Executive Summary and Key Messages
Executive Summary and Key Messages
In response to a desire from both federal and non-
federal stakeholders for the 2008 Physical Activity 
Guidelines for Americans to be updated on a regular 
basis, the U.S. Department of Health and Human 
Services (HHS) Office of Disease Prevention and 
Health Promotion (ODPHP), the President’s Council on 
Fitness, Sports & Nutrition (PCFSN), the Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the National 
Institutes of Health (NIH) formed a federal steering 
group to discuss this issue. Although research and new 
findings in the realm of physical activity continue to 
emerge, the group believed that the current Physical 
Activity Guidelines for Americans recommendations 
would change little if they were updated. Therefore, 
the steering group recommended a Midcourse Report, 
which would provide an opportunity for experts to 
review and highlight a specific topic of importance 
related to the Guidelines and to communicate findings 
to the public. The steering group identified “strategies 
to increase physical activity among youth” as a topic 
area that would help to inform current practice related 
to the Guidelines.
Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Midcourse 
Report: Strategies to Increase Physical Activity Among 
Youth is intended to identify interventions that can help 
increase physical activity in youth across a variety of 
settings. A subcommittee of the PCFSN comprised of 
experts in physical activity was convened to examine 
the evidence and deliver their findings in the Midcourse 
Report. The subcommittee focused on physical activity 
in general and did not examine specific types of 
activity, such as muscle- or bone-strengthening physical 
activities. The subcommittee also did not consider 
efforts to reduce sedentary time or screen time. The 
primary audiences for the report are policymakers, 
health care and public health professionals, and leaders 
in the settings covered in the report.
Recognizing that many settings have the potential 
to increase physical activity among youth, the 
subcommittee focused on five settings in which 
physical activity interventions for youth have been 
studied and evaluated and for which review articles 
existed: schools, preschool and childcare centers, 
community, family and home, and primary care. To 
assess the literature on these settings, the subcommittee 
and a literature review team from Washington 
University in St. Louis analyzed findings from review 
articles using a review-of-reviews approach.
This report discusses the importance of each of 
the five settings and its relation to youth physical 
activity, presents a review of and conclusions about 
the strength of evidence supporting interventions to 
increase physical activity, and describes research needs. 
The report also discusses several notable precedents 
for policy involvement in youth physical activity, 
describes the potential for policy and programs to 
further encourage increased physical activity among 
youth, and discusses other approaches to consider 
in developing strategies to increase physical activity 
among youth.
The remainder of this Executive Summary highlights 
key findings and recommendations from the Midcourse 
Report and discusses overarching needs for future 
research. Table 1 provides a summary of these findings 
and research needs. 
Key Findings and Recommendations
School Settings Hold a Realistic and Evidence-
based Opportunity to Increase Physical Activity 
Among Youth and Should be a Key Part of a 
National Strategy to Increase Physical Activity
More than 95 percent of youth are enrolled in schools, 
and a typical school day lasts approximately 6 to 7 
hours, making schools an ideal setting to provide 
physical activity to students.
1
Sufficient evidence 
is available to recommend wide implementation of 
multi-component school-based programs. These types 
of programs provide enhanced physical education (PE) 
Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Midcourse Report
viii
(e.g., increased lesson time, delivery by well-trained 
specialists, and instructional practices that provide 
substantial moderate-to-vigorous physical activity), as 
well as classroom activity breaks, activity sessions before 
and/or after school, and active transportation to school.
Similarly, well-designed enhanced PE in and of itself 
increases physical activity among youth and should 
be widely implemented in schools. Two additional 
approaches—activity breaks and commuting to and 
from school using active transport—show promise 
and are attractive because they can be implemented 
in situations where a full multi-component program 
or enhanced PE may be out of reach. Because the 
scientific knowledge of what works is still evolving, 
it is critical that, as a nation, we continue to evaluate 
the impact of physical activity programs in schools 
and ensure that effective programs are translated for a 
variety of audiences and widely disseminated.
Preschool and Childcare Centers That Serve Young 
Children Are an Important Setting in Which to 
Enhance Physical Activity
Millions of American children spend much of their 
day in structured childcare centers. More than 4.2 
million young children (about 60% of children ages 3 
to 5 who are not attending kindergarten) are enrolled 
in center-based preschools in the United States,
2
and 
the evidence suggests that well-designed interventions 
can increase physical activity among these children. 
Promising interventions include those that increase 
time children spend outside, provide portable play 
equipment (e.g., balls and tricycles) on playgrounds 
and other play spaces, provide staff with training in 
the delivery of structured physical activity sessions 
for children and increase the time allocated for such 
sessions, and integrate physically active teaching and 
learning activities.
Changes Involving the Built Environment and 
Multiple Sectors Are Promising 
The built environment includes the physical form of 
communities including urban design (how a city is 
designed; its physical appearance and arrangement), 
land use patterns (how land is used for commercial, 
residential and other activities), and the transportation 
system (the facilities and services that link one location 
to another).
3
Changes to this setting are important 
because they offer the potential to increase activity for 
all youth, not only those who elect to participate in 
specific programs or activities, which may be affected 
by socioeconomic factors. 
Multiple national, state, and local stakeholders play 
an important role in promoting physical activity in 
this setting, including those in transportation, urban 
planning, and public safety, whose primary mission 
is not physical activity promotion. What has yet to 
be tested is the added value of including these sectors 
in comprehensive community interventions for youth 
physical activity.
To Advance Efforts to Increase Physical Activity 
Among Youth, Key Research Gaps Should Be 
Addressed
During the development of this report, several research 
needs emerged that could be applied to all of the five 
settings addressed. Currently, reviews of physical 
activity in youth have limited long-term or longitudinal 
follow up. Extending research beyond short-term 
interventions can help determine the sustainability 
and long-term benefits of increasing physical activity 
among youth. Additionally, research including a variety 
of demographic, geographic, health status, racial and 
ethnic, and socioeconomic status groups would be 
beneficial in determining how interventions can best 
be applied to specific populations. Behavioral theories 
underlying the interventions that yield the strongest 
effects in youth need further examination.
Several settings reviewed by the subcommittee, 
including Community, Family and Home, and Primary 
Care, had limited evidence about specific interventions 
strategies, but showed promise as an opportunity to 
engage youth. These settings should be highlighted as 
priority areas for research to better understand how 
interventions can be applied in both specific areas and 
across multiple settings to increase opportunities for 
physical activity.
Finally, most policy-relevant research related to youth 
physical activity is cross-sectional, showing associations 
but not permitting causal connections between the 
policies and programs to be drawn. In the future, 
longitudinal assessments and rigorous evaluation of 
policies and programs related to youth physical activity 
are particularly high priorities.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested