asp net mvc show pdf in div : Split pdf software control dll windows web page .net web forms pag-mid-course-report-final1-part1391

ix
Executive Summary and Key Messages
Table 1. Summary of Findings and Next Steps for Research
Setting and 
Strength of 
Evidence*
Strategies to Increase Physical Activity  
Among Youth
Next Steps for Research
School Setting
Multi-component 
Sufficient
• Provide enhanced physical education (PE) that 
increases lesson time, is delivered by well-trained 
specialists, and emphasizes instructional practices 
that provide substantial moderate-to-vigorous 
physical activity. 
• Provide classroom activity breaks.
• Develop activity sessions before and/or after school, 
including active transportation.
• Build behavioral skills.
• Provide after-school activity space and equipment.
• Evaluate the translation and dissemination of effective 
interventions, particularly in the multi-component and 
PE areas, where sufficient evidence indicates that school 
programs increase physical activity among youth.
• Determine the specific strategies that contribute 
importantly to the success of multi-component 
interventions.
• Determine specific approaches with the greatest 
effectiveness for increasing activity transportation to school 
(e.g., walking school bus).
• Examine the effectiveness of approaches to increase 
physical activity during break times already structured into 
the school day (e.g., recess) versus other planned times, or 
the optimal combination of both.
• Examine intervention effects on overall daily and weekly 
physical activity levels.
• Conduct intervention studies with long-term follow-up 
measures.
• Conduct intervention studies with robust process evaluation 
protocols, in addition to examining implementation and 
sustainability.
• Compare intervention effects across race, ethnicity, and 
socioeconomic groups.
Physical 
Education 
Sufficient
• Develop and implement a well-designed PE 
curriculum. 
• Enhance instructional  practices to provide 
substantial moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. 
• Provide teachers with appropriate training.
• 
Evaluate the translation and dissemination of effective interventions, particularly in the multi-component and PE areas, where sufficient evidence indicates that school programs increase physical activity among youth.
• 
Determine the specific strategies that contribute importantly to the success of multi-component interventions.
• 
Determine specific approaches with the greatest effectiveness for increasing activity transportation to school (e.g. walking school bus).
• 
Examine the effectiveness of approaches to increase physical activity during break times already structured into the school day (e.g., recess) versus other planned times, or the optimal combination of both
• 
Examine intervention effects on overall daily and weekly physical activity levels.
• 
Conduct intervention studies with long-term follow-up measures.
• 
Conduct intervention studies with robust process evaluation protocols, in addition to examining implementation and sustainability..
• 
Compare intervention effects across race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic groups.
Active 
Transportation 
Suggestive
• Involve school personnel in intervention efforts.
• Educate and encourage parents to participate with 
their children in active transportation to school.
• 
Evaluate the translation and dissemination of effective interventions, particularly in the multi-component and PE areas, where sufficient evidence indicates that school programs increase physical activity among youth.
• 
Determine the specific strategies that contribute importantly to the success of multi-component interventions.
• 
Determine specific approaches with the greatest effectiveness for increasing activity transportation to school (e.g. walking school bus).
• 
Examine the effectiveness of approaches to increase physical activity during break times already structured into the school day (e.g., recess) versus other planned times, or the optimal combination of both
• 
Examine intervention effects on overall daily and weekly physical activity levels.
• 
Conduct intervention studies with long-term follow-up measures.
• 
Conduct intervention studies with robust process evaluation protocols, in addition to examining implementation and sustainability..
• 
Compare intervention effects across race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic groups.
Activity Breaks
Emerging
• Add short bouts of physical activity to existing 
classroom activities.
• Encourage activity during recess, lunch, and other 
break periods.
• Promote environmental or systems change 
approaches, such as providing physical activity and 
game equipment, teacher training, and organized 
physical activity during breaks before and after 
school. 
• 
Evaluate the translation and dissemination of effective interventions, particularly in the multi-component and PE areas, where sufficient evidence indicates that school programs increase physical activity among youth.
• 
Determine the specific strategies that contribute importantly to the success of multi-component interventions.
• 
Determine specific approaches with the greatest effectiveness for increasing activity transportation to school (e.g. walking school bus).
• 
Examine the effectiveness of approaches to increase physical activity during break times already structured into the school day (e.g., recess) versus other planned times, or the optimal combination of both
• 
Examine intervention effects on overall daily and weekly physical activity levels.
• 
Conduct intervention studies with long-term follow-up measures.
• 
Conduct intervention studies with robust process evaluation protocols, in addition to examining implementation and sustainability..
• 
Compare intervention effects across race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic groups.
School Physical 
Environment
Insufficient
Not applicable
• 
Evaluate the translation and dissemination of effective interventions, particularly in the multi-component and PE areas, where sufficient evidence indicates that school programs increase physical activity among youth.
• 
Determine the specific strategies that contribute importantly to the success of multi-component interventions.
• 
Determine specific approaches with the greatest effectiveness for increasing activity transportation to school (e.g. walking school bus).
• 
Examine the effectiveness of approaches to increase physical activity during break times already structured into the school day (e.g., recess) versus other planned times, or the optimal combination of both
• 
Examine intervention effects on overall daily and weekly physical activity levels.
• 
Conduct intervention studies with long-term follow-up measures.
• 
Conduct intervention studies with robust process evaluation protocols, in addition to examining implementation and sustainability..
• 
Compare intervention effects across race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic groups.
After School
Insufficient
Not applicable
• 
Evaluate the translation and dissemination of effective interventions, particularly in the multi-component and PE areas, where sufficient evidence indicates that school programs increase physical activity among youth.
• 
Determine the specific strategies that contribute importantly to the success of multi-component interventions.
• 
Determine specific approaches with the greatest effectiveness for increasing activity transportation to school (e.g. walking school bus).
• 
Examine the effectiveness of approaches to increase physical activity during break times already structured into the school day (e.g., recess) versus other planned times, or the optimal combination of both
• 
Examine intervention effects on overall daily and weekly physical activity levels.
• 
Conduct intervention studies with long-term follow-up measures.
• 
Conduct intervention studies with robust process evaluation protocols, in addition to examining implementation and sustainability..
• 
Compare intervention effects across race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic groups.
*Table 2, p. 8, provides details on the criteria used to determine the strength of evidence. 
Split pdf - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break apart a pdf in reader; c# split pdf
Split pdf - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf into separate pages; break a pdf apart
Table 1. Summary of Findings and Next Steps for Research (continued)
Setting and 
Strength of 
Evidence*
Strategies to Increase Physical Activity  
Among Youth
Next Steps for Research
Preschool and 
Childcare Center 
Setting
Suggestive
• Provide portable play equipment on playgrounds 
and other play spaces.
• Provide staff with training in the delivery of 
structured physical activity sessions for children and 
increase the time allocated for such sessions. 
• Integrate physically active teaching and learning 
activities into pre-academic instructional routines.
• Increase time that children spend outside.
• Conduct longitudinal, observational studies with rigorous 
measures.
• Examine specific strategies to promote physical activity in 
the childcare setting.
• Conduct policy research to examine the effects of state and 
institutional policy innovations.
• Examine the effect of the center physical environment on 
child physical activity.
• Investigate center-based interventions that involve parents 
and activities at home. 
• Compare intervention effects across race, ethnicity, and 
socioeconomic groups.
Community 
Setting
Built 
Environment 
Suggestive
• Improve the land-use mix to increase the 
number of walkable and bikeable destinations in 
neighborhoods.
• Increase residential density so that people can use 
methods other than driving to reach the places they 
need or want to visit.
• Implement traffic-calming measures, such as traffic 
circles and speedbumps.
• Increase access to, density of, and proximity to 
parks and recreation facilities.
• Improve walking and biking infrastructure,  such as 
sidewalks,  multi-use trails, and bike lanes. 
• Increase walkability of communities.
• Improve pedestrian safety structures, such as traffic 
lights.
• Increase vegetation, such as trees along streets.
• Decrease traffic speed and volume to encourage 
walking and biking for transportation.
• Reduce incivilities and disorders, such as litter and 
vacant or poorly-maintained lots. 
• Conduct studies with longer intervention periods and long-
term follow up.
• Conduct quasi-experimental evaluation research on the 
built environment and youth physical activity, taking 
advantage of “natural experiments” (i.e., environmental 
changes implemented by policymakers and/or others).
• Evaluate the effects of built environment changes on 
adolescent physical activity.
• Assess the effect of neighborhood crime-related safety on 
youth physical activity.
• Develop methods to improve attendance in the programs 
and interventions under study.
• Examine ways to convert summer camp activity into 
habitual activity.
• Examine the role of “location in the community,” 
particularly distance from school or home, on participation 
and adherence.
• Compare intervention effects across race, ethnicity, and 
socioeconomic groups.
Camps and Youth 
Organizations
Insufficient
Not applicable
• 
Conduct studies with longer intervention periods and long-term follow up.
• 
Conduct quasi-experimental evaluation research on the built environment and youth physical activity, taking advantage of “natural experiments” (i.e., environmental changes implemented by policymakers and/or others).
• 
Evaluate the effects of built environment changes on adolescent physical activity.
• 
Assess the effect of neighborhood crime-related safety on youth physical activity.
• 
Develop methods to improve attendance in the programs and interventions under study.
• 
Examine ways to convert summer camp activity into habitual activity.
• 
Examine the role of “location in the community,” particularly distance from school or home, on participation and adherence.
• 
Compare intervention effects across race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic groups.
*Table 2, p. 8, provides details on the criteria used to determine the strength of evidence.
x
Online Split PDF file. Best free online split PDF tool.
Online Split PDF, Separate PDF file into Multiple ones. Download Free Trial. Split PDF file. Just upload your file by clicking
break a pdf into parts; break pdf password
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
File & Page Process. Create new file, load PDF from existing files. Merge, split PDF files. Insert, delete PDF pages. Re-order, rotate PDF pages. PDF Read.
pdf no pages selected to print; break apart pdf pages
xi
Executive Summary and Key Messages
Table 1. Summary of Findings and Next Steps for Research (continued)
Setting and 
Strength of 
Evidence*
Strategies to Increase Physical Activity  
Among Youth
Next Steps for Research
Community 
Setting 
(continued)
Other 
Community 
Programs
Insufficient
Not applicable
• 
Conduct studies with longer intervention periods and long-term follow up.
• 
Conduct quasi-experimental evaluation research on the built environment and youth physical activity, taking advantage of “natural experiments” (i.e., environmental changes implemented by policymakers and/or others).
• 
Evaluate the effects of built environment changes on adolescent physical activity.
• 
Assess the effect of neighborhood crime-related safety on youth physical activity.
• 
Develop methods to improve attendance in the programs and interventions under study.
• 
Examine ways to convert summer camp activity into habitual activity.
• 
Examine the role of “location in the community,” particularly distance from school or home, on participation and adherence.
• 
Compare intervention effects across race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic groups.
Family and Home 
Setting 
Insufficient
Not applicable
• Conduct observational studies to examine the relevance of 
family and home-based strategies throughout childhood 
and adolescence.
• Conduct longitudinal, observational studies to delineate 
which components of family life influence children’s 
physical activity behavior. 
• Test specific strategies that engage parents and other 
family members in promoting physical activity in the home 
setting.
• Test specific strategies that enrich the home 
environment to favor activity over sedentary pursuits.
• Compare intervention effects across race, ethnicity, and 
socioeconomic groups.
Primary Care 
Setting
Insufficient
Not applicable
• Conduct randomized, controlled studies of the effectiveness 
of primary care counseling on physical activity behavior.
• Identify the optimal intensity and delivery mode of primary 
care physical activity interventions. 
• Consider the utility of interventions that combine 
primary care counseling with referral and integration into 
community youth-focused programs.
• Identify the optimal age range for effective interventions 
in primary care settings, as well as intervention effects in 
normal weight as well as overweight or obese youth. 
• Examine strategies to promote physical activity in different 
primary care settings, including integrated health care, fee-
for-service, and community clinics.
• Conduct cost-effectiveness research after effective 
interventions have been identified.
• Compare intervention effects across race, ethnicity, and 
socioeconomic groups.
*Table 2, p. 8, provides details on the criteria used to determine the strength of evidence. 
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Tell VB.NET users how to: create a new PDF file and load PDF from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy
break a pdf file; acrobat split pdf into multiple files
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
Jpeg. Convert PDF to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File and Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. File
break pdf file into multiple files; can't cut and paste from pdf
1
Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Midcourse Report
Introduction
R
egular physical activity in children and 
adolescents promotes health and fitness.
4
Compared to those who are inactive, physically 
active youth have higher levels of cardiorespiratory 
fitness and stronger muscles. They also typically have 
lower body fatness. Their bones are stronger and 
they may have reduced symptoms of anxiety and 
depression.
Youth who are regularly active also have a better 
chance of a healthy adulthood. In the past, chronic 
diseases, such as heart disease, hypertension, or type 2 
diabetes were rare in youth. However, a growing 
literature is showing that the incidence of these chronic 
diseases and their risk factors are now increasing 
among children and adolescents.
5
Regular physical 
activity makes it less likely that these risk factors and 
resulting chronic diseases will develop and more likely 
that youth will remain healthy as adults.
Key Terms
In this report, we use the terms:
• youth to include children ages 3 to 11 and 
adolescents ages 12 to 17, and
• physical activity to refer to bodily movement that 
enhances health. It includes moderate-intensity 
activities, such as skateboarding or softball, and 
vigorous-intensity activities, such as jumping rope 
or running.
Current Levels of Physical Activity  
Among Youth
Despite the importance of regular physical activity 
in promoting lifelong health and well-being, current 
evidence shows that levels of physical activity among 
youth remain low, and that levels of physical activity 
decline dramatically during adolescence. Opportunities 
for regular physical activity are limited in many 
schools; daily PE is provided in only 4 percent of 
elementary schools, 8 percent of middle schools, 
and 2 percent of high schools.
6
The 2011 National 
Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), which collects 
self-reported physical activity data from high school 
students across the United States, found that many 
youth are not meeting the Guidelines recommendation 
of 60 minutes of physical activity each day:
7
• 29 percent of high school students participated in at 
least 60 minutes per day of physical activity on each 
of the 7 days before the survey. Boys were more 
than twice as likely as girls to meet the Guidelines 
(38% vs. 19%).
• 14 percent of high school students did not 
participate in 60 or more minutes of any kind of 
physical activity on any day during the 7 days 
before the survey.
A separate study of U.S. youth used accelerometers 
to objectively measure physical activity. This study 
found that 42 percent of children and only 8 percent of 
adolescents engaged in moderate- to vigorous-intensity 
activity on 5 of the past 7 days for at least 60 minutes 
each day.
8
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page
pdf format specification; pdf specification
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page
pdf splitter; break pdf password online
2
Chapter 1. Introduction
The Benefits of Physical Activity for Youth
• Improves cardiorespiratory fitness.
• Strengthens muscles and bones.
• Helps attain/maintain healthy weight. 
• Reduces likelihood of developing risk factors for 
later diseases, such as high blood cholesterol, 
high blood pressure, and type 2 diabetes, thus 
increasing the chances that youth will remain 
healthy as adults.
• May reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression.
The 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for 
Americans
In 2008, the U.S. Department of Health and Human 
Services (HHS) issued the first comprehensive 
guidelines on physical 
activity for individuals 
ages 6 and older. The 
2008 Physical Activity 
Guidelines for Americans 
provide information 
on the amount, types, 
and intensity of physical 
activity needed to achieve 
health benefits across the 
lifespan.
9
The Guidelines provide physical activity guidance 
for youth ages 6 to 17 and focus on physical activity 
beyond the light-intensity activities of daily life, such 
as walking slowly or lifting light objects. As described 
in the Guidelines, youth can achieve substantial health 
benefits by doing moderate- and vigorous-intensity 
physical activity for periods of time that add up to 
60 minutes or more each day. This activity should 
include aerobic activity as well as age-appropriate 
muscle- and bone-strengthening activities (see Key 
Guidelines box, below).
Current science suggests that as with adults, the 
total amount of physical activity is more important 
in helping youth achieve health benefits than is any 
one component (frequency, intensity, or duration) or 
specific mix of activities (aerobic [e.g., tag, bike riding], 
muscle-strengthening [e.g., push-ups, climbing trees], 
or bone strengthening [e.g., hopscotch, tennis]).
Parents and other adults who work with or care for 
youth should be familiar with the Guidelines, as adults 
play an important role in providing age-appropriate 
opportunities for physical activity. They need to foster 
active play in children and encourage sustained and 
structured activity in adolescents. In doing so, adults 
help lay an important foundation for lifelong health, 
for youth who grow up being physically active are 
more likely to be active adults.
9
Key Guidelines for Children and Adolescents
• Children and adolescents should do 60 minutes (1 hour) or more of physical activity daily.
  
 
  
  
   
  
 
 
 
— Aerobic:Most of the 60 or more minutes a day should be either moderate- or vigorous-intensity aerobic physical 
   
  
 
  
  
 
activity, and should include vigorous-intensity physical activity at least 3 days a week.
   
 
 
 
 
  
— Muscle-strengthening: As part of their 60 or more minutes of daily physical activity, children and adolescents 
  
 
 
 
  
 
should include muscle-strengthening physical activity on at least 3 days of the week.
 
 
 
   
  
   
 
— Bone-strengthening: As part of their 60 or more minutes of daily physical activity, children and adolescents 
 
  
   
 
  
 
 
 
  
 
should include bone-strengthening physical activity on at least 3 days of the week.
 
 
 
 
   
  
   
 
• It is important to encourage young people to participate in physical activities that are appropriate for their age, that 
  
 
 
 
are enjoyable, and that offer variety.
 
  
 
 
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page
break apart a pdf; pdf separate pages
VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page
break password pdf; break up pdf file
Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Midcourse Report
3
The Midcourse Report: Building on the Physical 
Activity Guidelines
In response to a desire from both federal and non-
federal stakeholders for the Physical Activity Guidelines 
for Americans to be updated on a regular basis, a 
federal steering group including representatives from 
the HHS Office of Disease Prevention and Health 
Promotion (ODPHP), the President’s Council on Fitness, 
Sports & Nutrition (PCFSN), the Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention (CDC), and the National 
Institutes of Health (NIH) was formed to discuss this 
issue. Although research and new findings in the realm 
of physical activity continue to emerge, the group 
believed that the current Guidelines recommendations 
would change little if they were updated. Therefore, 
the steering group recommended a Midcourse Report, 
which would provide an opportunity for experts to 
review and highlight a specific topic of importance 
related to the Guidelines and to communicate 
findings to the public. With expertise 
from the PCFSN Science Board 
and coordination by the ODPHP 
and PCFSN staff, the steering group 
identified “strategies to increase 
physical activity among youth” as a topic 
area that would help to inform current 
practice related to the Guidelines.
A subcommittee of the PCFSN was 
convened in spring 2012 with the approval 
of HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius and 
Assistant Secretary for Health, Dr. Howard Koh. The 
subcommittee was comprised of experts in school- 
and community-based interventions, policy, exercise 
physiology, epidemiology, measurement/quantification 
and assessment of physical activity, childhood obesity, 
public health, and environmental influences on physical 
activity and was chaired by President’s Council Member, 
Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey. The ODPHP was responsible 
for coordinating the subcommittee’s work.
The subcommittee was asked to review the evidence 
on strategies to increase youth physical activity 
and make recommendations. It conducted its work 
through biweekly conference calls and three in-person 
meetings held in May, August, and October, 2012. The 
subcommittee’s findings and recommendations are 
summarized here in the Physical Activity Guidelines 
for Americans Midcourse Report: Strategies to Increase 
Physical Activity Among Youth.
The Midcourse Report is intended to identify 
interventions that can help increase physical activity 
in youth across a variety of settings. The subcommittee 
focused on physical activity in general and did not 
examine specific types of activity, such as muscle- 
or bone-strengthening physical activities. The 
subcommittee also did not consider efforts to reduce 
sedentary time or screen time. The primary audiences 
for the report are policymakers, health care and public 
health professionals, and leaders in the settings covered 
in the report.
Even though the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for 
Americans does not include specific 
recommendations for children younger 
than age 6, the subcommittee expanded its 
review to include children ages 3 to 5. This 
decision was made in light of the fact 
that physical activity for young children 
is necessary for healthy growth and 
development.
9
The environments in 
which young children spend their days 
are often less structured than the 
formal school environments of later 
childhood and adolescence, thus 
providing opportunities for the free play 
and unstructured physical activity that are important 
for this age group. The subcommittee’s consideration 
of this young age group also is consistent with the 
recommendations of the Institute of Medicine’s 2011 
report Early Childhood Obesity Prevention Policies
10
and 
the recommendations of several countries, including 
Australia and the United Kingdom, that have developed 
physical activity guidelines for infants and young 
children.
11-13
Organization of the Report
The Midcourse Report consists of three major 
components. The first component, which includes 
the Introduction and Methods sections, describes the 
background and context for the Report and the process 
by which the subcommittee reviewed the evidence and 
developed its recommendations.
4
Chapter 1. Introduction
The second component, Results by Intervention 
Setting, focuses on five settings that are central 
to the lives of youth. Each section within this 
component discusses the importance of the setting 
and its relationship to youth physical activity, 
presents a review of and conclusions about the 
strength of evidence supporting interventions to 
increase physical activity, and describes research 
needs. A third component, Additional Approaches 
to Consider, discusses several notable precedents 
for policy involvement in youth 
physical activity and describes the 
potential for policy and programs 
to further encourage increased 
physical activity among youth. 
This component also discusses other approaches to 
consider in developing strategies to increase physical 
activity among youth, including building on lessons 
learned from the VERB
TM
campaign; incorporating the 
interests, characteristics, and social media habits of 
today’s youth in future physical activity interventions; 
and emphasizing tried-and-true methods, such as 
playing outdoors.
The Report contains a number of terms important 
to physical activity and health. Definitions of these 
terms can be found in the 2008 Physical Activity 
Guidelines for Americans Glossary 
(http://www.health.gov/paguidelines/
guidelines/glossary.aspx).
5
Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Midcourse Report
5
Methods
T
he CDC contracted with Washington University 
researchers at the Prevention Research Center 
(PRC) in St. Louis to conduct the literature review 
for the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans  
Midcourse Report. A team from the PRC used 
Washington University library services to carry out the 
literature review, which was coordinated by the ODPHP 
and the CDC Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, 
and Obesity, Physical Activity and Health Branch. The 
subcommittee and the PRC team together determined 
that the literature review team would use a review-
of-reviews approach to assess the current literature 
on interventions to increase physical activity in youth 
across the five selected settings. When more than one 
narrative or systematic review has been published, the 
use of this methodology facilitates the examination 
and comparison of intervention strategies and results 
because it allows for the translation and synthesis 
of knowledge across multiple reviews that include 
multiple studies. Because the PRC team had used the 
review-of-reviews approach previously, they took the 
lead in determining the operational plan and literature 
review process, with regular consultation from the 
subcommittee. A representative from the PRC team 
participated in the subcommittee’s meetings to provide 
regular updates on the literature review process, and 
to answer subcommittee questions about findings from 
the literature.
Several limitations of our review are worth noting. 
First, by its nature, a review-of-reviews includes 
only work published in peer-reviewed publications. 
Consequently, some relevant documents, such as 
those by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and National 
Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE), 
and those found in the grey literature, such as policy 
documents, were not included. Another drawback is 
that some areas of research were not included, as they 
are too new to the scientific literature to have been 
reviewed. The subcommittee did not use the review-
of-reviews method for the section on Additional 
Approaches to Consider because reviews do not yet 
exist in these areas. Third, a thorough assessment of 
the quality of the reviews was not included, as would 
be conducted in a systematic review. The review-of-
reviews approach also precluded an assessment of 
quality at the individual study level (e.g., taking into 
account study design and study execution), and the 
subcommittee did not examine individual studies 
for their contributions to the findings. Finally, the 
review-of-reviews methodology did not allow the 
subcommittee to identify specific theories that could be 
used to structure potentially effective interventions or 
to critically evaluate external validity. 
Conceptual Framework
The subcommittee used an ecological framework to 
identify settings where youth live, learn, and play. 
Recognizing that many settings have potential for 
increasing physical activity among youth but that 
evidence across the settings varies, the subcommittee 
focused on five in which physical activity interventions 
for youth have been studied and evaluated: schools, 
preschool and childcare centers, community, family 
and home, and primary care.
6
Chapter 2. Methods
Literature Review
The review-of-reviews process to assess the current 
level of evidence for physical activity interventions in 
youth began in summer 2012 and continued through 
early fall 2012. The basis for the current review-of-
reviews was formed by two previously published 
review-of–reviews.
14, 15
Using the seven-step process 
described below, the PRC team identified review articles 
published from January 2001 through July 2012, 
determined which articles should be included based 
on inclusion and exclusion criteria developed by the 
subcommittee, and then abstracted and synthesized the 
data. A total of 31 reviews containing 910 studies (this 
number includes some studies that were cited in more 
than one review) ultimately were included.
Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria for the  
Review-of-Reviews
Inclusion Criteria
• Youth ages 3–17 years
• English language
• Peer-reviewed literature of intervention studies
• Systematic reviews and meta-analyses
• Reviews published January 2001 through July 2012
• Interventions must measure physical activity as an 
outcome
• Interventions including technology approaches to promote 
physical activity
• Primarily healthy population
• Results must be available specifically for children or 
adolescents
Exclusion Criteria
• Interventions focused on limiting screen time
• Interventions focused on decreasing sedentary behavior
• Interventions focused solely on weight loss 
• Review containing only cross-sectional data
A key inclusion criterion was the measurement of 
physical activity as an intervention outcome. Because 
physical activity measures must be consistent with 
the intervention targets, physical activity assessment 
measures included in the reviews covered by this 
review-of-reviews were device-based measures, 
self-report, and direct observations. In cases where 
a particular aspect of physical activity was the 
intervention target, self-report measures or direct 
observation that can identify specific behaviors were 
deemed to be preferable to device-based measures, 
which cannot identify behaviors or context.
The literature search and synthesis process involved the 
following steps:
1. Select Database(s) Most Likely to Yield the 
Desired Document Types. The search for reviews 
of physical activity interventions in any language 
was conducted using the following databases: 
Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), 
the Cochrane library, Turning Research Into 
Practice (TRIP), PubMed (Medline), the American 
Psychological Association, and National Guidelines 
Clearinghouse.
2. Determine Search Parameters and Conduct the 
Search. The evidence resources reviewed and 
abstracted were limited to those published between 
January 2001 through July 2012, plus articles 
accepted for publication in English-language, peer-
reviewed journals. Search terms included: “physical 
activity,” “interventions,” “systematic review,” “meta 
analysis,” “child,” and “adolescent.” The Washington 
University library system was used to conduct the 
search.
3. Screen the Titles and Abstracts to Determine 
Potential Relevance. The results were automatically 
filtered through the databases for date (January 
2001 through July 2012) and English language. 
One reviewer then manually filtered the titles and 
abstracts for age of the populations in the reviews. 
Two reviewers examined the databases and included 
all titles and abstracts that met the inclusion criteria, 
as well as those for which the applicability of the 
inclusion criteria could not be determined. These 
same two reviewers then examined the abstracts for 
further information regarding inclusion.
4. Obtain Selected Documents. The literature review 
team obtained copies of the complete articles 
selected through the Washington University library 
system.
Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Midcourse Report
7
5. Perform an Initial Synthesis to Determine 
Inclusion. Relevant review articles were screened to 
ensure each document met the inclusion criteria.
6. Abstract Selected Review Articles and Summarize. 
All relevant articles that met the inclusion criteria 
were summarized and information was abstracted to 
create detailed evidence tables. These tables included 
the following information:
— Methodological information: 
reference, year of publication, 
objective, type of review 
(systematic, narrative), type of 
studies/methods reviewed (e.g., 
randomized controlled trial, 
quasi-experimental design), 
review methods, number of 
included studies, year of 
publication, study populations 
and settings, independent 
variables, dependent variables.
— Intervention information: type of intervention, 
age group, focus on high-risk population, setting, 
number of studies, number of children, countries/
region of studies.
— Results: main conclusion, race/ethnic groups 
and low socioeconomic status group estimates. 
(Note: Effect size estimates and sufficient 
information for calculating pooled mean effect 
sizes were collected but the information was not 
sufficient to make comparisons across population 
subgroups.)
— Information to determine level of evidence: 
determined in part by type of studies/methods 
reviewed and assessed as a component of 
“methodological information.”
Using the information contained in the evidence 
tables, the literature review team then collectively and 
systematically reviewed physical activity intervention 
strategies to assess their effectiveness. Emerging 
intervention strategies were assessed, reviewed, and 
reported when available, but many were so recent that 
they had not yet been incorporated into systematic 
evidence reviews and therefore may not have been 
included in the Midcourse Report.
7. Synthesize Evidence. The final step was to 
synthesize the evidence by setting. To determine the 
quality, strength, and consistency of the available 
evidence for each of these settings and sub-topics, 
the subcommittee reviewed the evidence tables 
and used the most relevant reviews. The 
most relevant reviews were those 
dedicated to the setting (if available), 
those with sections dedicated to the 
setting (if available), or those with 
discussion/conclusions dedicated to the 
setting. The evidence within each of these 
settings was then classified into one of the 
following categories (sufficient, suggestive, 
insufficient [including emerging or no 
evidence], or evidence of no effect) developed 
by the subcommittee using the specific 
criteria contained in Table 2.
Report Development and Review
Once the literature review was completed, 
subcommittee members drafted individual sections of 
the report. The sections were reviewed and discussed 
by all members of the subcommittee and revised 
multiple times. The completed draft was reviewed 
by three leading physical activity experts and made 
available for public comment from November 9 to 
December 10, 2012.  The subcommittee carefully 
considered all the comments generated from the 
external review and public comment process and made 
a number of changes to the report in response. Many of 
the comments addressed the need for special attention 
to disparities, underserved populations, and the built 
environment. While the subcommittee acknowledges 
the importance of these issues, the ability to generalize 
recommendations to all populations and settings 
is limited by the available data.  These limitations 
underscore the urgent need for additional research, 
and the research recommendations included here are 
intended to address this need.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested