asp net open pdf file in web browser using c# : Add page break to pdf software Library cloud windows .net winforms class nhtsa-5stars-rfc-notice12-part145

Table 6, the lower beam headlighting performance maps to prevent or mitigate 13 of the 32 crash 
scenarios, including both pedestrian crash scenarios.  
While extended illumination distance may better inform drivers so as to avoid striking 
pedestrians, this additional light could have unintended consequences if it is not properly 
controlled to limit glare. As such, the test procedure presented in Appendix VIII of this RFC 
notice grades a vehicle’s headlighting system’s lower beams for seeing light far down the road, 
but reduces the score for a headlighting system that produces glare beyond 0.634 lux, measured 
at a distance of 60 m (197 ft) and at a height of 1000 mm (39.7 in) above the road. Unlike the 
current test procedure for the FMVSS No. 108 requirement that evaluates a headlamp in a 
laboratory, this NCAP test would evaluate the headlighting system as installed on the vehicle. In 
order to support reproducibility of the test results, the headlighting system would be measured 
using seasoned bulbs and the headlamps would be aimed according to the manufacturer’s 
recommendation prior to conducting the test. Five levels of performance would be established 
based on the measurement of five illuminance meters located 75 to 115 meters (246 ft to 377 ft) 
(spaced 10 m (32.8 ft) apart) forward of the vehicle. The level of performance would be 
established based on the lower beam headlighting system’s ability to provide 3.000 lux of light to 
each of the five detectors. If all five detectors are illuminated to at least 3.000 lux and the glare 
detector is illuminated at less than 0.634 lux, the headlighting system would receive full credit 
within the final crash avoidance rating. If the glare meter is illuminated beyond 0.634 lux, the 
headlighting systems scoring would be reduced as detailed in the test procedure (see the docket, 
Appendix VIII). 
b.  Semi-automatic Headlamp Beam Switching 
121 
Add page break to pdf - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
can't select text in pdf file; cannot select text in pdf
Add page break to pdf - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break up pdf file; split pdf files
NHTSA intends to include semi-automatic headlamp beam switching in its crash 
avoidance NCAP rating because the agency believes it could lead to reductions of injuries and 
fatalities, particularly for pedestrians during darkness. FMVSS No. 108 requires each vehicle to 
have the ability to switch between lower and upper beam headlamps. As an option, a vehicle may 
be equipped with a semi-automatic device to switch between the lower and upper beam, which 
means the vehicle may automatically switch the headlamps from upper to lower beams and back 
based on photometric sensors installed as part of the semi-automatic beam switching system. 
While these systems switch the beams automatically, they are not fully-automatic in that they 
must allow the driver to have control of the system and manually switch beams based on the 
driver’s input. The photometric design of the upper beam headlamp is optimized to provide long 
seeing distance. However, upper beam headlamps provide limited protection to other roadway 
users against glare. Therefore, properly switching between the upper and lower beam headlamps 
maximizes the overall seeing distance when driving at night without causing glare. While state 
laws often impose driver upper beam restrictions (situations in which the upper beam cannot be 
used), there is very little information available to drivers to help them determine when to safely 
use upper beam headlamps.  
Based on studies indicating that the upper beam headlamps are used only 25 percent of 
the time in situations for which they would be useful without creating glare,
255
NHTSA intends 
to include semi-automatic headlamp beam switching in this NCAP upgrade. As discussed 
previously in the lower beam headlighting performance section, the agency believes that among 
other crash types, pedestrian fatalities that occur under dark-not-lighted conditions may be 
255
Mefford, M. L., Flannagan, M. J., & Bogard, S. E. (2006). Real-World Use of High-Beam Headlamps (UMTRI­
2006-11). 
122 
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Add necessary references to your C# project: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
break apart pdf; break pdf password
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
Add necessary references to your C# project: a document"); default: Console.WriteLine(" Fail: unknown error"); break; }. code just convert first word page to Png
pdf file specification; pdf will no pages selected
reduced or mitigated by additional proper use of the upper beam. As shown in Table 6, semi­
automatic headlamp beam switching maps to prevent or mitigate 14 of the 32 crash scenarios. 
Semi-automatic headlamp beam switching was reported as optional or standard for 
approximately 52 percent of the “trim lines” (sub-models) listed in the 2016 Buying a Safer Car 
letter by the manufacturers. Since most semi-automatic headlamp beam switching devices 
activate above a minimum driving speed and react dynamically to the environment, primarily to 
other vehicles on the roadway, a traditional, passive and stationary goniometer-based laboratory 
test procedure will not suffice for confirmation of beam switching operation. Therefore, NHTSA 
intends to use vehicle related static measurements including confirmation of manual override 
capability, automatic dimming indicator, and mounting height, as well as two vehicle maneuver 
tests to effectively produce the semi-automatic beam switching device response to a suddenly 
appearing vehicle representation in a straight road scenario. The first dynamic test simulates an 
approaching vehicle, and the second dynamic test simulates a preceding vehicle. This test 
procedure will confirm that the driver has both the information necessary and the responsibility 
for final control of headlamp beam switching. 
c.  Amber Rear Turn Signal Lamps 
In 2009, NHTSA studied the effect of rear turn signal color as a means to reduce the 
frequency of passenger vehicles crashes.
256
Specifically, the agency analyzed whether amber or 
red turn signals were more effective at preventing front-to-rear collisions when the rear-struck 
(leading) vehicle was engaged in a maneuver (i.e., turning, changing lanes, merging, or parking) 
where turn signals were assumed to be engaged.  
256 
Allen (2009). National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT HS 811 115). Available at 
www.nhtsa.gov/DOT/NHTSA/NRD/Multimedia/PDFs/Crash%20Avoidance/2009/811115.pdf. 
123 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
break pdf into separate pages; break password pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function.
add page break to pdf; a pdf page cut
FMVSS No. 108 requires each vehicle to have two turn signals on the rear of the vehicle. 
The regulation provides manufacturers the option of installing either amber (yellow) or red rear 
turn signals with applicable performance requirements for each choice. To avoid imposing an 
unreasonable cost to society, NHTSA’s lighting regulation continues to allow for the lower cost 
rear signal and visibility configurations that meet these requirements. Typically, the lower cost 
configuration includes one combination lamp on each of the rear corners of the vehicle, 
containing a red stop lamp, a red side marker lamp, a red turn signal lamp, a red rear reflex 
reflector, a red side reflex reflector, a red tail lamp, and a white backup lamp. (A separate license 
plate lamp is typically the most cost effective choice for vehicles rated in the NCAP information 
program). Such a configuration can be achieved using just two bulbs and a two color (red and 
white) lens. 
The purpose of FMVSS No. 108 is to reduce crashes and injuries by providing adequate 
illumination of the roadway and by enhancing the visibility of motor vehicles on public roads so 
that their presence is perceived and their signals understood, both in daylight and in darkness or 
other conditions of reduced visibility. While the red rear turn signal lamp configuration provides 
a minimum acceptable level of safety, the agency believes improved safety (measured as the 
reduction in the number of rear-end crashes that resulted in property damage or injury) can be 
achieved with amber rear turn signal lamps at a cost comparable to red rear turn signal lamp 
configurations. This is supported by the observation of vehicle manufacturers changing the rear 
turn signal lamp color for a vehicle model from one year to the next, as was discussed in NHTSA 
Report DOT HS 811 115. The results of this NHTSA study estimated the effectiveness of amber 
rear turn signal lamps, as compared to red turn signal lamps, decrease the risk of two-vehicle, 
124 
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
properties using C# TWAIN image acquiring library add-on step by device. TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE)
break a pdf into multiple files; pdf split pages in half
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
are three parts on this page, including system Add the following C# demo code to device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod
break pdf into multiple files; break pdf into single pages
rear-end crashes where the lead vehicle is turning by 5.3 percent.
257
That study was designed 
around the concept of “switch pairs,” in which make-models of passenger vehicles switched rear 
turn signal color. The crash involvement rates were computed before and after the switch. 
NHTSA estimates that there are roughly 68,550 injury rear-end crashes annually in which the 
lead vehicle is changing direction. As shown in Table 6, rear amber turn signal lamps map to 
prevent or mitigate 11 of the 32 crash scenarios listed. For these reasons, NHTSA intends to 
include amber rear turn signals in this NCAP upgrade.  
A test procedure for amber turn signal lamps exists in FMVSS No. 108. For this program, 
NHTSA intends to use only the Tristimulus method (FMVSS No. 108 S14.4.1.4) for determining 
that the color of the rear turn signal lamp falls within the range of allowable amber colors. As is 
the case with the regulation, the color of light emitted must be within the chromaticity 
boundaries as follows: 
y = 0.39 (red boundary) 
y = 0.79 - 0.67x (white boundary) 
y = x - 0.12 (green boundary) 
If the motor vehicle is equipped with amber rear turn signals meeting these requirements, the 
agency intends to give credit in the crash avoidance rating for these vehicles. 
3. Driver Awareness and Other Technologies 
NHTSA believes crash avoidance warning systems have the potential to improve driver 
performance and reduce the incidence and severity of common crash situations. Analysis of 
manufacturer reported make/model features reveals that warning systems are increasingly 
257 
Allen (2009). National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT HS 811 115). Available at 
www.nhtsa.gov/DOT/NHTSA/NRD/Multimedia/PDFs/Crash%20Avoidance/2009/811115.pdf. 
125 
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. acquire image to file using our C#.NET TWAIN Add-On Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
break a pdf into smaller files; split pdf files
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
be found at this tutorial page of how TWAIN image scanning control add-on owns TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
pdf no pages selected to print; pdf insert page break
offered in passenger vehicles, possibly the result of heightened levels of interest or demand by 
the consumer.  
a.  Lane Departure Warning (LDW)  
NHTSA intends to include LDW in its crash avoidance rating for this NCAP upgrade. 
Currently, LDW is one of the ‘Recommended Technologies’ listed on the NHTSA website 
Safercar.gov.
258
The LDW system is a driver aid that uses vision-based sensors to detect lane 
markers ahead of the vehicle. The LDW system alerts the driver when the vehicle is laterally 
approaching a lane boundary marker, as indicated by a solid line, a dashed line, or raised 
reflective indicators such as Botts dots. The LDW system may produce one or more user 
interfaces, such as an auditory alert or haptic feedback to the driver, and is often accompanied 
with a visual indicator or display icon in the instrument panel to indicate which side of the 
vehicle is departing the lane. 
Vehicle-based LDW technology utilizes either GPS technology or forward- or 
downward-looking optical sensors. A GPS system compares position data with a high resolution 
map database to determine the vehicle location within the lane. An optical sensor system uses a 
forward looking or downward looking optical sensor with image processing algorithms to 
determine where the lane edge lines are located. If the turn signal is activated, the LDW system 
computer software algorithm considers the driver to be purposefully crossing the lane boundary 
marker, and no alert is issued. LDW system performance may be adversely affected by 
precipitation (e.g., rain, snow, fog) and roadway conditions with construction zones, unmarked 
intersections, and faded, worn, or missing lane markings. 
258
A video file and an animation file describing LDW are available at 
www.safercar.gov/staticfiles/safetytech/st_landing_ca.htm. 
126 
LDW systems are designed to help prevent crashes resulting from a vehicle 
unintentionally drifting out of its travel lane. For the light passenger-vehicle crashes considered 
over the period 2002-2006, the Advanced Crash Avoidance Technologies (ACAT) program 
performed around 15,000 simulations in order to set up the underlying virtual crash population; 
by optimizing driving scenario weights it was possible to produce a reasonable degree of fit to 
the actual (GES coded) crash population. ACAT estimated that a baseline set of 180,900 crashes 
annually in the United States could be reduced to about 121,600 with LDW in place, so that 
around 59,300 crashes might be prevented.
259
AAA reported that LDW systems activate when 
vehicle speeds are above 40 to 45 mph (64 to 72 km/h).
260
NHTSA crash data from the period 
2004 to 2013 indicate that a lane departure maneuver was a precursor to approximately 40 
percent of the fatal crashes involving a single vehicle.
261
NHTSA determined that a vehicle 
departed its lane as characterized by the database annotation of the relation to roadway as Off 
Roadway, Shoulder, or Median.
262
The agency believes additional benefits from LDW 
technology may contribute to the possible reduction in the number of head-on collisions.
263 264 
The IIHS similarly estimated in a 2010 report that LDW systems could prevent as many 
as 7,500 fatal crashes, noting that while crashes in which vehicles drift off the road have a low 
incidence rate, they account for a large proportion of fatal crashes.
265
In addition to the numbers 
259
DOT HS 811 405, Advanced Crash Avoidance Technologies (ACAT) Program – Final Report of the Volvo‐
Ford‐UMTRI Project: Safety Impact Methodology for Lane Departure Warning – Method Development and 
Estimation of Benefits, October 2010. Available at 
www.nhtsa.gov/DOT/NHTSA/NVS/Crash%20Avoidance/Technical%20Publications/2010/811405.pdf.
260
AAA Status Report, Vol. 44, No. 10. November 18, 2009.  
261
FARS and GES.  
262
Ibid. 
263
www.nhtsa.gov/DOT/NHTSA/NRD/Multimedia/PDFs/Public%20Paper/SAE/2006/Barickman_LaneDepartuerW  
arning_final.pdf
264 
IIHS, Status Report, Vol. 45, No. 5. May 20, 2010.  
265
Lund, A. Drivers and Driver Assistance Systems: How well do they match? 2013 Driving Assessment 
Conference, Lake George, NY. June 18, 2013. 
127 
NHTSA used in the 2008 NCAP upgrade notice,
266
the Highway Loss Data Institute (HLDI) 
estimates that LDW could apply in approximately 3 percent of police-reported crashes.
267
Three 
percent of the 2013 NHTSA estimated 5,687,000 police-reported crashes equates to 170,610 
crashes that could potentially be reduced or mitigated with LDW crash avoidance technology. 
NHTSA monitors and analyses the interaction and accumulation of vehicle alerts directed 
at drivers. Based on recently published technical papers describing consumer acceptance or 
preference of alert modality, the agency is aware that some drivers choose to disable the LDW 
system if they experience numerous alerts, thereby diminishing any safety benefit.
268 
Additionally, the agency is concerned that multiple and overlapping alerts may create confusion 
for the driver regarding which safety system is being activated or engaged. Rather than require a 
specific alert modality for the LDW crash avoidance technology, the agency intends to re-define 
the LDW performance criteria such that the LDW alert may not occur when the lateral position 
of the vehicle is greater than +1.0 ft (+0.30 m) from the lane line edge to pass the planned NCAP 
test procedure. NHTSA would not consider the intensity of the haptic or the feedback delivery 
component (e.g., steering wheel or seat haptic) in determining whether or not a vehicle received 
credit for LDW in NCAP.  
Development of LDW technology has evolved into lane keeping support (LKS) systems 
that actively guide the vehicle within the lane by counter steering. In the NCAP LDW 
assessment, an LKS steering wheel movement would be considered an acceptable LDW haptic 
alert. 
266
LDW effectiveness of 6 – 11 percent was estimated from data included in NHTSA Report No. DOT HS 810 854,  
Evaluation of a Road Departure Crash Warning System, December 2007. 
267 
IIHS Status Report, Vol. 47, No. 5. Special Issue: Crash Avoidance. July 3, 2012.  
268
Ibid. 
128 
The agency is also concerned about false activations and missed detections resulting from 
tar lines reflecting sun light or covered with water and other unforeseen anomalies, which would 
result in an unreliable driver warning. However, the LDW test procedure is not currently 
structured to address these concerns. Comments are requested on these issues.  
LDW systems, as NHTSA currently defines them, only focus on lane departures while 
the vehicle is traveling along a straight line and does not account for technologies that look at 
curve speed warnings (CSW). CSW alerts the driver when he or she is traveling too fast for an 
upcoming curve. NHTSA crash data indicates off-roadway crashes occur substantially more 
often than crashes departing from the shoulder and median combined. NHTSA believes LDW 
has the potential to provide the driver with the vital sliver of time for rapid decision-making 
necessary to adjust and correct the vehicle direction prior to a road departure situation 
developing. 
The agency intends to continue to use the current NCAP test procedure titled NCAP Lane 
Departure Warning and LKS Test Procedure for NCAP,
269
and requests comment on whether to 
revise certain aspects of the test procedures. The LDW test procedure provides the specifications 
for confirming the existence of LDW hardware. Specifically, it tests for the ability to detect lane 
presence, an unintended lane departure, LDW engagement, and LDW disengagement. The 
NCAP LDW tests are conducted at a constant test speed of 45 mph (72 km/h), in two different 
departure directions, left and right, using three different styles of roadway markings, continuous 
white lines, discontinuous yellow lines, and discontinuous raised pavement markers. Test track 
conditions are defined as a dry, uniform, solid-paved surface with high contrast line markings 
defining a single roadway lane edge. Each test series is repeated until five (5) valid tests are 
269
Available at www.safercar.gov/Vehicle+Shoppers/5-Star+Safety+Ratings/NCAP+Test+Procedures.  
129 
produced. LDW performance is evaluated by examining the proximity of the vehicle with respect 
to the edge of a lane line at the time of the LDW alert. 
Each test trial measures whether the LDW issues an appropriate alert during the 
maneuver in order to determine a pass or fail. In the context of this test procedure, a lane 
departure is said to occur when any part of the two dimensional polygon used to represent the 
test vehicle breaches the inboard lane line edge. The agency requests comments on whether a 
valid trial is considered a failure if the distance between the inside edge of the polygon to the 
lane line at the time of the LDW warning is outside –1.0 to +1.0 ft (–0.30 to +0.30 m), where a 
negative number represents post-line position, or if no warning is issued. This is a change from 
the current NCAP test procedure which specifies -1.0 to +2.5 ft (-0.30 to +0.75 m). The LDW 
system must satisfy the pass criteria for 3 of 5 individual trials for each combination of departure 
direction and lane line type (60%), and pass 20 of the 30 trials overall (66%). If more than five 
trials are deemed valid, the pass/fail criteria must be met for three of the first five valid trials. If 
LDW is offered as an optional safety system, the vehicle model would receive half credit for this 
system. If LDW is offered as standard safety system, the vehicle model would receive full credit 
for the system. Comments are requested on whether the agency should only award NCAP credit 
to LDW systems with haptic alerts. 
b.  Rollover Resistance  
Rollover crashes are complex events that reflect the interaction of driver, road, vehicle, 
and environmental factors. The term “rollover” describes the condition of at least a 90-degree 
rotation about the longitudinal axis of a vehicle,
270
regardless of whether the vehicle ends up 
270
“Rating System for Rollover Resistance, An Assessment,” Transportation Research Board Special Report 265, 
National Research Council. 
130 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested