laying on its side, roof, or even returning upright on all four wheels. Rollovers occur in a 
multitude of ways. The risk of rollover is greater for vehicles designed with a high center of 
gravity in relation to the track width. Driver behavior and road conditions are significant factors 
in rollover crash events. Specifically, the factors that strongly relate to rollover fatalities are: if it 
was a single-vehicle crash, if it was a rural crash location, if it was a high-speed roadway, if it 
occurred at night, if there was an off-road tripping/tipping mechanism, if it was a young driver, if 
the driver was male, if it was alcohol-related, if it was speed-related, if there was an unbelted 
occupant, and if an occupant was ejected.  
i. Background 
Rollover is one of the most severe crash types for light vehicles. In 2012, 112,000 
rollovers occurred as the first harmful event, measuring 2 percent of the 5,615,000 police-
reported crashes involving all types of motor vehicles. In 2012, single, light-vehicle rollovers 
accounted for 6,763 occupant deaths. This represented 20 percent of motor vehicle fatalities in 
2012, 31 percent of people who died in light-vehicle crashes, and 46 percent of people who died 
in light-vehicle single-vehicle crashes.
271 
NHTSA describes rollovers as “tripped” or “untripped.” In a tripped rollover, the vehicle 
rolls over after leaving the roadway due to striking a curb, soft shoulder, guard rail or other 
object that “trips” it. Crash data suggest approximately 95 percent of rollovers in single-vehicle 
crashes are tripped.
272
A small percentage of rollover events are untripped, typically induced by 
tire and/or road interface friction. Whether or not a vehicle rolls when it encounters a tripping 
mechanism is highly dependent upon the ratio of two vehicle geometric properties, referred to as 
271 
DOT HS 812 016, available at www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/Pubs/812016.pdf. 
272
See 68 FR 59251. Docket No. NHTSA-2001-9663, Notice 3. Available at https://federalregister.gov/a/03-25360 
131 
Pdf no pages selected to print - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
c# split pdf; pdf file specification
Pdf no pages selected to print - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf file into multiple files; break a pdf into parts
the Static Stability Factor (SSF). The SSF of a vehicle is calculated as one-half the track width, t, 
divided by the height of the center of gravity (c.g.) above the road, h; SSF = (t/2h). The inertial 
force that causes a vehicle to sway on its suspension (and roll over in extreme cases) in response 
to cornering, rapid steering reversals or striking a tripping mechanism, like a curb or the soft 
shoulder of the road, when the vehicle is sliding laterally, may be thought of as a force acting at 
the c.g. to pull the vehicle body laterally. A reduction in c.g. height increases the lateral inertial 
force necessary to cause rollover by reducing its leverage, and this is represented by an increase 
in the computed value of SSF. A wider track width also increases the lateral force necessary to 
cause rollover by increasing the leverage of the vehicle’s weight in resisting rollover, and that 
advantage also increases the computed value of SSF. The factor of two in the computation (t/2h) 
makes SSF equal to the lateral acceleration at which rollover begins in the most simplified 
rollover analysis of a vehicle, which is represented by a rigid body without suspension 
movement or tire deflections.
273 
In 2001, the agency decided to use SSF to indicate rollover risk in a single-vehicle 
crash.
274
Additionally, in that notice, the agency introduced the rollover resistance rating as a 
means to quantify the risk of a rollover if a single-vehicle crash occurs. The agency emphasizes 
that this rating does not predict the likelihood of a rollover crash occurring only that of a rollover 
occurring given that a single vehicle crash occurs. In this rating system, the lowest rated vehicles 
(1 star) are at least 4 times more likely to rollover than the highest rated vehicles (5 stars).  
The rollover rating that was included as part of NCAP was based on a regression analysis 
that estimated the relationship between single-vehicle rollover crashes and the vehicles’ SSF 
273
For further explanation see the description and Figure 1 at  
www.nhtsa.gov/cars/rules/rulings/Rollover/Chapt05.html.
274 
See 66 FR 3388. Docket No. NHTSA-2000-8298. Available at https://federalregister.gov/a/01-973.  
132 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK deployment on IIS in .NET
the place where you store XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer Bit Applications" in accordance with the selected DLL (x86 site configured in IIS has no sufficient authority
break pdf; break a pdf into separate pages
VB.NET PDF - VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer Deployment on IIS
the place where you store XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer Bit Applications" in accordance with the selected DLL (x86 site configured in IIS has no sufficient authority
split pdf; break apart pdf pages
using state crash data. The SSF is measured at a Vehicle Inertial Measurement Facility 
(VIMF).
275
NHTSA acquires vehicles and measures the height of the vehicle c.g. The VIMF 
consistently measures the c.g. height location of a particular vehicle using the stable pendulum 
configuration. The test facility must be capable of measuring the c.g. height location to within 
0.5 percent of the theoretical height, typically the 3-dimensional computer generated solid model 
value of that vehicle. The track width is also measured on the same vehicle at this time. The risk 
of rollover originally calculated for the 2001 notice was based on a linear regression analysis of 
220,000 single-vehicle crash events reported by 8 States (Florida, Maryland, Missouri, New 
Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Utah).  
Pursuant to the FY 2001 DOT Appropriations Act, NHTSA funded a National Academy 
of Science (NAS) study on vehicle rollover resistance ratings.
276
The study focused on two 
topics: whether the SSF is a scientifically valid measurement that presents practical, useful 
information to the public, and a comparison of the SSF versus a test with rollover metrics based 
on dynamic driving conditions that may include rollover events. NAS published their report at 
the end of February 2002.
277 
The NAS study found that SSF is a scientifically valid measure of rollover resistance for 
which the underlying physics and real-word crash data are consistent with the conclusions that an 
increase in SSF reduces the likelihood of rollover. It also found that dynamic tests should 
complement static measures, such as SSF, rather than replace them in consumer information on 
rollover resistance. The NAS study also made recommendations concerning the statistical 
275
“The design of a Vehicle Inertial Measurement Facility,” Heydinger, G. J. et al, SAE Paper 950309, February, 
1995. 
276
Department of Transportation and Related Agencies Appropriations, 2001. Pub. L. 106-346 (Oct. 23, 2000). 
277
“Rating System for Rollover Resistance, An Assessment,” Transportation Research Board Special Report 265, 
National Research Council. 
133 
VB.NET TIFF: .NET TIFF Printer Control; Print TIFF Using VB.NET
document printing add-on has no limitation on the function to print multiple TIFF pages by defining powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
split pdf by bookmark; break apart pdf pages
C# Image: Create C#.NET Windows Document Image Viewer | Online
C# Windows Document Image Viewer Features. No need for viewing multiple document & image formats (PDF, MS Word value of selected drop-down list to switch pages.
pdf splitter; break pdf into multiple documents
analysis of rollover risk and the representation of ratings methodology. The two primary 
recommendations suggested using logistic regression rather than linear regression for analysis of 
the relationship between rollover and SSF, and a high-resolution representation of the 
relationship between rollover and SSF than is provided in the current 5-star program. 
On October 14, 2003, NHTSA published a final policy statement outlining its changes to 
the NCAP rollover resistance rating.
278
Beginning with the 2004 model year, NHTSA combined 
a vehicle’s SSF measurement with its performance in a dynamic “fishhook” test maneuver 
presented as a single rating. The fishhook maneuver is performed on a smooth pavement and is a 
rapid steering input followed by an over-correction representative of a general loss-of-control 
situation. This action attempts to simulate steering maneuvers that a driver acting in panic might 
use in an effort to regain lane position after dropping two wheels off the roadway onto the 
shoulder. 
Additionally, the predicted rollover resistance ratings were reevaluated. Consistent with 
the NAS recommendations, the agency changed from a linear regression to a logistic regression 
analysis of the data. The sample size increased to 293,000 single-vehicle crash events, producing 
a narrow confidence interval on the repeatability of the relationship between SSF and rollover. In 
contrast, the linear regression analysis performed on the rollover rate of 100 make/models in 
each of the six States providing data, resulted in a sample size of 600. In addition, a second risk 
curve was generated for vehicles that experienced a tip-up in the dynamic fishhook test. 
ii. Updates to the rollover NCAP SSF risk curve 
Commenters to NHTSA’s 2008 NCAP upgrade notice asked NHTSA to collect crash 
data on vehicles equipped with ESC in order to develop a new rollover risk model. In July 2008, 
278
See 68 FR 59250. Docket No. NHTSA-2001-9663, Notice 3. Available at https://federalregister.gov/a/03-25360. 
134 
VB.NET Word: Use VB.NET Code to Convert Word Document to TIFF
Render one or multiple selected DOCXPage instances into to TIFF image converting application, no external Word user guides with RasteEdge .NET PDF SDK using VB
break a pdf; break a pdf into smaller files
the agency upgraded the NCAP program to combine the rollover rating with the frontal and side 
crash ratings, creating a single, overall vehicle rating.
279
No changes were made to the risk model 
at that time.
280
However, NHTSA received comments requesting that the agency collect this 
crash data to develop a new rollover risk model that better describes the rollover risk of all 
vehicles that reflects the real-world benefits of ESC.
281
To enhance its rollover program, the 
agency responded that they would continue to monitor the rollover rate for single-vehicle crashes 
involving ESC equipped vehicles.  
The accumulation of crash data involving vehicles equipped with ESC has been slow. 
The 2003 regression analysis was based on 293,000 crash events. Up until recently, the agency 
had observed fewer than 10,000 crashes with ESC-equipped vehicles. Previously, NHTSA was 
not confident that it could accurately redraw the risk curves using such a small sample size. The 
agency now believes that it has accumulated enough data to see a narrower tolerance band 
adequate for use in a rating system.  
According to the 2013 FARS, 7,500 vehicle occupants were killed in light-vehicle 
rollovers.
282
These 2013 rollovers accounted for 34.6 percent of the 21,667 fatalities in light 
vehicles that year. Of these 7,500 fatalities, 6,254 were killed in single-vehicle rollovers. NCAP 
provides a consumer information rating program articulating the risk of rollover, to encourage 
consumers to purchase vehicles with a predicted lower risk of a rollover. This information 
enables prospective purchasers to make choices about new vehicles based on differences in 
rollover risk and serve as a market incentive to manufacturers to design their vehicles with 
279
See 73 FR 40021. Docket No. NHTSA-2006-26555. Available at https://federalregister.gov/a/E8-15620. 
280
See 73 FR 40032. Docket No. NHTSA-2006-26555. Available at https://federalregister.gov/a/E8-15620. 
281 
See 72 FR 3475. Docket No. NHTSA-2006-26555. Available at https://federalregister.gov/a/E7-1130. 
282
Traffic Safety Facts 2012. DOT HS 812 032 available at www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/Pubs/812032.pdf.  
135 
greater rollover resistance. The consumer information program also informs drivers, especially 
those who choose vehicles with poorer rollover resistance, that their risk of harm can be greatly 
reduced with seat belt use to avoid ejection. The program seeks to remind consumers that even 
the highest rated vehicle can roll over, but that they can reduce their chance of being killed in a 
rollover by about 75 percent just by wearing their seat belts. 
NHTSA intends to update and recalculate the risk curve using ESC data collected from 
20 States, and to transition the rollover risk rating into a new crash avoidance rating. In this new 
rollover scoring, NHTSA would not be changing the dynamic rollover test. The agency believes 
that embedding rollover into the crash avoidance rating is more appropriate since it targets 
rollover prevention and it also consolidates the message of reduced crash incidence. Rollover 
resistance would remain a significant component in the rating scheme, weighted based on its 
relative importance to overall vehicle safety. The details of how the crashworthiness rating is 
combined with the crash avoidance rating into an overall rating system are discussed in the rating 
section of this RFC notice. 
The statistical model created in 2003 combined SSF and dynamic maneuver test 
information to predict rollover risk. The agency performed the Fishhook test on about 25 of the 
100 make/model vehicles for which SSF was measured and substantial State crash data was 
available.
283
Eleven of the 25 vehicles tipped up
284
in the Fishhook maneuver that was conducted 
in the heavy condition with a 5-occupant load. All 11 vehicles had SSFs less than 1.20.  
283
An Experimental Examination of 26 Light Vehicles Using Test Maneuvers That May Induce On-Road,  
Untripped Light Vehicle Rollover—Phase VI of NHTSA’s Light Vehicle Rollover Research  
Program, NHTSA Technical Report, DOT HS 809 547, 2003. 
284
A “tip-up” occurs when the two vehicle wheels lift off the ground 2 inches during the Fishhook test.  
136 
At that time, the agency believed it was very unlikely that passenger cars would tip-up in 
the maneuver test because no tip-ups were observed in the passenger cars tested at the low end of 
the SSF range for passenger cars. To validate that assumption, the agency tested a few passenger 
cars each year at the low end of the SSF range. No tip-ups have been observed in the agency tests 
for any vehicle type since 2007. Therefore, the agency is unable to produce an estimate or a 
logistic regression curve based on tip/no-tip as a variable. 
The rollover statistical model was populated with new data and used logistic regression 
analysis to update the rollover risk curve. The agency examined 20 State datasets for single-
vehicle crashes involving vehicles equipped with ESC that occurred during 2011 and 2012. Data 
were reported by Delaware, Florida, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, 
Michigan, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North 
Dakota, Pennsylvania, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. The dataset was comprised of 
11,647 single-vehicle crashes, of which 627 resulted in rollover. For 2011, NHTSA used data 
reported by each of the 20 States for single-vehicle crashes involving ESC-equipped vehicles; a 
summation of 5,429 crashes. For 2012, NHTSA used data reported by 10 States for single-
vehicle crashes involving ESC-equipped vehicles; 6,218 crashes. Table 8 shows a summary of 
the 2011 and 2012 State dataset used for the logistic regression analysis. 
Table 8. Summary of 2011 and 2012 State data used to generate the rollover risk curve 
State 
2011 
2012 
Non-
Rollover 
Rollover 
Total 
Non-Rollover 
Rollover 
Total 
DE 
29 
31 
88 
90 
FL 
624 
26 
650 
No data 
No data 
No data 
IA 
123 
12 
135 
237 
22 
259 
IL 
319 
19 
338 
No data 
No data 
No data 
IN 
283 
283 
723 
17 
740 
KS 
92 
94 
266 
273 
KY 
211 
17 
228 
464 
50 
514 
137 
MD 
133 
14 
147 
310 
31 
341 
MI 
619 
34 
653 
1,344 
74 
1,418 
MO 
204 
22 
226 
No data 
No data 
No data 
NC 
407 
43 
450 
1,028 
87 
1,115 
ND 
17 
21 
No data 
No data 
No data 
NE 
67 
71 
213 
13 
226 
NJ 
503 
18 
521 
1,199 
43 
1,242 
NM 
55 
58 
No data 
No data 
No data 
NY 
793 
797 
No data 
No data 
No data 
PA 
383 
39 
422 
No data 
No data 
No data 
WA 
73 
81 
No data 
No data 
No data 
WI 
203 
212 
No data 
No data 
No data 
WY 
10 
11 
No data 
No data 
No data 
Total 
5,148 
281 
5,429 
5,872 
346 
6,218 
The new dataset included 197 different makes/models for which the SSF had been 
calculated within NCAP; the SSF ranged from 1.07 to 1.53. The new dataset contained two 
vehicle types, passenger cars and light truck vehicles, including pickup trucks, SUVs, and vans. 
To accomplish the rollover analysis, it is more appropriate to use the state dataset because it 
provides the ability to filter for ESC-equipped vehicles rather than the NHTSA FARS database, 
which is not sufficiently granular. FARS contains two data elements; rollover and rollover 
location. The rollover data element has attributes of no rollover, tripped rollover, untripped 
rollover, and unknown type rollover. The rollover location data element has attributes of no 
rollover, on roadway, on shoulder, on median/separator, in gore, on roadside, outside of 
trafficway, in parking lane/zone, and unknown. The State dataset distribution compares similarly 
to the FARS number of vehicles involved in fatal crashes with a rollover occurrence. Table 9 
summarizes the 2011 and 2012 rollover data for the number of single-vehicle crashes for ESC-
equipped vehicles by vehicle type. For comparison, Table 10 summarizes the number of vehicles 
involved in fatal crashes with a rollover occurrence by vehicle type, as reported in FARS. In the 
new rollover model dataset, pickup trucks appear to be slightly underrepresented and SUVs 
appear to be slightly overrepresented compared with the FARS data. 
138 
Table 9. Summary of 2011 and 2012 State data used to generate the rollover risk curve 
Vehicle Type 
Single-Vehicle Crashes 
(ESC-equipped Vehicles) 
Number of 
Rollovers 
Proportion, by 
Vehicle Type 
2011 
2012 
Total 
Passenger Car 
2,803 
3,280 
6,083 
262 
42 % 
Pickup 
636 
768 
1,404 
92 
15 % 
SUV 
1,823 
1,931 
3,754 
259 
41 % 
Van 
167 
239 
406 
14 
2 % 
Total 
5,429 
6,218 
11,647 
627 
100 % 
Source: State Data System 
Table 10. Vehicles involved in fatal crashes with a rollover occurrence 
Vehicle Type 
2011 
2012 
2011 + 2012 
Vehicles 
Involved in 
Fatal 
Crashes 
Rollover 
Occurrence 
Vehicles 
Involved in 
Fatal 
Crashes 
Rollover 
Occurrence 
Number of 
Rollovers 
Proportion, by 
Vehicle Type 
Passenger Car 
17,508 
2,680 
18,269 
2,827 
5,507 
38 % 
Pickup 
7,790 
2,050 
8,001 
2,117 
4,167 
28 % 
SUV 
6,787 
2,128 
7,118 
2,170 
4,298 
29 % 
Van 
2,187 
365 
2,173 
316 
681 
5 % 
Total 
34,272 
7,223 
35,561 
7,430 
14,653 
100 % 
Source: FARS 
The agency performed a logistic regression analysis of the 11,647 single-vehicle crash 
events. The dependent variable in this analysis is vehicle rollover, while the independent 
variables are SSF, light condition, driver age, driver gender, and the State indicator variable.  The 
SAS® logistic regression program used these variables to compute the model. The SAS® 
statistical analysis software output tables are available in the docket for this RFC notice. Figure 4 
shows a plot of the predicted rollover probability versus the SSF for the 20-State dataset. Figure 
5 is a plot of the average predicted probability of rollover for each SSF in the dataset.  Figures 4 
and 5 demonstrate the relationship between SSF and the predicted probability of rollover, that at 
every level of SSF the predicted probability of rollover is less than it was estimated to be in 
2003. The flatter curve for the 2011 + 2012 dataset aligns with increased vehicle SSFs, the 
139 
expected effect of ESC on rollover frequency, and the reduced observation of rollover in single-
vehicle crashes. 
Figure 4. Current and new rollover risk curve 
140 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested