asp net open pdf file in web browser using c# : Pdf split and merge control application platform web page azure asp.net web browser pdfaforAcrobat0-part1476

Adobe Acrobat White Paper
Making the case for PDF/A and Adobe® Acrobat®
The introduction of personal computers into business has drastically changed the archiving environment. Prior 
to the 1990s, most offices still had typing pools and word processing groups and kept records on paper in 
centralized files. But when computers became the norm for the majority of workers, the usefulness of the 
centralized file room disappeared. In those early days, it was everyone’s responsibility to create, file, and 
maintain their own documents. As a result, corporations lost control over important records, and regulatory 
compliance fines began to rise. A few years ago, for instance, a major pharmaceutical company in the United 
States was fined $125M by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) because they were unable to provide 
information to an audit team in a timely manner during an investigation. 
Today, organizations are embracing the need for digital archiving. Governments are defining regulatory 
standards that mandate, recommend, or accept PDF or PDF/A (a subset of PDF designed specifically for 
archiving). In addition, the PDF file format is rapidly overtaking paper for long-term storage. Recently, an AIIM 
Market IQ study, Content Creation and Delivery: The On-Ramps and Off-Ramps of ECM, found that 90% of the 
organizations studied were using PDF for long-term storage of scanned documents, and 89% were converting 
office files to PDF for distribution and archive. Not surprisingly, 100% of the organizations were still using 
paper. But when asked to predict the situation in five years, the use of paper for long-term storage dropped to 
77%, while PDF rose to 93%. 
In another study focusing specifically on PDF/A use in Europe, Nearly all archiving projects use PDF/A, the PDF/A 
Competence Center found that of the 400 survey respondents, 16% used PDF/A already, and an impressive 
50% intended to introduce it in the next 12 months. Older archiving formats, such as TIFF, JPEG, and 
conventional PDF, had decreased by about 5% from the previous years’ survey. Email archiving was identified 
as one of the key driving factors for the recent increase. 
If you’re like most IT or compliance professionals today, the need for digital archiving is clear but you’re 
wondering how you’re going to make it work. And perhaps more importantly, you’re wondering how you and 
your team are going to make the case for investing in a new approach. You’ll be faced with many questions. 
Why PDF/A versus other file formats? At what point after document creation should electronic records be 
converted to PDF/A? How will you authenticate documents entering the archive and protect them from being 
changed over time? How will you capture and archive electronic forms? How will you manage the metadata 
(information about the document itself)?
These questions and many more are being addressed every day, and PDF/A is playing a central role in the 
strategies that are being devised. This white paper provides the facts you need as well as links to the resources 
that will help you address these questions and make the business case for an investment in PDF/A and Adobe 
Acrobat software. If you’re interested in Adobe LiveCycle® Enterprise Suite (ES) software for process 
automation, be sure to read the companion white paper, Making the Case for PDF/A and Adobe LiveCycle ES.
Table of contents
2: PDF/A adoption
2: PDF/A: 周e digital 
document archiving 
standard
6: Working with Adobe 
Acrobat
16: Summary
16: Resources
PDF/A in summary
PDF/A stands for PDF for 
Archiving. It is a set of ISO 
standards (ISO 19005) 
using a subset of the PDF 
format that leave out PDF 
features not suited for 
long-term preservation. 
It provides specifica-
tions for the creation, 
viewing, and printing of 
PDF documents with the 
intent of preserving final 
documents of record as 
self-contained files. It 
does not allow references 
to external content since 
those items may not exist 
in years to come. 
Pdf split and merge - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
pdf split and merge; pdf separate pages
Pdf split and merge - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf file into parts; break pdf into multiple pages
2
Adobe Acrobat White Paper
PDF/A adoption
Since it became an ISO standard in 2005, PDF/A has gained significant acceptance. The earliest adopters have 
been government organizations who define the regulatory standards that businesses must live by. Here is just 
a sampling of government organizations that mandate, recommend, or accept PDF/A.
• 周e U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) accepts PDF/A submissions, and PDF/A is 
accepted or recommended by the national archives or libraries in Germany, France, Italy, Sweden, the 
Netherlands, Austria, Victoria Australia, and Norway. 
• In the European Commission’s Model Requirements for the Management of Electronic Documents and 
Records (MoReq), PDF/A is on the list of recommended data formats for scanned documents and long-term 
archiving. 
• One of the earliest adopters, the U.S. Courts, mandates PDF submissions for legal filings such as complaints, 
bankruptcy petitions, briefs, and depositions. Upon receipt, documents are converted to PDF/A, time and 
date-stamped, and a certifying signature is applied before routing to the workflow for further processing. 
• 周e Organization for the Promotion of Automated Accounting, based in Europe, defined a standard process 
for e-billing that uses PDF/A as a document format with the XML standard openTrans for embedding invoiced 
data. 周e PDF/A document and the embedded invoice data form a single entity which is “sealed” with a 
digital signature.
• Countries such as Germany, France, and the Netherlands recommend PDF/A at a nationwide level when it 
comes to archiving administrative documents with static, inalterable content. 
PDF/A is also being put to use in real-world business scenarios. The Illinois Municipal Retirement Fund (IMRF), 
for instance, turned to PDF and PDF/A to improve services and cut costs. IMRF provides employees of local 
governments and school districts with retirement, disability, and death benefits. Like many organizations, IMRF 
used the TIFF file format for their first generation of electronic documents, but large file sizes, long download 
times, and difficulties searching for information within those files drove them to look for a better approach. For 
their next-generation solution, they turned to conventional PDF for the distribution of member and employer 
correspondence, and PDF/A for archival. On average, member statements were generated up to 68% faster, 
with the total file size 76% smaller. A smaller file size also meant smaller storage requirements for the archived 
statements at a much lower cost than the previous solution. 
PDF/A: 周e digital document archiving standard
PDF/A stands for PDF for Archiving. It is one set of standards among a larger suite of PDF-based standards 
managed by ISO, the International Organization for Standardization. As its name suggests, it was developed to 
enable long-term preservation of electronic documents. It provides specifications for the creation, viewing, and 
printing of PDF documents with the intent of preserving final documents of record as self-contained 
documents. The standard does not define an archiving strategy or the goals of an archiving system. Instead, it 
identifies a “profile” for a PDF file that makes it possible to reproduce the visual appearance of the document 
the exact same way in years to come. This profile specifies what must be included the file, while prohibiting 
features that are not suited for long-term archiving. 
When making the case for PDF/A, you and your team might run into challenges from others in your 
organization. Typical questions include: Wouldn’t it be easier to archive documents in their original formats? 
We’ve already got a system that generates TIFF, why not use that? We’re already using PDF files in other phases 
of the work, so why don’t we just archive those? Let’s take a look at all of these questions.
Challenges archiving original formats
Archiving electronic documents in their original, or “native,” format certainly qualifies as the simplest and least 
expensive method in the short term. The documents are already there. You only need to capture them in your 
records management system. Unfortunately, it is also the most risky method for the long-term given the rise in 
more stringent, standards-based regulatory requirements. 
周e Illinois Municipal 
Retirement Fund (IMRF)
replaced TIFF with PDF 
and PDF/A. 
Read more about IMRF
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Merge and Append PDF. VB.NET PDF - Merge PDF Document Using VB.NET. VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in VB.NET Project.
break apart pdf; how to split pdf file by pages
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Merge and Append PDF. C#.NET PDF Library - Merge PDF Documents in C#.NET. Merge PDF with byte array, fields.
break a pdf apart; pdf print error no pages selected
3
Adobe Acrobat White Paper
Original format documents are editable by nature and can be read only by their authoring applications. These 
characteristics lead to serious difficulties from an archiving perspective. 
• Ensuring authenticity—Most original documents are not locked and can’t be read without pu瑴ing them at 
risk of modification. During an audit, it’s virtually impossible to prove a document hasn’t been tampered with 
during its lifetime. While many applications do offer options to lock a document, each one deploys its own 
unique method, making future management of those records vastly more complex. 
• Ensuring file format compliance—Increasingly, government bodies require standards-based document 
formats, rather than original formats, for legal or regulatory submissions. 
• Avoiding a costly effort to restore documents during a compliance event—Government regulations 
require companies to store records for many years. If older versions of the so晴ware aren’t available when a 
compliance event occurs, it might be necessary to open the original documents using newer versions of the 
so晴ware to print them or convert them to PDF/A. If the layout doesn’t match the original, manual adjustment 
might be required. 
Challenges archiving image formats
Many organizations chose TIFF as their first-generation archiving format for electronic documents. With so 
many paper documents to be converted to digital, it was a logical choice because of its ability to capture the 
appearance of the original document precisely. However, drawbacks, such as large file sizes, unreliable readers, 
and searchable text files that were separated from their TIFF counterparts, made archiving with TIFF a complex 
and expensive proposition. As time passed and more documents were “born digital,” PDF began overtaking 
TIFF in popularity for a variety of reasons:
• PDF files are more compact and require only a fraction of the memory space of TIFF files, o晴en with  
be瑴er quality.
• 周e availability and reliability of Adobe Reader® reduces the support burden for IT organizations. 
• PDF stores structured objects (for example, text, vector graphics, and raster images), allowing for an efficient 
full-text search in an entire archive. 周is includes scanned images whose text has been extracted through 
optical character recognition (OCR) and incorporated into the same PDF.
• Because metadata, such as the title, author, and keywords, can be embedded in a PDF file, PDF files can be 
automatically classified based on the metadata without requiring human intervention. 
• PDF files have become commonplace in upstream business processes, so rendering an archival version of the 
PDF file as a final step in the process is easier to do and simplifies the task of capturing the necessary 
metadata. Electronic forms, for instance, which can include XML-based data and digital signatures, can be 
processed as interactive documents and then frozen in an archival form. 
Using the appropriate PDF standard for the job
Demands of the 21st century are making corporations and governments rethink their old perceptions of 
documents. Content lifecycles have become more complex. Documents must be able to present diverse 
content to multiple audiences, each with different needs and goals. The simple truth is that no single file format 
is ideal for every purpose or stage of the content lifecycle. Document creation is still done with dedicated 
software, but increasingly, organizations are adopting different types of PDF files to streamline the subsequent 
steps. Each stage, including review, publication, utilization, and archiving, has its own unique requirements, so 
the PDF files used often require different characteristics, as shown in this content lifecycle example.
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
C# PDF - Merge or Split PDF File in C#.NET. C#.NET Code Demos to Combine or Divide Source PDF Document File. Visual C#. VB.NET. Home
pdf format specification; pdf split pages in half
VB.NET PDF: Use VB.NET Code to Merge and Split PDF Documents
VB.NET PDF - How to Merge and Split PDF. How to Merge and Split PDF Documents by Using VB.NET Code. Visual C#. VB.NET. Home > .NET Imaging
acrobat split pdf bookmark; cannot print pdf no pages selected
4
Adobe Acrobat White Paper
The start of the content livecycle; 
when people put ideas to any type 
of media.   
Capturing comments electronically 
facilitates more ecient reviews, 
and creates an audit trail.
Final content distributed to 
appropriate parties via paper 
or electronic media.  
Intended audience engaging or 
transacting with the content.
Long-term retention of the data 
or content.    
LESSON
PDF
PAPER
www.
@
Content Lifecycle
1. Creation
3. Publishing
4. Utilization
5. Archival
2. Review
PDF
CAD
FORM
PDF
PDF
FORM
PDF
PDF
ARCHIVE
PDF/A
ODF
XML
DOC
1.  Creation is done with dedicated 
software, such as Microsoft Oce or 
CAD applications.
2.  Review typically uses PDF features like 
interactive commenting and external 
references for review tracking.
3a.  Electronic publication might require 
PDF features like embedded audio, 
video, or hyperlinks.
3b.  Print publication might require specic 
instructions in the PDF to render 
properly on a printing press.
4.  Utilization might require interactive 
PDF features such as llable form elds 
or digital signatures.
5. Archiving requires a self-contained PDF 
document with only nal-form, static 
content.
Increasingly, organizations are adopting PDF to streamline steps like review, publication, utilization and archival.
A key question is how many different types of PDF are needed in your organization? If there’s a document of 
record involved in any stage of the upstream process, does it make sense to convert documents to PDF/A during 
that stage, or should you wait until the end? The answer depends on your organization’s requirements. In the 
U.S. Courts example mentioned earlier, the submissions they receive are official documents of record, so it makes 
sense to convert to PDF/A quite early in the processing cycle. The IMRF, by contrast, uses a more traditional 
approach with a conventional PDF file used for publication and utilization, and PDF/A for final archival. 
Determining where and when to use PDF/A in your organization starts by examining the specification closely. 
Review it with an eye toward archival first to make sure it meets your needs, and then decide whether PDF/A or 
another type of PDF is appropriate for other stages in the content lifecycle. 
PDF/A-1 characteristics
ISO 19005-1 defines “a file format based on PDF, known as PDF/A, which provides a mechanism for 
representing electronic documents in a manner that preserves their visual appearance over time, independent 
of the tools and systems used for creating, storing or rendering the files.” The current version of the standard is 
PDF/A-1, which is based on PDF v1.4. The next generation, PDF/A-2, is under development and will add 
selected features from the current master PDF standard, ISO-32000-1, which is now maintained by the 
International Organization for Standardization. 
Here are the key characteristics of a PDF/A file. A complete copy of the ISO 19005-1 specification can be 
purchased from the AIIM catalog.
• Self-contained—Everything needed to render or print a PDF/A file must be contained within the file. 周is 
includes all visible content, such as text, raster images, vector graphics, fonts, and color information. In 
addition, a wide range of external content references are not allowed, including audio and video content, 
JavaScript, and executable files.
• Self-documenting—PDF/A promotes the use of metadata, enhancing the document by providing informa-
tion about the document itself. It provides recommendations, for instance, for documenting file a瑴ributes 
such as the file identifier, file provenance, and font metadata. When metadata is used, PDF/A requires the use 
of the Adobe Extensible Metadata Platform (XMP) for embedding the data in the files.
Focus on fonts
All embedded fonts must 
be legally embeddable 
for unlimited, universal 
rendering. Organizations 
who have adopted PDF/A 
typically set corporate 
document standards 
defining fonts that are 
compatible with the 
standard.
Focus on metadata 
周ere are many ways to 
work with metadata in 
PDF/A files.  
Read the article PDF/A 
Metadata—XMP, RDF 
& Dublin Core to learn 
more.
VB.NET TIFF: Merge and Split TIFF Documents with RasterEdge .NET
Merge certain pages from different TIFF documents and create a &ltsummary> ''' Split a TIFF provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
can print pdf no pages selected; acrobat split pdf into multiple files
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Tell VB.NET users how to: create a new PDF file and load PDF from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy
break pdf into multiple documents; break password pdf
5
Adobe Acrobat White Paper
• Device-independent—PDF/A requires device-independent components, such as specific RGB or CMYK color 
profiles, so that the static visual appearance can be reliably and consistently rendered and printed without 
regard to the hardware or so晴ware platform used. 
• Two levels of compliance—周e lowest level of compliance, PDF/A-1b, meets all the core requirements, 
ensuring reliable reproduction of the visual appearance of a document. 周is specification is o晴en applied to 
scanned images and preexisting PDF files that are converted to PDF/A. 周e higher level, PDF/A-1a, requires 
document structure called tags, which provides an underlying structure for the content within the document 
and facilitates searching, repurposing of content, and accessibility for people with disabilities such as 
blindness. 周is higher level specification is typically applied to “digitally born” documents captured directly 
from applications like Microso晴 Word, which create document structure during the authoring process.
• Unfe瑴ered—PDF/A prohibits encryption. 周is means that a compliant PDF/A file must be open and available 
to anyone or any so晴ware that processes the file. User IDs and passwords cannot be embedded. Access 
control is typically managed outside the file format by a content or records management system. 
Comparing PDF/A to other PDF standards
PDF/A is uniquely designed to support long-term archiving, but what about other stages of the content 
lifecycle? This chart summarizes each of the standards based on PDF. Because the complete PDF specification 
is now a formal, open standard (ISO 32000), it is possible to use a wide range of PDF types and still be 
confident that your approach is standards-based.
PDF Standards
Specification 
or guideline
Designed for:
Description
PDF  
ISO 32000
The umbrella standard 
Conventional PDF for a 
broad range of uses
PDF is a formal, open standard maintained by the ISO. ISO 32000 contains 
the complete PDF specification and supersedes the 1.7 edition of the Adobe 
PDF Reference. This standard will become the foundation for all future 
generations of derivative standards. The next generation of PDF/A, for 
instance, will build on ISO 32000 to enhance the definition of PDF files used 
for long-term archiving. 
PDF/A  
ISO 19005
Archiving  
Records managers, 
archivists, compliance 
managers
Provides specifications for the creation, viewing, and printing of digital 
documents used for long-term preservation. PDF/A preserves and protects 
final documents of record as self-contained files. It does not allow 
references to external content because those items might not exist in years 
to come. PDF/A-1 is based on PDF v1.4. PDF/A-2 is under development.
PAdES  
ETSI TS 102 
778
PDF digital signatures in 
the European Union  
Anyone who needs 
document-based 
signatures to enable 
electronic processes
Provides a standard that facilitates secure, paperless business transactions 
throughout Europe, in conformance with European legislation. Maintained 
by ETSI, this standard builds on the ISO 32000 standard to define a series of 
profiles for advanced electronic signatures that comply with European 
Directive 1999/93/EC.
PDF/E  
ISO 24517
Engineering  
Architects, engineers, 
construction 
professionals, 
manufacturing product 
teams
Provides specifications for the creation, viewing, and printing of documents 
used in engineering workflows. PDF/E facilitates the exchange of 
documentation and drawings to share with others in the supply chain or 
streamline review and markup. It specifies PDF settings suitable for building, 
manufacturing, and geospatial workflows and supports interactive media, 
including animation and 3D. PDF/E-1 is based on PDF v1.6.
PDF/X  
ISO 15930
Print production  
Print professionals, 
graphic designers, 
creative professionals
Provides specifications for the creation, viewing, and printing of final 
print-ready or press-ready pages. PDF/X provides guidelines for PDF settings 
affecting critical aspects of printing, such as color space and trapping. It also 
restricts other content, such as embedded multimedia, that does not directly 
serve high-quality print production output. 
PDF 
Healthcare
Healthcare  
Healthcare providers and 
consumers
Provides best practice and implementation guidelines to facilitate the 
capture, exchange, preservation, and protection of healthcare information. 
Following these guidelines provides a secure electronic container that can 
store and transmit health information, including personal documents, XML 
data, DICOM images and data, clinical notes, lab reports, electronic forms, 
scanned images, photographs, digital x-rays, and ECGs. 
Focus on digital 
signatures 
Live digital signatures can 
be included in a PDF/A 
file as long as they are 
applied a晴er the PDF/A 
file has been created. To 
make sure that the file 
remains compliant with 
the standard, apply the 
signature using so晴ware 
that is PDF/A-aware, such 
as Adobe Acrobat or 
Adobe LiveCycle ES. 
Governments and 
standards bodies have 
done extensive work to 
advance the legal accep-
tance of digital signa-
tures. For instance, the 
U.S. Courts, U.S. Army, 
and Belgian government 
have been among the 
leaders in defining poli-
cies and adopting digital 
signatures. 周e European 
Telecommunications 
Standards Institute (ETSI) 
has also developed 
multiple standards 
related to electronic 
signatures, including PDF 
for Advanced Electronic 
Signatures (PAdES). 
Many organizations 
have found ways to build 
effective processes that 
include digital signatures. 
Some of them create 
PDF/A files first, and then 
apply certifying signa-
tures and route the files 
for further processing. 
Other organizations use 
conventional PDF files 
with digital signatures 
earlier in the content life-
cycle and then convert 
to PDF/A for archive. 
周e la瑴er scenario is 
supported by Adobe 
LiveCycle ES, which sets 
up an automated process 
to capture metadata 
about the signature at 
the time of archiving 
and then embeds it in 
the PDF/A file. LiveCycle 
ES also preserves the 
signature’s appearance at 
the time of archiving.
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
functions. Able to create, load, merge, and split PDF document using C#.NET code, without depending on any product from Adobe. Compatible
can't select text in pdf file; break pdf into single pages
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
for each of those page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how to split PDF document in
acrobat split pdf; break a pdf file
6
Adobe Acrobat White Paper
PDF Standards
Specification 
or guideline
Designed for:
Description
PDF/UA  
ISO 14289 
Universal access  
People with disabilities, IT 
managers in government 
or commercial 
enterprises, compliance 
managers
Provides a set of guidelines for creating PDF files that are universally 
accessible. PDF/UA files enhance readability of a document for people with 
disabilities, such as vision impairment or limited mobility. These guidelines 
can be used in conjunction with a wide variety of other PDF creation 
settings. 
PDF/VT  
ISO 16612-2
Variable and transactional  
Print professionals
Provides specifications for the creation, viewing, and printing of print files 
used in the variable and transactional printing industry, such as bank 
statements and business invoices.
Previewing PDF/A-2
Like all great standards, PDF/A is designed to evolve over time to meet the changing needs of technology. The 
first generation, Part 1 (PDF/A-1), was adopted in 2005 and was based on the Adobe PDF Reference 1.4. The 
second generation is under development with a publication goal set in the second half of 2010. It will build on 
the open PDF standard, ISO-32000, which is now maintained by the ISO. While PDF/A-2 will remain focused on 
the “static paper” metaphor for archiving, many enhancements have been incorporated by the standards 
committee. Examples include: 
• Supporting new and improved feature sets in the current PDF standard, including areas such as fonts, 
metadata, transparency, compression, PDF layers, and digital signatures.
• Enabling new use cases, including supporting collections and packages of PDF/A documents, archival 
preservation of PDF/X-4 and PDF/E-1 documents, and creating a new conformance level to designate 
documents that are searchable but not necessarily accessible.
• Continuing to maintain compatibility with other ISO standards, such as PDF/X-4 and PDF/E-1.
• Ensuring forward compatibility so that organizations using PDF/A-1 won’t need to migrate or change existing 
workflows, unless they want to use new features.
Working with Adobe Acrobat Professional
Once you’ve decided to implement PDF/A as part of your archiving strategy, the first question you’ll probably 
ask yourself is whether you want to automate the processing of PDF/A files or request company employees to 
create them one at a time as they go about their daily jobs. Chances are you’ll be doing a combination of both. 
This white paper focuses on desktop processing with Adobe Acrobat 9 Professional and also includes 
information about batch processes that are available with the software. If you’re interested in high-volume 
processing or building PDF/A processing into automated workflows, read the companion white paper, Making 
the Case for PDF/A and Adobe LiveCycle.
The basic workflow for processing PDF/A files looks the same whether you’re working with files on the desktop 
or in an automated fashion. Content from a variety of sources is converted to PDF/A, validated, then delivered 
to an archive.
Adobe Acrobat 
Professional
Adobe Acrobat 
Professional is desktop 
so晴ware that lets you 
reliably collaborate and 
exchange information.
You can gather, prepare, 
and share information 
in PDF files using Adobe 
Acrobat Professional; 
streamline document 
development and review; 
simplify form creation 
and data collection; and 
combine multiple file 
types in polished PDF 
Portfolios that commu-
nicate clearly and help 
make your work shine.
7
Adobe Acrobat White Paper
If you plan ahead and configure your documents and conversion settings correctly, PDF/A files created directly 
from native file formats, email, or the web generally get converted and validated easily. Documents built to 
corporate standards, for instance, would only include fonts that work with the PDF/A specification. Similarly, 
image files convert and validate easily because of their relative simplicity. More difficulties arise, however, 
when you work with second-generation documents such as existing PDF files. Because these documents were 
never created with PDF/A in mind, you might run into issues. Fonts might be missing or incompatible. PDF files 
might be encrypted or have other variations that don’t comply with the PDF/A standard. 
As you begin processing files with Adobe Acrobat, you’ll discover that the steps to take depend on the source 
file type you begin with. The following section walks you through the typical steps involved in converting files 
to PDF/A and then validating—or verifying conformance with—the standard. We’ll focus first on processing 
one document at a time, and then give you steps for setting up available batch processes. 
Converting documents to PDF/A with one-button creators
If you’re using any one of several Microsoft applications or Autodesk AutoCAD®, Acrobat Professional provides 
direct creation of PDF through one-button creators called PDF Makers. Each PDF Maker is uniquely developed 
to extract the highest quality information from the particular authoring application. For instance, if you’re 
working with Microsoft Word, the user-defined document structure, such as headers, subheads, and body 
copy, are automatically included in the resulting PDF file. For PDF/A, you’ll have access to the more robust set 
of information needed to create the document structure tags that are required to build PDF/A-1a files at the 
highest level of compliance with the standard. 
Each application provides a menu offering a method to configure the PDF conversion. This is where you 
choose PDF/A as an option. The following example uses Microsoft Word 2007 running on the Windows Vista® 
operating system.
1. Under the Acrobat tab, click Preferences. 周e Se瑴ings tab appears.
2. For Conversion Se瑴ings, choose PDF/A-1a:2005 (RGB).
3. Click OK. 周e se瑴ing remains for all future sessions of Microso晴 Word (or other Microso晴 Office application).
4. Under the Acrobat tab, click Create PDF.
Windows® applications 
with  one-bu瑴on creator 
support in Acrobat 9:
• Microso晴 Word
• Microso晴 Excel
• Microso晴 PowerPoint
• Microso晴 Project
• Microso晴 Visio
• Microso晴 Publisher
• Autodesk AutoCAD 
8
Adobe Acrobat White Paper
5. Provide a filename and location when prompted.
6. Click Save
Converting documents to PDF/A using the Adobe PDF print driver
If you’re working with applications other than the ones listed in the one-button section above, the standard 
method for PDF creation is the Adobe PDF print driver. This conversion technique precisely captures the look 
and feel of your document, but it lacks some of the more sophisticated features of the one-button PDF Maker 
options. Because of these limitations, using the Adobe PDF print driver can only create files that meet the 
minimal conformance level, PDF/A-1b. 
1. Choose File—>Print.
2. Choose Adobe PDF from the Name drop-down list.
3. Click the Properties bu瑴on.
周e Adobe PDF Se瑴ings tab opens.
4. Choose the PDF/A-1b:2005 (RGB) se瑴ing.
5. Click OK to return to the Print window
6. Click OK to start the conversion process. Acrobat asks you for a filename and location.
7. Click Save.
The settings remain for future sessions. 
9
Adobe Acrobat White Paper
Verifying conformance 
To check a file for conformance:
1. Open the PDF file that you want to check.
If the PDF you’re viewing was created with properly configured PDF/A settings, you’ll see this information 
message above the document window, “You are viewing this document in PDF/A mode.”
2. Click the Standards icon in the Navigation panel. 
周e standards panel displays the conformance information.
3. Click Verify Conformance. If the PDF/A file is properly configured, the status changes to “verification succeeded.”
10
Adobe Acrobat White Paper
Converting image files to PDF/A
Converting image files, such as TIFF or JPEG, involves two steps:
• Converting to a PDF image-only document
• Converting the PDF document to PDF/A
To set preferences for image conversion: 
1. Choose Edit—>Preferences.
2. In the Categories list on the le晴, click Convert to PDF.
3. Select the source image file type.
4. Click the Edit Se瑴ings bu瑴on and choose the se瑴ings you want. 
To convert your image file to PDF:
1. Choose File—>Create PDF—>From File.
2. Select the file to convert. A new, unsaved PDF file opens in an Acrobat window.
3. Choose File—>Save As—>PDF/A. Your file is saved as a PDF/A-compliant document.
To convert a PDF file to PDF/A, follow the steps in the next section.
Converting existing PDF files to PDF/A
It can be challenging to convert conventional PDF documents to PDF/A, especially the more strict PDF/A-1a 
standard. The Preflight tool in Acrobat Professional is a powerful resource that can make short work of 
“fixing”adjusting a conventional PDF file to turn it into a compliant PDF/A file, as long as the conventional PDF 
has the proper “ingredients” in the first place. Non-embedded fonts are usually the greatest obstacle. Many—
perhaps even the majority of—existing PDF files do not have all fonts embedded. For example, the Acrobat 
default PDF creation setting—Standard—does not embed common Windows fonts such as Arial, Verdana, and 
Times New Roman. The Standard setting creates very compact files, but assumes that standard fonts are 
available on your local system for viewing.
The most typical process for converting conventional PDF documents to PDF/A looks like this:
• Check to see if fonts are embedded in the conventional PDF file.
• If fonts are embedded, convert the conventional PDF file directly to PDF/A.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested