50
th
percentile male dummy; (4) updating the rollover static stability factor risk curve to account 
for newer ESC-equipped vehicles that are less likely to be involved in rollover crashes;            
(5) adding crashworthiness pedestrian testing to measure the extent to which vehicles are 
designed to minimize injuries and fatalities to pedestrians struck by vehicles; (6) adding multiple 
new vehicle safety technologies to a group of advanced technologies already in NCAP; and      
(7) creating a new rating system that will account for all elements of NCAP – crashworthiness, 
crash avoidance, and pedestrian protection. Each of these areas has been discussed in detail 
above. As indicated earlier, the agency will be conducting additional technical work in some of 
these areas, the results of which will be made publicly available no later than the agency’s 
release of the final decision notice. 
The agency intends to issue a final decision notice regarding the new tools and 
approaches detailed in this RFC notice in 2016. NHTSA plans to implement these enhancements 
in NCAP in 2018, beginning with MY 2019 and later vehicles manufactured on or after    
January 1, 2018. Interested parties are strongly encouraged to submit thorough and detailed 
ents submitted will 
help to inform the agency’s decisions in each of these areas as it continues to advance its NCAP 
program to encourage continuous safety improvements of new vehicles in the United States.  
IX. Public Participation 
How do I prepare and submit comments? 
Your comments must be written and in English. To ensure that your comments are filed 
correctly in the docket, please include the docket number of this document in your comments. 
Your comments must not be more than 15 pages long (49 CFR 553.21). NHTSA 
established this limit to encourage you to write your primary comments in a concise fashion.  
171 
Pdf no pages selected - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
split pdf by bookmark; break a pdf into separate pages
Pdf no pages selected - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
c# print pdf to specific printer; add page break to pdf
However, you may attach necessary additional documents to your comments. There is no limit 
on the length of the attachments. 
Please submit one copy (two copies if submitting by mail or hand delivery) of your 
comments, including the attachments, to the docket following the instructions given above under 
ADDRESSES. Please note, if you are submitting comments electronically as a PDF (Adobe) file, 
NHTSA asks that the documents submitted be scanned using an Optical Character Recognition 
(OCR) process, thus allowing the agency to search and copy certain portions of your 
submissions.   
How do I submit confidential business information? 
If you wish to submit any information under a claim of confidentiality, you should submit 
three copies of your complete submission, including the information you claim to be confidential 
business information, to the Office of the Chief Counsel, NHTSA, at the address given above 
under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. In addition, you may submit a copy (two 
copies if submitting by mail or hand delivery), from which you have deleted the claimed 
confidential business information, to the docket by one of the methods given above under 
ADDRESSES. When you send a comment containing information claimed to be confidential 
business information, you should include a cover letter setting forth the information specified in 
NHTSA’s confidential business information regulation (49 CFR Part 512). 
Will the agency consider late comments? 
NHTSA will consider all comments received before the close of business on the 
comment closing date indicated above under DATES. To the extent possible, the agency will 
also consider comments received after that date.   
172 
VB.NET TWAIN: TWAIN Image Scanning in Console Application
First, there is no SelectSourceDialog in VB.NET TWAIN console scanning application. image scanning SDK, like how to scan multiple pages to one PDF or TIFF
break a pdf; pdf specification
VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
VB.NET programmers can easily render selected PowerPoint slide our VB.NET PowerPoint to PDF conversion add pptx document file independently, no other external
pdf print error no pages selected; break pdf password online
Please note that even after the comment closing date, we will continue to file relevant 
information in the Docket as it becomes available. Accordingly, we recommend that interested 
people periodically check the Docket for new material. 
You may read the comments received at the address given above under ADDRESSES.  
The hours of the docket are indicated above in the same location. You may also see the 
comments on the Internet, identified by the docket number at the heading of this notice, at 
www.regulations.gov
Anyone is able to search the electronic form of all comments received into any of our 
dockets by the name of the individual submitting the comment (or signing the comment, if 
submitted on behalf of an association, business, labor union, etc.). You may review DOT's 
complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 
19477-78) or you may visit www.dot.gov/privacy.html
173 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK deployment on IIS in .NET
the place where you store XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer Bit Applications" in accordance with the selected DLL (x86 site configured in IIS has no sufficient authority
split pdf; acrobat split pdf bookmark
VB.NET PDF - VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer Deployment on IIS
the place where you store XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer Bit Applications" in accordance with the selected DLL (x86 site configured in IIS has no sufficient authority
pdf no pages selected; pdf rotate single page
X. 
Appendices 
Appendix I: Frontal Crash Target Population 
Recent NHTSA efforts have resulted in a more refined approach to analyzing frontal 
crash field data, from data sources such as the National Automotive Sampling System 
Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS) and Crash Injury Research and Engineering 
as developed to 
categorize frontal crashes more in terms of expected occupant kinematics during the crash event, 
as occupant motion and restraint engagement are more relevant to injury causation than the 
specifics of the vehicle damage (e.g., frontal plane crush). The new approach does not facilitate 
direct comparison with prior frontal crash target populations. The refined method is still based on 
vehicle damage characteristics such as Collision Deformation Classification (CDC) and vehicle 
crush measures,
305
but separates crashes into groups that are intended to be more indicative of 
occupant kinematic response. One feature of the new approach is the inclusion of some crashes 
that would previously have been considered side impact crashes due to the vehicle damage being 
on the side plane (based on the CDC area of deformation).
306
Those side impacts result in 
frontal-like occupant kinematics, and are more appropriately grouped into a frontal crash target 
population rather than a side impact target population when assessing frontal crash injury 
causation. 
NASS-CDS data from case years 2000 through 2013 were chosen to establish the frontal 
crash target population. Passenger vehicles involved in tow-away non-rollover crashes were 
305
SAE J224 March 1980 Collision Deformation Classification. 
306
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, “NASS Analysis in Support of NHTSA’s Frontal Small 
Overlap Program,” DOT HS 811 522, August 2011. 
174 
C# Image: Create C#.NET Windows Document Image Viewer | Online
C# Windows Document Image Viewer Features. No need for viewing multiple document & image formats (PDF, MS Word value of selected drop-down list to switch pages.
break password pdf; acrobat split pdf
VB.NET TIFF: .NET TIFF Printer Control; Print TIFF Using VB.NET
document printing add-on has no limitation on the function to print multiple TIFF pages by defining powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
break pdf file into multiple files; break a pdf apart
eligible for inclusion. The CDC of the most significant event was used to initially select frontal 
and frontal-oriented side impact crashes for analysis according to the following criteria:
307 
General Area of 
Damage (GAD1) 
Specific Horizontal 
Location (SHL1) 
Direction of Force 
(DOF1) 
Any 
Any 
F,Y 
11,12,1 o’clock 
F,Y 
11,12,1 o’clock 
Elements of the CDC coding are described in SAE J224. The choice of which combinations of codes is determined 
by NHTSA. See DOT HS 811 522. 
The Frontal Impact Taxonomy (FIT) uses the CDC, crush profile, principal direction of 
force (PDOF), and vehicle class-specific geometry indicators
308
to identify and classify frontal 
crash types within the broad set of crashes described above based on the amount of overlap and 
the angle (obliquity) of the impact. This approach was developed to more comprehensively 
identify small overlap crashes, which had been identified as a potential area for frontal impact 
crashworthiness enhancements.
309
Occupant inclusion requirements for the frontal target 
population consisted of belt-restrained occupants, who were not completely ejected, and who 
sustained an AIS 2+ injury or were killed. The seat positions and ages considered are 
summarized below: 
Seat Row 
Position 
Age [years] 
Outboard only (11,13) 13+ 
All (21,22,23) 
8+ 
307
See SAE J224, March 1980, Collision Deformation Classification for a guide to the acronyms used here. 
308
These are generic dimensions, by vehicle class, that are used as a guide for determining whether the damage is  
small overlap or not. See Bean, J., Kahane, C., Mynatt, M., Rudd, R., Rush, C., & Wiacek, C., National Highway 
Traffic Safety Administration, “Fatalities in Frontal Crashes Despite Seat Belts and Air Bags,” DOT HS 811 202,  
September 2009 for more detail. 
309
Bean, J., Kahane, C., Mynatt, M., Rudd, R., Rush, C., & Wiacek, C., National Highway Traffic Safety 
Administration, “Fatalities in Frontal Crashes Despite Seat Belts and Air Bags,” DOT HS 811 202, September 2009. 
175 
VB.NET Word: Use VB.NET Code to Convert Word Document to TIFF
Render one or multiple selected DOCXPage instances into to TIFF image converting application, no external Word user guides with RasteEdge .NET PDF SDK using VB
break apart pdf pages; acrobat split pdf into multiple files
C# Word: C#.NET Word Rotator, How to Rotate and Reorient Word Page
Remarkably, no other external products, including Microsoft Office rotate all MS Word document pages by 90 & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
break pdf into multiple documents; a pdf page cut
The first step in applying the FIT is to identify small overlap crashes based on the CDC 
alone for cases with damage described by GAD1 of F and SHL1 of L or R.
310
That subset of 
small overlap crashes is then augmented by the addition of crashes meeting a small overlap 
definition based on class-based vehicle geometry and crush. This crush-based assessment looks 
at the damage relative to the longitudinal frame rails for cases where the CDC may not indicate a 
small overlap impact based on the damage type coded by SHL1 (e.g., when SHL1 is either Y 
(left +center) or Z (right+center)). The frontal-oriented side plane impacts with GAD1 of L or R 
are examined from a crush perspective relative to vehicle class-specific geometry. In other 
words, when certain damage, and impact vector (PDOF) characteristics are met, the crash will be 
considered a small overlap frontal crash by the FIT. Frontal crashes not identified as small 
overlap at this stage are then classified based on the crush profile relative to the frame rail 
locations into left partial overlap, right partial overlap, or narrow center impacts if crush 
measures are defined. Remaining frontal crashes are considered full overlap. 
After crashes have been classified based on the extent of overlap, they are categorized as 
either co-linear or oblique based on the coded PDOF value. All small overlap crashes, even with 
0° PDOF angles, are considered oblique to the side of crush based on findings from laboratory 
research.
311
All full overlap and partial overlap crashes with non-zero PDOF angles are 
considered oblique. Full overlap crashes with 0° PDOF angle are considered co-linear. Partial 
overlap crashes with 0° PDOF angle are divided between oblique and co-linear based on findings 
of the study reported by Rudd et al. (2011). In that study, approximately 20 percent of the 0° 
310
Ibid. 
311
Saunders, J. & Parent, D., "Repeatability of a Small Overlap and an Oblique Moving Deformable Barrier Test 
Procedure," SAE World Congress, Paper No. 2013-01-0762, 2013. 
176 
partial offset cases resulted in oblique occupant kinematics (to the side of crush).
312
Therefore, 
NASS-CDS case weights are apportioned 20 percent to oblique and 80 percent to co-linear for 
partial overlap 0° crashes. Note that the narrow center-impact partial overlap crashes are 
considered a special category, and will not be further broken into oblique or co-linear groups as 
they are not specifically addressed by any of the planned tests. For the purposes of this frontal 
target population, the crashes are further restricted to those with PDOF angles between 330° to 
0° and 0° to 30°. There are no restrictions on the impacted object or on the model year of the 
case vehicle.
313 
The data are presented on an occupant basis, so the counts do not correspond to the 
number of vehicles meeting a particular crash description. There may be more than one occupant 
in a given vehicle. A tree diagram depicting the breakdown of the relevant frontal crash 
occupants considered in this analysis is provided in Figure I-1. The weighted 14-year total count 
of MAIS 2+ or fatal occupants in each level is shown. Data presented in this analysis have not 
been adjusted to account for air bag presence, changes in data collection procedures by case year, 
and to match fatality counts from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS). The counts 
presented are therefore only indicative of relative contributions – actual counts may differ. 
Table I-1 shows counts of the occupants further broken down by MAIS 2+, MAIS 3+, or 
fatal and by seat row. Note that some fatally-injured occupants do not have injury data coded, 
and are therefore not represented in the MAIS 2+ or 3+ columns. This leads to small differences 
in calculated totals from Table I-1 and Figure I-1. Another difference between the counts shown 
312
Rudd, R., Scarboro, M., & Saunders, J., “Injury Analysis of Real-World Small Overlap and Oblique Frontal 
Crashes,” The 22nd International Technical Conference for the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles, Paper No. 11-0384,  
2011. 
313
NHTSA is currently investigating this topic, and may revise its approach to categorizing frontal crashes as either 
co-linear or oblique. 
177 
in Figure I-1 and Table I-1 is that variant impacts, in which the PDOF angle is from the opposite 
side of the partial overlap, are merged into the “Other” category due to their unique occupant 
kinematics characteristics. Partial overlap crashes where the angle of obliquity is on the same 
side as the crush are considered coincident.
314 
Figure I-1: Breakdown of MAIS 2+ or fatal frontal crash occupants by overlap and obliquity. 
Counts represent weighted totals from 2000-2013 NASS-CDS. 
Table I-1. Distribution of total weighted occupants for the fourteen year period by crash type 
(overlap) and obliquity for MAIS 2+, 3+, and fatal severity levels. 
Front Row 
Second Row 
Overlap 
Full 
Left moderate 
Right moderate 
Obliquity 
Co-linear 
Left 
Right
Co-linear 
Left 
Co-linear 
MAIS 2+ MAIS 3+ 
147,234 
34,351 
124,204 
29,343 
89,851 
26,986 
85,518 
17,662 
47,278 
16,352 
39,055 
10,067 
Fatal 
7,162 
3,843 
3,033 
1,432 
1,864 
813 
MAIS 2+ MAIS 3+ 
2,578 
330 
2,045 
1,173 
936 
323 
627 
255 
3,725 
845 
728 
141 
Fatal 
98 
84 
82 
426 
52 
314
Halloway, D., Pintar, F., Saunders, J., & Barsan-Anelli, A. (2012) “Classifiers to Augment the CDC System to 
Distinguish the Role of Structure in a Frontal Impact Taxonomy.” SAE International Journal of Passenger Cars – 
Mechanical Systems, 5(2):778-788. 
178 
Left small 
Right 
Co-linear 
43,922 
28,251 
7,998 
9,697 
589 
616 
1,096 
831 
109 
440 
Left 
51,000 
16,038 2,252 
630 
52 
Right small 
Co-linear 
29,584 
7,798 
813 
42 
Right 
26,361 
6,609 
346 
1,004 
78 
Narrow center 
All angles 
64,971 
22,302 3,041 
907 
568 228 
Other 
51,574 
10,187 1,241 
817 
250 
Total 
828,803 
215,390 27,045 
15,966 
4,568 970 
* Includes small and moderate overlap crashes with variant obliquity (e.g. left small overlap with right oblique 
PDOF angle). Source: NASS-CDS (2000-2013) 
With left and right partial overlap broken out into co-linear and coincident groups, the 
next step is to look at co-linear versus oblique crashes. The counts in Table I-1 are combined into 
co-linear full overlap, oblique, and co-linear moderate overlap groups and annualized by dividing 
by the number of case years (14) included in the analysis. It is important to note that Table I-2 
does not distinguish between left and right oblique crashes – they are pooled together at this 
stage. 
Table I-2. Distribution of occupants by crash obliquity for MAIS 2+, 3+, and fatal severity levels 
(annualized unadjusted occupants counts) 
Crash Mode 
Front Row 
Second Row 
MAIS 2+ 
MAIS 3+ 
Fatal 
MAIS 2+ 
MAIS 3+ 
Fatal 
Co-linear full 
10,517 
2,454 
512 
184 
24 
overlap 
Co-linear 
8,898 
1,981 
160 
97 
28 
moderate 
overlap 
Oblique 
31,461 
8,630 
954 
736 
216 
42 
Narrow center 
4,641 
1,593 
217 
65 
41 
16 
Other frontal* 
3,684 
728 
89 
58 
18 
Total 
59,200 
15,385 
1,932 
1,140 
326 
69 
*
Other frontal includes variant impacts and crashes that cannot be categorized due to missing data. Source: NASS-
CDS (2000-2013) 
Left oblique and right oblique crashes are similar in that the occupants’ trajectories are 
not straight forward relative to the vehicle interior, but the side of obliquity results in the near­
side and far-side occupants experiencing different conditions (a driver would be considered a 
near-side occupant in a left oblique crash while the right front passenger would be a far-side 
occupant). Left oblique crashes represent a greater proportion of the oblique crashes, and Table 
179 
I-3 excludes the right oblique crashes (although 80% of the 0° right moderate overlap crashes 
have been accounted for in the co-linear full overlap category).  
Table I-3. Distribution of occupants in left oblique and co-linear frontal crashes for MAIS 2+, 3+, 
and fatal severity levels (annualized unadjusted occupants counts) 
Crash Mode 
Front Row 
Second Row 
MAIS 2+ 
MAIS 3+ 
Fatal 
MAIS 2+ 
MAIS 3+ 
Fatal 
Co-linear full 
12,747 
3,028 
558 
226 
32 
10 
overlap 
Co-linear left 
6,108 
1,262 
102 
45 
18 
moderate 
overlap 
Left oblique 
17,910 
5,102 
613 
517 
179 
36 
Total 
36,765 
9,392 
1,273 
787 
229 
46 
Source: NASS-CDS (2000-2013) 
Applying the 80/20 rule previously described for the 0° left moderate overlap crashes 
leads to the counts shown in Table I-4, which shows the annualized target population for co-
linear and left oblique frontal crashes. A graphical depiction of the distribution of MAIS 2+ 
counts is shown in Figure I-2. The counts shown are annualized, unadjusted counts, and 
represent the number of MAIS 2+, 3+, or fatal occupants in each crash and obliquity group.  
Table I-4. Distribution of occupants in left oblique and co-linear frontal crashes for MAIS 2+, 3+, 
and fatal severity levels after redefining the dataset using NHTSA’s approach on categorizing 
oblique crashes^ 
Crash Mode 
Front Row 
Second Row 
MAIS 2+ 
MAIS 3+ 
Fatal 
MAIS 2+ 
MAIS 3+ 
Fatal 
Co-linear full 
17,634 
4,037 
640 
261 
46 
10 
overlap 
Left oblique 
19,131 
5,354 
633 
525 
183 
36 
Total 
36,765 
9,392 
1,273 
787 
229 
46 
For the co-linear moderate overlap crashes, 20% were assigned to their respective oblique category with the 
remaining 80% being assigned to the co-linear category. Source: NASS-CDS (2000-2013) 
180 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested