In September 2009, NHTSA published a report that sought to describe why people were 
still dying in frontal crashes despite the use of seat belts, air bags, and the crashworthy structures 
of late-model vehicles.
17
The study found that many fatalities and injuries could be attributed to 
crashes involving poor structural engagement between a vehicle and its collision partner. These 
crashes consisted mainly of corner impacts, oblique crashes, impacts with narrow objects, and 
heavy vehicle underrides. 
To better understand and classify the injuries and fatalities from crashes involving 
oblique and corner impacts, the agency took a new approach to field data research. A 2011 report 
detailed this new method to more comprehensively identify frontal crashes based on an alternate 
interpretation of vehicle damage characteristics.
18
NHTSA incorporated this approach into its 
efforts to examine frontal crashes occurring in the field data. Furthermore, recognizing that 
occupant kinematics and restraint engagement differed among frontal crash types, the agency’s 
new method allowed for better identification of frontal crashes with more emphasis on occupant 
responses than vehicle damage characteristics. When using this method, the population of frontal 
crashes generated tends to include some crashes that would previously have been classified as 
side impact crashes. In this, there may be damage located on the side plane of a given vehicle, 
though the kinematics of the occupants resembles those typically seen in a conventionally coded 
frontal impact.  
In support of this RFC notice, National Automotive Sampling System – Crashworthiness 
Data System (NASS-CDS) data from case years 2000 through 2013 were chosen for analysis 
17
Bean, J., Kahane, C., Mynatt, M., Rudd, R., Rush, C., Wiacek, C., National Highway Traffic Safety 
Administration, “Fatalities in Frontal Crashes Despite Seat Belts and Air Bags,” DOT HS 811 202, September 2009. 
18
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, “NASS Analysis in Support of NHTSA’s Frontal Small Overlap 
Program,” DOT HS 811 522, August 2011. 
21 
Pdf split pages in half - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break a pdf apart; break pdf into smaller files
Pdf split pages in half - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break a pdf into parts; c# print pdf to specific printer
using the new approach. The resulting NASS-CDS data generated for this effort are contained in 
Appendix I. Crashes were selected to include passenger vehicles involved in a tow-away non-
rollover crash with a Principal Direction of Force (PDOF) between 330 degrees and 30 degrees 
(11 o’clock to 1 o’clock). Only non-ejected, belt-restrained occupants, who sustained AIS 2 and 
higher severity injuries or were killed, were selected from those crashes. The two crash 
configurations responsible for the most injuries and fatalities in the resulting frontal crash data 
set are shown in Table 1 below. They are the co-linear full overlap and the left (driver side) 
oblique crash modes. 
Table 1 shows the number of restrained Maximum Abbreviated Injury Scale (MAIS) 2+ 
and 3+ injured and fatal occupants seated in the front rows of vehicles involved in left oblique 
and co-linear full frontal crashes.
19
These are unadjusted, annualized occupant counts. This 
means that the total weighted counts over the 14-year period are simply divided by 14 to produce 
an average annual count. Case weights were not adjusted to account for factors such as vehicle 
age or matching fatality counts in the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS). There were 
more MAIS 2+ and 3+ injured occupants from left oblique crashes than co-linear full overlap 
crashes in this dataset. The numbers of fatalities are very similar when comparing both crash 
types. 
Table 1. Distribution of annual restrained MAIS 2+, MAIS 3+, and fatal occupants 
in left oblique and co-linear frontal crashes 
Crash Mode 
Front Row 
MAIS 2+ 
MAIS 3+ 
Fatal 
Co-linear full overlap 
17,634 
4,037 
640 
Left oblique 
19,131 
5,354 
633 
Total 
36,765 
9,392 
1,273 
Source: NASS-CDS (2000-2013) 
19
The Maximum Abbreviated Injury Scale (or MAIS) is the maximum injury per occupant. 
22 
C# PDF: Use C# APIs to Control Fully on PDF Rendering Process
For example, to convert the left half of PDF document page, you can set the source rectangle to start at (0, 0) and with the original height in pixel and half
combine pages of pdf documents into one; break pdf into separate pages
VB.NET Image: JPEG 2000 Codec for Image Encoding and Decoding in
Integrate PDF, Tiff, Word compression add-on with JPEG 2000 codec easily in VB.NET; That is to say you can display full size, full resolution or half size, one
reader split pdf; split pdf
The occupant counts defined in Table 1 were further examined to better understand 
which individual body regions in both of these frontal crash modes sustained AIS 3+ injuries. 
The following body regions were used in the classification of injuries: Head (including face 
injuries, brain injuries, and skull fracture); Neck (including the brain stem and cervical spine); 
Chest (thorax); Abdomen; Knee-Thigh-Hip; Below Knee (lower leg, feet, and ankles); Spine 
(excluding the cervical spine); and Upper Extremity.  
Figure 1 shows the break-down of drivers with MAIS 3+ injuries in each body region for 
both frontal crash modes. These unadjusted, annualized counts indicate the number of times a 
given body region sustained an AIS 3 or higher injury among the drivers in Table 1. Some 
drivers may be represented in multiple columns. Some key inferences can be made. First, drivers 
in oblique crashes experienced more MAIS 3+ injuries to nearly every body region than drivers 
in co-linear crashes. Drivers in oblique crashes experienced more injuries to the head, neck and 
cervical spine, abdomen, upper extremities, knee/thigh/hip (KTH), and areas below the knee. 
Though drivers in co-linear crashes experienced more MAIS 3+ chest injuries than drivers in 
oblique crashes, these injuries were the highest in number for both crash types. Driver injuries in 
both frontal crash types occurred to a wide variety of body regions. 
23 
C# Word: Set Rendering Options with C# Word Document Rendering
& raster and vector images, such as PDF, tiff, png rendering and converting any Word document pages, you may get the image which sources the left half of page
split pdf files; break a pdf password
C# Excel: Customize Excel Conversion by Setting Rendering Options
rectangle to start at (0, 0) and with the original width and half of the can save created image object/collection to these file formats, like PDF, TIFF, SVG
break pdf into single pages; cannot print pdf no pages selected
200 
400 
600 
800 
1000 
1200 
1400 
1600 
1800 
Oblique 
Co-linear 
Figure 1. Number of Annual Driver MAIS 3+ Injuries by Body Region in Co-linear 
and Left Oblique Crashes 
Source: NASS-CDS (2000-2013) 
Figure 2 is similar to Figure 1, but provides an overview of the MAIS 3+ injuries for the 
right front passenger instead. It shows a pattern similar to the driver; MAIS 3+ injuries in left 
oblique crashes outweigh the numbers of similar injuries in co-linear crashes. Right front 
passengers in left oblique crashes experienced more injuries to the head, neck and cervical spine, 
chest, abdomen, upper extremities, and KTH regions than right front passengers involved in co-
linear full frontal crashes. Injuries for the right front passenger occurred to a wide variety of 
body regions, which is similar to what was observed for the driver. 
24 
C# PowerPoint: How to Set PowerPoint Rendering Parameters in C#
you use this SDK to render PowerPoint (2007 or above) slide into PDF document or For example, to convert the top half of the slide/page to image, you can set
break pdf password; split pdf files
How to C#: Special Effects
LinearStretch. Level the pixel between the black point and white point. Magnify. Double the image size. Mignify. Half the image size. Normolize.
pdf format specification; break apart a pdf in reader
50 
100 
150 
200 
250 
300 
350 
400 
Oblique 
Co-linear 
Figure 2. Number of Annual Front Passenger MAIS 3+ Injuries by Body Region in Co-linear and 
Left Oblique Crashes 
Source: NASS-CDS (2000-2013) 
This real-world data analysis suggests that there is an opportunity for the agency to continue 
examining the oblique crash type that was identified as a frontal crash problem by NHTSA in 
2009. Real-world co-linear crashes that are represented in FMVSS No. 208, “Occupant crash 
protection,” and the current full frontal NCAP test are also still resulting in serious injuries and 
fatalities.  
2. Full Frontal Rigid Barrier Test 
NCAP intends to continue conducting its current full width rigid frontal barrier test at 56 
km/h (35 mph). As shown in the 2000-2013 NASS-CDS data discussed earlier, these frontal 
crashes are still a major source of injuries and fatalities in the field. However, NHTSA intends to 
update the ATDs to evaluate occupant protection in NCAP’s full frontal crash. Rather than using 
the HIII-50M ATD, NHTSA intends to use the THOR-50M ATD in the driver’s seat of full 
frontal rigid barrier tests conducted for this NCAP upgrade. NHTSA intends to continue using 
the HIII-5F dummy in the right front passenger’s seat of these tests for frontal NCAP, though the 
25 
C# Raster - Image Compression in C#.NET
B44. The value is 17. B44 This form of compression is lossy for half data and stores 32bit data uncompressed. B44A. The value is 18.
split pdf into individual pages; pdf will no pages selected
C# Image: C# Code to Encode & Decode JBIG2 Images in RasterEdge .
RegisteredDecoders.GetDecoderFromType(typeof(JBIG2Decoder)); JBIG2.ScaleFactor = JBIG2ScaleFactor.Half; and decompressing of Word & PDF documents as well as
break apart pdf pages; cannot select text in pdf file
ATD would now be seated at the mid-track position rather than the full-forward position it is 
currently placed in (based on the current NCAP and FMVSS No. 208 test procedures). In every 
full width rigid barrier frontal NCAP test, the agency intends to seat another HIII-5F ATD in the 
second row of the vehicle, behind the right front passenger. The agency is seeking comment on 
the seating procedures for these dummies in the full frontal rigid barrier test.   
The THOR-50M ATD requires a different seating procedure than the currently used HIII­
50M ATD. Some modifications are necessary in the areas of adjusting the seat back angle, seat 
track, and positioning of the legs, feet, shoulder, and other body regions related to the inherent 
physical characteristics of the THOR-50M ATD. The agency is seeking comment on draft 
procedures for seating a THOR-50M ATD in the driver’s seat of vehicles.
20 
NHTSA seeks comment on an alternative seating procedure for the right front passenger 
ATD, the HIII-5F. Currently, the HIII-5F ATD is seated in the forward-most seating position for 
FMVSS No. 208 and NCAP full frontal tests. In light of real-world data gathered from NASS­
CDS, (2000-2013 full frontal crashes, with MAIS 2+ injured occupants, discussed further below) 
the agency intends to conduct research tests with the HIII-5F ATD seated in the right front 
passenger seat’s mid-track location instead of the forward-most location. This data, shown below 
in Figure 3, indicates that the majority of MAIS 2+ injured occupants sit in a mid- to rear seat 
track position.
21
The number of right front passengers injured when seated in the full-forward 
position was the smallest number of occupants seen in this data set. In addition, the right front 
passenger seats in this data set were most likely to be placed in the forward-mid or middle 
position along the seat track. The prevalence of real-world injuries to occupants seated at these 
20
Draft seating procedures may be found in the docket for this notice. 
21
Forward-mid is defined as the seat track position that is halfway between forward-most and mid-track (middle), 
while rear-mid is defined as the seat track position between the mid-track and rear-most. 
26 
VB Imaging - Postnet Barcode Creation Tutorial
can encode 5, 6, 9 or 11 digits, excluding check digit, in half- and full image and document files, including PNG, BMP, GIF, JPEG, TIFF, PDF, Excel, PowerPoint
pdf split pages; pdf splitter
VB.NET Image: Image Scaling SDK to Scale Picture / Photo
After you run following VB.NET code demo, you will get a scaled image file whose height & width are all half of original image width & height.
pdf no pages selected to print; acrobat split pdf pages
positions, along with research indicating that higher chest deflections may be seen for occupants 
seated at the mid-track position,
22
indicate there may be an opportunity for safety gains for 
NCAP to test vehicles with the right front passenger ATD in the mid-track position.  
10,000 
20,000 
30,000 
40,000 
50,000 
60,000 
70,000 
Forward-most Forward-mid 
Middle 
Rear-mid 
Rear-most 
Driver 
RFP 
Figure 3. Number of MAIS 2+ injured occupants by seat track location in full frontal crashes. 
Source: NASS-CDS (2000-2013) 
As such, the agency is seeking comment on the appropriateness of potentially seating the 
right front passenger HIII-5F dummy in a position that is closer to (or at) the mid-track location. 
NHTSA plans to conduct research using the NCAP procedure but with the HIII-5F seated in the 
mid-track location instead. The agency believes this choice in seating location could also allow 
NCAP’s testing to serve as a compliment to the forward-most seating location used in FMVSS 
No. 208.
23
NHTSA included a draft procedure for seating the HIII-5F ATD in the mid-track 
location in the docket of this RFC notice. The agency also included a draft procedure for seating 
the same ATD in the row behind the right front passenger, but this very closely follows the 
22
Tylko, S., and Bussières, A. “Responses of the Hybrid III 5th Female and 10‐year‐old ATD Seated in the Rear 
Seats of Passenger Vehicles in Frontal Crash Tests.” IRCOBI Conference 2012, Paper IRC-12-65. 
23 
See 65 FR 30680. Docket No. NHTSA 00-7013 Notice 1. Available at https://federalregister.gov/a/00-11577. 
27 
seating procedure for the current 5
th
percentile rear passenger dummy in the side moveable 
deformable barrier (MDB) NCAP test, the SID-IIs.
24 
3. Frontal Oblique Test 
As stated previously, NHTSA published a report in 2009 examining why occupant 
fatalities are still occurring for belted occupants in air bag-equipped vehicles involved in frontal 
crashes.
25
Around this time, the agency initiated research to develop both small overlap and 
oblique test procedures.
26 
To establish a baseline for testing, NHTSA initiated research by conducting a series of 
full-scale vehicle-to-vehicle tests to understand occupant kinematics and vehicle interactions. 
The agency then conducted barrier-to-vehicle tests using the MDB already in use in FMVSS No. 
214. These tests failed to produce the results seen in the vehicle-to-vehicle tests, which prompted 
NHTSA to develop a more appropriate barrier to use with the frontal oblique test configuration.
27 
The resulting modified version of the FMVSS No. 214 MDB is called the Oblique 
Moving Deformable Barrier (OMDB). Some differences between the OMDB and the FMVSS 
No. 214 MDB are that the OMDB has a face plate wider than the barrier outer track width, a 
suspension to prevent bouncing at high speeds, and an optimized barrier honeycomb depth and 
stiffness.
28
The OMDB was optimized to produce target vehicle crush patterns similar to real-
world cases while minimizing the likelihood of the rigid face plate contacting the target vehicle 
24
“U.S. Department of Transportation National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Laboratory Test Procedure  
for the New Car Assessment Program Side Impact Moving Deformable Barrier Test,” Docket No. NHTSA-2015­
0046, September 2013.
25
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, “Fatalities in Frontal Crashes Despite Seat Belts and Air Bags,” 
DOT HS 811 202, September 2009.
26
Saunders, J., Craig, M., Parent, D., "Moving Deformable Barrier Test Procedure for Evaluating Small 
Overlap/Oblique Crashes," SAE Int. J. Commer. Veh. 5(1):2012, doi:10.4271/2012-01-0577.
27
Saunders, J., Craig, M.J., Suway, J., “NHTSA’s Test Procedure Evaluations for Small Overlap/Oblique Crashes,” 
The 22nd International Technical Conference for the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles, Paper No. 11-0343, 2011. 
28
Ibid. 
28 
due to honeycomb bottoming-out.
29
It is heavier than the FMVSS No. 214 MDB at a weight of 
2,486 kilograms (kg) (5,480 pounds (lb)). 
Per NHTSA’s current frontal oblique testing protocol, the OMDB impacts a stationary 
vehicle at a speed of 90 km/h (56 mph).
30
This vehicle is placed at a 15-degree angle and a 35­
percent overlap occurs between the OMDB and the front end of the struck vehicle. The selected 
test condition was shown to be representative of a midsize vehicle-to-vehicle 15-degree oblique, 
50-percent overlap test, resulting in a 56 km/h (35 mph) delta-V. When a midsize vehicle is 
exposed to the OMDB test condition it creates a longitudinal delta-V of about 56 km/h (35 mph). 
The test speed was selected to be analogous with the current severity of the NCAP full width 
frontal rigid barrier test of a midsize vehicle.
31
The agency has published the results of the frontal 
oblique test program several times over the past few years in public forums.
32 33
In Saunders 
(2013), NHTSA also demonstrated the frontal oblique test protocol’s repeatability. Generally, the 
results of this research have shown good agreement with the agency’s continued examination of 
this particular frontal crash problem and the injuries and fatalities it causes. The fatalities and 
injuries caused by this crash scenario were surveyed at length in Rudd’s 2011 analysis of field 
data from both the NASS-CDS and CIREN databases.
34
The findings discussed in Rudd (2011) 
as well as the NASS-CDS analysis presented earlier demonstrate that there are real-world 
29
Ibid. 
30
Drawing package available in the docket for this notice. 
31
Saunders, J., Craig, M.J., Suway, J., “NHTSA's Test Procedure Evaluations For Small Overlap/Oblique Crashes,” 
22nd ESV Conference, Paper No. 11-0343, 2011. 
32
Saunders, J. and Parent, D., "Repeatability of a Small Overlap and an Oblique Moving Deformable Barrier Test 
Procedure," SAE World Congress, Paper No. 2013-01-0762, 2013. 
33
Saunders, J., Parent, D., Ames, E., “NHTSA Oblique Crash Test Results: Vehicle Performance and Occupant 
Injury risk Assessment in Vehicles with Small Overlap Countermeasures,” The 24th International Technical  
Conference for the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles, Paper No. 15-0108, 2015.
34
Rudd, R., Scarboro, M., Saunders, J., “Injury Analysis of Real-World Small Overlap and Oblique Frontal 
Crashes,” The 22nd International Technical Conference for the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles, Paper No. 11-0384,  
2011. 
29 
injuries occurring to the knee-thigh-hip, lower extremities, head, and chest. Accordingly, the 
agency’s frontal oblique research tests predict a high probability of injury to these body regions. 
NHTSA has considered existing regulations and consumer information programs, both 
within the agency and outside of the agency, in the development of its frontal oblique testing 
protocol. The most similar test mode is the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety’s small 
overlap frontal test (IIHS-SO). The IIHS-SO test is a co-linear impact with a rigid barrier that 
overlaps with 25 percent of the vehicle’s width, and for most vehicles does not engage the 
primary longitudinal structure of the front end of the vehicle. As such, the IIHS-SO test tends to 
drive structural countermeasures outside of the frame rails of the vehicle and strengthening of the 
occupant compartment.
35
The OMDB in the NHTSA frontal oblique test, in contrast, does 
interact with at least one frame rail of the vehicle, often resulting in a more severe crash pulse 
that puts greater emphasis on restraint system countermeasures. Also, because the OMDB 
impacts a stationary vehicle at the same speed regardless of the target vehicle’s mass, the frontal 
oblique test protocol is a constant energy test, which allows for the comparison of test results 
between vehicle classes. 
Recently, the agency presented its results from testing late model, high sales volume 
vehicles.
36
Those results indicated that many of these modern vehicles that perform well in tests 
conducted for other consumer information programs (including the IIHS-SO test described 
above) and air bags meeting FMVSS No. 226, “Ejection Mitigation,” requirements may need 
additional design improvements to address real-world injuries and fatalities in frontal oblique 
35
Mueller, B. C., Brethwaite, A. S., Zuby, D. S., & Nolan, J. M. (2014). Structural Design Strategies for Improved 
Small Overlap Crashworthiness Performance. Stapp Car Crash Journal, 58, 145.
36
Saunders, J., Parent, D., Ames, E., “NHTSA Oblique Crash Test Results: Vehicle Performance and Occupant 
Injury Risk Assessment in Vehicles with Small Overlap Countermeasures,” The 24th International Technical 
Conference for the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles, Paper No. 15-0108, 2015. 
30 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested