crashes.
37
The agency intends to continue looking into the differences between the IIHS-SO and 
its own frontal oblique test. The observations in Saunders (2015), along with the real-world data 
presented previously in this document, indicate there is an opportunity to improve upon current 
vehicle designs in an effort to reduce fatalities and injuries in real world oblique crashes.  
NCAP intends to test and rate new vehicles under a protocol very similar to the frontal 
oblique test protocol previously researched by the agency.
38
The program also intends to use the 
associated draft seating procedures for the THOR-50M ATDs in both the driver’s seat and the 
right front passenger’s seat.
39 
The potential exists for NCAP to encourage vehicles design changes that address this 
particular crash type. As previously noted, the occupants in Saunders (2015) showed a range of 
responses across several injury types.
40
This suggests that the frontal oblique test has the ability 
to discriminate between vehicle performances and, in turn, could allow NCAP to offer 
consumers comparative safety information for vehicles exposed to this crash mode.  
At this time, the agency only intends to conduct left side frontal oblique impact tests in 
NCAP. As discussed in Appendix I, left side oblique impacts constitute a greater proportion of 
real-world oblique crashes. Research on both the left and right frontal oblique crash impacts is 
ongoing in an effort to gain a better understanding of the restraint and structural countermeasures 
needed to combat occupant injury in oblique impacts on both sides of vehicles.   
4. Frontal Test Dummies 
37 
See 76 FR 3212. Docket No. NHTSA-2011-0004. Available at https://federalregister.gov/a/2011-547. 
38
Draft test procedure available in the docket for this notice. 
39
Draft seating procedures may be found in the docket for this notice.  
40
Saunders, J., Parent, D., Ames, E., “NHTSA Oblique Crash Test Results: Vehicle Performance and Occupant 
Injury Risk Assessment in Vehicles with Small Overlap Countermeasures,” The 24th International Technical 
Conference for the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles, Paper No. 15-0108, 2015.  
31 
Pdf split file - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break a pdf file; acrobat separate pdf pages
Pdf split file - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
split pdf into multiple files; pdf rotate single page
a. Hybrid III 50
th
Percentile Male ATD (HIII-50M ) 
NCAP does not intend to use the HIII-50M ATD in frontal crash tests in this NCAP 
upgrade. This dummy is still sufficient for the needs of regulatory standards (such as FMVSS 
No. 208, which assesses minimal performance of vehicles with this device) and will continue to 
be used in that capacity. Significant advancements in vehicle safety and restraint design have 
taken place since the HIII-50M was incorporated into Part 572. NCAP seeks a test device that 
produces the most biofidelic capability and response to distinguish between the levels of 
occupant protection provided by modern vehicles so that manufacturers are continually 
challenged to design safer vehicles and consumers may be afforded the most complete and 
meaningful comparative safety information possible. NHTSA believes that the THOR-50M ATD 
has this potential. Information on the biofidelity, anthropometry, injury measurement, and other 
capabilities of the THOR-50M ATD is included in the section following. 
b.  THOR 50
th
Percentile Male Metric ATD (THOR-50M) 
To provide consumers with the most complete and meaningful safety information 
possible, the agency intends to implement the THOR-50M in both frontal NCAP crash modes. 
The THOR-50M would be seated in the driver’s seat in the full frontal rigid barrier crash test, 
and in both the driver’s and right front passenger’s seats in the frontal oblique crash test.  
NHTSA currently uses the HIII-50M ATD for frontal NCAP and as one of the ATDs for 
compliance frontal crash testing, the latter falling under FMVSS No. 208. While the HIII-50M 
ATD is sufficient for the needs of regulatory standards including FMVSS No. 208, which ensure 
an acceptable level of safety performance has been met, NHTSA believes that a more sensitive 
32 
Online Split PDF file. Best free online split PDF tool.
Split PDF file. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag-and-drop your PDF file into the drop area. Then set your PDF file split settings.
break pdf; acrobat split pdf
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Also able to uncompress PDF file in VB.NET programs. Offer flexible and royalty-free developing library license for VB.NET programmers to compress PDF file.
pdf format specification; break pdf documents
evaluation tool would be beneficial to help differentiate between the advancements in vehicle 
safety developed since the HIII-50M ATD was incorporated into Part 572 in 1986.
41
Other 
organizations have also announced their intentions to begin using the THOR-50M in consumer 
information settings. Euro NCAP indicated that it would use the THOR-50M in the development 
of a new offset frontal impact protection test in its 2020 Road Map published in March 2015.
42 
i. Background 
NHTSA has been researching advanced ATDs since the early 1980s. The goal of this 
research has been to create a device that represents the responses of human occupants in modern 
restraint and vehicle environments. NHTSA began developing the THOR-50M around the same 
time that the HIII-50M was added in 49 CFR Part 572 for use in FMVSS No. 208. The THOR­
50M was designed to incorporate advances in biomechanics and injury prediction that were not 
included in the design of the HIII-50M ATD. 
NHTSA has published its work on the THOR-50M throughout its development, including 
the THOR Alpha,
43
THOR-NT,
44
THOR-NT with Modification Kit,
45
and THOR Metric
46
build 
levels. For the purposes of this RFC notice, further references to the THOR-50M indicate 472­
41
See 51 FR 26701. Federal Register documents published before 1993 (Volumes 1-58) are available through a 
Federal Depository Library. 
42
European New Car Assessment Programme, “2020 Roadmap,” March 2015. [http://Euro  
NCAP.blob.core.windows.net/media/16472/euro-ncap-2020-roadmap-rev1-march-2015.pdf]
43
Haffner, M., Rangarajan, N., Artis, M., Beach, D., Eppinger, R., & Shams, T., “Foundations and Elements of the 
NHTSA THOR Alpha ATD Design,” The 17th International Technical Conference for the Enhanced Safety of 
Vehicles, Paper No. 458, 2001. 
44
Shams, T., Rangarajan, N., McDonald, J., Wang, Y., Platten, G., Spade, C., Pope, P., & Haffner, M., 
“Development of THOR NT: Enhancement of THOR Alpha – the NHTSA Advanced Frontal Dummy,” The 19th  
International Technical Conference for the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles, Paper No. 05-0455, 2005. 
45
Ridella, S. & Parent, D., “Modifications to Improve the Durability, Usability, and Biofidelity of the THOR-NT 
Dummy,” The 22nd International Technical Conference for the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles, Paper No. 11-0312,  
2011. 
46
Parent, D., Craig, M., Ridella, S., & McFadden, J., “Thoracic Biofidelity Assessment of the THOR Mod Kit 
ATD,” The 23rd International Technical Conference for the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles, Paper No. 13-0327, 2013.  
33 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Well-designed APIs are provided. Splitting PDF File. If you want to split PDF file into two or small files, you may refer to this online guide.
cannot select text in pdf; acrobat split pdf bookmark
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Professional VB.NET PDF file merging SDK support Visual Studio .NET. Merge PDF without size limitation. Append one PDF file to the end of another one in VB.NET.
break password on pdf; break pdf into multiple pages
0000 Revision F of the THOR drawing package, released on the NHTSA website in September 
2015.
47
The performance of this ATD shall meet the specifications defined in the THOR-50M 
Qualification Procedures Manual.
48 
NHTSA has updated the public on its THOR-50M research in various forums.
49
On 
January 20, 2015, NHTSA held a public meeting to present further updates to its work with 
THOR-50M.
50
NHTSA presented draft descriptions of updated qualification procedures and data 
supporting the repeatability and reproducibility of the THOR-50M. During this meeting, several 
industry representatives took the opportunity to present their research related to the ATD. 
NHTSA itself has used the THOR-50M ATD extensively in testing to support both 
biomechanics and crashworthiness research objectives.
51 
47
Drawing package available in the docket for this notice. 
48 
Draft qualification procedures available in the docket for this notice.  
49
Parent, D., “NHTSA THOR Update,” National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Washington, DC, 
September 2013. 
[www.nhtsa.gov/DOT/NHTSA/NVS/Biomechanics%20&%20Trauma/NHTSA_THOR_update_2013-09-30.pdf]; 
Parent, D., “Applications of the THOR ATD in NHTSA Research,” Society of Automotive Engineers 
Government/Industry Meeting, January 2014. 
[www.nhtsa.gov/DOT/NHTSA/NVS/Public%20Meetings/SAE/2014/2014-SAE-GIM_Parent.pdf]
50
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, “THOR Public Meeting,” January 20, 2015. 
[www.nhtsa.gov/Research/Biomechanics+&+Trauma/THOR+Public+Meetings]
51 
Martin, P. &Shook, L., “NHTSA’s THOR-NT Database,” The 20th International Technical Conference for the 
Enhanced Safety of Vehicles, Paper No. 07-0289, 2007; Saunders, J., Craig, M. & Suway, J., “NHTSA’s Test  
Procedure Evaluations for Small Overlap/Oblique Crashes,” The 22nd International Technical Conference for the 
Enhanced Safety of Vehicles, Paper No. 11-0343, 2011; Saunders, J., Craig, M., & Parent, D., “Moving Deformable  
Barrier Test Procedure for Evaluating Small Overlap/Oblique Crashes,” SAE International Journal of Commercial 
Vehicles, 5(2012-01-0577), 172-195, 2012; Saunders, J. & Parent, D., "Repeatability of a Small Overlap and an  
Oblique Moving Deformable Barrier Test Procedure," SAE World Congress, paper no. 2013-01-0762, 2013; 
Saunders, J. & Parent, D., “Assessment of an Oblique Moving Deformable Barrier Test Procedure,” The 23rd 
International Technical Conference for the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles, Paper No. 13-0402, 2013; Forman, J., 
Michaelson, J., Kent, R., Kuppa, S., & Bostrom, O., “Occupant Restraint in the Rear Seat: ATD Responses to 
Standard and Pre-tensioning, Force-limiting Belt Restraints,” Annals of Advances in Automotive Medicine, 52:141­
54, Oct 2008; Hu, J., Fischer, K., & Adler, A., “Rear Seat Occupant Protection: Safety Beyond Seat Belts,” Society 
of Automotive Engineers Government/Industry Meeting, January 2015. 
[www.nhtsa.gov/DOT/NHTSA/NVS/Public%20Meetings/SAE/2015/2015SAE-Saunders­
AdvOccupantProtection.pdf]; Cyliax, B., Scavnicky, M., Mueller, I., Zhao, J., & Hiroshi, A., “Advanced Adaptive 
Restraints Program: Individualization of Occupant Safety Systems,” Society of Automotive Engineers 
Government/Industry Meeting, January 2015. 
[www.nhtsa.gov/DOT/NHTSA/NVS/Public%20Meetings/SAE/2015/2015SAE-Cyliax-AARP.pdf]; Shaw, G.,  
34 
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively.
how to split pdf file by pages; break pdf into multiple files
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Professional C#.NET PDF SDK for merging PDF file merging in Visual Studio .NET. Append one PDF file to the end of another and save to a single PDF file.
can't cut and paste from pdf; cannot select text in pdf file
ii. THOR-50M Design 
To ensure that the dummy responds in a human-like manner in a vehicle crash 
environment it is necessary that the size and shape of the dummy, referred to as anthropometry, 
provides an accurate representation of a mid-sized human. To accomplish this, a study on the 
Anthropometry of Motor Vehicle Occupants (AMVO) was carried out by the University of 
Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI) to document the anthropometry of a mid-
size (50
th
percentile in stature and weight) male occupant in an automotive seating posture.
52 53 
The AMVO anthropometry was used as a basis for the development of the THOR-50M design. 
The THOR-50M includes anatomically-correct designs in the neck, chest, shoulder, spine, and 
pelvis in order to represent the human occupant response in a frontal or frontal oblique vehicle 
crash environment.  
The cervical neck column of the THOR-50M has a unique design. In the THOR-50M, the 
neck is connected to the head via three separate load paths (two cables – anterior and posterior – 
and a pin joint centered between the cables) versus a single path for other ATDs (a pin joint 
only). The biomechanical basis of the THOR-50M neck design is well established.
54 55
The 
construction of the THOR-50M neck allows the head to rotate relatively freely in the fore and aft 
Lessley, D., Bolton, J., & Crandall, J., "Assessment of the THOR and Hybrid III Crash Dummies: Steering Wheel 
Rim Impacts to the Upper Abdomen," SAE Technical Paper 2004-01-0310, 2004, doi:10.4271/2004-01-0310.
52
Schneider, L. W., Robbins, D. H., Pflug, M. A., & Snyder, R. G., "Development of Anthropometrically Based 
Design Specifications for an Advanced Adult Anthropomorphic Dummy Family; Volume 1-Procedures, Summary 
Findings and Appendices," U.S. Department of Transportation, DOT HS 806 715, 1985. 
53 
Robbins, D. H., "Development of Anthropometrically Based Design Specifications for an Advanced Adult 
Anthropomorphic Dummy Family; Volume 2-Anthropometric Specifications for mid-Sized Male Dummy; Volume 
3- Anthropometric Specifications for Small Female and Large Male Dummies," U.S. Department of Transportation, 
DOT-HS-806-716 & 717, 1985. 
54
White, R. P., Zhoa, Y., Rangarajan, N., Haffner, M., Eppinger, R., & Kleinberger M. “Development of an 
Instrumented Biofidelic Neck for the NHTSA Advanced Frontal Test Dummy,” The 15th International Technical 
Conference on the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles, Paper No. 96-210-W-19, 1996. 
55
Hoofman, M., van Ratingen, M., & Wismans, J., “Evaluation of the Dynamic and Kinematic Performance of the 
THOR Dummy: Neck Performance,” Proceeding of the International Conference on the Biomechanics of Injury 
(IRCOBI) Conference, pp. 497-512, 1998. 
35 
C# Word - Split Word Document in C#.NET
C# DLLs: Split Word File. Add references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. using RasterEdge.XDoc.Word; Split Word file into two files in C#.
split pdf; c# split pdf
C# PowerPoint - Split PowerPoint Document in C#.NET
File: Split PowerPoint Document. |. Home ›› XDoc.PowerPoint ›› C# PowerPoint: Split PowerPoint Document. Split PowerPoint file into two files in C#.
pdf file specification; break a pdf password
directions. THOR can undergo low levels of uninjurious “nodding” without generating an 
appreciable moment at its pin joint. Because of this design, a THOR-specific risk curve for neck 
injury (discussed below) is better aligned with human injury risk at all levels of risk. 
Throughout the development of the THOR-50M ATD, specific attention was given to the 
human-like response and injury prediction capability of the chest. The rib cage geometry is more 
realistic because the individual ribs are angled downward to better match the human rib 
orientation.
56
Performance requirements were selected to ensure human-like behavior in response 
to central chest impacts, oblique chest impacts, and steering rim impacts to the rib cage and 
upper abdomen.
57
Better chest anthropometry means that the dummy’s interaction with the 
restraint system (as the seat belt lies over the shoulder and across the chest, for example) is more 
representative of the interaction humans would experience. Moreover, NHTSA has previously 
identified instrumentation opportunities beyond a single-point chest deflection measurement 
system that may improve the assessment of thoracic loading in a vehicle environment with 
advanced restraint technology such as air bags and pretensioners.
58
Thoracic trauma imparted to 
restrained occupants does not always occur at the same location on the rib cage for all occupants 
in all frontal crashes.
59
Kuppa and Eppinger found (in a data set consisting of 71 human subjects 
in various restraint systems and crash severities) that using the maximum deflection from 
56
Kent, R., Shaw, C. G., Lessley, D. J., Crandall, J. R. & Svensson, M. Y, “Comparison of Belted Hybrid III, 
THOR, and Cadaver Thoracic Responses in Oblique Frontal and Full Frontal Sled Tests,” Proc. SAE 2003 World 
Congress. Paper No. 2003-01-0160, 2003. 
57
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, “Biomechanical Response Requirements of the THOR NHTSA 
Advanced Frontal Dummy, Revision 2005.1,” Report No: GESAC-05-03, U.S. Department of Transportation, 
Washington, DC, March 2005. [www.nhtsa.gov/DOT/NHTSA/NVS/Biomechanics%20&%20Trauma/THOR­
NT%20Advanced%20Crash%20Test%20Dummy/thorbio05_1.pdf]
58
Yoganandan, N., Pintar, F., Rinaldi, J., “Evaluation of the RibEye Deflection Measurement System in the 50th 
Percentile Hybrid III Dummy.” National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, DOT HS 811 102, March 2009. 
59
Morgan, R. M., Eppinger, R. H., Haffner, M. P., Yoganandan, N., Pintar, F. A., Sances, A., Crandall, J. R., Pilkey,  
W. D., Klopp, G. S., Kallieris, D., Miltner, E., Mattern, R., Kuppa, S. M., & Sharpless, C. L., “Thoracic Trauma 
Assessment Formulations for Restrained Drivers in Simulated Frontal Impacts,” Proc. 38th Stapp Car Crash 
Conference, pp. 15-34. Society of Automotive Engineers, Warrendale, PA., 1994. 
36 
multiple measurement locations on the chest resulted in improved injury prediction.
60
The 
THOR-50M ATD is capable of measuring three-dimensional deflections at four different 
locations on the rib cage. This instrumentation, coupled with its thoracic biofidelity,
61
provides 
the THOR-50M ATD with the ability to better predict thoracic injuries and to potentially drive 
more appropriate restraint system countermeasures. 
The THOR-50M shoulder was developed to allow a human-like range of motion and 
includes a clavicle linkage intended to better represent the human shoulder interaction with 
shoulder belt restraints.
62
The spine of the THOR-50M ATD has two flexible elements, one in 
the thoracic spine and one in the lumbar spine, which are intended to allow human-like spinal 
kinematics in both frontal and oblique loading conditions.
63
The pelvis was designed to represent 
human pelvis bone structure to better represent lap belt interaction,
64 65
and the pelvis flesh was 
designed to represent uncompressed geometry to allow human-like interaction of the pelvis flesh 
with the vehicle seat.
66 
THOR-50M ATD has instrumentation that can be used to predict injury risk to the head, 
neck, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, upper leg, and lower leg. Coupled with improved biofidelity in 
60
Kuppa, S., & Eppinger, R., “Development of an Improved Thoracic Injury Criterion,” Proceedings of the 42nd  
Stapp Car Crash Conference, SAE No. 983153, 1998. 
61
Parent, D., Craig, M., Ridella, S., & McFadden, J. “Thoracic Biofidelity Assessment of the THOR Mod Kit 
ATD,” The 23rd Enhanced Safety of Vehicles Conference, Paper No. 13-0327, 2013.
62
Törnvall, F. V., Holmqvist, K., Davidsson, J., Svensson, M. Y., HÅland, Y., & Öhrn, H., “A New THOR 
Shoulder Design: A Comparison with Volunteers, the Hybrid III, and THOR NT,” Traffic Injury Prevention, 8:2,  
205-215, 2007. 
63
Haffner, M., Rangarajan, N., Artis, M., Beach, D., Eppinger, R., & Shams, T., “Foundations and Elements of the 
NHTSA THOR Alpha ATD Design,” The 17th International Technical Conference for the Enhanced Safety of 
Vehicles, Paper No. 458, 2001. 
64
Reynolds, H., Snow, C., & Young, J., “Spatial Geometry of the Human Pelvis,” U.S. Department of 
Transportation, Technical Report No. FAA-AM-82-9, 1982.
65
Haffner, M., Rangarajan, N., Artis, M., Beach, D., Eppinger, R., & Shams, T., “Foundations and Elements of the 
NHTSA THOR Alpha ATD Design,” The 17th International Technical Conference for the Enhanced Safety of 
Vehicles, Paper No. 458, 2001. 
66
Shams, T., Rangarajan, N., McDonald, J., Wang, Y., Platten, G., Spade, C., Pope, P., & Haffner, M., 
“Development of THOR NT: Enhancement of THOR Alpha – the NHTSA Advanced Frontal Dummy,” The 19th  
International Technical Conference for the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles, Paper No. 05-0455, 2005. 
37 
these areas, THOR-50M ATD has the potential to measure meaningful and appropriate sources 
of injury, especially in offset or oblique loading scenarios. 
Evidence of the ability of the THOR-50M ATD to simulate occupant kinematics and 
predict injury risk has been demonstrated through a combination of field studies and fleet testing 
in the oblique crash test mode. NHTSA conducted two field studies to examine the sources of 
injury and fatality in small overlap and oblique crashes using the Crash Injury Research and 
Engineering Network (CIREN) and NASS-CDS databases.
67 68
The body regions that showed the 
highest average injury risk as predicted by the THOR-50M ATD in fleet testing were also those 
regions that showed the highest incidence of injury in the 2011 field study by Rudd et al.:
69
knee-
thigh-hip, lower extremity, head, and chest. Head and chest contacts observed in the fleet testing 
generally aligned with the sources of the most severe injuries indicated in the 2013 field study by 
Rudd. A majority of the fatalities in the field study were sourced to the head or chest, body 
regions which were also predicted to have a high risk of AIS 3+ injury in fleet testing. 
Additionally, Rudd (2011) observed that over half of the pelvis injuries occurred in the absence 
of a femur shaft fracture, which was mirrored in the fleet testing in that the average risk of 
acetabulum fracture was higher than the average risk of femur fracture. 
Because of its improved biofidelity and injury prediction capabilities, the THOR-50M 
ATD is more sensitive to the performance of different restraint systems. In a study of belt-only, 
force-limited belt plus air bag, and reduced force force-limited belt plus air bag restraint 
67
Rudd, R., Scarboro, M., & Saunders, J., “Injury Analysis of Real-World Small Overlap and Oblique Frontal 
Crashes,” The 22nd International Technical Conference for the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles, Paper No. 11-0384, 
2011. 
68
Rudd, R., “Characteristics of Injuries in Fatally Injured Restrained Occupants in Frontal Crashes,” The 23rd 
International Technical Conference for the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles, Paper No. 13-0349, 2013. 
69
Saunders, J., Craig, M., & Parent, D., “Moving Deformable Barrier Test Procedure for Evaluating Small 
Overlap/Oblique Crashes,” SAE International Journal of Commercial Vehicles, 5(2012-01-0577), 172-195, 2012 
38 
conditions in a frontal impact sled test series, the THOR-50M was able to differentiate between 
both crash severity and restraint performance.
70 
iii. Injury Criteria and Risk Curves 
To assess injury in any crash test that the THOR-50M ATD is used in, NCAP intends to 
use many of the injury criteria and risk curves that have been used in NHTSA research testing as 
previously published,
71
with some modifications. These preliminary injury criteria and risk 
curves are described below and summarized in Appendix II of this document. The agency is 
seeking comment on all aspects of the following: 
HEAD – NHTSA intends to use the head injury criterion (HIC
15
) as a metric for 
assessing head injury risk in frontal crashes. It is currently in use in FMVSS No. 208 and frontal 
NCAP tests.
72 73
As described in the 2008 NCAP Final Decision Notice, the risk curve associated 
with HIC
15
in frontal NCAP testing represents a risk of AIS 3+ injury. However, while HIC
15 
injury assessment values in frontal NCAP testing have continued to decrease over time as have 
the field incidence of skull and facial fractures, the incidence of traumatic brain injury in frontal 
crashes has not decreased at a similar rate.
74
This may be because the HIC
15
criterion only 
addresses linear acceleration of the head, which does not completely describe the motion of and 
70
Sunnevång, C., Hynd, D., Carroll, J., & Dahlgren, M., “Comparison of the THORAX Demonstrator and HIII 
Sensitivity to Crash Severity and Occupant Restraint Variation,” Proceedings of the 2014 IRCOBI Conference, 
Paper No. IRC-14-42, 2014. 
71
Saunders, J., Parent, D., & Ames, E., “NHTSA Oblique Crash Test Results: Vehicle Performance and Occupant 
Injury Risk Assessment in Vehicles with Small Overlap Countermeasures,” The 24th International Technical 
Conference for the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles, Paper No. 15-0108, 2015.
72
Eppinger, R., Sun, E., Bandak, F., Haffner, M., Khaewpong, N., Maltese, M., & Saul, R., “Development of 
Improved Injury Criteria for the Assessment of Advanced Automotive Restraint Systems II,” NHTSA Docket No. 
NHTSA–1999–6407–5, 1999. 
73
See 73 FR 40016. Docket No. NHTSA-2006-26555. Available  at https://federalregister.gov/a/E8-15620 
74
Takhounts, E. G., Hasija, V., Moorhouse, K., McFadden, J., & Craig, M., “Development of Brain Injury Criteria 
(BrIC)”, Proceedings of the 57th Stapp Car Crash Conference, Orlando, FL, November 2013.  
39 
subsequent injury risk to the brain. To assess the risk of brain injury due to rotation of the head, 
Takhounts (2013) developed a kinematically based brain injury criterion (BrIC). BrIC is 
calculated by combining the angular velocities of the head about its three local axes compared to 
directionally dependent critical values. BrIC was one of many brain injury correlates that were 
considered and was found to have the highest correlation to two strain metrics measured in the 
brain. These strain metrics, cumulative strain and maximum principal strain, are the mechanical 
measures that have been shown to be directly associated with brain injury potential.
75 
NECK – NHTSA intends to use a modified, THOR-specific version of the neck injury 
criterion (Nij) as a metric for assessing neck injury in frontal crashes. Two approaches are being 
considered to address this difference: 
a) Update Nij critical values. The formulation of Nij would be retained, but the critical 
values would be updated to specifically represent the THOR-50M ATD. In a presentation 
to the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) THOR Evaluation Task Group, 
Nightingale et al. proposed critical values for the THOR ATD based on age-adjusted 
post-mortem human surrogate cervical spine tolerance data.
76
These critical values were 
based on measurements from the upper neck load cell alone: 2520 N in tension, 3640 N 
in compression, 48 Nm in flexion, and 72 Nm in extension. Dibb et al. recognized this as 
75
Takhounts, E., Eppinger, R., Campbell, J., Tannous, R., Power, Erik., & Shook, L., “On the Development of the 
SIMon Finite Element Head Model.” Stapp Car Crash Journal, Vol. 47 (October 2003), pp. 107-33.; Takhounts, E., 
Ridella, R., Hasija, V., Tannous, R., Campbell, J., Malone, D., Danelson, K., Stitzel, J., Rowson, S., & Duma, S., 
“Investigation of Traumatic Brain Injuries Using the Next Generation of Simulated Injury Monitor (SIMon) Finite 
Element Head Model,” Stapp Car Crash Journal, Vol. 52 (November 2008), pp1-31.
76
Nightingale, R., Ono, K., Pintar, F., Yoganandan, N., & Martin, P., “THOR Head and Neck IARVs,” SAE THOR  
Evaluation Task Group, 2009. 
40 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested