which are optional. The dummy’s upper and lower legs include load cells and rotational 
potentiometers, in addition to other sensors.  
The WorldSID-50M ATD was also designed to have an optional in-dummy data 
acquisition system (DAS), which is wholly contained within the dummy and includes integrated 
wiring. This DAS, which has the ability to collect up to 224 data channels, eliminates the need 
for a single, large umbilical cable.
164
Current dummies require the use of an umbilical cable that 
runs from the dummy’s spine to a DAS located elsewhere – either on or off the vehicle. These 
cables can add weight to the test vehicle. With the large amount of data channels possible for the 
WorldSID-50M ATD, an umbilical cable is not practical. 
ix. Injury Criteria and Risk Curves 
The construction of injury risk curves for the WorldSID-50M ATD was initiated in 2004 
by the ISO Technical Committee 22, Sub-committee 12, Working Group 6 
(ISO/TC22/SC12/WG6). Additional support for this project came from the Dummy Task Force 
of the Association des Constructeurs Europeens d’Automobiles (ACEA-TFD) in 2008. The 
ACEA-TFD aimed to promote consensus among biomechanical experts as to the injury risk 
curves that should be used. Subsequently, a group of biomechanical experts worked to develop 
injury risk curves for the WorldSID-50M ATD shoulder, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis.
165
These 
curves, which were released and discussed at the May 2009 meeting of ISO/TC22/SC12/WG6, 
were developed using the following process: (1) an extensive review of all available PMHS side 
impact test datasets (impactor tests and sled tests) worldwide was conducted, and those test 
164
ISO WorldSID Task Group, “Background,” [www.worldsid.org/Documentation/Background%2020051116.pdf]. 
Accessed 25 Sep 2015.
165 
Petitjean, A., Trosseille, X., Petit, P., Irwin, A., Hassan, J., & Praxl, N., “Injury Risk Curves for the WorldSID 
50
th 
Percentile Male Dummy,” Stapp Car Crash Journal, 53: 443-476, 2009. 
71 
Pdf link to specific page - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
pdf splitter; split pdf files
Pdf link to specific page - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
pdf file specification; a pdf page cut
configurations that could be reproduced using the WorldSID-50M ATD were selected, (2) 
WorldSID-50M ATD responses from similar test configurations were obtained and scaled to 
simulate the same test severities the PMHS were exposed to by accounting for anthropometry 
differences between the PMHS and 50
th
percentile dummy, and (3) the scaled WorldSID-50M 
ATD data was paired with PMHS injuries for each body region and test condition to construct 
injury risk curves based on commonly used statistical methods. Although injury risk curves are 
historically constructed for AIS 3+ injuries, a well-distributed sample of injured and non-injured 
PMHS at this AIS level was not available for some body regions. In such instances, risk curves 
were developed for other AIS levels for which injury results were better balanced.
166
In most 
cases, the AIS levels evaluated were reduced. This should have the effect of addressing a larger 
amount of injuries in the real world. 
When injury risk curves for the WorldSID-50M ATD were proposed by Petitjean et al. in 
2009, there was no consensus on what injury criteria should be adopted or which statistical 
method – certainty, Mertz-Weber, consistent threshold estimate (CTE), logistic regression, or 
survival analysis with Weibull distribution – should be used to construct the injury risk curves 
from the test data. Ultimately, however, in 2011, after using statistical simulations to compare 
the performance of the different statistical methods, Petitjean et al. recommended that the 
Weibull survival method be used over the other statistical methods to construct injury risk curves 
for the WorldSID-50M ATD.
167
Around the same time, ISO/TC22/SC12/WG6 reached 
consensus on a set of guidelines that was to be used to not only build injury risk curves, but also 
to recommend the risk curve that is considered to be the most relevant to the sample studied. In 
166
Ibid. 
167
NHTSA has historically used logistic regression to develop injury risk curves.  
72 
C# PDF url edit Library: insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.
Able to embed link to specific PDF pages. Link access to variety of objects, such as website, image, document, bookmark, PDF page number, flash, etc.
combine pages of pdf documents into one; pdf format specification
VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net
VB.NET Sample Code to Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page in VB.NET Class. Able to embed link to specific PDF pages in VB.NET program.
acrobat split pdf; pdf link to specific page
2012, Petitjean et al. applied these guidelines to the WorldSID-50M ATD results published in 
2009 in order to provide a final set of injury risk curves for the WorldSID-50M ATD. These 
curves, which were specified for lateral shoulder force, thoracic rib deflection, abdomen rib 
deflection, and pubic force, were ultimately recommended by ISO/TC22/SC12/WG6. 
The recommended risk curves for the WorldSID-50M ATD, as published by Petitjean et 
al. in 2012, were adjusted for both 45-year-olds and 67-year-olds.
168
The agency will decide on 
an appropriate age at which to scale risk curves for the WorldSID-50M ATD once final, adjusted 
population estimate data has been calculated and examined. The injury criteria and associated 
risk curves NCAP intends to use for the WorldSID-50M ATD are described below and detailed 
in Appendix IV of this document. The agency intends to adopt injury criteria to address head, 
shoulder, thorax, abdominal, and pelvis risk. Injury criteria for most of these body regions (head, 
thorax, abdomen, and pelvis) are currently included for the ES-2re dummy in FMVSS No. 214 
and side NCAP. The injury criteria mentioned below are generally consistent with those 
recommended by ISO/TC22/SC12/WG6 and those currently under evaluation by the Working 
Party on Passive Safety (GRSP) for inclusion in the pole side impact GTR. With few exceptions, 
they are also used currently by Euro NCAP for rating vehicles. 
The agency is seeking comment on the risk curves included herein, as well as all aspects 
of the following: 
HEAD - NHTSA’s preliminary analysis of real-world vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-pole 
side impact crashes showed that approximately one third (34%) of all AIS 3+ injuries for front 
seat, medium-stature occupants were to the head. The data reviewed showed that, of the AIS 3+ 
head injuries reported, 91 percent were brain injuries in vehicle-to-vehicle crashes, and 82 
168
Petitjean, 2012. 
73 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. XDoc.PDF allows you to easily move PDF document pages specific APIs to copy and get a specific page of PDF
reader split pdf; break apart pdf
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
By referring to this VB.NET guide, you can use specific APIs to copy and get a specific page of PDF file; you are also able to copy and paste pages from a PDF
pdf specification; break pdf file into multiple files
percent were brain injuries in vehicle-to-pole crashes.
169
As mentioned previously, HIC (either 
15 milliseconds (ms) or 36 ms in duration) is a measure of only translational head acceleration; it 
does not account for rotational motion of the head, which has been commonly seen in side 
impact crashes and which may induce brain injury. To account for this rotational motion, the 
agency is planning to adopt the brain injury criterion, BrIC, for the WorldSID-50M dummy. The 
WorldSID-50M ATD can be equipped to measure rotational accelerations and/or rotational 
velocities at the head center of gravity. If accelerations are used, they must be integrated to 
obtain the rotational velocity used to calculate BrIC; however, if rotational velocity is measured 
directly, no further processing is necessary. Therefore, the agency intends to use angular rate 
sensors to calculate BrIC. The AIS 3+ risk curve associated with BrIC for the WorldSID-50M is 
included in Appendix IV. 
As BrIC is intended to complement HIC rather than replace it, the agency will continue to 
measure HIC
36
readings in side NCAP MDB and pole tests with the WorldSID-50M dummy. 
The AIS3+ risk curve associated with HIC
36
is found in Appendix IV. 
SHOULDER - The agency also intends to evaluate injuries stemming from the crash 
forces imparted to the WorldSID-50M ATD’s shoulder. The agency’s analysis of real-world 
vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-pole crashes showed that 13 percent of all AIS 2+ injuries 
reported for medium-stature occupants in the front seat were shoulder injuries.
170
The 
WorldSID-50M ATD’s shoulder shows excellent biofidelity; recall that the ISO rating for the 
WorldSID-50M ATD’s shoulder is 10, and its NHTSA external and internal BioRank scores are 
1.0 and 0.9, respectively. Shoulder design can substantially affect dummy response during side 
169
NHTSA’s review of NASS-CDS cases; see Real-World Data section. 
170
Ibid. 
74 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File Using VB. This demo explains how to use VB to insert an empty page to a specific location of current PDF file .
break pdf into smaller files; break pdf into separate pages
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File in C#.NET. This C# demo explains how to insert an empty page to a specific location of current PDF file.
break apart a pdf file; break up pdf file
pole and side air bag interactions, and biofidelity is extremely important in narrow object crashes 
where the margins between minor and serious or fatal injury are relatively small.
171 
NHTSA has chosen to evaluate shoulder injury risk for the WorldSID-50M ATD as a 
function of maximum shoulder force in the lateral direction (Y). The associated AIS 2+ risk 
curve, developed by Petitjean et al. (2012), can be found in Appendix IV.  
The agency has some concern that assessing shoulder injury risk in NCAP may prohibit 
manufacturers from offering the best thorax protection, as it may be necessary for vehicle 
manufacturers to direct loading in severe side impact crashes towards body regions that are best 
able to withstand impact, such as the shoulder, in order to divert loads away from more 
vulnerable body regions, such as the thorax. In fact, it is for these reasons that the side pole GTR 
informal working group decided not to establish a threshold for shoulder force based on the AIS 
2+ injury risk curves developed by ISO/TC22/SC12/WG6.
172
That said, the informal working 
group thought it was still important to prevent non-biofidelic (e.g., excessive) shoulder loading 
so that vehicle manufacturers could not use such excessive shoulder loading to reduce thorax 
loading artificially. Accordingly, the informal working group agreed upon a maximum peak 
lateral shoulder force of 3.0 kN (674.4 lb-force). The agency’s fleet testing showed maximum 
shoulder forces ranging from 1.2 kN (269.8 lb-force) to 2.6 kN (584.5 lb-force) for oblique pole 
tests and 876 N (196.9 lb-force) to 2.3 kN (517.0 lb-force) in the side impact MDB tests. The 
agency is requesting comments on the merits of using a performance criterion limit (e.g., IARV) 
instead of the AIS 2+ risk curve for shoulder force in NCAP ratings.  
171
ECE/TRANS/180/Add.14 
172
Ibid. 
75 
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page. Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are all can be altered in properties.
break a pdf; break a pdf file into parts
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page. Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are all can be altered in properties.
can print pdf no pages selected; break a pdf into parts
Petitjean et al. did not recommend an injury risk curve for shoulder deflection for the 
WorldSID-50M ATD because, during development of the risk curves, shoulder deflection data 
was only available for impactor tests, whereas shoulder force data was available for both 
impactor and sled tests. Since a wider range of test configurations could be used to build an 
injury risk curve for shoulder force compared to shoulder deflection, only a curve for maximum 
shoulder force was recommended.
173
The decision to recommend one injury risk per body 
region, injury type, and injury severity was in keeping with the guidelines agreed to by the 
ISO/TC22/SC12/WG6 experts.  
The agency notes that it does not subscribe to these guidelines universally. For example, 
the Hybrid III ATD chest deflection and acceleration are both used as separate indicators of 
injury in FMVSSs. That said, the agency is requesting comments on the merits of also adopting a 
risk curve for AIS 2+ shoulder injury that is a function of shoulder deflection, as this risk curve 
has also been developed by ISO/TC22/SC12/WG6.
174 
CHEST - The NASS-CDS data examined showed that, in addition to the head, the chest 
is one of the most common seriously injured body regions in side crashes. Thirty-four percent of 
all AIS 3+ injuries to front seat, medium-stature occupants involved in vehicle-to-vehicle and 
vehicle-to-pole crashes were thoracic injuries.
175
As such, NHTSA intends to incorporate chest 
deflection injury criteria to measure thoracic injury for the WorldSID-50M ATD. 
Petitjean et al., 2012 developed an injury risk function to relate maximum thoracic and 
abdominal rib deflection of the WorldSID-50M ATD, as measured by a 1D IR-TRACC, to AIS 
173 
Petitjean, A., Trosseille, X., Praxl, N., Hynd, D., Irwin, A., “Injury Risk Curves for the WorldSID 50
th
Male 
Dummy,” Stapp Car Crash Journal, 56: 323-347, 2012. 
174
ISO/TR 12350:2002(E). 
175
NHTSA’s review of NASS-CDS cases; see Real-World Data section. 
76 
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit Delete and remove all image objects contained in a specific PDF page
break pdf into pages; break password pdf
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
C#: Select All Images from One PDF Page. C# programming sample for extracting all images from a specific PDF page. // Open a document.
split pdf; split pdf files
3+ thoracic skeletal (and abdominal skeletal) injury obtained from PMHS. This risk curve, 
presented in Appendix IV, is a function of both thoracic and abdominal rib deflection because 
the abdominal ribs of the WorldSID-50M dummy partially overlap the thorax ribs of a mid-size 
adult male.
176
Because of this, increased loading of the WorldSID-50M ATD’s abdominal ribs 
would be expected to increase the risk of both AIS 3+ thorax and AIS 3+ abdominal injuries. 
Although chest deflection has been shown to be the best predictor of thoracic injuries in side 
impact crashes, the agency has some concerns, as mentioned previously, regarding the 
WorldSID-50M ATD’s ability to accurately measure deflections under oblique loading 
conditions. It should be noted that Petitjean et al. concluded that, for impact directions from 
lateral to 15
o
forward of lateral, the injury risk curves that would be constructed for thoracic 
deflection using the Y-component of the deflection measured by a 2D IR-TRACC would be 
close to those developed for deflection measured by a 1D IR-TRACC.
177
The authors also 
concluded that, for air bag tests, the deflection measured by the 1D IR-TRACC can be used as 
criteria for an impact direction between pure lateral and 30
o
forward of lateral. However, Hynd et 
al., 2004 concluded that for rearward oblique loading, a 1D IR-TRACC would underestimate rib 
deflection, and therefore, a 2D IR-TRACC or RibEye™ may more accurately reflect actual 
deflection under such loading conditions.
178
Research with the WorldSID-50M ATD using the 
optical sensing system, RibEye™, is ongoing. 
176
As indicated in Petitjean 2009, the maximum of the three thorax rib and two abdomen rib deflections was used to 
develop the thorax injury risk curves. This was done to be consistent with AIS 2005, which specifies that all rib 
fractures are used to code thoracic skeletal injuries. 
177 
Petitjean, A., Trosseille, X., Praxl, N., Hynd, D., & Irwin, A., “Injury Risk Curves for the WorldSID 50
th
Male 
Dummy,” Stapp Car Crash Journal, 56: 323-347, 2012. 
178
Hynd, D., Carroll, J., Been, B., & Payne, A., “Evaluation of the Shoulder, Thorax, and Abdomen of the 
WorldSID Pre-Production Side Impact Dummy,” Research Laboratory Published Project Report. 2004. PPR 029. 
77 
Other thoracic injury criteria adopted by ISO/TC22/SC12/WG6 are maximum thoracic 
rib and abdomen rib viscous criteria, or VC, which are designed to address both soft tissue and 
skeletal injuries. The agency has not found VC to be repeatable and reproducible in the agency’s 
research;
179
however, the agency realizes that many other organizations, including regulatory 
authorities, have been using VC for the EuroSID 1 and the ES-2 dummies in side impact MDB 
testing, including ECE Regulation No. 95, for many years. As ISO/TC22/SC12/WG6 has not yet 
been able to construct an AIS 3+ thoracic VC injury risk curve with an acceptable quality index 
for the WorldSID-50M percentile male dummy, the agency will not incorporate a peak thoracic 
VC into side NCAP for the next upgrade. 
ABDOMEN - A smaller, yet still notable, portion of real-world injuries in side impact 
crashes are abdominal injuries. The agency’s review of the NASS-CDS database showed that 
15% of all AIS 2+ injuries for front seat, medium-stature occupants in vehicle-to-vehicle and 
vehicle-to-pole side impact crashes were abdominal injuries.
180
The biofidelity rating for the 
WorldSID-50M ATD’s abdomen is greatly improved; the ISO rating for the WorldSID-50M’s 
abdomen is a 9.3 and external and internal BioRank scores are 1.9 and 2.4, respectively. 
Accordingly, as part of the upgrade to NCAP, the agency intends to include abdominal rib 
deflection injury criterion for the WorldSID-50M ATD.  
Whereas the thoracic rib deflection criterion discussed in the previous section is designed 
to assess both thoracic and abdominal skeletal injuries, the maximum abdomen rib deflection 
injury criterion is designed to gauge abdominal soft tissue injuries. Risk curves showing AIS 2+ 
179
See 69 FR 28002. Docket No. NHTSA-2004-17694. Available at https://federalregister.gov/a/04-10931. 
180
NHTSA’s review of NASS-CDS cases; see Real-World Data section. 
78 
abdomen soft tissue injury for the WorldSID-50M ATD as a function of maximum abdomen rib 
deflection measured by a 1D IR-TRACC can be found in Appendix IV. 
This abdominal rib deflection injury criterion, which was developed and recommended 
by Petitjean et al. and adopted by ISO/TC22/SC12/WG6, was selected over the maximum 
abdomen rib VC to assess the risk of AIS 2+ abdominal soft tissue injuries because the quality 
index associated with the abdomen rib deflection was better than the abdomen rib VC.
181
In 
keeping with the ISO/TC22/SC12/WG6 guidelines to recommend one injury risk per body 
region, injury type, and injury severity, and in light of the agency’s past experience with VC, 
mentioned above, the agency will not adopt an abdominal injury criterion based on maximum 
abdominal VC.  
The agency is requesting comment on whether it is appropriate to also adopt a resultant 
lower spine injury criterion in hopes of capturing severe lower thorax and abdomen loading that 
is undetected by unidirectional deflection measurements, such as excessive loadings behind the 
dummy, which may cause excessive forward rotations of the ribs.
182
Resultant spinal 
accelerations have been shown to provide a good measure of the overall load on the thorax and, 
because they are being derived from tri-axial accelerometers (x, y, and z direction), are less 
sensitive to the direction of impact.
183
Adopting an additional criterion for lower spine 
acceleration would be in line with what the informal working group has decided for the side pole 
GTR. The informal working group agreed that the lower spine acceleration should not exceed 75 
g, except for intervals whose cumulative duration is not more than 3 ms.  
181 
Petitjean, A., Trosseille, X., Praxl, N., Hynd, D., Irwin, A., “Injury Risk Curves for the WorldSID 50
th
Male 
Dummy,” Stapp Car Crash Journal, 56: 323-347, 2012. 
182
ECE/TRANS/180/Add.14 
183
Kuppa, S. “Injury Criteria for Side Impact Dummies,” National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, January 
2006. 
79 
PELVIS - The agency’s preliminary review of real-world data showed that pelvis 
injuries represent 13% of all AIS 2+ injuries for front seat, mid-size occupants involved in 
vehicle-to-vehicle crashes, and 20% of all AIS 2+ injuries for these occupants in fixed narrow 
object side impact crashes.
184
To evaluate pelvis injuries in side NCAP testing using the 
WorldSID-50M ATD, the agency intends to adopt pubic force as an additional injury criterion.  
As mentioned earlier, the WorldSID-50M ATD is capable of measuring lateral pelvis 
acceleration and posterior sacro-iliac loads in addition to anterior pubic symphysis loads. At this 
time, however, the agency will only incorporate pubic symphysis injury criteria for the pelvis. 
The agency believes that adding a criterion to evaluate pubic symphysis loads instead of lateral 
pelvis acceleration is appropriate because most of the pelvis injuries observed in the PMHS 
samples reviewed by Petitjean et al. were ilioischial rami and pubic symphysis injuries.
185 
Furthermore, pubic force is generally considered to be a more acceptable biomechanical measure 
than lateral pelvis acceleration.
186
The agency will also not adopt a criterion for sacro-iliac loads 
because a risk curve for the sacro-iliac has not yet been developed for the WorldSID-50M ATD. 
However, because the agency is aware that field evidence suggests that posterior pelvic injury 
may not be detected by the pubic symphysis load cell, the agency is requesting comment on how 
the pubic symphysis and sacro-iliac loads interrelate, and whether it is possible and necessary to 
establish injury criteria for both pelvic regions.  
Human tolerance to pelvic loading has been established and related to the WorldSID­
50M ATD, resulting in an injury risk curve, included in Appendix IV, to relate the measured 
184
NHTSA’s review of NASS-CDS cases; see Real-World Data section. 
185 
Petitjean, A., Trosseille, X., Praxl, N., Hynd, D., & Irwin, A., “Injury Risk Curves for the WorldSID 50
th
Male 
Dummy,” Stapp Car Crash Journal, 56: 323-347, 2012. 
186
Ibid. 
80 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested