asp net open pdf file in web browser using c# : Break pdf documents application software tool html windows asp.net online nhtsa-5stars-rfc-notice9-part159

In comparison to motor vehicle occupants, the distribution of pedestrian fatalities is 
greater for age groups that include children and people over 45 years old (see Appendix VII, 
Figure VII-1). The agency believes that a crashworthiness pedestrian safety program in NCAP is 
necessary to stimulate improvements in pedestrian crashworthiness in new light vehicles sold in 
the United States and ultimately reduce pedestrian fatalities and injuries from vehicle crashes in 
the United States. Europe and Japan have responded to the high proportion of pedestrian 
fatalities compared to all traffic fatalities by including pedestrian protection in their respective 
NCAPs and requiring pedestrian protection through regulation. These actions have likely 
contributed to a downward trend in pedestrian fatalities in Europe and Japan (see Appendix VII, 
Figure VII-2). 
As opposed to Europe and Japan, fatalities in the United States have remained steady 
over the last 14 years (see Appendix VII, Figure VII-3). The agency believes that including 
pedestrian protection in the NCAP program would be a step toward realizing similar downward 
trends experienced in regions of the world that include pedestrians in their consumer information 
programs. 
2.  Current NCAP Activities in the U.S./World 
NHTSA intends to implement vehicle crashworthiness tests for pedestrian safety. This 
plan follows the agency’s April 2013 RFC notice in which it asked whether the agency should 
consider such testing in the NCAP program. Though opinion varied on its inclusion, a common 
thread among many commenters was a desire for worldwide harmonization of tests and protocols 
if a pedestrian testing or rating program was introduced. In consideration of this, the test 
91 
Break pdf documents - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
pdf link to specific page; break a pdf password
Break pdf documents - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
how to split pdf file by pages; break pdf into separate pages
procedures and scoring scheme that the agency plans to use is essentially the same as those of 
Euro NCAP. 
216 
The speeds at which Euro NCAP conducts its pedestrian protection tests are supported by 
the agency’s data regarding speeds at which the greatest number of pedestrian impacts occurred.  
However, the agency plans to conduct its own tests independently from Euro NCAP. 
3. Planned Upgrade 
The agency intends to use the Euro NCAP test procedures rather than those of KNCAP or 
JNCAP because the European fleet make-up, including vehicle sizes and classes, is more similar 
to the U.S. fleet. Moreover, the societal benefits of the Euro NCAP pedestrian component are 
well documented. Recent retrospective studies indicate that ratings are yielding positive results 
in the European Union (E.U.) based on studies of their effect on real-world crashes and injuries. 
One such study was reported by the Swedish Transport Administration in 2014. A correlation 
between higher rating in Euro NCAP pedestrian protection scores and reduced head injuries and 
fatalities was observed among Swedish pedestrians struck between January 2003 and January 
2014.
217
Similar observations were observed by BAST
218
for pedestrian collisions in Germany in 
the years 2009 to 2011. 
The following is a list of Euro NCAP documents that NHTSA plans to use as a basis for 
its own test procedures: 
216
NHTSA’s plan as to how the pedestrian safety rating will factor into the overall vehicle rating is discussed later 
in this document, but that will not be identical to how Euro NCAP calculates their overall ratings. 
217
Standroth, J. et al. (2014), “Correlation between Euro NCAP pedestrian test results and injury severity in injury 
crashes with pedestrians and bicyclists in Sweden,” Stapp Car Crash Journal, Vol. 58 (November 2014), pp. 213­
231.  
218
Pastor, C., “Correlation between pedestrian injury severity in real-life crashes and Euro NCAP pedestrian test  
results,” The 23rd International Technical Conference on the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles, Paper No. 13-0308,  
2013. 
92 
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert MS PPT to Adobe PDF Document
RasterEdge.com is specializing in documents and images conversion WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
break a pdf into smaller files; acrobat split pdf
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Office Excel to Adobe PDF
sheet size will keep unchanged for conversion among documents. WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
break pdf into multiple pages; pdf split and merge
(1) Pedestrian Testing Protocol, Version 8.1, January 2015. This describes the vehicle 
preparation, the test devices and their qualification requirements, and procedures to 
carry out the tests. 
(2) Pedestrian Testing Protocol, Version 5.3.1, November 2011. If a vehicle 
manufacturer elects not to provide NHTSA with headform impact assessment data, 
the headform test protocol in V5.3.1 will be followed in lieu of V8.1.  
(3) Euro NCAP Pedestrian Headform Point Selection, V12. The routine contained within 
this (Microsoft Excel) file is used to generate verification points to be tested by 
NHTSA. 
(4) Technical Bulletin TB 019, Headform to Bonnet Leading Edge Tests, Version 1.0, 
June 2014. This document describes a procedure for child headform testing under the 
special case when test grid points lie forward of the hood and within the grille or hood 
leading edge area. 
(5) Film and Photo Protocol, Version 1.1, Chapter 8 – Pedestrian Subsystem Tests, 
November 2014. This document describes camera set-up procedure only. 
(6) Technical Bulletin, TB 013, Pedestrian CAE Models & Codes, Version 1.4, June 
2015. This document lists various computer-aided engineering models that have been 
deemed acceptable for use by a vehicle manufacturer in demonstrating the operation 
and performance of an active hood. 
(7) Technical Bulletin, TB 008, Windscreen Replacement for Pedestrian Testing, Version 
1.0, September 2009. This document describes exceptions on bonding agents when 
windshields are replaced during the course of a vehicle test series.  
93 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Forms. Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free SDK library for Visual Studio .NET. Independent
break pdf into smaller files; pdf split file
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
break pdf into multiple files; break password on pdf
(8) Assessment Protocol – Pedestrian Protection, Part 1 –Pedestrian Impact Assessment, 
Version 8.1, June 2015. Once all test data are collected, this protocol is used to 
determine the results. 
NHTSA intends to publish and maintain its own set of procedures and assessment 
protocols. However, the agency intends for them to be fundamentally the same as those 
described above, though some revisions will be needed to align with the agency’s current 
practices under NCAP. Among such revisions is defining how manufacturers will communicate 
with NHTSA on providing information needed to conduct tests. Also, revisions may be 
necessary to account for differences in vehicle fleet composition (i.e., test zone markup of large 
vehicles may differ slightly from Euro NCAP) or how the various test types are weighted to 
calculate the overall pedestrian protection score. NHTSA will consider whether to harmonize 
with any future revision put forth by Euro NCAP. 
4.  Test Procedures/Devices 
The pedestrian safety assessment program the agency intends to implement is derived 
from multiple tests carried out on a stationary vehicle. The procedures are meant to simulate a 
pedestrian-to-vehicle impact scenario of either a 6-year-old child or an average-size adult male 
walking across a street and being struck from the side by an oncoming vehicle traveling at 40 
km/hr (25 mph). This speed was selected by the GTR working group in the mid-2000s and is 
used as the basis for all subsequent international pedestrian regulations. It is also the target speed 
of all other NCAP procedures. The speed of 40 km/h (25 mph) was selected in part because the 
majority of pedestrian collisions occur at this speed or less. Though fatalities typically occur at 
higher speeds (70 km/h (43.5 mph) on average), a test speed above 40 km/h (25 mph) is not 
warranted due to the changing dynamics of a pedestrian-vehicle interaction as collision speeds 
94 
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's not supported tell stop.
break up pdf into individual pages; pdf splitter
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's
pdf rotate single page; break a pdf into separate pages
increase. For pedestrian-related crashes above 40 km/h (25 mph), an initial hood-to-torso 
interaction takes place in which the pedestrian tends to slide along the hood such that the head 
impact overshoots the hood and windshield. Moreover, the practicability of designing a vehicle 
front-end to achieve a high rating becomes increasingly difficult due to energy dissipation 
required as the impact increases.  
The first point of contact occurs between the front-end of the vehicle and the lateral 
aspect of an adult pedestrian’s leg near the knee region. As the lower leg becomes fully engaged 
with the vehicle front-end, contact is made between the leading edge of the hood and the lateral 
aspect of the pedestrian’s pelvis or upper leg. Then, as the lower leg is kicked forward and away 
from the front-end of the vehicle, the pedestrian’s upper body swings abruptly downward 
towards the hood whereupon the head strikes the vehicle. Depending on the size of the pedestrian 
and vehicle, the head strikes either the hood or the windshield.  
When colliding with high profile vehicles, the pedestrian’s pelvis engages early with the 
vehicle’s front structure. The upper body then rotates about the pelvis while wrapping around the 
hood. When a pedestrian is hit by a low profile vehicle, only his/her lower leg is engaged by the 
vehicle’s front structure and the head is likely to be projected onto the hood or windshield as the 
whole body rotates. The dynamic tests included in this pedestrian protection assessment program 
that the agency intends to include in this NCAP upgrade would account for both low and high 
profile vehicle impact scenarios. 
The targeted walking posture is one in which a pedestrian is side-struck. This posture was 
chosen because it represents one of the more common interactions between vehicles and 
95 
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
foreach (TwainStaticFrameSizeType frame in frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
can't cut and paste from pdf; break pdf documents
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. if (device.Compression != TwainCompressionMode.Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
break apart pdf pages; pdf format specification
pedestrians.
219
The side-struck posture is also regarded as “worst case” scenario for pedestrians 
(as in most likely to result in serious injury or death), which is supported by a recent study 
commissioned by the E.U.,
220
and the particulars for impact angle and impact velocity have been 
developed for that posture. The headforms used in the dynamic tests are hemispherical with no 
geometric characteristics for the face, which is beneficial in that the test procedure is generalized 
to mimic any head-to-hood/windshield interaction such as one resulting from a collision to a 
pedestrian who is struck from the rear while walking along the shoulder of the road.  
The agency plans to conduct this pedestrian safety assessment program through a series 
of dynamic tests in which impactors are launched into the front-end of a stationary vehicle. Three 
different types of impactors, which are described in UNECE Regulation No. 127, “Pedestrian 
protection,” would be used to assess the front end of a vehicle:  
  Headforms – Two separate hemispherical headforms are used to assess the safety 
performance of the hood, windshield, and A-pillar against a head injury to the pedestrian. 
One headform representing the head of an adult and the other the head of a 6-year-old 
child. Both measure 165 mm (6.5 in) in diameter and each has three parts: a main 
hemisphere, a vinyl covering, and an end plate. A triaxial arrangement of accelerometers 
is mounted within each. Though they look similar and their diameters are identical, the 
headforms are not the same. The adult headform is 4.5 kg (9.9 lb) and the child headform 
is 3.5 kg (7.7 lb). The injury risk associated with the headform measurement is based on 
HIC – a function of the tri-axial linear acceleration, which is well established and used in 
219
Neal-Sturgess, C. E., Carter, E., Hardy, R., Cuerden, R., Guerra, L., & Yang, J., “APROSYS European In-Depth 
Pedestrian Database,” The 20
th
International Technical Conference on the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles, 2007. 
220
Soni, A., Robert, T., & Beillas, P. (2013), “Effects of Pedestrian Pre‐Crash Reactions on Crash Outcomes during 
Multi‐body Simulations,” 2013 IRCOBI Conference, Paper No. IRC-13-92. 
96 
numerous occupant protection FMVSSs where HIC of 1000 represents a 48-percent risk 
of skull fracture.
221 
 Upper Legform – The upper legform is used to measure how well the hood leading edge 
(or the area near the junction of the hood and grille) can protect a pedestrian against a hip 
injury and potentially child head or thorax injury. The upper legform impactor is a rigid, 
foam-covered device, 350 mm (13.8 in) long with a mass of 9.5 kg (20.9 lb). The front 
member is equipped with strain gauges to measure bending moments in three positions. 
Two load transducers measure individually the forces applied at either end of the 
impactor. This test was developed by the European Experimental Vehicles Committee 
(EEVC) in the working group (WG) 7, 10, and 17. The pelvis/hip injury risk associated 
with the upper legform measurements was originally based on a series of crash 
reconstructions associating pelvis/hip injury with energy measurements.
222 223
These 
injury risk functions were subsequently assessed in a number of studies prior to inclusion 
of this test in Euro NCAP.
224 225 226 227 
221
Eppinger, R. H., Sun, E., Bandak, F., Haffner, M., Khaewpong, N., Maltese, M., Kuppa, S., Nguyen, T., 
Takhounts, E., Tannous, R., Zhang, R., & Saul, R. (1999), “Development of improved injury criteria for the 
assessment of advanced automotive restrain systems – II,” National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 
Washington, DC, November 1999. 
222
Lawrence, G., Hardy, B., & Harris, J. (1991). “Bonnet Leading Edge Subsystem Test for Cars to Assess 
Protection for Pedestrians.” The 13
th
International Technical Conference on the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles.  
223
Janssen, E., “EEVC Test Methods to Evaluate Pedestrian Protection Afforded by Passenger Cars.” The 15th  
International Technical Conference on the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles, 1996.
224
Konosu, A. et al., “A Study on Pedestrian Impact Test Procedure by Computer Simulation.” The 16th 
International Technical Conference on the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles, Paper Number 98-S10-W-19, 1998.
225
Matsui, Y. et al., “Validation of Pedestrian Upper Legform Impact Test – Reconstruction of Pedestrian 
Accidents.” The 16
th
International Technical Conference on the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles, Paper No. 98-S10-O­
05, 1998.  
226 
EEVC WG17 report (2002). “Improved Test Methods to evaluate pedestrian protection afforded by passenger  
cars”. 
227
Snedeker, J. et al. (2003). “Assessment of Pelvis and Upper Leg Injury Risk in Car-Pedestrian Collisions: 
Comparison of Accident Statistics, Impactor Tests, and a Human Body Finite Element Model.” 47
th
Stapp Car Crash 
Journal, p. 437-457. 
97 
  FlexPLI – A pedestrian leg impactor (known as FlexPLI) is used to assess the bumper 
areas’s capability to protect a pedestrian from incurring an injury to the knee and lower 
leg. The FlexPLI consists of synthetic flesh and skin material that cover two flexible 
long-bone segments (representing the femur and tibia), and a knee joint. The assembled 
impactor has a mass of 13.2 kg (29.1 lb) and is 928 mm (36.5 in) long. Bending moments 
are measured at four points along the length of the tibia and three points along the femur. 
Three transducers are installed in the knee joint to measure elongations of the medial 
collateral ligament (MCL), anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), and posterior cruciate 
ligament (PCL). Knee ligament and bone fracture injury risk functions associated with 
FlexPLI ligament elongation and tibia bending moment measurements are detailed by 
Takahashi et al. (2012).
228 
These devices and their associated launching rigs are the same as those currently in use in 
all other international NCAP pedestrian test protocols. Thus, to the extent that U.S. 
manufacturers are testing vehicles using the test procedures for international NCAP programs, 
they already likely own these devices and have experience with the test protocols. 
The contact areas, which include the vehicle front-end, the hood leading edge, the hood 
itself, and the windshield, are the main sources of injury.
229
Testing with the devices – the 
FlexPLI, the upper legform, and the headforms – would provide a means to establish separate 
safety assessment for each contact area, respectively. Multiple tests over the contact areas would 
be carried out with each device. In this manner, a grid pattern is formed over the entire front-end 
228
Takahashi, Y., et al. (2012). Development of Injury Probability Functions for the Flexible Pedestrian Legform  
Impactor. SAE Paper No. 2012-01-0277.
229 
Mallory, A., et al. (2012), “Pedestrian injuries by source: serious and disabling injuries in the U.S. and 
European Cases,” Proceedings of the 2012 AAAM Conference. 
98 
of the vehicle with safety scores established for each point. The scores are then combined to 
form an overall pedestrian safety score for the vehicle. 
NHTSA estimates that including these test procedures in NCAP would have a positive 
impact on a significant portion of pedestrian injuries and fatalities. According to FARS and 
NASS General Estimates System (GES) 2012 data, there were 3,930 pedestrian fatalities and 
65,000 pedestrian injuries that included a frontal (10 – 2 o’clock) impact with a vehicle. Figure 
VII-4 in Appendix VII indicates that 9 percent of fatalities (FARS 2012 curve) and 69 percent 
of injuries (GES 2012 curve) in 2012 occurred at or below a vehicle speed of 40 km/h (25 mph), 
which is the baseline used in Euro NCAP test procedures. When these percentages are applied 
to the total fatalities and injuries, the target populations are 354 [3,930*9%] fatalities and 
44,850 [65,000*69%] injuries. NHTSA’s most detailed collection of pedestrian crash 
information was the Pedestrian Crash Data Study (PCDS) from 1994-1998. As shown in Figure 
VII-4 in Appendix VII , PCDS indicated that 32 percent of fatalities and 78 percent of injuries 
occurred at 40 km/h or lower, which, when applied to 2012 FARS/GES totals, would result in 
higher target populations of 1,258 [3930*32%] fatalities and 50,700 [65,000*78%] injuries. 
Based on GES 2012 and PCDS data, speeds at which pedestrians are getting hit by vehicles 
today are not significantly different than impact speeds 20 years ago, which supports PCDS as a 
reasonable comparative dataset for examining the distribution of impact speeds where fatalities 
and injuries occur.
230
Thus, a reasonable range of target population for pedestrian-related crashes 
in the United States is in the range of 354 – 1,258 fatalities and 44,850 – 50,700 injuries.  
230
Differences between the low (FARS/GES) and the high (PCDS) estimates are most likely attributed to the way 
impact speed is determined: as reported by police in FARS/GES and by NHTSA accident investigative methods in 
PCDS. Considering this, PCDS estimates might appear more genuine. On the other hand, the PCDS is not 
99 
D. 
Crash Avoidance Technologies 
NHTSA believes the greatest gains in highway safety in coming years will result from 
widespread application of crash avoidance technologies. Accordingly, the agency seeks to 
expand the scope of the NCAP program to rate crash avoidance and advanced technologies that 
NHTSA believes have potential to reduce the incidence of motor vehicle crashes and incorporate 
those ratings into the star rating system. Currently, crash avoidance technologies are not included 
in the star safety rating and, instead, are listed as “Recommended Technologies” on NHTSA’s 
Safercar.gov website. As of today, the agency identifies vehicles equipped with Forward 
Collision Warning, Lane Departure Warning, and Rearview Video Systems as the 
Recommended Technologies that meet certain performance requirements.
231
When revisions to 
the NCAP program were implemented, NHTSA chose not to include crash avoidance tests in the 
star safety ratings based, in part, on comments submitted by manufacturers, trade associations, 
consumer groups, public health groups, and public citizens.
232
Initial market research in 2008 
was inconclusive, but later market research in 2012 suggested that consumers may have lacked 
sufficient knowledge about advanced technologies prompting NHTSA to delay the incorporation 
considered a representative sample of the entire population and may be biased toward lower speed collisions.  This 
would have the effect of inflating PCDS estimates of collisions under 40 km/hr. Also, any general improvement over 
time in vehicle design for pedestrian protection would be reflected in the (new, lower) FARS/GES estimates. Thus, 
the ranges given above are appropriate high and low bounds. 
231
Initially, NHTSA identified vehicles equipped with Electronic Stability Control (ESC), Forward Collision 
Warning and Lane Departure Warning as the Recommended Technologies in the prior round of revisions to the 
NCAP program, which began with MY 2011. ESC is now a required safety system on vehicles with a gross vehicle 
weight rating of 10,000 pounds or less. Beginning with MY2014, ESC was removed from the list of Recommended 
Technologies and Rearview Video Systems was added. 
232
On January 25, 2007 (see 72 FR 3472), NHTSA announced a Public Meeting (held March 7, 2007) and requested 
comments on a report titled, “The New Car Assessment Program Suggested Approaches for Future Program 
Enhancements.” Docket No. NHTSA-2006-26555 contains this report (file ID NHTSA-2006-26555-0005), the 
meeting transcript (file ID NHTSA-2006-26555-0093) and all of the comments, In the 2008 NCAP upgrade notice 
(73 FR 40016, 40033, July 11, 2008), the agency stated most [Public Meeting] commenters supported the proposal 
to implement a crash avoidance rating program. At that time, the agency decided to promote a selection of beneficial 
crash avoidance technologies and to defer implementation of a quantified rating system.  
100 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested