asp net pdf viewer control c# : Add page break to pdf Library control API .net web page wpf sharepoint nistir-73871-part163

Acknowledgements  
The authors, Rick Ayers, Wayne Jansen, Aurelien Delaitre, and Ludovic Moenner wish to 
express their gratitude to colleagues who reviewed drafts of this document.  In particular, their 
appreciation goes to Karen Scarfone, Murugiah Souppaya and Tim Grance from NIST, Rick 
Mislan from Purdue University, and Lee Reiber from Mobile Forensics for their research, 
technical support, and written contributions to this document.  The authors would also like to 
express thanks to all others who assisted with our internal review process. 
This report was sponsored in part by Dr. Bert Coursey of the Department of Homeland Security 
(DHS). The Department’s support and guidance in this effort are greatly appreciated. 
xi
Add page break to pdf - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
cannot print pdf no pages selected; pdf split
Add page break to pdf - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
acrobat split pdf pages; pdf split pages
Introduction  
Computer forensics involves the identification, preservation, extraction, documentation, and 
analysis of computer data.  Computer forensic examiners follow clear, well-defined 
methodologies and procedures that can be adapted for specific situations.  Such methodologies 
consist of the following steps: 
•  Prepare a forensic copy (i.e., an identical bit-for-bit physical copy) of the acquired digital 
media, while preserving the acquired media’s integrity. 
•  Examine the forensic copy to recover information. 
•  Analyze the recovered information and develop a report documenting any pertinent 
information uncovered. 
Forensic toolkits are intended to facilitate the work of examiners, allowing them to perform the 
above steps in a timely and structured manner, and improve the quality of the results.  This paper 
discusses available forensic software tools for handheld cellular devices, highlighting the 
facilities offered and associated capabilities.   
Forensic software tools strive to address a wide range of applicable devices and handle the most 
common investigative situations with modest skill level requirements.  These tools typically 
perform logical acquisitions using common protocols for synchronization, debugging, and 
communications. More complicated situations, such as the recovery of deleted data, often 
require highly specialized hardware-based tools and expertise, which is not within the scope of 
this report. 
Handheld device forensics is a fairly new and emerging subject area within the computer 
forensics field, which traditionally emphasized individual workstations and network servers.    
Discrepancies between handheld device forensics and classical computer forensics exist due to 
several factors, including the following, which constrain the way in which the tools operate: 
•  The orientation toward mobility (e.g., compact size and battery powered, requiring 
specialized interfaces, media, and hardware) 
•  The filesystem residing in volatile memory versus non-volatile memory on certain 
systems 
•  Hibernation behavior, suspending processes when powered off or idle, but remaining 
active 
•  The diverse variety of embedded operating systems used 
•  Short product cycles for introducing new handheld devices 
Most cell phones offer comparable sets of basic capabilities.  However, the various families of 
devices on the marketplace differ in such areas as the hardware technology, advanced feature set, 
and physical format.  This paper looks at forensic software tools for a number of popular 
platforms, including Symbian, Research In Motion (RIM), Pocket PC, and Palm OS devices.  
Together these platforms comprise the majority of the so-called smart phone devices currently 
available and in use. More basic phones, produced by various manufacturers and operational on 
various types of cellular networks are also addressed in the paper.     
1
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Add necessary references to your C# project: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
a pdf page cut; break pdf
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
Add necessary references to your C# project: a document"); default: Console.WriteLine(" Fail: unknown error"); break; }. code just convert first word page to Png
break apart pdf pages; split pdf into multiple files
The remaining sections provide an overview of cell phones, memory cards, and forensic toolkits; 
describe the scenarios used to analyze the various tools and toolkits; present the findings from 
applying the scenarios; and summarize the conclusions drawn.  The reader is assumed to have 
some background in computer forensics and technology.  The reader should also be apprised that 
the tools discussed in the report are rapidly evolving, with new versions and better capabilities 
available regularly. The tool manufacturer should always be contacted for up-to-date 
information.  
2  
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
break a pdf into smaller files; combine pages of pdf documents into one
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function.
break pdf into pages; break a pdf into parts
Background  
Cell phones are highly mobile communications devices that can do an array of functions ranging 
from that of a simple digital organizer to that of a low-end personal computer.  Designed for 
mobility, they are compact in size, battery powered, and lightweight, often use proprietary 
interfaces or operating systems, and may have unique hardware characteristics for product 
differentiation. Overall, they can be classified as basic phones that are primarily simple voice 
and messaging communication devices; advanced phones that offer additional capabilities and 
services for multimedia; and smart phones or high-end phones that merge the capabilities of an 
advanced phone with those of a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA).  
Figure 1 gives an overview of the hardware characteristics of basic, advanced, and high-end cell 
phones for display quality, processing and storage capacity, memory and I/O expansion, built-in 
communications, and video and image capture.  The bottom of the diagram shows the range of 
cellular voice and data advances from kilobit analog networks, still in use today, to megabit 3
rd 
generation digital networks in the planning and early deployment stages.  The diagram attempts 
to illustrate that more capable phones can capture and retain not only more information, but also 
more varied information, through a wider variety of sources, including removable memory 
modules, other wireless interfaces, and built-in hardware.  Note that hardware components can 
and do vary from those assignments made in the diagram and, over time, technology once 
considered high end or advanced eventually appears in what would then be considered a basic 
phone. 
Figure 1: Phone Hardware Components 
Just as with hardware components, software components involved in communications vary with 
the class of phone. Basic phones normally include text messaging using the Short Message 
Service (SMS). An advanced phone might add the ability to send simple picture messages or 
3
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
properties using C# TWAIN image acquiring library add-on step by device. TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE)
pdf rotate single page; split pdf by bookmark
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
are three parts on this page, including system Add the following C# demo code to device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod
cannot print pdf file no pages selected; break pdf into multiple pages
lengthy text messages using the Extended Message Service (EMS), while a high-end phone 
typically supports the Multimedia Message Service (MMS) to exchange sounds, color images, 
and text. Similarly, the ability to chat online directly with another user may be unsupported, 
supported through a dedicated SMS channel, or supported with a full Instant Messaging (IM) 
client. High-end phones typically support full function email and Web clients that respectively 
use Post Office Protocol (POP)/Internet Message Access Protocol (IMAP)/Simple Mail Transfer 
Protocol (SMTP) and HTTP, while advanced phones provide those services via Wireless 
Application Protocol (WAP), and basic phones do not include any support.  Figure 2 gives an 
overview of the capabilities usually associated with each class of phone. 
Figure 2: Phone Software Components 
Most basic and many advanced phones rely on proprietary real-time operating systems 
developed by the manufacturer.  Commercially embedded operating systems for cellular devices 
are also available that range from a basic preemptive scheduler with support for a few other key 
system calls to more sophisticated kernels with scheduling alternatives, memory management 
support, device drivers, and exception handling, to complete embedded real-time operating 
systems.  The bottom of Figure 2 illustrates this range. 
Many high-end smart phones have a PDA heritage, evolving from Palm OS and Pocket PC (also 
known as Windows mobile) handheld devices.  As wireless telephony modules were 
incorporated into such devices, the operating system capabilities were enhanced to accommodate 
the functionality. Similarly, the Symbian OS used on many smart phones also stems from an 
electronic organizer heritage. RIM OS devices, which emphasize push technology for email 
messaging, are another device family that also falls into the smart phone category.   
4  
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. acquire image to file using our C#.NET TWAIN Add-On Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
pdf file specification; break pdf password
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
be found at this tutorial page of how TWAIN image scanning control add-on owns TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
break up pdf file; acrobat split pdf bookmark
Subscriber Identity Module  
Another useful way to classify cellular devices is by whether they involve a Subscriber Identity 
Module (SIM). A SIM is removable card designed for insertion into a device, such as a handset.  
SIMs originated with a set of specifications originally developed by the Conference of European 
Posts and Telecommunications (CEPT) and continued by the European Telecommunications 
Standards Institute (ETSI) for Global System for Mobile communications (GSM) networks.  
GSM standards mandate the use of a SIM for the operation of the phone.  Without it, a GSM 
phone cannot operate.  In contrast, present-day Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) phones 
do not require a SIM. Instead, SIM functionality is incorporated directly within the device.   
A SIM is an essential component of a GSM cell phone that contains information particular to the 
user. A SIM is a special type of smart card that typically contains between 16 to 64 kilobytes 
(KB) of memory, a processor, and an operating system.  A SIM uniquely identifies the 
subscriber, determines the phone's number, and contains the algorithms needed to authenticate a 
subscriber to a network. A user can remove the SIM from one phone, insert it into another 
compatible phone, and resume use without the need to involve the network operator.  The 
hierarchically organized filesystem of a SIM is used to store names and phone numbers, received 
and sent text messages, and network configuration information.  Depending on the phone, some 
of this information may also coexist in the memory of the phone or reside entirely in the memory 
of the phone instead of the SIM. While SIMs are most widely used in GSM systems, compatible 
modules are also used in Integrated Digital Enhanced Network (IDEN) phones and Universal 
Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) user equipment (i.e., a Universal Subscriber 
Identity Module [USIM]).  Because of the flexibility a SIM offers GSM phone users to port their 
identity and information between devices, eventually all cellular phones are expected to include 
SIM capability. 
Though two sizes of SIMs have been standardized, only the smaller size shown at left is 
broadly used in GSM phones today. The module has a width of 25 mm, a height of 15 
mm, and a thickness of .76 mm, which is roughly the size of a postage stamp.  Its 8-pin 
connectors are not aligned along a bottom edge as might be expected, but instead form a 
circular contact pad integral to the smart card chip, which is embedded in a plastic frame.  Also, 
the slot for the SIM card is normally not accessible from the exterior of the phone as with a 
memory card.  When a SIM is inserted into a phone and pin contact is made, a serial interface is 
used to communicate with the computing platform using a half-duplex protocol.  SIMs can be 
removed from a phone and read using a specialized SIM card reader and software.  A SIM can 
also be placed in a standard-size smart card adapter and read using a conventional smart card 
reader. 
As with any smart card, its contents are protected and a PIN can be set to restrict access.  Two 
PINs exist, sometimes called PIN1 and PIN2 or CHV1 and CHV2.  These PINs can be modified 
or disabled by the user. The SIM allows only a preset number of attempts, usually three, to enter 
the correct PIN before further attempts are blocked.  Entering the correct PIN Unblocking Key 
(PUK) resets the PIN number and the attempt counter.  The PUK can be obtained from the 
service provider or the network operator based on the SIM’s identity (i.e., its Integrated Circuit 
Card Identifier [ICCID]). If the number of attempts to enter the PUK correctly exceeds a set 
limit, normally ten attempts, the card becomes blocked permanently.   
5
Removable Media  
Removable media extends the storage capacity of a cell phone, allowing individuals to store 
additional information beyond the device’s built-in capacity.  They also provide another avenue 
for sharing information between users that have compatible hardware.  Removable media is non-
volatile storage, able to retain recorded data when removed from a device.  The main type of 
removable media for cell phones is a memory card.  Though similar to SIMs in size, they follow 
a different set of specifications and have vastly different characteristics.  Some card 
specifications also allow for I/O capabilities to support wireless communications (e.g., Bluetooth 
or WiFi) or other hardware (e.g., a camera) to be packaged in the same format. 
A wide array of memory cards exists on the market today for cell phones and other mobile 
devices. The storage capacities of memory cards range from megabytes (MB) to gigabytes (GB) 
and come in sizes literally as small as a thumbnail.  As technological advances continue, such 
media is expected to become smaller and offer greater storage densities.  Fortunately, such media 
is normally formatted with a conventional filesystem (e.g., File Allocation Table [FAT]) and can 
be treated similarly to a disk drive, imaged and analyzed using a conventional forensic tool with 
a compatible media adapter that supports an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) 
interface. Such adapters can be used with a write blocker to ensure that the contents remain 
unaltered. Below is a brief overview of several commonly available types of memory cards used 
with cell phones. 
Multi-Media Cards (MMC):
A Multi-Media Card (MMC) is a solid-state disk card with a 7-pin connector.  MMC 
cards have a 1-bit data bus. They are designed with flash technology, a non-volatile 
storage technology that retains information once power is removed from the card.  
Multi-Media Cards are about the size of a postage stamp (length-32 mm, width-24 mm, and 
thickness-1.4 mm).  Reduced Size Multi-Media cards (RS-MMC) also exist.  They are 
approximately one-half the size of the standard MMC card (length-18mm, width-24mm, and 
thickness-1.4mm).  An RS-MMC can be used in a full-size MMC slot with a mechanical adapter. 
A regular MMC card can be also used in an RS-MMC card slot, though part of it will stick out 
from the slot.  MMCplus and MMCmobile are higher performance variants of MMC and RS-
MMC cards respectively that have 13-pin connectors and 8-bit data buses. 
Secure Digital (SD) Cards:
Secure Digital (SD) memory cards (length-32 mm, width-24 mm, and thickness-
2.1mm) are comparable to the size and solid-state design of MMC cards.  In fact, SD 
card slots can often accommodate MMC cards as well.  However, SD cards have a 9-
pin connector and a 4-bit data bus, which afford a higher transfer rate.  SD memory cards feature 
an erasure-prevention switch; keeping the switch in the locked position protects data from 
accidental deletion.  They also offer security controls for content protection (i.e., Content 
Protection Rights Management).  MiniSD cards are an electrically compatible extension of the 
existing SD card standard in a more compact format (length-21.5 mm, width-20 mm, and 
1
Image courtesy of Lexar Media.  Used by permission. 
2
Image courtesy of Lexar Media.  Used by permission. 
6
thickness-1.4 mm).  They run on the same hardware bus as an SD card and also include content 
protection security features, but have a 11-pin connector and a smaller capacity potential due to 
size limitations.  For backward compatibility, an adapter allows a MiniSD Card to work with 
existing SD card slots. 
Memory Sticks:
Memory sticks provide solid-state memory in a size similar to, but smaller than, a stick 
of gum (length-50mm, width-21.45mm, thickness-2.8mm).  They have a 10-pin 
connector and a 1-bit data bus. As with SD cards, memory sticks also have a built-in 
erasure-prevention switch to protect the contents of the card.  Memory Stick PRO cards 
offer higher capacity and transfer rates than standard Memory Sticks, using a 10-pin 
connector, but with a 4-bit data bus. Memory Stick Duo and Memory Stick PRO Duo, smaller 
versions of the Memory Stick and Memory Stick PRO, are about two-thirds the size of the 
standard memory stick (length-31mm, width-20mm, thickness-1.6mm).  An adapter is required 
for a Memory Stick Duo or a Memory Stick PRO Duo to work with standard Memory Stick 
slots. 
TransFlash:
TransFlash, recently renamed MicroSD, is an extremely small size card (length-15 mm, 
width-11 mm, and thickness-1 mm).  Because frequent removal and handling can be 
awkward, they are used more as a semi-removable memory module.  TransFlash cards have an 
8-pin connector and a 4-bit data bus.  An adapter allows a TransFlash card to be used in SD-
enabled devices. Similarly, the MMCmicro device is another ultra small card (length-14 mm, 
width-12 mm, and thickness-1.1 mm), compatible with MMC-enabled devices via an adapter.  
MMCmicro cards have a 11-pin connector and a 4-bit data bus.  More recently, the Memory 
Stick Micro card has emerged, which is also ultra small (length-12.5 mm, width-15 mm, and 
thickness-1.2 mm) and, with an appropriate mechanical adaptor, able to be used in devices 
supporting fuller size cards in the Memory Stick family.  Memory Stick Micro cards have an 11-
pin connector and a 4-bit data bus 
3
Image courtesy of Lexar Media.  Used by permission. 
4
Image courtesy of SanDisk.  Used by permission. 
7  
Forensic Toolkits  
The variety of forensic toolkits for cell phones and other handheld devices is diverse.  A 
considerable number of software tools and toolkits exist, but the range of devices over which 
they operate is typically narrowed to distinct platforms for a manufacturer’s product line, a 
family of operating systems, or a type of hardware architecture.  Moreover, the tools require that 
the examiner have full access to the device (i.e., the device is not protected by some 
authentication mechanism or the examiner can satisfy any authentication mechanism 
encountered). 
While most toolkits support a full range of acquisition, examination, and reporting functions, 
some tools focus on a subset.  Similarly, different tools may be capable of using different 
interfaces (e.g., Infrared [IR], Bluetooth, or serial cable) to acquire device contents.  The types of 
information a tool can acquire can range widely and include Personal Information Management 
(PIM) data (e.g., phone book); logs of phone calls; SMS/EMS/MMS messages, email, and IM 
content; URLs and content of visited Web sites; audio, video, and image content; SIM content; 
and uninterrupted image data.  Information present on a cell phone can vary depending on 
several factors, including the following: 
• The inherent capabilities of the phone implemented by the manufacturer 
• The modifications made to the phone by the service provider or network operator 
• The network services subscribed to and used by the user 
• The modifications made to the phone by the user 
Acquisition through a cable interface generally yields acquisition results superior to those from 
other device interfaces.  However, although a wireless interface such as infrared or Bluetooth can 
serve as an alternative when the correct cable is not readily available, it should be used as a last 
resort due to the possibility of device modification during acquisition.  Regardless of the 
interface used, one must be vigilant about any associated forensic issues.  Note too that the 
ability to acquire the contents of a resident SIM may not be supported by some tools, particularly 
those strongly oriented toward PDAs. Table 1 lists open source and commercially available 
tools and the facilities they provide for certain types of cell phones.   
Table 1: Cell Phone Tools 
Function 
Features 
Device Seizure 
Acquisition, 
Examination, Reporting 
• Targets Palm OS, Pocket PC, RIM OS 
phones and certain models of GSM, TDMA, 
and CDMA devices 
• Supports recovery of internal and external 
SIM 
• Supports only cable interface 
pilot-link 
Acquisition 
• Targets Palm OS phones 
• Open source non-forensic software 
• No support for recovering SIM information 
• Supports only cable interface  
8
Function 
Features 
GSM .XRY 
Acquisition, 
Examination, Reporting 
• Targets certain models of GSM and CDMA 
phones 
• Internal and external SIM support 
• Requires PC/SC-compatible smart card 
reader for external SIM cards 
• Cable, Bluetooth, and IR interfaces supported 
• Supports radio-isolation SIM creation with 
proprietary card 
Oxygen PM 
(forensic version) 
Acquisition, 
Examination, Reporting 
• Targets certain models of GSM phones 
• Supports only internal SIM acquisition  
MOBILedit! 
Forensic 
Acquisition, 
Examination, Reporting 
• Targets certain models of GSM phones 
• Internal and external SIM support 
• Supports cable and IR interfaces 
BitPIM 
Acquisition, 
Examination 
• Targets certain models of CDMA phones 
• Open source software with write-blocking 
capabilities 
• No support for recovering SIM information 
TULP2G 
Acquisition, Reporting 
• Targets GSM and CDMA phones that use the 
supported protocols to establish connectivity 
• Internal and external SIM support 
• Requires PC/SC-compatible smart card 
reader for external SIM cards 
• Cable, Bluetooth, and IR interfaces supported 
• Supports radio-isolation SIM creation with 
GEM Xpresso card 
SecureView 
Acquisition, 
Examination, Reporting 
• Targets GSM, CDMA and TDMA phones 
that use the supported protocols to establish 
connectivity 
• Internal and external SIM support 
• Requires PC/SC-compatible smart card 
reader for external SIM cards 
• Cable, Bluetooth, and IR interfaces supported 
PhoneBase2 
Acquisition, 
Examination, Reporting 
• Targets GSM and CDMA phones that use the 
supported protocols to establish connectivity 
• External SIM support 
• Requires PC/SC-compatible smart card 
reader for external SIM cards 
• Cable, Bluetooth, and IR interfaces supported 
CellDEK 
Acquisition, 
Examination, Reporting 
• Targets GSM and CDMA phones that use the 
supported protocols to establish connectivity 
• Internal and external SIM support 
• Built in PC/SC-compatible smart card reader 
for external SIM cards 
• Cable, Bluetooth and IR interfaces supported 
9  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested