asp net pdf viewer control c# : Break pdf into pages software SDK dll windows wpf web page web forms nistir-73873-part172

Device Seizure 
Pilot-link 
GSM .XRY
OPM
Mobiledit!
TULP2G
BitPIM
SecureView
PhoneBase2 
CellDEK 
Kyocera 7135 
LG4015 
Motorola C333 
Motorola MPX220 
Motorola V66 
X X 
Motorola V300 
X X 
Nokia 3390 
Nokia 6200 
Nokia 6610i 
X X 
Nokia 7610 
Samsung i700 
Samsung SGH-i300 
Sanyo 8200 
Sony Ericsson P910a 
Treo 600 
Though SIMs are highly standardized, their content can vary among network operators and 
service providers. For example, a network operator might create an additional file on the SIM 
for use in its operations or might install an application to provide a unique service.  SIMs may 
also be classified according to the “phase” of the GSM standards that they support.  The three 
phases defined are phase 1, phase 2, and phase 2+, which correspond roughly to first, second, 
and 2.5 generation network facilities.  Another class of SIMs in early deployment is Universal 
SIMs (USIMS) used in third generation (3G) networks.   
Except for pay-as-you-go phones, each GSM phone was matched with a SIM that offered 
services compatible with the phone’s capabilities.  Only a subset of the SIMs used in the phone 
scenarios were used for the SIM scenarios. Table 5 lists the identifier and phase of the SIMs 
used in that analysis, the associated network operator, and some of the associated network 
*
Acquisition is supported only for non pay-as-you go carriers 
20  
Break pdf into pages - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break apart pdf pages; acrobat split pdf bookmark
Break pdf into pages - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
pdf format specification; break a pdf file
services activated on the SIM. Except for pay-as-you-go phones, each GSM phone was matched 
with a SIM that offered services compatible with the phone’s capabilities. 
Table 5: SIMs 
SIM 
Phase 
Network 
Services 
1144 
2 - profile 
download 
required 
AT&T 
Abbreviated Dialing Numbers (ADN) 
Fixed Dialing Numbers (FDN) 
Short Message Storage (SMS) 
Last Numbers Dialed (LND) 
General Packet Radio Service (GPRS) 
8778 
2- profile 
download 
required 
Cingular 
Abbreviated Dialing Numbers (ADN) 
Fixed Dialing Numbers (FDN) 
Short Message Storage (SMS) 
Last Numbers Dialed (LND) 
Group Identifier Level 1 (GID1) 
Group Identifier Level 2 (GID2) 
Service Dialing Numbers (SDN) 
General Packet Radio Service (GPRS) 
5343 
2 - profile 
download 
required 
T-Mobile 
Abbreviated Dialing Numbers (ADN) 
Fixed Dialing Numbers (FDN) 
Short Message Storage (SMS) 
Last Numbers Dialed (LND) 
General Packet Radio Service (GPRS) 
Overall, SIM forensic tools do not recover every possible item on a SIM.  While a few tools aim 
to recover all information present, most concentrate on a subset considered most useful as 
forensic evidence. The breadth of coverage varies considerably among tools.  Table 6 entries 
provide an overview of those items recovered, listed at the left, by the various SIM forensic 
tools, listed across the top. 
21  
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class.
pdf will no pages selected; pdf no pages selected
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Offer PDF page break inserting function. PDF document editor library control, RasterEdge XDoc.PDF, offers easy to add & insert an (empty) page into an existing
pdf split and merge; break pdf into separate pages
Table 6: Content Recovery Coverage 
Device Seizure 
GSM .XRY
Mobiledit!
TULP2G
FCR
ForensicSIM
SIMCon
SIMIS2
SecureView
PhoneBase2 
CellDEK
USIMdetective 
International Mobile 
Subscriber Identity – IMSI 
Integrated Circuit Card 
Identifier – ICCID 
Mobile Subscriber ISDN – 
MSISDN 
Service Provider Name – 
SPN 
Phase Identification – 
Phase 
SIM Service Table – SST 
Language Preference – LP 
X X X 
Abbreviated Dialing 
Numbers – ADN 
X X X X X X X X X X X X 
Last Numbers Dialed – 
LND 
X X X X X X X X 
X X X 
Short Message Service – 
SMS 
• Read/Unread 
• 
Deleted 
PLMN selector – PLMNsel 
Forbidden PLMNs – 
FPLMNs 
Location Information – 
LOCI 
GPRS Location 
Information - GPRSLOCI 
22  
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Success"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
reader split pdf; break pdf into pages
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. is not a document"); default: Console.WriteLine("Fail: unknown error"); break; }. This demo code convert word file all pages to Jpeg
break up pdf into individual pages; break pdf into multiple files
Scenarios 
The scenarios define a set of prescribed activities used to gauge the capabilities of the forensic 
tool to recover information from a phone, beginning with connectivity and acquisition and 
moving progressively toward more interesting situations involving common applications, file 
formats, and device settings.  The scenarios are not intended to be exhaustive or to serve as a 
formal product evaluation.  However, they attempt to cover a range of situations commonly 
encountered when examining a device (e.g., data obfuscation, data hiding, data purging) and are 
useful in determining the features and functionality afforded an examiner. 
Table 7 gives an overview of these scenarios, which are generic to all devices that have cellular 
phone capabilities. For each scenario listed, a description of its purpose, method of execution, 
and expected results are summarized.  Note that the expectations are comparable to those an 
examiner would have when dealing with the contents of a hard disk drive as opposed to a 
PDA/cell phone. Though the characteristics of the two are quite different, the recovery and 
analysis of information from a hard drive is a well-understood baseline for comparison and 
pedagogical purposes. Moreover, comparable means of digital evidence recovery from most 
phones exist, such as desoldering and removing non-volatile memory and reading out the 
contents with a suitable device programmer.  Also note that none of the scenarios attempt to 
confirm whether the integrity of the data on a device is preserved when applying a tool – that 
topic is outside the scope of this document. 
Table 7: Phone Scenarios 
Scenario 
Description 
Connectivity and Retrieval Determine whether the tool can successfully connect to the device and 
retrieve content from it. 
• Enable user authentication on the device before acquisition, 
requiring a PIN, password, or other known authentication 
information to be supplied for access. 
• Initiate the tool on a forensic workstation, attempt to connect with 
the device and acquire its contents, verify that the results are 
consistent with the known characteristics of the device. 
• Expect that the authentication mechanism(s) can be satisfied 
without affecting the tool, and information residing on the device 
can be retrieved. 
PIM Applications 
Determine whether the tool can find information, including deleted 
information, associated with Personal Information Management (PIM) 
applications such as phone book and date book. 
• Create various types of PIM files on the device, selectively delete 
some entries, acquire the contents of the device, locate and display 
the information. 
• Expect that all PIM-related information on the device can be found 
and reported, if not previously deleted.  Expect that remnants of 
deleted information can be recovered and reported. 
23
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
can set and integrate this duplex scanning feature into your C# device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device
split pdf into multiple files; break a pdf
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
how to install XImage.Twain into visual studio RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device. TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE
pdf insert page break; break password pdf
Dialed/Received Phone 
Calls 
Determine whether the tool can find dialed and received phone calls, 
including unanswered and deleted calls. 
• Place and receive various calls to and from different numbers, 
selectively delete some entries, acquire the contents of the device, 
locate and display dialed and received calls. 
• Expect that all dialed and received phone calls on the device can be 
recognized and reported, if not previously deleted.  Expect that 
remnants of deleted information can be recovered and reported. 
SMS/MMS Messaging 
Determine whether the tool can find placed and received SMS/MMS 
messages, including deleted messages. 
• Place and receive both SMS and MMS messages, selectively delete 
some messages, acquire the contents of the device, locate and 
display all messages. 
• Expect that all sent and received SMS/MMS messages on the 
device can be recognized and reported, if not previously deleted.  
Expect that remnants of deleted information can be recovered and 
reported. 
Internet Messaging 
Determine whether the tool can find sent and received email and Instant 
Message (IM) messages, including deleted messages. 
• Send and receive both IM and email messages, selectively delete 
some messages, acquire the contents of the device, locate and 
display all messages. 
• Expect that all sent and received IM and messages on the device 
can be recognized and reported, if not previously deleted.  Expect 
that remnants of deleted information can be recovered and reported. 
Web Applications 
Determine whether the tool can find a visited Web site and information 
exchanged over the internet. 
• Use the device to visit specific Web sites and perform queries,  
selectively delete some data, acquire the contents of the device 
locate and display the URLs of visited sites and any associated data 
acquired (e.g., images, text). 
• Expect that information about most recent Web activity can be 
found and reported.   
Text File Formats 
Determine whether the tool can find and display a compilation of text files 
residing on the device, including deleted files. 
• Load the device with various types of text files (via email and 
device synchronization protocols) selectively delete some files, 
acquire the contents of the device, find and report the data. 
• Expect that all files with common text file formats (i.e., .txt, .doc, 
.pdf) can be found and reported, if not deleted.  Expect that 
remnants of deleted information can be recovered and reported. 
24  
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
you want to acquire an image directly into the C# RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
break a pdf apart; pdf split pages
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
foreach (TwainStaticFrameSizeType frame in frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
break a pdf into multiple files; split pdf into individual pages
Graphics File Formats 
Determine whether the tool can find and display a compilation of the 
graphics formatted files residing on the device, including deleted files. 
• Load the device with various types of graphics files, (via email and 
device synchronization protocols) selectively delete some files, 
acquire the contents of the device, locate and display the images. 
• Expect that all files with common graphics files formats (i.e., .bmp, 
.jpg, .gif, .tif, and .png) can be found, reported, and 
collectively displayed, if not deleted.  Expect that remnants of 
deleted information can be recovered and reported. 
Compressed Archive File 
Formats 
Determine whether the tool can find text, images, and other information 
located within compressed-archive formatted files (i.e., .zip, .rar, .tar, 
.tgz, and self-extracting .exe) residing on the device. 
• Load the device with various types of file archives (via email and 
device synchronization protocols) acquire the contents of the 
device, find and display selected filenames and file contents. 
• Expect that text, images, and other information contained in the 
compressed archive formatted files can be found and reported. 
Misnamed Files 
Determine whether the tool can recognize file types by header information 
instead of file extension, and find common text and graphics formatted files 
that have been misnamed with misleading extensions. 
• Load the device (via email and device synchronization protocols) 
with various types of common text (e.g., .txt) and graphics files 
(e.g., .bmp, .jpg, .gif, and .png) that have been purposely 
misnamed, acquire the contents of the device, locate and display 
selected text and images. 
• Expect that all misnamed text and graphics files residing on the 
device can be recognized, reported, and, for images, displayed. 
Peripheral Memory Cards Determine whether the tool can acquire individual files stored on a memory 
card inserted into the device and whether deleted files can be identified and 
recovered. 
• Insert a formatted memory card containing text, graphics, archive, 
and misnamed files into an appropriate slot on the device, delete 
some files, acquire the contents of the device, find and display 
selected files and file contents, including deleted files. 
• Expect that the files on the memory card, including deleted files, 
can be properly acquired, found, and reported in the same way as 
expected with on-device memory. 
Acquisition Consistency 
Determine whether the tool provides consistent hashes on files resident on 
the device for two back-to-back acquisitions 
• Acquire the contents of the device and create a hash over the 
memory, for physical acquisitions, and over individual files, for 
logical acquisitions. 
• Expect that hashes over the individual file hashes are consistent 
between the two acquisitions, but inconsistent for the memory 
hashes. 
25  
Cleared Devices 
Determine whether the tool can acquire any user information from the 
device or peripheral memory after a hard reset has been performed. 
• Perform a hard reset on the device, acquire its contents, and find 
and display previously available filenames and file contents. 
• Expect that no user files, except those contained on a peripheral 
memory card, if present, can be recovered.   
Power Loss 
Determine if the tool can acquire any user information from the device after 
it has been completely drained of power. 
• Completely drain the device of power by exhausting the battery or 
removing the battery overnight and then replacing, acquire device 
contents, and find and display previously available filenames and 
file contents. 
• Expect that no user files, except those contained on a peripheral 
memory card, if present, can be recovered. 
A distinct set of scenarios was developed for SIM forensic tools.  The SIM scenarios differ from 
the phone scenarios in several ways. SIMs are highly standardized devices with relatively 
uniform interfaces, behavior, and content.  All of the SIM tools broadly support any SIM for 
acquisition via an external reader.  Thus, the emphasis in these scenarios is on loading the 
memory of the SIM with specific kinds of information for recovery, rather than the memory of 
the handset. Once a scenario is completed using a suitable GSM phone or SIM management 
program, the SIM can be processed by each of the SIM tools in succession.  Table 8 gives an 
overview of the SIM scenarios, including their purpose, method of execution, and expected 
results. 
Table 8: SIM Scenarios 
Scenario 
Description 
Basic Data 
Determine whether the tool can recover subscriber (i.e., IMSI, ICCID, SPN, 
and LP elementary files), PIM (i.e., ADN elementary file), call (i.e., LND 
elementary file), and SMS message related information on the SIM, 
including deleted entries, and whether all of the data is properly decoded 
and displayed.   
• Populate the SIM with known PIM, call, and SMS message related 
information that can be verified after acquisition; then remove the 
SIM for acquisition and analysis. 
• Expect that all information residing on the SIM can be successfully 
acquired and reported. 
Location Data 
Determine whether the tool can recover location-related information (i.e., 
LOCI, LOCIGPRS, and FPLMN elementary files) on the SIM and whether 
all of the data is properly decoded and displayed.  Location information can 
indicate where the device was last used for a particular service and other 
networks it might have encountered. 
• Register location-related data maintained by the network on the 
SIM by performing voice and data operations at known locations, 
then remove the SIM for acquisition and analysis. 
• Expect that all location-related information can be successfully 
acquired and reported. 
26  
Scenario 
Description 
EMS Data 
Determine whether the tool can recover EMS messages over 160 characters 
in length and containing non-textual content, and whether all of the data is 
properly decoded and displayed for both active and deleted messages.  EMS 
messages can convey pictures and sounds, as well as formatted text, as a 
series of concatenated SMS messages. 
• Populate the SIM with known EMS content that can be verified 
after acquisition; then remove the SIM for acquisition and analysis. 
• Expect that EMS messages can be successfully acquired and 
reported. 
Foreign Language Data 
Determine whether the tool can recover SMS messages and PIM data from 
the SIM that are in a foreign language, and whether all of the data is 
properly decoded and displayed.   
• Populate the SIM with known SMS and PIM content that can be 
verified after acquisition; then remove the SIM for acquisition and 
analysis. 
• Expect that foreign language data can be successfully acquired and 
reported. 
The chapters that follow provide a brief discussion on tools previously covered in NISTIR 7250 – 
Cell Phone Forensic Tools: An Overview and Analysis and a detailed synopsis on tools not 
previously covered as well as ones that have undergone significant updates.  A summary of the 
results of applying the above scenarios to the target devices determines the extent to which a 
given tool meets the expectations listed.  The tool synopsis concentrates on several core 
functional areas: acquisition, search, graphics library, and reporting, and also other useful 
features such as tagging uncovered evidence with a bookmark.   
The scenario results for each tool are weighed against the predefined expectations defined above 
in Table 7 and Table 8, and assigned a ranking.  The entry “Meet” indicates that the software met 
the expectations of the scenario for the device in question.  Since the scenarios are acquisition 
oriented, this ranking generally means that all of the identified data was successfully recovered.  
One caveat is that some phones lack the capability to handle certain data prescribed under a 
scenario, in which case the ranking applies only to the relevant subset.  Similarly, the entry 
“Below” indicates that the software fell short of fully meeting expectations, while “Above” 
indicates that the software surpassed expectations.   
A “Below” ranking is often a consequence of a tool performing a logical acquisition and being 
unable to recover deleted data, which is understandable.  However, the ranking may also be due 
to active data placed on the device not being successfully recovered, which is more of a concern.  
An “Above” ranking is typically a result associated with the characteristics of a device, such as 
the reset function not completely deleting data and leaving remnants for recovery by the tool.  
“Above” rankings should only occur with the last two phone scenarios: Cleared Devices and 
Power Loss. The entry “Miss” indicates that the software unsuccessfully met any expectations, 
highlighting a potential area for improvement.  Finally, the entry “NA” indicates that a particular 
scenario was not applicable to the device. 
27  
Synopsis of Device Seizure  
Device Seizure version 1.1
5
is able to acquire information from Pocket PC, Palm OS, and 
BlackBerry devices, including those with cellular capabilities, SIM cards and both GSM and 
non-GSM cell phones. Device Seizure allows the examiner to connect a device via a USB or a 
Serial connection. Examiners must have the correct cables and cradles to ensure connectivity, 
compatible synchronization software, and a backup battery source available.  Synchronization 
software (e.g., Microsoft ActiveSync, Palm HotSync, BlackBerry desktop manager software) 
allows examiners to create a guest partnership between the forensic workstation and the device 
under investigation. 
Pocket PC Phones   
Device Seizure acquires a Pocket PC Mobile phone device is done through Device Seizure with 
the aid of Microsoft’s ActiveSync communication protocol.  An examiner creates an ActiveSync 
connection as a “Guest” to the device. The “Guest” account is essential for disallowing any 
content synchronization between the workstation and the device prior to acquisition.  Before 
acquisition begins, Device Seizure places a small 
dll
program file on the device in the first 
available block of memory, which is then removed at the end of acquisition.  Paraben indicated 
that Device Seizure uses the 
dll
to access unallocated regions of memory on the device. 
To get the remaining information, Device Seizure utilizes Remote API (RAPI)
6
, which provides 
a set of functions for desktop applications to communicate with and access information on 
Windows CE platforms.  These functions are accessible once a Windows CE device is connected 
through ActiveSync. RAPI functions are available for the following: 
•  Device system information – includes version, memory (total, used, and available), and 
power status retrieval 
•  File and directory management – allows retrieval of path information, find specific files, 
permissions, time of creation, etc. 
•  Property database access – allows information to be gleaned from database information 
present on the device 
•  Registry manipulation – allows the registry to be queried (i.e., keys and associated value) 
If the device is password protected, the correct password must be supplied before the acquisition 
stage begins, as illustrated below in Figure 4.  If the correct password is not known or provided, 
connectivity cannot be established and the contents of the device cannot be acquired. 
5 Additional information on Paraben products can be found at: http://www.paraben-forensics.com 
6
Additional information on RAPI can be found at: http://www.cegadgets.com/artcerapi.htm 
28
Figure 4: Password Prompt (Pocket PC) 
During the beginning stages of acquisition, the examiner is prompted with four choices of data to 
acquire as illustrated below. 
Figure 5: Acquisition Selection (Pocket PC) 
Palm OS Phones 
The acquisition of a Palm OS device with cell phone capabilities entails the forensic examiner 
exiting all active HotSync applications and placing the device in console mode.  Console mode is 
used for physical acquisition of the device.
7
To put the Palm OS device in console mode, the 
examiner must go to the search window (press the magnifying glass by the Graffiti writing area), 
enter via the Graffiti interface the following symbols: lower-case cursive L, followed by two dots 
(results in a period), followed by writing a “2” in the number area.  For acquiring data from a 
palmOne Treo 600, the technique used is slightly different.  Instead of entering console mode via 
7
Additional information on console mode can be found at: http://www.ee.ryerson.ca/~elf/visor/dot-shortcuts.html 
29  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested