MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 101-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 101-
May humanity, fraternity, benevolence prescribe our reciprocal obligations, and let us individually fulfill
them with the simple degree of energy Nature has given us to this end; let us do so without blaming,
and above all without punishing, those who, of chillier temper or more acrimonious humor, do not
notice in these yet very touching social ties all the sweetness and gentleness others discover therein;
for, it will be agreed, to seek to impose universal laws would be a palpable absurdity: such a
proceeding would be as ridiculous as that of the general who would have all his soldiers dressed in a
uniform of the same size; it is a terrible injustice to require that men of unlike character all be ruled by
the same law: what is good for one is not at all good for another.
That we cannot devise as many laws as there are men must be admitted; but the laws can be
lenient, and so few in number, that all men, of whatever character, can easily observe them.
Furthermore, I would demand that this small number of laws be of such a sort as to be adaptable to
all the various characters; they who formulate the code should follow the principle of applying more or
less, according to the person in question. It has been pointed out that there are certain virtues
whose practice is impossible for certain men, just as there are certain remedies which do not agree
with certain constitutions. Now, would it not be to carry your injustice beyond all limits were you to
send the law to strike the man incapable of bowing to the law? Would your iniquity be any less here
than in a case where you sought to force the blind to distinguish amongst colors?
From these first principles there follows, one feels, the necessity to make flexible, mild laws and
especially to get rid forever of the atrocity of capital punishment, because the law which attempts a
man's life is impractical, unjust, inadmissible. Not, and it will be clarified in the sequel, that we lack an
infinite number of cases where, without offense to Nature (and this I shall demonstrate), men have
freely taken one another's lives, simply exercising a prerogative received from their common mother;
but it is impossible for the law to obtain the same privileges, since the law, cold and impersonal, is a
total stranger to the passions which are able to justify in man the cruel act of murder. Man receives
his impressions from Nature, who is able to forgive him this act; the law, on the contrary, always
opposed as it is to Nature and receiving nothing from her, cannot be authorized to permit itself the
same extravagances: not having the same motives, the law cannot have the same rights. Those are
wise and delicate distinctions which escape many people, because very few of them reflect; but they
will be grasped and retained by the instructed to whom I recommend them, and will, I hope, exert
some influence upon the new code being readied for us.
The second reason why the death penalty must be done away with is that it has never repressed
crime; for crime is every day committed at the foot of the scaffold. This punishment is to be got rid of,
in a word, because it would be difficult to conceive of a poorer calculation than this, by which a man
is put to death for having killed another: under the present arrangement the obvious result is not one
man the less but, of a sudden, two; such arithmetic is in use only amongst headsmen and fools.
Pdf will no pages selected - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break a pdf password; break password pdf
Pdf will no pages selected - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
acrobat split pdf pages; break pdf
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 102-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 102-
However all that may be, the injuries we can work against our brothers may be reduced to four types:
calumny; theft; the crimes which, caused by impurity, may in a disagreeable sense affect others; and
murder.
All these were acts considered of the highest importance under the monarchy; but are they quite so
serious in a republican State? That is what we are going to analyze with the aid of philosophy's torch,
for by its light alone may such an inquiry be undertaken. Let no one tax me with being a dangerous
innovator; let no one say that by my writings I seek to blunt the remorse in evildoers' hearts, that my
humane ethics are wicked because they augment those same evildoers' penchant for crime. I wish
formally to certify here and now, that I have none of these perverse intentions; I set forth the ideas
which, since the age when I first began to reason, have identified themselves in me, and to whose
expression and realization the in. famous despotism of tyrants has been opposed for uncounted
centuries. So much the worse for those susceptible to corruption by any idea; so much the worse for
them who fasten upon naught but the harmful in philosophic opinions, who are likely to be corrupted
by everything. Who knows? They may have been poisoned by reading Seneca and Charron. It is not
to them I speak; I address myself only to people capable of hearing me out, and they will read me
without any danger.
It is with utmost candor I confess that I have never considered calumny an evil, and especially in a
government like our own, under which all of us, bound closer together, nearer one to the other,
obviously have a greater interest in becoming acquainted with one another. Either one or the other:
calumny attaches to a truly evil man, or it falls upon a virtuous creature. It will be agreed that, in the
first case, it makes little difference if one imputes a little more evil to a man known for having done a
great deal of it; perhaps indeed the evil which does not exist will bring to light evil which does, and
there you have him, the malefactor, more fully exposed than ever before.
We will suppose now that an unwholesome influence reigns over Hanover, but that in repairing to
that city where the air is insalubrious, I risk little worse than a bout of fever; may I reproach the man
who, to prevent me from going to Hanover, tells me that one perishes upon arriving there? No, surely
not; for, by using a great evil to frighten me, he spared me a lesser one.
If, on the contrary, a virtuous man is calumniated, let him not be alarmed; he need but exhibit himself,
and all the calumniator's venom will soon be turned back upon the latter. For such a person, calumny
is merely a test of purity whence his virtue emerges more resplendent than ever. As a matter of fact,
his individual ordeal may profit the cause of virtue in the republic, and add to its sum; for this virtuous
and sensitive man, stung by the injustice done him, will apply himself to the cultivation of still greater
virtue; he will want to overcome this calumny from which he thought himself sheltered, and his
splendid actions will acquire a correspondingly greater degree of energy. Thus, in the first instance,
VB.NET TWAIN: TWAIN Image Scanning in Console Application
First, there is no SelectSourceDialog in VB.NET TWAIN console Here we will illustrate the benefits of this VB.NET how to scan multiple pages to one PDF or TIFF
break apart pdf pages; break pdf file into parts
VB.NET PowerPoint: Convert & Render PPT into PDF Document
on and VB.NET PDF editing add-on will be used. As our VB.NET PowerPoint to PDF conversion add-on and edit .pptx document file independently, no other external
break a pdf into smaller files; pdf no pages selected
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 103-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 103-
the calumniator produces quite favorable results by inflating the vices of the dangerous object of his
attacks; in the second, the results achieved are excellent, for virtue is obliged to offer itself to us
entire.
Well now, I am at a loss to know for what reason the calumniator deserves your fear, especially under
a regime where it is essential to identify the wicked, and to augment the energy of the good. Let us
hence very carefully avoid any declarations prejudicial to calumny; we will consider it both a lantern
and a stimulant, and in either case something highly useful. The legislator, all of whose ideas must
be as large as the work he undertakes is great, must never be concerned with the effect of that crime
which strikes only the individual. It is the general, overall effect he must study; and when in this
manner he observes the effects calumny produces, I defy him to find anything punishable in it. I defy
him to find any shadow or hint of justice in the law that would punish it; our legislator becomes the
man of greatest justice and integrity if, on the contrary, he encourages and rewards it.
Theft is the second of the moral offenses whose examination we proposed.
If we glance at the history of ancient times, we will see theft permitted, nay, recompensed in all the
Greek republics; Sparta and Lacedaemon openly favored it; several other peoples regarded it as a
virtue in a warrior; it is certain that stealing nourishes courage, strength, skill, tact, in a word, all the
virtues useful to a republican system and consequently to our own. Lay partiality aside, and answer
me: is theft, whose effect is to distribute wealth more evenly, to be branded as a wrong in our day,
under our government which aims at equality? Plainly, the answer is no: it furthers equality and, what
is more, renders more difficult the conservation of property. There was once a people who punished
not the thief but him who allowed himself to be robbed, in order to teach him to care for his property.
This brings us to reflections of a broader scope.
God forbid that I should here wish to assail the pledge to respect property the Nation has just given;
but will I be permitted some remarks upon the injustice of this pledge? What is the spirit of the vow
taken by all a nation's individuals? Is it not to maintain a perfect equality amongst citizens, to subject
them all equally to the law protecting the possessions of all? Well, I ask you now whether that law is
truly just which orders the man who has nothing to respect another who has everything? What are
the elements of the social contract? Does it not consist in one's yielding a little of his freedom and of
his wealth in order to assure and sustain the preservation of each?
Upon those foundations all the laws repose; they justify the punishments inflicted upon him who
abuses his liberty; in the same way, they authorize the imposition of conditions; these latter prevent a
citizen from protesting when these things are demanded of him, because he knows that by means of
what he gives, the rest of what he has is safeguarded for him; but, once again, by what right will he
C# Image: Create C#.NET Windows Document Image Viewer | Online
C# Windows Document Image Viewer Features. No need for viewing multiple document & image formats (PDF, MS Word The following list will give you a broad overview
can print pdf no pages selected; break apart a pdf file
VB.NET Word: Use VB.NET Code to Convert Word Document to TIFF
VB.NET Word to TIFF image converting application, no external Word free to contact us and we will offer you more user guides with RasteEdge .NET PDF SDK using
break pdf documents; acrobat split pdf bookmark
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 104-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 104-
who has nothing be enchained by an agreement which protects only him who has everything? If, by
your pledge, you perform an act of equity in protecting the property of the rich, do you not commit
one of unfairness in requiring this pledge of the owner who owns nothing? What advantage does the
latter derive from your pledge? and how can you expect him to swear to something exclusively
beneficial to someone who, through his wealth, differs so greatly from him? Certainly, nothing is more
unjust: an oath must have an equal effect upon all the individuals who pronounce it; that it bind him
who has no interest in its maintenance is impossible, because it would no longer be a pact amongst
free men; it would be the weapon of the strong against the weak, against whom the latter would
have to he in incessant revolt. Well, such, exactly, is the situation created by the pledge to respect
property the Nation has just required all the citizens to subscribe to under oath; by it only the rich
enchain the poor, the rich alone benefit from a bargain into which the poor man enters so
thoughtlessly, failing to see that through this oath wrung from his good faith, he engages himself to
do a thing that cannot be done with respect to himself.
Thus convinced, as you must be, of this barbarous inequality, do not proceed to worsen your
injustice by punishing the man who has nothing for having dared to filch something from the man
who has everything: your inequitable pledge gives him a greater right to it than ever. In driving him to
perjury by forcing him to make a promise which, for him, is absurd, you justify all the crimes to which
this perjury will impel him; it is not for you to punish something for which you have been the cause. I
have no need to say more to make you sense the terrible cruelty of chastising thieves. Imitate the
wise law of the people I spoke of just a moment ago; punish the man neglectful enough to let himself
be robbed; but proclaim no kind of penalty against robbery. Consider whether your pledge does not
authorize the act, and whether he who commits it does any more than put himself in harmony with
the most sacred of Nature's movements, that of preserving one's own existence at no matter whose
expense.
The transgressions we are considering in this second class of man's duties toward his fellows include
actions for whose undertaking libertinage may be the cause; among those which are pointed to as
particularly incompatible with approved behavior are prostitution, incest, rape, and sodomy. We surely
must not for one moment doubt that all those known as moral crimes, that is to say, all acts of the
sort to which those we have just cited belong, are of total inconsequence under a government whose
sole duty consists in preserving, by whatever may be the means, the form essential to its
continuance: there you have a republican government's unique morality. Well, the republic being
permanently menaced from the outside by the despots surrounding it, the means to its preservation
cannot be imagined as moral means, for the republic will preserve itself only by war, and nothing is
less moral than war. I ask how one will be able to demonstrate that in a state rendered immoral by its
obligations, it is essential that the individual be moral? I will go further: it is a very good thing he is
not. The Greek lawgivers perfectly appreciated the capital necessity of corrupting the member citizens
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK deployment on IIS in .NET
This page will navigate users how to deploy HTML5 PDF to the place where you store XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer The site configured in IIS has no sufficient authority
pdf will no pages selected; break a pdf file into parts
VB.NET PDF - VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer Deployment on IIS
This page will navigate users how to deploy HTML5 PDF to the place where you store XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer The site configured in IIS has no sufficient authority
reader split pdf; pdf specification
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 105-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 105-
in order that, their moral dissolution coming into conflict with the establishment and its values, there
would result the insurrection that is always indispensable to a political system of perfect happiness
which, like republican government, must necessarily excite the hatred and envy of all its foreign
neighbors. Insurrection, thought these sage legislators, is not at all a moral condition; however, it has
got to be a republic's permanent condition. Hence it would be no less absurd than dangerous to
require that those who are to insure the perpetual immoral subversion of the established order
themselves be moral beings: for the state of a moral man is one of tranquility and peace, the state of
an immoral man is one of perpetual unrest that pushes him to, and identifies him with, the necessary
insurrection in which the republican must always keep the government of which he is a member.
We may now enter into detail and begin by analyzing modesty, that fainthearted negative impulse of
contradiction to impure affections. Were it among Nature's intentions that man be modest, assuredly
she would not have caused him to be born naked; unnumbered peoples, less degraded by
civilization than we, go about naked and feel no shame on that account; there can be no doubt that
the custom of dressing has had its single origin in harshness of climate and the coquetry of women
who would rather provoke desire and secure to themselves its effects than have it caused and
satisfied independently of themselves. They further reckoned that Nature having created them not
without blemishes, they would be far better assured of all the means needed to please by concealing
these flaws behind adornments; thus modesty, far from being a virtue, was merely one of corruption's
earliest consequences, one of the first devices of female guile.
Lycurgus and Solon, fully convinced that immodesty's results are to keep the citizen in the immoral
state indispensable to the mechanics of republican government, obliged girls to exhibit themselves
naked at the theater.
13
Rome imitated the example: at the games of Flora they danced naked; the
greater part of pagan mysteries were celebrated thus; among some peoples, nudity even passed for
a virtue. In any event, immodesty is born of lewd inclinations; what comes of these inclinations
comprises the alleged criminality we are discussing, of which prostitution is the foremost effect.
Now that we have got back upon our feet and broken with the host of prejudices that held us
captive; now that, brought closer to Nature by the quantity of prejudices we have recently obliterated,
we listen only to Nature's voice, we are fully convinced that if anything were criminal, it would be to
resist the penchants she inspires in us, rather than to come to grips with them. We are persuaded
that lust, being a product of those penchants, is not to be stifled or legislated against, but that it is,
rather, a matter of arranging for the means whereby passion may be satisfied in peace. We must
hence undertake to introduce order into this sphere of affairs, and to establish all the security
necessary so that, when need sends the citizen near the objects of lust, he can give himself over to
13
It has been said the intention of these legislators was, by dulling the passion men experienced for a naked girl, to render more active the
one men sometimes experience for their own sex. These sages caused to be shown that for which they wanted there to be disgust, and to be
VB.NET TIFF: .NET TIFF Printer Control; Print TIFF Using VB.NET
TIFF document printing add-on has no limitation on VB.NET TIFF printing API will automatically send powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
a pdf page cut; acrobat split pdf
C# Word: C#.NET Word Rotator, How to Rotate and Reorient Word Page
Remarkably, no other external products, including Microsoft page rotation control SDK will integrate the & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
break a pdf file; break pdf into smaller files
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 106-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 106-
doing with them all that his passions demand, without ever being hampered by anything, for there is
no moment in the life of man when liberty in its whole amplitude is so important to him. Various
stations, cheerful, sanitary, spacious, properly furnished and in every respect safe, will be erected in
divers points in each city; in them, all sexes, all ages, all creatures possible will be offered to the
caprices of the libertines who shall come to divert themselves, and the most absolute subordination
will be the rule of the individuals participating—the slightest refusal or recalcitrance will be instantly
and arbitrarily punished by the injured party. I must explain this last more fully, and weigh it against
republican manners; I promised I would employ the same logic from beginning to end, and I shall
keep my word.
Although, as I told you just a moment ago, no passion has a greater need of the widest horizon of
liberty than has this, none, doubtless, is as despotic; here it is that man likes to command, to be
obeyed, to surround himself with slaves compelled to satisfy him; well, whenever you withhold from
man the secret means whereby he exhales the dose of despotism Nature instilled in the depths of his
heart, he will seek other outlets for it, it will be vented upon nearby objects; it will trouble the
government. If you would avoid that danger, permit a free flight and rein to those tyrannical desires
which, despite himself, torment man ceaselessly: content with having been able to exercise his small
dominion in the middle of the harem of sultanas and youths whose submission your good offices and
his money procure for him, he will go away appeased and with nothing but fond feelings for a
government which so obligingly affords him every means of satisfying his concupiscence; proceed, on
the other hand, after a different fashion, between the citizen and those objects of public lust raise
the ridiculous obstacles in olden times invented by ministerial tyranny and by the lubricity of our
Sardanapaluses
14
—, do that, and the citizen, soon embittered against your regime, soon jealous of
the despotism he sees you exercise all by yourself, will shake off the yoke you lay upon him, and,
weary of your manner of ruling, will, as he has just done, substitute another for it.
But observe how the Greek legislators, thoroughly imbued with these ideas, treated debauchery at
Lacedaemon, at Athens: rather than prohibiting, they sotted the citizen on it; no species of lechery
was forbidden him; and Socrates, whom the oracle described as the wisest philosopher of the land,
passing indifferently from Aspasia's arms into those of Alcibiades, was not on that account less the
glory of Greece. I am going to advance somewhat further, and however contrary are my ideas to our
present customs, as my object is to prove that we must make all haste to alter those customs if we
wish to preserve the government we have adopted, I am going to try to convince you that the
prostitution of women who bear the name of honest is no more dangerous than the prostitution of
men, and that not only must we associate women with the lecheries practiced in the houses I have
hidden what they thought inclined to inspire sweeter desires; in either case, did they not strive after the objective we have just mentioned.
One sees that they sensed the need of immorality in republican manners.
14
It is well known, that the infamous and criminal Sartine devised, in the interests of the king’s lewdness, the plan of having Dubarry read to
Louis XV, thrice each week, the private details, enriched by Sorrier, of all that transpired in the evil corners of Paris. This department of the
French Nero's libertinage cost the State three millions.
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 107-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 107-
set up, but we must even build some for them, where their whims and the requirements of their
temper, ardent like ours but in a quite different way, may too find satisfaction with every sex.
First of all, what right have you to assert that women ought to be exempted from the blind submission
to men's caprices Nature dictates? and, secondly, by what other right do you defend their
subjugation to a continence impossible to their physical structure and of perfect uselessness to their
honor?
I will treat each of these questions separately.
It is certain, in a state of Nature, that women are born vulguivaguous, that is to say, are born
enjoying the advantages of other female animals and belonging, like them and without exception, to
all males; such were, without any doubt, both the primary laws of Nature and the only institutions of
those earliest societies into which men gathered. Self-interest, egoism, and love degraded these
primitive attitudes, at once so simple and so natural; one thought oneself enriched by taking a
woman to wife, and with her the goods of her family: there we find satisfied the first two feelings I
have just indicated; still more often, this woman was taken by force, and thereby one became
attached to her—there we find the other of the motives in action, and in every case, injustice.
Never may an act of possession be exercised upon a free being; the exclusive possession of a
woman is no less unjust than the possession of slaves; all men are born free, all have equal rights:
never should we lose sight of those principles; according to which never may there be granted to one
sex the legitimate right to lay monopolizing hands upon the other, and never may one of these
sexes, or classes, arbitrarily possess the other. Similarly, a woman existing in the purity of Nature's
laws cannot allege, as justification for refusing herself to someone who desires her, the love she
bears another, because such a response is based upon exclusion, and no man may be excluded
from the having of a woman as of the moment it is clear she definitely belongs to all men. The act of
possession can only be exercised upon a chattel or an animal, never upon an individual who
resembles us, and all the ties which can bind a woman to a man are quite as unjust as illusory.
If then it becomes incontestable that we have received from Nature the right indiscriminately to
express our wishes to all women, it likewise becomes incontestable that we have the right to compel
their submission, not exclusively, for I should then be contradicting myself, but temporarily.
15
It cannot
be denied that we have the right to decree laws that compel woman to yield to the flames of him who
would have her; violence itself being one of that right's effects, we can employ it lawfully. Indeed! has
15
Let it not be said that I contradict myself here, and that after having established, at some point further above, that we have no right to bind a
woman to ourselves, I destroy those principles when I declare now we have the right to constrain her; I repeat, it is a question of enjoyment
only, not of property: I have no right of possession upon that fountain I find by the road, but I have certain rights to its use; I have the right to
avail myself of the limpid water it offers my thirst; similarly, I have no real right of possession over such-and-such a woman, but I have
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 108-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 108-
Nature not proven that we have that right, by bestowing upon us the strength needed to bend
women to our will?
It is in vain women seek to bring to their defense either modesty or their attachment to other men;
these illusory grounds are worthless; earlier, we saw how contemptible and factitious is the sentiment
of modesty. Love, which may be termed the soul's madness, is no more a title by which their
constancy may be justified: love, satisfying two persons only, the beloved and the loving, cannot
serve the happiness of others, and it is for the sake of the happiness of everyone, and not for an
egotistical and privileged happiness, that women have been given to us. All men therefore have an
equal right of enjoyment of all women; therefore, there is no man who, in keeping with natural law,
may lay claim to a unique and personal right over a woman. The law which will oblige them to
prostitute themselves, as often and in any manner we wish, in the houses of debauchery we referred
to a moment ago, and which will coerce them if they balk, punish them if they shirk or dawdle, is thus
one of the most equitable of laws, against which there can be no sane or rightful complaint.
A man who would like to enjoy whatever woman or girl will henceforth be able, if the laws you
promulgate are just, to have her summoned at once to duty at one of the houses; and there, under
the supervision of the matrons of that temple of Venus, she will be surrendered to him, to satisfy,
humbly and with submission, all the fancies in which he will be pleased to indulge with her, however
strange or irregular they may be, since there is no extravagance which is not in Nature, none which
she does not acknowledge as her own. There remains but to fix the woman's age; now, I maintain it
cannot be fixed without restricting the freedom of a man who desires a girl of any given age.
He who has the right to eat the fruit of a tree may assuredly pluck it ripe or green, according to the
inspiration of his taste. But, it will be objected, there is an age when the man's proceedings would be
decidedly harmful to the girl's well-being. This consideration is utterly without value; once you
concede me the proprietary right of enjoyment, that right is independent of the effects enjoyment
produces; from this moment on, it becomes one, whether this enjoyment be beneficial or damaging to
the object which must submit itself to me. Have I not already proven that it is legitimate to force the
woman's will in this connection? and that immediately she excites the desire to enjoy she has got to
expose herself to this enjoyment, putting all egotistical sentiments quite aside? The issue of her
well-being, I repeat, is irrelevant. As soon as concern for this consideration threatens to detract from
or enfeeble the enjoyment of him who desires her, and who has the right to appropriate her, this
consideration for age ceases to exist; for what the object may experience, condemned by Nature and
by the law to slake momentarily the other's thirst, is nothing to the point; in this study, we are only
interested in what agrees with him who desires. But we will redress the balance.
incontestable rights to the enjoyment of her; I have the right to force from her this enjoyment, if she refuses me it for whatever the cause may
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 109-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 109-
Yes, we will redress it; doubtless we ought to. These women we have just so cruelly enslaved—there
is no denying we must recompense them, and I come now to the second question I proposed to
answer.
If we admit, as we have just done, that all women ought to be subjugated to our desires, we may
certainly allow then ample satisfaction of theirs. Our laws must be favorable to their fiery
temperament. It is absurd to locate both their honor and their virtue in the antinatural strength they
employ to resist the penchants with which they have been far more profusely endowed than we; this
injustice of manners is rendered more flagrant still since we contrive at once to weaken them by
seduction, and then to punish them for yielding to all the efforts we have made to provoke their fall.
All the absurdity of our manners, it seems to me, is graven in this shocking paradox, and this brief
outline alone ought to awaken us to the urgency of exchanging them for manners more pure.
I say then that women, having been endowed with considerably more violent penchants for carnal
pleasure than we, will be able to give themselves over to it wholeheartedly, absolutely free of all
encumbering hymeneal ties, of all false notions of modesty, absolutely restored to a state of Nature; I
want laws permitting them to give themselves to as many men as they see fit; I would have them
accorded the enjoyment of all sexes and, as in the case of men, the enjoyment of all parts of the
body; and under the special clause prescribing their surrender to all who desire them, there must be
subjoined another guaranteeing them a similar freedom to enjoy all they deem worthy to satisfy them.
What, I demand to know, what dangers are there in this license? Children who will lack fathers? Ha!
what can that matter in a republic where every individual must have no other dam than the nation,
where everyone born is the motherland's child. And how much more they will cherish her, they who,
never having known any but her, will comprehend from birth that it is from her alone all must be
expected. Do not suppose you are fashioning good republicans so long as children, who ought to
belong solely to the republic, remain immured in their families. By extending to the family, to a
restricted number of persons, the portion of affection they ought to distribute amongst their brothers,
they inevitably adopt those persons' sometimes very harmful prejudices; such children's opinions,
their thoughts are particularized, malformed, and the virtues of a Man of the State become
completely inaccessible to them. Finally abandoning their heart altogether to those by whom they
have been given breath, they have no devotion left for what will cause them to mature, to
understand, and to shine, as if these latter blessings were not more important than the former! If
there is the greatest disadvantage in thus letting children imbibe interests from their family often in
sharp disagreement with those of their country, there is then the most excellent argument for
separating them from their family; and are they not naturally weaned away by the means I suggest,
since in absolutely destroying all marital bonds, there are no longer born, as fruits of the woman's
be.
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 110-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 110-
pleasure, anything but children to whom knowledge of their father is absolutely forbidden, and with
that the possibility of belonging to only one family, instead of being, as they must be, purely les
enfants de la patrie.
There will then be houses intended for women's libertinage and, like the men's, under the
government's protection; in these establishments there will be furnished all the individuals of either
sex women could desire, and the more constantly they frequent these places the higher they will be
esteemed. There is nothing so barbarous or so ludicrous as to have identified their honor and their
virtue with the resistance women show the desires Nature implants in them, and which continually
inflame those who are hypocrite enough to pass censure on them. From the most tender age,
16
a girl
released from her paternal fetters, no longer having anything to preserve for marriage (completely
abolished by the wise laws I advocate), and superior to the prejudices which in former times
imprisoned her sex, will therefore, in the houses created for the purpose, be able to indulge in
everything to which her constitution prompts her; she will be received respectfully, copiously satisfied
and, returned once again into society, she will be able to tell of the pleasures she tasted quite as
publicly as today she speaks of a ball or promenade. O charming sex, you will be free: as do men,
you will enjoy all the pleasures of which Nature makes a duty, from not one will you be withheld. Must
the diviner half of humankind be laden with irons by the other? Ah, break those irons; Nature wills it.
For a bridle have nothing but your inclinations, for laws only your desires, for morality Nature's alone;
languish no longer under brutal prejudices which wither your charms and hold captive the divine
impulses of ),our hearts;
17
like us, you are free, the field of action whereon one contends for Venus'
favors is as open to you as it is to us; have no fear of absurd reproaches; pedantry and superstition
are things of the past; no longer will you be seen to blush at your charming delinquencies; crowned
with myrtle and roses, the esteem we conceive for you will be henceforth in direct proportion to the
scale you give your extravagances.
What has just been said ought doubtless to dispense us from examining adultery; nevertheless, let's
cast a glance upon it, however nonexistent it be in the eyes of the laws I am establishing. To
what point was it not ridiculous in our former institutions to consider adultery criminal! Were there
anything absurd in the world, very surely it is the timelessness ascribed to conjugal relations; it
appears to me it is but necessary to scrutinize, or sense the weight of, those bonds in order to cease
to view as wicked the act which lightens them; Nature, as we remarked recently, having supplied
women with a temper more ardent, with a sensibility more profound, than she awarded persons of
the other sex, it is unquestionably for women that the marital contract proves more onerous.
16
The Babylonians scarcely awaited their seventh year to carry their first fruits to the temple of Venus. The first impulse to concupiscence a
young girl feels is the moment when Nature bids her prostitute herself, and without any other kind of consideration she must yield instantly
Nature speaks; if she resists, she outrages Nature's law.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested