asp net pdf viewer control c# : Break a pdf password software application cloud windows azure html class philosophy_in_the_bedroom11-part1708

MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 111-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 111-
Tender women, you ablaze with love's fire, compensate yourselves now, and do so boldly and
unafraid; persuade yourselves that there can exist no evil in obedience to Nature's promptings, that it
is not for one man she created you, but to please them all, without discrimination. Let no anxiety
inhibit you. Imitate the Greek republicans; never did the philosophers whence they had their laws
contrive to make adultery a crime for them, and nearly all authorized disorderliness among women.
Thomas More proves in his Utopia that it becomes women to surrender themselves to debauchery,
and that great man's ideas were not always pure dreams.
18
Amongst the Tartars, the more profligate a woman, the more she was honored; about her neck she
publicly wore a certain jewelry attesting to her impudicity, and those who were not at all decorated
were not at all admired. In Peru, families cede their wives and daughters to the visiting traveler; they
are rented at so much the day, like horses, or carriages! Volumes, finally, would not suffice to
demonstrate that lewd behavior has never been held criminal amongst the illuminated peoples of the
earth. Every philosopher knows full well it is solely to the Christian impostors we are indebted for
having puffed it up into crime. The priests had excellent cause to forbid us lechery: this injunction, by
reserving to them acquaintance with and absolution for these private sins, gave them an incredible
ascendancy over women, and opened up to them a career of lubricity whose scope knew no limits.
We know only too well bow they took advantage of it and how they would again abuse their powers,
were they not hopelessly discredited.
Is incest more dangerous? Hardly. It loosens family ties and the citizen has that much more love to
lavish on his country; the primary laws of Nature dictate it to us, our feelings vouch for the fact; and
nothing is so enjoyable as an object we have coveted over the years. The most primitive institutions
smiled upon incest; it is found in society's origins: it was consecrated in every religion, every law
encouraged it. If we traverse the world we will find incest everywhere established. The blacks of the
Ivory Coast and Gabon prostitute their wives to their own children; in Judah, the eldest son must
marry his father's wife; the people of Chile lie indifferently with their sisters, their daughters, and marry
mother and daughter at the same time. I would venture, in a word, that incest ought to be every
government's law—every government whose basis is fraternity. How is it that reasonable men were
able to carry absurdity to the point of believing that the enjoyment of one's mother, sister, or
daughter could ever be criminal? Is it not, I ask, an abominable view wherein it is made to appear a
crime for a man to place higher value upon the enjoyment of an object to which natural feeling draws
him close? One might just as well say that we are forbidden to love too much the individuals Nature
enjoins us to love best, and that the more she gives us a hunger for some object, the more she
orders us away from it. These are absurd paradoxes; only people bestialized by superstition can
17
Women are unaware to what point their lasciviousness embellishes them. Let one compare two women of roughly comparable age and
beauty, one of whom lives in celibacy, and the other in libertinage: it will be seen by how much the latter exceeds in éclat and freshness; all
violence done Nature is far more wearing than the abuse of pleasures; everyone knows beds improve a woman's looks.
18
The same thinker wished affianced couples to see each other naked before marriage. How many alliances would fail, were this law
enforced! It might be declared that the contrary is indeed what is termed purchase of merchandise sight unseen.
Break a pdf password - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break apart pdf; break pdf password online
Break a pdf password - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf into multiple documents; pdf print error no pages selected
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 112-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 112-
believe or uphold them. The community of women I am establishing necessarily leading to incest,
there remains little more to say about a supposed misdemeanor whose inexistence is too plainly
evident to warrant further pursuit of the matter, and we shall turn our attention to rape, which at first
glance seems to be, of all libertinage's excesses, the one which is most dearly established as being
wrong, by reason of the outrage it appears to cause. It is certain, however, that rape, an act so very
rare and so very difficult to prove, wrongs one's neighbor less than theft, since the latter is destructive
to property, the former merely damaging to it. Beyond that, what objections have you to the ravisher?
What will you say, when he replies to you that, as a matter of fact, the injury he has committed is
trifling indeed, since he has done no more than place a little sooner the object he has abused in the
very state in which she would soon have been put by marriage and love.
But sodomy, that alleged crime which will draw the fire of heaven upon cities addicted to it, is sodomy
not a monstrous deviation whose punishment could not be severe enough? Ah, sorrowful it is to
have to reproach our ancestors for the judiciary murders in which, upon this head, they dared indulge
themselves. We wonder that savagery could ever reach the point where you condemn to death an
unhappy person all of whose crime amounts to not sharing your tastes. One shudders to think that
scarce forty years ago the legislators' absurd thinking had not evolved beyond this point. Console
yourselves, citizens; such absurdities are to cease: the intelligence of your lawmakers will answer for
it. Thoroughly enlightened upon this weakness occurring in a few men, people deeply sense today
that such error cannot be criminal, and that Nature, who places such slight importance upon the
essence that flows in our loins, can scarcely be vexed by our choice when we are pleased to vent it
into this or that avenue.
What single crime can exist here? For no one will wish to maintain that all the parts of the body do
not resemble each other, that there are some which are pure, and others defiled; but, as it is
unthinkable such nonsense be advanced seriously, the only possible crime would consist in the
waste of semen. Well, is it likely that this semen is so precious to Nature that its loss is necessarily
criminal? Were that so, would she every day institute those losses? and is it not to authorize them to
permit them in dreams, to permit them in the act of taking one's pleasure with a pregnant woman? Is
it possible to imagine Nature having allowed us the possibility of committing a crime that would
outrage her? Is it possible that she consent to the destruction by man of her own pleasures, and to
his thereby becoming stronger than she? It is unheard of—into what an abyss of folly one is hurled
when, in reasoning, one abandons the aid of reason's torch! Let us abide in our unshakable
assurance that it is as easy to enjoy a woman in one manner as in another, that it makes absolutely
no difference whether one enjoys a girl or a boy, and as soon as it is clearly understood that no
inclinations or tastes can exist in us save the ones we have from Nature, that she is too wise and too
consistent to have given us any which could ever offend her.
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Success"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
cannot select text in pdf file; break pdf into single pages
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. FileType.IMG_JPEG); switch (result) { case ConvertResult. NO_ERROR: Console.WriteLine("Success"); break; case ConvertResult
pdf format specification; break pdf into separate pages
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 113-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 113-
The penchant for sodomy is the result of physical formation, to which we contribute nothing and
which we cannot alter. At the most tender age, some children reveal that penchant, and it is never
corrected in them. Sometimes it is the fruit of satiety; but even in this case, is it less Nature's doing?
Regardless of how it is viewed, it is her work, and, in every instance, what she inspires must be
respected by men. If, were one to take an exact inventory, it should come out that this taste is
infinitely more affecting than the other, that the pleasures resulting from it are far more lively, and that
for this reason its exponents are a thousand times more numerous than its enemies, would it not
then be possible to conclude that, far from affronting Nature, this vice serves her intentions, and that
she is less delighted by our procreation than we so foolishly believe? Why, as we travel about the
world, how many peoples do we not see holding women in contempt! Many are the men who strictly
avoid employing them for anything but the having of the child necessary to replace them. The
communal aspect of life in republics always renders this vice more frequent in that form of society; but
it is not dangerous. Would the Greek legislators have introduced it into their republics had they
thought it so? Quite the contrary; they deemed it necessary to a warlike race. Plutarch speaks with
enthusiasm of the battalion of lovers: for many a year they alone defended Greece's freedom. The
vice reigned amongst comrades-in-arms, and cemented their unity. The greatest of men lean toward
sodomy. At the time it was discovered, the whole of America was found inhabited by people of this
taste. In Louisiana, amongst the Illinois, Indians in feminine garb prostituted themselves as
courtesans. The blacks of Benguéla publicly keep men; nearly all the seraglios of Algiers are today
exclusively filled with young boys. Not content to tolerate love for young boys, the Thebans made it
mandatory; the philosopher of Chaeronea prescribed sodomy as the surest way to a youth's
affection.
We know to what extent it prevailed in Rome, where they had public places in which young boys,
costumed as girls, and girls as boys, prostituted themselves. In their letters, Martial, Catullus, Tibullus,
Horace, and Virgil wrote to men as though to their mistresses; and we read in Plutarch
19
that women
must in no way figure in men's love. The Amasians of Crete used to abduct boys, and their initiation
was distinguished by the most singular ceremonies. When they were taken with love for one, they
notified the parents upon what day the ravisher wished to carry him off; the youth put up some
resistance if his lover failed to please him; in the contrary case, they went off together, and the
seducer restored him to his family as soon as he had made use of him; for in this passion as in that
for women, one always has too much when one has had enough. Strabo informs us that on this very
island, seraglios were peopled with boys only; they were prostituted openly.
Is one more authority required to prove how useful this vice is in a republic? Let us lend an ear to
Jerome the Peripatetic: "The love of youths," says he, "spread throughout all of Greece, for it instilled
in us strength and courage, and thus stood us in good stead when we drove the tyrants out;
19
The Moralities: “On Love.”
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Forms. Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free SDK library for Visual Studio .NET. Independent
cannot select text in pdf; acrobat split pdf into multiple files
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
break pdf password; break pdf into multiple documents
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 114-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 114-
conspiracies were formed amongst lovers, and they were readier to endure torture than denounce
their accomplices; such patriots sacrificed everything to the State's prosperity; it was beheld as a
certain thing, that these attachments steadied the republic, women were declaimed against, and to
entertain connections with such creatures was a frailty reserved to despots." Pederasty has always
been the vice of warrior races. From Caesar we learn that the Gauls were to an extraordinary degree
given to it. The wars fought to sustain the republic brought about the separation of the two sexes,
and hence the propagation of the vice, and when its consequences, so useful to the State, were
recognized, religion speedily blessed it. That the Romans sanctified the amours of Jupiter and
Ganymede is well known. Sextus Empiricus assures us that this caprice was compulsory amongst the
Persians. At last, the women, jealous and contemned, offered to render their husbands the same
service they received from young boys; some few men made the experiment, and returned to their
former habits, finding the illusion impossible. The Turks, greatly inclined toward this depravity
Mohammed consecrated in the Koran, were nevertheless convinced that a very young virgin could
well enough be substituted for a youth, and rarely did they grow to womanhood without having
passed through the experience. Sextus Quintus and Sanchez allowed this debauch; the latter even
undertook to show it was of use to procreation, and that a child created after this preliminary exercise
was infinitely better constituted thanks to it. Finally, women found restitution by turning to each other.
This latter fantasy doubtless has no more disadvantages than the other, since nothing comes of the
refusal to reproduce, and since the means of those who have a bent for reproduction are powerful
enough for reproduction's adversaries never to be able to harm population. Amongst the Greeks, this
female perversion was also supported by policy: the result of it was that, finding each other sufficient,
women sought less communication with men and their detrimental influence in the republic's affairs
was thus held to a minimum. Lucian informs us of what progress this license promoted, and it is not
without interest we see it exemplified in Sappho.
In fine, these are perfectly inoffensive manias; were women to carry them even further, were they to
go to the point of caressing monsters and animals, as the example of every race teaches us, no ill
could possibly result therefrom, because corruption of manners often of prime utility to a government,
cannot in any sense harm it, and we must demand enough wisdom and enough prudence of our
legislators to be entirely sure that no law will emanate from them that would repress perversions
which, being determined by constitution and being inseparable from physical structure, cannot render
the person in whom they are present any more guilty than the person Nature created deformed.
In the second category of man's crimes against his brethren, there is left to us only murder to
examine, and then we will move on to man's duties toward himself. Of all the offenses man may
commit against his fellows, murder is without question the cruelest, since it deprives man of the single
asset he has received from Nature, and its loss is irreparable. Nevertheless, at this stage several
questions arise, leaving aside the wrong murder does him who becomes its victim.
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's not supported tell stop.
break password on pdf; break pdf file into parts
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's
acrobat split pdf; break pdf into smaller files
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 115-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 115-
1. As regards the laws of Nature only, is this act really criminal?
2. Is it criminal with what regards the laws of politics?
3. Is it harmful to society?
4.What must be a republican government's attitude toward it?
5. Finally, must murder be repressed by murder?
Each of these questions will be treated separately; the subject is important enough to warrant
thorough consideration; our ideas touching murder may surprise for their boldness. But what does
that matter? Have we not acquired the right to say anything? The time has come for the ventilation of
great verities; men today will not be content with less. The time has come for error to disappear; that
blindfold must fall beside the heads of kings. From Nature's point of view, is murder a crime? That is
the first question posed.
It is probable that we are going to humiliate man's pride by lowering him again to the rank of all of
Nature's other creatures, but the philosopher does not flatter small human vanities; ever in burning
pursuit of truth, he discerns it behind stupid notions of pride, lays it bare, elaborates upon it, and
intrepidly shows it to the astonished world.
What is man? and what difference is there between him and other plants, between him and all the
other animals of the world?
None, obviously. Fortuitously placed, like them, upon this globe, he is born like them; like them, he
reproduces, rises, and falls; like them he arrives at old age and sinks like them into nothingness at
the close of the life span Nature assigns each species of animal, in accordance with its organic
construction. Since the parallels are so exact that the inquiring eye of philosophy is absolutely
unable to perceive any grounds for discrimination, there is then just as much evil in killing animals as
men, or just as little, and whatever be the distinctions we make, they will be found to stem from our
pride's prejudices, than which, unhappily, nothing is more absurd. Let us all the same press on to the
question. You cannot deny it is one and the same, to destroy a man or a beast; but is not the
destruction of all living animals decidedly an evil, as the Pythagoreans believed, and as they who
dwell on the banks of Ganges yet believe? Before answering that, we remind the reader that we are
examining the question only in terms of Nature and in relation to her; later on, we will envisage it with
reference to men.
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
foreach (TwainStaticFrameSizeType frame in frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
break apart pdf; break pdf into single pages
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. if (device.Compression != TwainCompressionMode.Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
break pdf; acrobat split pdf into multiple files
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 116-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 116-
Now then, what value can Nature set upon individuals whose making costs her neither the least
trouble nor the slightest concern? The worker values his work according to the labor it entails and the
time spent creating it. Does man cost Nature anything? And, under the supposition that he does,
does he cost her more than an ape or an elephant? I go further: what are the regenerative materials
used by Nature? Of what are composed the beings which come into life? Do not the three elements
of which they are formed result from the prior destruction of other bodies? If all individuals were
possessed of eternal life, would it not become impossible for Nature to create any new ones? If
Nature denies eternity to beings, it follows that their destruction is one of her laws. Now, once we
observe that destruction is so useful to her that she absolutely cannot dispense with it, and that she
cannot achieve her creations without drawing from the store of destruction which death prepares for
her, from this moment onward the idea of annihilation which we attach to death ceases to be real;
there is no more veritable annihilation; what we call the end of the living animal is no longer a true
finis, but a simple transformation, a transmutation of matter, what every modern philosopher
acknowledges as one of Nature's fundamental laws. According to these irrefutable principles, death
is hence no more than a change of form, an imperceptible passage from one existence into another,
and that is what Pythagoras called metempsychosis.
These truths once admitted, I ask whether it can ever be proposed that destruction is a crime? Will
you dare tell me, with the design of preserving your absurd illusions, that transmutation is
destruction? No, surely not; for, to prove that, it would be necessary to demonstrate matter inert for
an instant, for a moment in repose. Well, you will never detect any such moment. Little animals are
formed immediately a large animal expires, and these little animals' lives are simply one of the
necessary effects determined by the large animal's temporary sleep. Given this, will you dare suggest
that one pleases Nature more than another? To support that contention, you would have to prove
what cannot be proven: that elongated or square are more useful, more agreeable to Nature than
oval or triangular shapes; you would have to prove that, with what regards Nature's sublime scheme,
a sluggard who fattens in idleness is more useful than the horse, whose service is of such
importance, or than a steer, whose body is so precious that there is no part of it which is not useful;
you would have to say that the venomous serpent is more necessary than the faithful dog.
Now, as not one of these systems can be upheld, one must hence consent unreservedly to
acknowledge our inability to annihilate Nature's works; in light of the certainty that the only thing we
do when we give ourselves over to destroying is merely to effect an alteration in forms which does not
extinguish life, it becomes beyond human powers to prove that there may exist anything criminal in
the alleged destruction of a creature, of whatever age, sex, or species you may suppose it. Led still
further in our series of inferences proceeding one from the other, we affirm that the act you commit in
juggling the forms of Nature's different productions is of advantage to her, since thereby you supply
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 117-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 117-
her the primary material for her reconstructions, tasks which would be compromised were you to
desist from destroying.
Well, let her do the destroying, they tell you; one ought to let her do it, of course, but they are
Nature's impulses man follows when he indulges in homicide; it is Nature who advises him, and the
man who destroys his fellow is to Nature what are the plague and famine, like them sent by her hand
which employs every possible means more speedily to obtain of destruction this primary matter, itself
absolutely essential to her works.
Let us deign for a moment to illumine our spirit by philosophy's sacred flame; what other than
Nature's voice suggests to us personal hatreds, revenges, wars, in a word, all those causes of
perpetual murder? Now, if she incites us to murderous acts, she has need of them; that once
grasped, how may we suppose ourselves guilty in her regard when we do nothing more than obey
her intentions?
But that is more than what is needed to convince any enlightened reader, that for murder ever to be
an outrage to Nature is impossible.
Is it a political crime? We must avow, on the contrary, that it is, unhappily, merely one of policy's and
politics' greatest instruments. Is it not by dint of murders that France is free today? Needless to say,
here we are referring to the murders occasioned by war, not to the atrocities committed by plotters
and rebels; the latter, destined to the public's execration, have only to be recollected to arouse
forever general horror and indignation. What study, what science, has greater need of murder's
support than that which tends only to deceive, whose sole end is the expansion of one nation at
another's expense? Are wars, the unique fruit of this political barbarism, anything but the means
whereby a nation is nourished, whereby it is strengthened, whereby it is buttressed? And what is war
if not the science of destruction? A strange blindness in man, who publicly teaches the art of killing,
who rewards the most accomplished killer, and who punishes him who for some particular reason
does away with his enemy! Is it not high time errors so savage be repaired?
Is murder then a crime against society? But how could that reasonably be imagined? What difference
does it make to this murderous society, whether it have one member more, or less? Will its laws, its
manners, its customs be vitiated? Has an individual's death ever had any influence upon the general
mass? And after the loss of the greatest battle, what am I saying? after the obliteration of half the
world—or, if one wishes, of the entire world—would the little number of survivors, should there be
any, notice even the faintest difference in things? No, alas. Nor would Nature notice any either, and
the stupid pride of man, who believes everything created for him, would be dashed indeed, after the
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 118-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 118-
total extinction of the human species, were it to be seen that nothing in Nature had changed, and
that the stars' flight had not for that been retarded. Let us continue.
What must the attitude of a warlike and republican state be toward murder?
Dangerous it should certainly be, either to cast discredit upon the act, or to punish it. Republican
mettle calls for a touch of ferocity: if he grows soft, if his energy slackens in him, the republican will be
subjugated in a trice. A most unusual thought comes to mind at this point, but if it is audacious it is
also true, and I will mention it. A nation that begins by governing itself as a republic will only be
sustained by virtues because, in order to attain the most, one must always start with the least. But an
already old and decayed nation which courageously casts off the yoke of its monarchical government
in order to adopt a republican one, will only be maintained by many crimes; for it is criminal already,
and if it were to wish to pass from crime to virtue, that is to say, from a violent to a pacific, benign
condition, it should fall into an inertia whose result would soon be its certain ruin. What happens to
the tree you would transplant from a soil full of vigor to a dry and sandy plain? All intellectual ideas
are so greatly subordinate to Nature's physical aspect that the comparisons supplied us by
agriculture will never deceive us in morals.
Savages, the most independent of men, the nearest to Nature, daily indulge in murder which
amongst them goes unpunished. In Sparta, in Lacedaemon, they hunted Helots, just as we in
France go on partridge shoots. The freest of people are they who are most friendly to murder: in
Mindanao, a man who wishes to commit a murder is raised to the rank of warrior brave, he is
straightway decorated with a turban; amongst the Caraguos, one must have killed seven men to
obtain the honors of this headdress: the inhabitants of Borneo believe all those they put to death will
serve them when they themselves depart life; devout Spaniards made a vow to St. James of Galicia
to kill a dozen Americans every day; in the kingdom of Tangut, there is selected a strong and
vigorous young man: on certain days of the year he is allowed to kill whomever he encounters! Was
there ever a people better disposed to murder than the Jews? One sees it in every guise, upon every
page of their history.
Now and again, China's emperor and mandarins take measures to stir up a revolt amongst the
people, in order to derive, from these maneuvers, the right to transform them into horrible slaughters.
May that soft and effeminate people rise against their tyrants; the latter will be massacred in their
turn, and with much greater justice; murder, adopted always, always necessary, will have but
changed its victims; it has been the delight of some, and will become the felicity of others.
An infinite number of nations tolerates public assassinations; they are freely permitted in Genoa,
Venice, Naples, and throughout Albania; at Kachoa on the San Domingo River, murderers,
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 119-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 119-
undisguised and unashamedly, upon your orders and before your very eyes cut the throat of the
person you have pointed out to them; Hindus take opium to encourage themselves to murder; and
then, rushing out into the street, they butcher everyone they meet; English travelers have found this
idiosyncrasy in Batavia, too.
What people were at once greater and more bloodthirsty than the Romans, and what nation longer
preserved its splendor and freedom? The gladiatorial spectacles fed its bravery, it became warlike
through the habit of making a game of murder. Twelve or fifteen hundred victims filled the circus'
arena every day, and there the women, crueler than the men, dared demand that the dying fall
gracefully and be sketched while still in death's throes. The Romans moved from that to the
pleasures of seeing dwarfs cut each other to pieces; and when the Christian cult, then infecting the
world, came to persuade men there was evil in killing one another, the tyrants immediately enchained
that people, and everyone's heroes became their toys.
Everywhere, in short, it was rightly believed that the murderer—that is to say, the man who stifled his
sensibilities to the point of killing his fellow man, and of defying public or private
vengeance—everywhere, I say, it was thought such a man could only be very courageous, and
consequently very precious to a warlike or republican community. We may discover certain nations
which, yet more
ferocious, could only satisfy themselves by immolating children, and very often their own, and we will
see these actions universally adopted, and upon occasion even made part of the law. Several
savage tribes kill their children immediately they are born. Mothers, on the banks of the Orinoco, firm
in the belief their daughters were born only to be miserable, since their fate was to become wives in
this country where women were found insufferable, immolated them as soon as they were brought
into the light. In Taprobane and in the kingdom of Sopit, all deformed children were immolated by
their own parents. If their children are born on certain days of the week, the women of Madagascar
expose them to wild beasts. In the republics of Greece, all the children who came into the world were
carefully examined, and if they were found not to conform to the requirements determined by the
republic's defense, they were sacrificed on the spot: in those days, it was not deemed essential to
build richly furnished and endowed houses for the preservation of mankind's scum.
20
Up until the
transferal of the seat of the Empire, all the Romans who were not disposed to feed their offspring
flung them upon the dung heaps. The ancient legislators had no scruple about condemning children
to death, and never did one of their codes repress the rights of a father over his family. Aristotle
urged abortion; and those ancient republicans, filled with enthusiasm, with patriotic fervor, failed to
appreciate this commiseration for the individual person that one finds in modern nations: they loved
their children less, but their country more. In all the cities of China, one finds every morning an
incredible number of children abandoned in the streets; a dung cart picks them up at dawn, and they
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 120-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 120-
are tossed into a moat; often, midwives themselves disencumbered mothers by instantly plunging
their issue into vats of boiling water, or by throwing it into the river. In Peking, infants were put into
little reed baskets that were left on the canals; every day, these canals were skimmed clean, and the
famous traveler Duhalde calculates as above thirty thousand the number of infants collected in the
course of each search.
It cannot be denied that it is extraordinarily necessary, extremely politic to erect a dike against
overpopulation in a republican system; for entirely contrary reasons, the birth rate must be
encouraged in a monarchy; there, the tyrants being rich only through the number of their slaves, they
assuredly have to have men; but do not doubt for a minute that populousness is a genuine vice in a
republican government. However, it is not necessary to butcher people to restrain it, as our modern
decemvirs used to say; it is but a question of not leaving it the means of extending beyond the limits
its happiness prescribes. Beware of too great a multiplication in a race whose every member is
sovereign, and be certain that revolutions are never but the effect of a too numerous population. If,
for the State's splendor, you accord your warriors the right to destroy men, for the preservation of that
same State grant also unto each individual the right to give himself over as much as he pleases,
since this he may do without offending Nature, to ridding himself of the children he is unable to feed,
or to whom the government cannot look for assistance; in the same way, grant him the right to rid
himself, at his own risk and peril, of all enemies capable of harming him, because the result of all
these acts, in themselves of perfect inconsequence, will be to keep your population at a moderate
size, and never large enough to overthrow your regime. Let the monarchists say a State is great only
by reason of its extreme population: this State will forever be poor, if its population surpasses the
means by which it can subsist, and it will flourish always if, kept trimly within its proper limits, it can
make traffic of its superfluity. Do you not prune the tree when it has overmany branches? and do not
too many shoots weaken the trunk? Any system which deviates from these principles is an
extravagance whose abuses would conduct us directly to the total subversion of the edifice we have
just raised with so much trouble; but it is not at the moment the man reaches maturity one must
destroy him in order to reduce population. It is unjust to cut short the days of a well-shaped person; it
is not unjust, I say, to prevent the arrival in the world of a being who will certainly be useless to it. The
human species must be purged from the cradle; what you foresee as useless to society is what must
be stricken out of it; there you have the only reasonable means to the diminishment of a population,
whose excessive size is, as we have just proven, the source of certain trouble.
The time has come to sum up.
Must murder be repressed by murder? Surely not. Let us never impose any other penalty upon the
murderer than the one he may risk from the vengeance of the friends or family of him he has killed. "I
20
It must be hoped the nation will eliminate this expense, the most useless of all; every individual born lacking the qualities to become
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested