asp net pdf viewer control c# : Break pdf file into parts control SDK system azure wpf asp.net console philosophy_in_the_bedroom12-part1709

MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 121-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 121-
grant you pardon," said Louis XV to Charolais who, to divert himself, had just killed a man; "but I also
pardon whoever will kill you." All the bases of the law against murderers may be found in that sublime
motto.
21
Briefly, murder is a horror, but an often necessary horror, never criminal, which it is essential to
tolerate in a republican State. I have made it clear the entire universe has given an example of it; but
ought it be considered a deed to be punished by death? They who respond to the following dilemma
will have answered the question:
Is it or is it not a crime?
If it is not, why make laws for its punishment? And if it is, by what barbarous logic do you, to punish it,
duplicate it by another crime?
We have now but to speak of man's duties toward himself. As the philosopher only adopts such
duties in the measure they conduce to his pleasure or to his preservation, it is futile to recommend
their practice to him, still more futile to threaten him with penalties if he fails to adopt them.
The only offense of this order man can commit is suicide. I will not bother demonstrating here the
imbecility of the people who make of this act a crime; those who might have any doubts upon the
matter are referred to Rousseau's famous letter. Nearly all early governments, through policy or
religion, authorized suicide. Before the Areopagites, the Athenians explained their reasons for
self-destruction; then they stabbed themselves. Every Greek government tolerated suicide; it entered
into the ancient legislators' scheme; one killed oneself in public, and one made of one's death a
spectacle of magnificence.
The Roman Republic encouraged suicide; those so greatly celebrated instances of devotion to
country were nothing other than suicides. When Rome was taken by the Gauls, the most illustrious
senators consecrated themselves to death; as we imitate that spirit, we adopt the same virtues.
During the campaign of '92, a soldier, grief-stricken to find himself unable to follow his comrades to
the Jemappes affair, took his own life. Keeping ourselves at all times to the high standard of those
proud republicans, we will soon surpass their virtue: it is the government that makes the man.
Accustomed for so long to despotism, our courage was utterly crippled; despotism depraved our
manners; we are being reborn; it will shortly be seen of what sublime actions the French genius and
character are capable when they are free; let us maintain, at the price of our fortunes and our lives,
useful someday to the republic, has no right to live, and the best thing for all concerned is to deprive him of life the moment he receives it.
21
The Salic Law only punished murder by exacting a simple fine, and as the guilty one easily found ways to avoid payment, Childebert, king
of Austrasia, decreed, in a writ published at Cologne, the death penalty, not against the murderer, but against him who would shirk the
murderer's fine. Ripuarian Law similarly ordained no more against this act than a fine proportionate to the individual killed. A priest was
Break pdf file into parts - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
pdf splitter; break a pdf file into parts
Break pdf file into parts - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
how to split pdf file by pages; break pdf into separate pages
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 122-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 122-
this liberty which has already cost us so many victims, of whom we regret not one if we attain our
objective; every one of them sacrificed himself voluntarily; let us not permit their blood to have been
shed in vain; but union… union, or we will lose the fruit of all our struggles. Upon the victories we
have just achieved let us seat excellent laws; our former legislators, still slaves of the despot we have
just slaughtered, had given us nothing, but laws worthy of that tyrant they continued to reverence: let
us re-do their work, let us consider that it is at last for republicans we are going to labor; may our laws
be gentle, like the people they must rule.
In pointing out, as I have just done, the nullity, the indifference of an infinite number of actions our
ancestors, seduced by a false religion, beheld as criminal, I reduce our labor to very little. Let us
create few laws, but let them be good; rather than multiplying hindrances, it is purely a question of
giving an indestructible quality to the law we employ, of seeing to it that the laws we promulgate
have, as ends, nothing but the citizen's tranquility, his happiness, and the glory of the republic. But,
Frenchmen, after having driven the enemy from your lands, I should not like your zeal to broadcast
your principles to lead you further afield; it is only with fire and steel you will be able to carry them to
the four corners of the earth. Before taking upon yourselves such resolutions, remember the
unsuccess of the crusades. When the enemy will have fled across the Rhine, heed me, guard your
frontiers, and stay at home behind them. Revive your trade, restore energy and markets to your
manufacturing; cause your arts to flourish again, encourage agriculture, both so necessary in a
government such as yours, and whose aim must be to provide for everyone without standing in need
of anyone. Leave the thrones of Europe to crumble of themselves: your example, your prosperity will
soon send them flying, without your having to meddle in the business at all.
Invincible within, and by your administration and your laws a model to every race, there will not be a
single government which will not strive to imitate you, not one which will not be honored by your
alliance; but if, for the vainglory of establishing your principles outside your country, you neglect to
care for your own felicity at home, despotism, which is no more than asleep, will awake, you will be
rent by intestine disorder, you will have exhausted your monies and your soldiers, and all that, all that
to return to kiss the manacles the tyrants, who will have subjugated you during your absence, will
impose upon you; all you desire may be wrought without leaving your home: let other people observe
you happy, and they will rush to happiness by the same road you have traced for them.
22
EUGENIE, to Dolmancé — Now, it strikes me as a very solidly composed document, that one, and it
seems to me in such close agreement with your principles, at least with many of them, that I should
be tempted to believe you its author.
extremely costly: a leaden tunic, cut to his measurements, was tailored for the assassin, and he was obliged to produce the equivalent of this
tunic's weight in gold; in default of which the guilty one and his family remained slaves of the Church.
22
Let it be remembered that foreign warfare was never proposed save by the infamous Dumouriez.
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. See if the device supports file transfer device. TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE)
pdf format specification; pdf no pages selected
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
How to Save Acquired Image to File in C#.NET TWAIN image scanning size and location contains two parts. LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
break a pdf apart; reader split pdf
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 123-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 123-
DOLMANCE — Indeed my thinking does correspond with some part of these reflections, and my
discourses—they've proven it to you—even lend to what has just been read to us the appearance of
a repetition
EUGENIE — That I did not notice; wise and good words cannot be too often uttered; however, I find
several amongst these principles a trifle dangerous.
DOLMANCE — In this world there is nothing dangerous but pity and beneficence; goodness is never
but a weakness of which the ingratitude and impertinence of the feeble always force honest folk to
repent. Let a keen observer calculate all of pity's dangers, and let him compare them with those of a
staunch, resolute severity, and he will see whether the former are not the greater. But we are
straying, Eugénie; in the interests of your education, let's compress all that has just been said into
this single word of advice: Never listen to your heart, my child; it is the most untrustworthy guide we
have received from Nature; with greatest care close it up to misfortune's fallacious accents; far better
for you to refuse a person whose wretchedness is genuine than to run the great risk of giving to a
bandit, to an intriguer, or to a caballer: the one is of a very slight importance, the other may be of the
highest disadvantage.
LE CHEVALIER — May I be allowed to cast a glance upon the foundations of Dolmancé's principles?
for I would like to try to annihilate them, and may be able to. Ah, how different they would be, cruel
man, if, stripped of the immense fortune which continually provides you with the means to gratify your
passions, you were to languish a few years in that crushing misfortune out of which your ferocious
mind dares to fashion knouts wherewith to lash the wretched! Cast a pitying look upon them, and
stifle not your soul to the point where the piercing cries of need shall never more be heard by you;
when your frame, weary from naught but pleasure, languorously reposes upon swansdown couches,
look ye at those others wasted by the drudgeries that support your existence, and at their bed,
scarcely more than a straw or two for protection against the rude earth whereof, like beasts, they
have nothing but the chill crust to lie down upon; cast a glance at them while surrounded by
succulent meats wherewith every day twenty of Comus' students awake your sensuality, cast a
glance, I say, at those wretches in yonder wood, disputing with wolves the dry soil's bitter root; when
the most affecting objects of Cythera's temple are with games, charms, laughter led to your impure
bed, consider that poor luckless fellow stretched out near his grieving wife: content with the pleasures
he reaps at the breast of tears, he does not even suspect the existence of others; look ye at him
when you are denying yourself nothing, when you are swimming in the midst of glut, in a sea of
surfeit; behold him, I say, doggedly lacking even the basic necessities of life; regard his disconsolate
family, his trembling wife who tenderly divides herself between the cares she owes her husband,
languishing near her, and those Nature enjoins for love's offspring, deprived of the possibility to fulfill
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 124-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 124-
any of those duties so sacred unto her sensitive heart; if you can do it, without a tremor hear her beg
of you the leavings your cruelty refuses her!
Barbaric one, are these not at all human beings like you? and if they are of your kind, why should
you enjoy yourself when they lie dying? Eugénie, Eugénie, never slay the sacred voice of Nature in
your breast! it is to benevolence it will direct you despite yourself when you extricate from out of the
fire of passions that absorb it the clear tenor of Nature. Leave religious principles far behind
you—very well, I approve it; but abandon not the virtues sensibility inspires in us; 'twill never be but
by practicing them we will taste the sweetest, the most exquisite of the soul's delights. A good deed
will buy pardon for all your mind's depravities, it will soothe the remorse your misconduct will bring to
birth and, forming in the depths of your conscience a sacred asylum whereunto you will sometimes
repair, you will find there consolation for the excesses into which your errors will have dragged you.
Sister, I am young, yes, I am libertine, impious, I am capable of every mental obscenity, but my heart
remains to me, it is pure and, my friends, it is with it I am consoled for the irregularities of this my age.
DOLMANCE — Yes, Chevalier, you are young, your speeches illustrate it; you are wanting in
experience; the day will come, and I await it, when you will be seasoned; then, my dear, you will no
longer speak so well of mankind, for you will have its acquaintance. 'Twas men's ingratitude dried out
my heart, their perfidy which destroyed in me those baleful virtues for which, perhaps, like you, I was
also born. Now, if the vices of the one establish these dangerous virtues in the other, is it not then to
render youth a great service when one throttles those virtues in youth at an early hour? Oh, my
friend, how you do speak to me of remorse! Can remorse exist in the soul of him who recognizes
crime in nothing? Let your principles weed it out of you if you dread its sting; will it be possible to
repent of an action with whose indifference you are profoundly penetrated? When you no longer
believe evil anywhere exists, of what evil will you be able to repent?
LE CHEVALIER — It is not from the mind remorse comes; rather, 'tis the heart's issue, and never will
the intellect's sophistries blot out the soul's impulsions.
DOLMANCE — However, the heart deceives, because it is never anything but the expression of the
mind's miscalculations; allow the latter to mature and the former will yield in good time; we are
constantly led astray by false definitions when we wish to reason logically: I don't know what the
heart is, not I: I only use the word to denote the mind's frailties. One single, one unique flame sheds
its light in me: when I am whole and well, sound and sane, I am never misled by it; when I am old,
hypochondriacal, or pusillanimous, it deceives me; in which case I tell myself I am sensible, but in
truth I am merely weak and timid. Once again, Eugénie, I say it to you: be not abused by this
perfidious sensibility; be well convinced of it, it is nothing but the mind's weakness; one weeps not
save when one is afraid, and that is why kings are tyrants. Reject, spurn the Chevalier's insidious
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 125-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 125-
advice; in telling you to open your heart to all of misfortune's imaginary ills, he seeks to fashion for
you a host of troubles which, not being your own, would soon plunge you into an anguish and that
for no purpose. Ah, Eugénie, believe me when I tell you that the delights born of apathy are worth
much more than those you get of your sensibility; the latter can only touch the heart in one sense,
the other titillates and overwhelms all of one's being. In a word, is it possible to compare permissible
pleasures with pleasures which, to far more piquant delights, join those inestimable joys that come of
bursting socially imposed restraints and of the violation of every law?
EUGENIE — You triumph, Dolmancé, the laurel belongs to you! The Chevalier's harangue did but
barely brush my spirit, yours seduces and entirely wins it over. Ah, Chevalier, take my advice: speak
rather to the passions than to the virtues when you wish to persuade a woman.
MADAME DE SAINT-ANGE, to the Chevalier — Yes, my friend, fuck us to be sure, but let us have no
sermons from you: you'll not convert us, and you might upset the lessons with which we desire to
saturate this charming girl's mind.
EUGENIE — Upset? Oh, no, no; your work is finished; what fools call corruption is by now firmly
enough established in me to leave not even the hope of a return, and your principles are far too
thoroughly riven into my heart ever to be destroyed by the Chevalier's casuistries.
DOLMANCE — She is right, let us not discuss it any longer, Chevalier; you would come off poorly in
this debate, and we wish nothing from you but excellence.
LE CHEVALIER — So be it; we are met here for a purpose very different, I know, from the one I
wished to achieve; let's go directly to that destination, I agree with you; I'll save my ethics for others
who, less besotted than you, will be in a better way to hear me.
MADAME DE SAINT-ANGE — Yes, dear brother, yes, exactly, give us nothing but your fuck; we'll
forgo your morals; they are too gentle and mild for roués of our ilk.
EUGENIE — I greatly fear, Dolmancé, that this cruelty you recommend with such warmth may
somewhat influence your pleasures; I believe I have already remarked something of the sort: you are
hard when you take your pleasure; and I too might be able to confess to feeling a few dispositions to
viciousness… In order to clear my thoughts on the matter, please do tell me with what kind of an eye
you view the object that serves your pleasures?
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 126-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 126-
DOLMANCE — As absolutely null, that is how I view it, my dear; whether it does or does not share my
enjoyment, whether it feels contentment or whether it doesn't, whether apathy or even pain, provided
I am happy, the rest is absolutely all the same to me.
EUGENIE — Why, it is even preferable to have the object experience pain, is it not?
DOLMANCE — To be sure, 'tis by much to be preferred; I have given you my opinion on the matter;
this being the case, the repercussion within us is much more pronounced, and much more
energetically and much more promptly launches the animal spirits in the direction necessary to
voluptuousness. Explore the seraglios of Africa, those of Asia, those others of southern Europe, and
discover whether the masters of these celebrated harems are much concerned, when their pricks are
in the air, about giving pleasure to the individuals they use; they give orders, and they are obeyed,
they enjoy and no one dares make them answer; they are satisfied, and the others retire. Amongst
them are those who would punish as a lack of respect the audacity of partaking of their pleasure.
The king of Acahem pitilessly commands to be decapitated the woman who, in his presence, has
dared forget herself to the point of sharing his pleasure, and not infrequently the king performs the
beheading himself. This despot, one of Asia's most interesting, is exclusively guarded by women; he
never gives them orders save by signs; the cruelest death is the reward reserved for her who fails to
understand him, and the tortures are always executed either by his hand or before his eyes.
All that, Eugénie, is founded entirely upon the principles I have already developed for you. What is it
one desires when taking one's pleasure? that everything around us be occupied with nothing but
ourselves, think of naught but of us, care for us only. If the objects we employ know pleasure too,
you can be very sure they are less concerned for us than they are for themselves, and lo! our own
pleasure consequently disturbed. There is not a living man who does not wish to play the despot
when he is stiff: it seems to him his joy is less when others appear to have as much as he; by an
impulse of pride, very natural at this juncture, he would like to be the only one in the world capable of
experiencing what he feels: the idea of seeing another enjoy as he enjoys reduces him to a kind of
equality with that other, which impairs the unspeakable charm despotism causes him to feel.
23
'Tis
false as well to say there is pleasure in affording pleasure to others; that is to serve them, and the
man who is erect is far from desiring to be useful to anyone. On the contrary, by causing them hurt
he experiences all the charms a nervous personality relishes in putting its strength to use; 'tis then he
dominates, is a tyrant; and what a difference is there for the amour propre! Think not that it is silent
during such episodes.
23
The poverty of the French language compels us to employ words which, today, our happy government, with so much good sense,
disfavors; we hope our enlightened reader will understand us well and will not at all confound absurd political despotism with the very
delightful despotism of libertinage's passion.
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 127-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 127-
The act of enjoyment is a passion which, I confess, subordinates all others to it, but which
simultaneously unites them. This desire to dominate at this moment is so powerful in Nature that one
notices it even in animals. See whether those in captivity procreate as do those others that are free
and wild; the camel carries the matter further still: he will engender no more if he does not suppose
himself alone: surprise him and, consequently, show him a master, and he will fly, will instantly
separate himself from his companion. Had it not been Nature's intent that man possess this feeling of
superiority, she would not have created him stronger than the beings she destines to belong to him
at those moments. The debility to which Nature condemned woman incontestably proves that her
design is for man, who then more than ever enjoys his strength, to exercise it in all the violent forms
that suit him best, by means of tortures, if he be so inclined, or worse. Would pleasure's climax be a
kind of fury were it not the intention of this mother of humankind that behavior during copulation be
the same as behavior in anger? What well-made man, in a word, what man endowed with vigorous
organs does not desire, in one fashion or in another, to molest his partner during his enjoyment of
her? I know perfectly well that whole armies of idiots, who are never conscious of their sensations, will
have much trouble understanding the systems I am establishing; but what do I care for these fools?
'Tis not to them I am speaking; soft-headed women-worshipers, I leave them prostrate at their
insolent Dulcineas' feet, there let them wait for the sighs that will make them happy and, basely the
slaves of the sex they ought to dominate, I abandon them to the vile delights of wearing the chains
wherewith Nature has given them the right to overwhelm others! Let these beasts vegetate in the
abjection which defiles them—'twould be in vain to preach to them!—, but let them not denigrate
what they are incapable of understanding, and let them be persuaded that those who wish to
establish their principles pertinent to this subject only upon the free outbursts of a vigorous and
untrammeled imagination, as do we, you, Madame, and I, those like ourselves, I say, will always be
the only ones who merit to be listened to, the only ones proper to prescribe laws unto them and to
give lessons!…
Goddamn! I've an erection!… Get Augustin to come back here, if you please. (They ring; he
reappears.) 'Tis amazing how this fine lad's superb ass does preoccupy my mind while I talk! All my
ideas seem involuntarily to relate themselves to it… Show my eyes that masterpiece, Augustin… let
me kiss it and caress it, oh! for a quarter of an hour. Hither, my love, come, that I may, in your lovely
ass, render myself worthy of the flames with which Sodom sets me aglow. Ah, he has the most
beautiful buttocks… the whitest! I'd like to have Eugénie on her knees; she will suck his prick while I
advance; in this manner, she will expose her ass to the Chevalier, who'll plunge into it, and Madame
de Saint-Ange, astride Augustin's back, will present her buttocks to me: I'll kiss them; armed with the
cat-o'-nine-tails, she might surely, it should seem to me, by bending a little, be able to flog the
Chevalier who, thanks to this stimulating ritual, might resolve not to spare our student. (The position is
arranged.) Yes, that's it; let's do our best, my friends; indeed, it is a great pleasure to commission you
to execute tableaux; in all the world, there's not an artist fitter than you to realize them!… This rascal
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 128-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 128-
does have a nipping tight ass!… 'tis all I can do to get a foothold in it. Would you do me the great
kindness, Madame, of allowing me to bite and pinch your lovely flesh while I'm at my fuckery?
MADAME DE SAINT-ANGE — As much as you like, my friend; but, I warn you, I am ready to take my
revenge: I swear that, for every vexation you give me, I'll blow a fart into your mouth.
DOLMANCE — By God, now! that is a threat!… quite enough to drive me to offend you, my dear. (He
bites her.) Well! Let's see if you'll keep your word. (He receives a fart.) Ah, fuck, delicious! delicious!…
(He slaps her and immediately receives another fart.) Oh, 'tis divine, my angel! Save me a few for the
critical moment… and, be sure of it, I'll then treat you with the extremest cruelty… most barbarously I'll
use you… Fuck! I can tolerate this no longer… I discharge!… (He bites her, strikes her, and she farts
uninterruptedly.) Dost see how I deal with you, my fine fair bitch!… how I dominate you… once again
here… and there… and let the final insult be to the very idol at which I sacrificed! (He bites her
asshole; the circle of debauchees is broken.) And the rest of you—what have you been up to, my
friends?
EUGENIE, spewing forth the fuck from her mouth and her ass — Alas! dear master… you see how
your disciples have accommodated me! I have a mouthful of fuck and half a pint in my ass, 'tis all I
am disgorging on both ends.
DOLMANCE, sharply — Hold there I want you to deposit in my mouth what the Chevalier introduced
into your behind.
EUGENIE, assuming a proper position — What an extravagance!
DOLMANCE — Ah, there's nothing that can match fuck drained out of the depths of a pretty
behind… 'tis a food fit for the gods. (He swallows some.) Behold, 'tis neatly wiped up, eh? (Moving to
Augustin's ass, which he kisses.) Mesdames, I am going to ask your permission to spend a few
moments in a nearby room with this young man.
MADAME DE SAINT-ANGE — But can't you do here all you wish to do with him?
DOLMANCE, in a low and mysterious tone — No; there are certain things which strictly require to be
veiled.
EUGENIE — Ah, by God, tell us what you'd be about!
MADAME DE SAINT-ANGE — I'll not allow him to leave if he does not.
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 129-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 129-
DOLMANCE — You then wish to know?
EUGENIE — Absolutely.
DOLMANCE, dragging Augustin — Very well, Mesdames, I am going… but, indeed, it cannot be said.
MADAME DE SAINT-ANGE — Is there, do you think, any conceivable infamy we are not worthy to
hear of and execute?
LE CHEVALIER — Wait, sister. I'll tell you. (He whispers to the two women.)
EUGENIE, with a look of revulsion — You are right, 'tis hideous.
MADAME DE SAINT-ANGE — Why, I suspected as much.
DOLMANCE — You see very well I had to be silent upon this caprice; and you grasp now that one
must be alone and in the deepest shadow in order to give oneself over to such turpitudes.
EUGENIE — Do you want me to accompany you? I'll frig you while you amuse yourself with Augustin.
DOLMANCE — No, no, this is an affaire d'honneur and should take place between men only; a
woman would only disturb us… At your service in a moment, dear ladies. (He goes out, taking
Augustin with him.)
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 130-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 130-
DIALOGUE THE SIXTH
MADAME DE SAINT-ANGE
EUGENIE
LE CHEVALIER
MADAME DE SAINT-ANGE — Indeed, brother, your friend is greatly a libertine.
LE CHEVALIER — Then I've not deceived you in presenting him as such.
EUGENIE — I am persuaded there is not his equal anywhere in the world… Oh, my dearest, he is
charming; I do hope we will see him often.
MADAME DE SAINT-ANGE — I hear a knock… who might it be?… I gave orders… it must be very
urgent. Go see what it is, Chevalier, if you will be so kind.
LE CHEVALIER — A letter Lafleur has brought; he left hastily, saying he remembered the
instructions you had given him, but that the matter appeared to him as important as it was pressing.
MADAME DE SAINT-ANGE — Ah ha! what's this? 'Tis your father, Eugénie!
EUGENIE — My father!… then we are lost!…
MADAME DE SAINT-ANGE — Let's read it before we get upset. (She reads.)
Would you believe it, my dear lady? my unbearable wife, alarmed by my daughter's journey to your
house, is leaving immediately, with the intention of bringing Eugénie home. She imagines all sorts of
things… which, even were one to suppose them real, would, in truth, be but very ordinary and human
indeed. I request you to punish her impertinence with exceeding rigor; yesterday, I chastised her for
something similar: the lesson was not sufficient. Therefore, mystify her well, I beseech you on bended
knee, and believe that, no matter to what lengths you carry things, no complaint will be heard from
me. Tis a very long time this whore's been oppressing me… indeed … Do you follow me what you do
will be well done: that is all I can say to you. She will arrive shortly after my letter; keep yourself in
readiness. Adieu; I should indeed like to be numbered in your company. Do not, I beg of you, return
Eugénie to me until she is instructed. I am most content to leave the first gatherings to your hands,
but be well convinced however that you will have labored in some sort in my behalf.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested