asp net pdf viewer control c# : Split pdf application software cloud windows html .net class philosophy_in_the_bedroom9-part1718

MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 91-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 91-
YET ANOTHER EFFORT, FRENCHMEN, IF YOU WOULD BECOME REPUBLICANS
RELIGION
I am about to put forward some major ideas; they will be heard and pondered. If not all of them
please, surely a few will; in some sort, then, I shall have contributed to the progress of our age, and
shall be content. We near our goal, but haltingly: I confess that I am disturbed by the presentiment
that we are on the eve of failing once again to arrive there. Is it thought that goal will be attained
when at last we have been given laws? Abandon the notion; for what should we, who have no
religion, do with laws? We must have a creed, a creed befitting the republican character, something
far removed from ever being able to resume the worship of Rome. In this age, when we are
convinced that morals must be the basis of religion, and not religion of morals, we need a body of
beliefs in keeping with our customs and habits, something that would be their necessary
consequence, and that could, by lifting up the spirit, maintain it perpetually at the high level of this
precious liberty, which today the spirit has made its unique idol.
Well, I ask, is it thinkable that the doctrine of one of Titus' slaves, of a clumsy histrionic from Judea,
be fitting to a free and warlike nation that has just regenerated itself? No, my fellow countrymen, no;
you think nothing of the sort. If, to his misfortune, the Frenchman were to entomb himself in the grave
of Christianity, then on one side the priests' pride, their tyranny, their despotism, vices forever
cropping up in that impure horde, on the other side the baseness, the narrowness, the platitudes of
dogma and mystery of this infamous and fabulous religion, would, by blunting the fine edge of the
republican spirit, rapidly put about the Frenchman's neck the yoke which his vitality but yesterday
shattered.
Let us not lose sight of the fact this puerile religion was among our tyrants' best weapons: one of its
key dogmas was to render unto Caesar that which is Caesar's. However, we have dethroned Caesar,
we are no longer disposed to render him anything. Frenchmen, it would be in vain were you to
suppose that your oath-taking clergy today is in any essential manner different from yesterday's
non-juring clergy: there are inherent vices beyond all possibility of correction. Before ten years are
out—utilizing the Christian religion, its superstitions, its prejudices—your priests, their pledges
notwithstanding and though despoiled of their riches, are sure to reassert their empire over the souls
they shall have undermined and captured; they shall restore the monarchy, because the power of
kings has always reinforced that of the church; and your republican edifice, its foundations eaten
away, shall collapse.
O you who have axes ready to hand, deal the final blow to the tree of superstition; be not content to
prune its branches: uproot entirely a plant whose effects are so contagious. Well understand that
Split pdf - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break a pdf apart; split pdf by bookmark
Split pdf - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
pdf link to specific page; break up pdf into individual pages
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 92-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 92-
your system of liberty and equality too rudely affronts the ministers of Christ's altars for there ever to
be one of them who will either adopt it in good faith or give over seeking to topple it, if he is able to
recover any dominion over consciences. What priest, comparing the condition to which he has been
reduced with the one he formerly enjoyed, will not do his utmost to win back both the confidence and
the authority he has lost? And how many feeble and pusillanimous creatures will not speedily
become again the thralls of this cunning shavepate! Why is it imagined that the nuisances which
existed before cannot be revived to plague us anew? In the Christian church's infancy, were priests
less ambitious than they are today? You observe how far they advanced; to what do you suppose
they owed their success if not to the means religion furnished them? Well, if you do not absolutely
prohibit this religion, those who preach it, having yet the same means, will soon achieve the same
ends.
Then annihilate forever what may one day destroy your work. Consider that the fruit of your labors
being reserved for your grandchildren only, duty and probity command that you bequeath them none
of those seeds of disaster which could mean for your descendants a renewal of the chaos whence
we have with so much trouble just emerged. At the present moment our prejudices are weakening;
the people have already abjured the Catholic absurdities; they have already suppressed the temples,
sent the relics flying, and agreed that marriage is a mere civil undertaking; the smashed
confessionals serve as public meeting places; the former faithful, deserting the apostolic banquet,
leave the gods of flour dough to the mice. Frenchmen, an end to your waverings: all of Europe, one
hand halfway raised to the blindfold over her eyes, expects that effort by which you must snatch it
from her head. Make haste: holy Rome strains every nerve to repress your vigor; hurry, lest you give
Rome time to secure her grip upon the few proselytes remaining to her. Unsparingly and recklessly
smite off her proud and trembling head; and before two months the tree of liberty, overshadowing the
wreckage of Peter's Chair, will soar victoriously above all the contemptible Christian vestiges and idols
raised with such effrontery over the ashes of Cato and Brutus.
Frenchmen, I repeat it to you: Europe awaits her deliverance from scepter and censer alike. Know
well that you cannot possibly liberate her from royal tyranny without at the same time breaking for her
the fetters of religious superstition: the shackles of the one are too intimately linked to those of the
other; let one of the two survive, and you cannot avoid falling subject to the other you have left
intact. It is no longer before the knees of either an imaginary being or a vile impostor a republican
must prostrate himself; his only gods must now be courage and liberty. Rome disappeared
immediately Christianity was preached there, and France is doomed if she continues to revere it.
Let the absurd dogmas, the appalling mysteries, the impossible morality of this disgusting religion be
examined with attention, and it will be seen whether it befits a republic. Do you honestly believe I
would allow myself to be dominated by the opinion of a man I had just seen kneeling before the idiot
Online Split PDF file. Best free online split PDF tool.
Online Split PDF, Separate PDF file into Multiple ones. Download Free Trial. Split PDF file. Just upload your file by clicking
break pdf into multiple documents; pdf split file
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
File & Page Process. Create new file, load PDF from existing files. Merge, split PDF files. Insert, delete PDF pages. Re-order, rotate PDF pages. PDF Read.
split pdf files; break pdf file into multiple files
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 93-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 93-
priest of Jesus? No; certainly not! That eternally base fellow will eternally adhere, by dint of the
baseness of his attitudes, to the atrocities of the ancien régime; as of the moment he were able to
submit to the stupidities of a religion as abject as the one we are mad enough to acknowledge, he is
no longer competent to dictate laws or transmit learning to me; I no longer see him as other than a
slave to prejudice and superstition.
To convince ourselves, we have but to cast our eyes upon the handful of individuals who remain
attached to our fathers' insensate worship: we will see whether they are not all irreconcilable enemies
of the present system, we will see whether it is not amongst their numbers that all of that justly
contemned caste of royalists and aristocrats is included. Let the slave of a crowned brigand grovel, if
he pleases, at the feet of a plaster image; such an object is readymade for his soul of mud. He who
can serve kings must adore gods; but we, Frenchmen, but we, my fellow countrymen, we, rather than
once more crawl beneath such contemptible traces, we would die a thousand times over rather than
abase ourselves anew! Since we believe a cult necessary, let us imitate the Romans: actions,
passions, heroes—those were the objects of their respect. Idols of this sort elevated the soul,
electrified it, and more: they communicated to the spirit the virtues of the respected being. Minerva's
devotee coveted wisdom. Courage found its abode in his heart who worshiped Mars. Not a single
one of that great people's gods was deprived of energy; all of them infused into the spirit of him who
venerated them the fire with which they were themselves ablaze; and each Roman hoped someday
to be himself worshiped, each aspired to become as great at least as the deity he took for a model.
But what, on the contrary, do we find in Christianity's futile gods? What, I want to know, what does
this idiot's religion offer you?
8
Does the grubby Nazarene fraud inspire any great thoughts in you? His
foul, nay repellent mother, the shameless Mary—does she excite any virtues? And do you discover in
the saints who garnish the Christian Elysium, any example of greatness, of either heroism or virtue?
So alien to lofty conceptions is this miserable belief, that no artist can employ its attributes in the
monuments he raises; even in Rome itself, most of the embellishments of the papal palaces have
their origins in paganism, and as long as this world shall continue, paganism alone will arouse the
verve of great men.
Shall we find more motifs of grandeur in pure theism? Will acceptance of a chimera infuse into men's
minds the high degree of energy essential to republican virtues, and move men to cherish and
practice them? Let us imagine nothing of the kind; we have bid farewell to that phantom and, at the
present time, atheism is the one doctrine of all those prone to reason. As we gradually proceeded to
our enlightenment, we came more and more to feel that, motion being inherent in matter, the prime
mover existed only as an illusion, and that all that exists essentially having to be in motion, the motor
was useless; we sensed that this chimerical divinity, prudently invented by the earliest legislators,
8
A careful inspection of this religion will reveal to anyone that the impieties with which it is filled come in part from the Jews' ferocity and
innocence, and in part from the indifference and confusion of the Gentiles; instead of appropriating what was good in what the ancient peoples
had to offer, the Christians seem only to have formed their doctrine from a mixture of the vices they found everywhere.
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Tell VB.NET users how to: create a new PDF file and load PDF from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy
break apart a pdf in reader; break apart a pdf file
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
Jpeg. Convert PDF to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File and Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. File
pdf splitter; acrobat split pdf
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 94-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 94-
was, in their hands, simply one more means to enthrall us, and that, reserving unto themselves the
right to make the phantom speak, they knew very well how to get him to say nothing but what would
shore up the preposterous laws whereby they declared they served us. Lycurgus, Numa, Moses,
Jesus Christ, Mohammed, all these great rogues, all these great thought-tyrants, knew how to
associate the divinities they fabricated with their own boundless ambition; and, certain of captivating
the people with the sanction of those gods, they were always studious, as everyone knows, either to
consult them exclusively about, or to make them exclusively respond to, what they thought likely to
serve their own interests.
Therefore, today let us equally despise both that empty god impostors have celebrated, and all the
farce of religious subtleties surrounding a ridiculous belief: it is no longer with this bauble that free
men are to be amused. Let the total extermination of cults and denominations therefore enter into
the principles we broadcast throughout all Europe. Let us not be content with breaking scepters; we
will pulverize the idols forever: there is never more than a single step from superstition to royalism.
9
Does anyone doubt it? Then let him understand once and for all, that in every age one of the primary
concerns of kings has been to maintain the dominant religion as one of the political bases that best
sustains the throne. But, since it is shattered, that throne, and since it is, happily, shattered for all
time, let us have not the slightest qualm about also demolishing the thing that supplied its plinth.
Yes, citizens, religion is incompatible with the libertarian system; you have sensed as much. Never will
a free man stoop to Christianity's gods; never will its dogmas, its rites, its mysteries, or its morals suit a
republican. One more effort; since you labor to destroy all the old foundations, do not permit one of
them to survive, for let but one endure, 'tis enough, the rest will be restored. And how much more
certain of their revival must we not be if the one you tolerate is positively the source and cradle of all
the others! Let us give over thinking religion can be useful to man; once good laws are decreed unto
us, we will be able to dispense with religion. But, they assure us, the people stand in need of one; it
amuses them, they are soothed by it. Fine! Then, if that be the case, give us a religion proper to free
men; give us the gods of paganism. We shall willingly worship Jupiter, Hercules, Pallas; but we have
no use for a dimensionless god who nevertheless fills everything with his immensity, an omnipotent
god who never achieves what he wills, a supremely good being who creates malcontents only, a
friend of order in whose government everything is in turmoil. No, we want no more of a god who is at
loggerheads with Nature, who is the father of confusion, who moves man at the moment man
abandons himself to horrors; such a god makes us quiver with indignation, and we consign him
forever to the oblivion whence the infamous Robespierre wished to call him forth.
10
9
Inspect the history of every race: never will you find one of them changing the government it has for a monarchical system, save by reason
of the brutalization or the superstition that grips them; you will see kings always upholding religion, and religion sanctifying kings. One
knows the story of the steward and the cook: Hand me the pepper; I'll pass you the butter. Wretched mortals! are you then destined forever
to resemble these two rascals' master?
10
All religions are agreed in exalting the divinity's wisdom and power; but as soon as they expose his conduct, we find nothing but
imprudence, weakness, and folly. God, they say, created the world for himself, and up until the present time his efforts to make it honor him
have proven unsuccessful; God created us to worship him, and our days are spent mocking him! Unfortunate fellow, that God!
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page
break pdf into separate pages; pdf split pages
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page
split pdf into multiple files; break pdf into pages
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 95-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 95-
Frenchmen, in the stead of that unworthy phantom, we will substitute the imposing simulacra that
rendered Rome mistress of the earth; let us treat every Christian image as we have the tokens of
monarchy. There where once tyrants sat we have mounted emblems of liberty; in like manner we will
place effigies of great men on the pedestals once occupied by statues of the knaves Christianity
adored.
11
Let us cease to entertain doubts as to the effect of atheism in the country: have not the
peasants felt the necessity of the annihilation of the Catholic cult, so contradictory to the true
principles of freedom? Have they not watched undaunted, and without sorrow or pain, their altars
and presbyteries battered to bits? Ah! rest assured, they will renounce their ridiculous god in the
same way. The statues of Mars, of Minerva, and of Liberty will be set tip in the most conspicuous
places in the villages; holidays will be celebrated there every year; the prize will be decreed to the
worthiest citizen. At the entrance to a secluded wood, Venus, Hymen, and Love, erected beneath a
rustic temple, will receive lovers' homages; there, by the band of the Graces, Beauty will crown
Constancy. More than mere loving will be required in order to pose one's candidacy for the tiara; it will
be necessary to have merited love. Heroism, capabilities, humaneness, largeness of spirit, a proven
civism—those are the credentials the lover shall be obliged to present at his mistress' feet, and they
will be of far greater value than the titles of birth and wealth a fool's pride used to require. Some
virtues at least will be born of this worship, whereas nothing but crimes come of that other we had the
weakness to profess. This worship will ally itself to the liberty we serve; it will animate, nourish, inflame
liberty, whereas theism is in its essence and in its nature the most deadly enemy of the liberty we
adore.
Was a drop of blood spilled when the pagan idols were destroyed under the Eastern Empire? The
revolution, prepared by the stupidity of a people become slaves again, was accomplished without the
slightest hindrance or outcry. Why do we dread the work of philosophy as more painful than that of
despotism? It is only the priests who still hold the people, whom you hesitate to enlighten, captive at
the feet of their imaginary god: take the priests from the people, and the veil will fall away naturally.
Be persuaded that these people, a good deal wiser than you suppose them, once rid of tyranny's
irons, will soon also be rid of superstition's. You are afraid of the people unrestrained—how
ridiculous! Ah, believe me, citizens, the man not to be checked by the material sword of justice will
hardly be halted by the moral fear of hell's torments, at which he has laughed since childhood; in a
word, many crimes have been committed as a consequence of your theism, but never has it
prevented a single one.
If it is true that passions blind, that their effect is to cloud our eyes to dangers that surround us, how
may we suppose that those dangers which are remote, such as the punishments announced by your
god, can successfully dispel the cloud not even the blade of the law itself, constantly suspended
11
We are only speaking here of those great men whose reputation has been for a long while secure.
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page
acrobat split pdf into multiple files; pdf format specification
VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page
break apart a pdf; break a pdf into parts
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 96-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 96-
above the passions, is able to penetrate? If then it is patently clear that this supplementary check
imposed by the idea of a god becomes useless, if it is demonstrated that by its other effects it is
dangerous, then I wish to know, to what use can it be put, and from what motives should we lend our
support in order to prolong its existence?
Is someone about to tell me that we are not yet mature enough to consolidate our revolution in so
brilliant a manner? Ah, my fellow citizens, the road we took in '89 has been much more difficult than
the one still ahead of us, and we have little yet to do to conquer the opinion we have been harrying
since the time of the overwhelming of the Bastille. Let us firmly believe that a people wise enough
and brave enough to drag an impudent monarch from the heights of grandeur to the foot of the
scaffold, a people that, in these last few years, has been able to vanquish so many prejudices and
sweep away so many ridiculous impediments, will be sufficiently wise and brave to terminate the affair
and in the interests of the republic's well-being, abolish a mere phantom after having successfully
beheaded a real king.
Frenchmen, only strike the initial blows; your State education will then see to the rest. Get promptly to
the task of training the youth, it must be amongst your most important concerns; above all, build their
education upon a sound ethical basis, the ethical basis that was so neglected in your religious
education. Rather than fatigue your children's young organs with deific stupidities, replace them with
excellent social principles; instead of teaching them futile prayers which, by the time they are sixteen,
they will glory in having forgotten, let them be instructed in their duties toward society; train them to
cherish the virtues you scarcely ever mentioned in former times and which, without your religious
fables, are sufficient for their individual happiness; make them sense that this happiness consists in
rendering others as fortunate as we desire to be ourselves. If you repose these truths upon Christian
chimeras, as you so foolishly used to do, scarcely will your pupils have detected the absurd futility of
its foundations than they will overthrow the entire edifice, and they will become bandits for the simple
reason they believe the religion they have toppled forbids them to be bandits. On the other hand, if
you make them sense the necessity of virtue, uniquely because their happiness depends upon it,
egoism will turn them into honest people, and this law which dictates their behavior to men will always
be the surest, the soundest of all. Let there then be the most scrupulous care taken to avoid mixing
religious fantasies into this State education. Never lose sight of the fact it is free men we wish to form,
not the wretched worshipers of a god. Let a simple philosopher introduce these new pupils to the
inscrutable but wonderful sublimities of Nature; let him prove to them that awareness of a god, often
highly dangerous to men, never contributed to their happiness, and that they will not be happier for
acknowledging as a cause of what they do not understand, something they well understand even
less; that it is far less essential to inquire into the workings of Nature than to enjoy her and obey her
laws; that these laws are as wise as they are simple; that they are written in the hearts of all men;
and that it is but necessary to interrogate that heart to discern its impulse. If they wish absolutely that
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 97-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 97-
you speak to them of a creator, answer that things always having been what now they are, never
having had a beginning and never going to have an end, it thus becomes as useless as impossible
for man to be able to trace things back to an imaginary origin which would explain nothing and do not
a jot of good. Tell them that men are incapable of obtaining true notions of a being who does not
make his influence felt on one of our senses.
All our ideas are representations of objects that strike us: what is to represent to us the idea of a
god, who is plainly an idea without object? Is not such an idea, you will add when talking to them,
quite as impossible as effects without causes? Is an idea without prototype anything other than an
hallucination? Some scholars, you will continue, assure us that the idea of a god is innate, and that
mortals already have this idea when in their mothers' bellies. But, you will remark, that is false; every
principle is a judgment, every judgment the outcome of experience, and experience is only acquired
by the exercise of the senses; whence it follows that religious principles bear upon nothing whatever
and are not in the slightest innate. How, you will go on, how have they been able to convince rational
beings that the thing most difficult to understand is the most vital to them? It is that mankind has
been terrorized; it is that when one is afraid one ceases to reason; it is, above all, that we have been
advised to mistrust reason and defy it; and that, when the brain is disturbed, one believes anything
and examines nothing. Ignorance and fear, you will repeat to them, ignorance and fear—those are
the twin bases of every religion.
Man's uncertainty with respect to his god is, precisely, the cause for his attachment to his religion.
Man's fear in dark places is as much physical as moral; fear becomes habitual in him, and is changed
into need: he would believe he were lacking something even were he to have nothing more to hope
for or dread. Next, return to the utilitarian value of morals: apropos of this vast subject, give them
many more examples than lessons, many more demonstrations than books, and you will make good
citizens of them: you will turn them into fine warriors, fine fathers, fine husbands: you will fashion men
that much more devoted to their country's liberty, whose minds will be forever immune to servility,
forever hostile to servitude, whose genius will never be troubled by any religious terror. And then true
patriotism will shine in every spirit, and will reign there in all its force and purity, because it will become
the sovereign sentiment there, and no alien notion will dilute or cool its energy; then your second
generation will be sure, reliable, and your own work, consolidated by it, will go on to become the law
of the universe. But if, through fear or faintheartedness, these counsels are ignored, if the
foundations of the edifice we thought we destroyed are left intact, what then will happen? They will
rebuild upon these foundations, and will set thereupon the same colossi, with this difference, and it
will be a cruel one: the new structures will be cemented with such strength that neither your
generation nor ensuing ones will avail against them.
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 98-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 98-
Let there be no doubt of it: religions are the cradles of despotism: the foremost amongst all the
despots was a priest: the first king and the first emperor of Rome, Numa and Augustus, associated
themselves, the one and the other, with the sacerdotal; Constantine and Clovis were rather abbots
than sovereigns; Heliogabalus was priest of the sun. At all times, in every century, every age, there
has been such a connection between despotism and religion that it is infinitely apparent and
demonstrated a thousand times over, that in destroying one, the other must be undermined, for the
simple reason that the first will always put the law into the service of the second. I do not, however,
propose either massacres or expulsions. Such dreadful things have no place in the enlightened
mind. No, do not assassinate at all, do not expel at all; these are royal atrocities, or the brigands' who
imitate kings; it is not at all by acting as they that you will force men to look with horror upon them
who practiced those crimes. Let us reserve the employment of force for the idols; ridicule alone will
suffice for those who serve them: Julian's sarcasm wrought greater damage to Christianity than all
Nero's tortures. Yes, we shall destroy for all time any notion of a god, and make soldiers of his
priests; a few of them are already; let them keep to this trade, soldiering, so worthy of a republican;
but let them give us no more of their chimerical being nor of his nonsense-filled religion, the single
object of our scorn.
Let us condemn the first of those blessed charlatans who comes to us to say a few more words either
of god or of religion, let us condemn him to be jeered at, ridiculed, covered with filth in all the public
square and marketplaces in France's largest cities: imprisonment for life will be the reward of
whosoever falls a second time into the same error. Let the most insulting blasphemy, the most
atheistic works next be fully and openly authorized, in order to complete the extirpation from the
human heart and memory of those appalling pastimes of our childhood; let there be put in circulation
the writings most capable of finally illuminating the Europeans upon a matter so important, and let a
considerable prize, to be bestowed by the Nation, be awarded to him who, having said and
demonstrated everything upon this score, will leave to his countrymen no more than a scythe to mow
the land clean of all those phantoms, and a steady heart to hate them. In six months, the whole will
be done; your infamous god will be as naught, and all that without ceasing to be just, jealous of the
esteem of others without ceasing to be honest men; for it will have been sensed that the real friend
of his country must in no way be led about by chimeras, as is the slave of kings; that it is not, in a
word, either the frivolous hope of a better world nor fear of the greatest ills Nature sends us that must
lead a republican, whose only guide is virtue and whose one restraint is conscience.
MANNERS
After having made it clear that theism is in no wise suitable to a republican government, it seems to
me necessary to prove that French manners are equally unsuitable to it. This article is the more
crucial, for the laws to be promulgated will issue from manners, and will mirror them.
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 99-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 99-
Frenchmen, you are too intelligent to fail to sense that new government will require new manners.
That the citizens of a free State conduct themselves like a despotic king's slaves is unthinkable: the
differences of their interests, of their duties, of their relations amongst one another essentially
determine an entirely different manner of behaving in the world; a crowd of minor faults and of little
social indelicacies, thought of as very fundamental indeed under the rule of kings whose
expectations rose in keeping with the need they felt to impose curbs in order to appear respectable
and unapproachable to their subjects, are due to become as nothing with us; other crimes with which
we are acquainted under the names of regicide and sacrilege, in a system where kings and religion
will be unknown, in the same way must be annihilated in a republican State. In according freedom of
conscience and of the press, consider, citizens—for it is practically the same thing—whether freedom
of action must not be granted too: excepting direct clashes with the underlying principles of
government, there remain to you it is impossible to say how many fewer crimes to punish, because in
fact there are very few criminal actions in a society whose foundations are liberty and equality.
Matters well weighed and things closely inspected, only that is really criminal which rejects the law; for
Nature, equally dictating vices and virtues to us, in reason of our constitution, yet more
philosophically, in reason of the need Nature has of the one and the other, what she inspires in us
would become a very reliable gauge by which to adjust exactly what is good and bad. But, the better
to develop my thoughts upon so important a question, we will classify the different acts in man's life
that until the present it has pleased us to call criminal, and we will next square them to the true
obligations of a republican.
In every age, the duties of man have been considered under the following three categories:
1.Those his conscience and his credulity impose upon him, with what regards a supreme being;
2.Those he is obliged to fulfill toward his brethren;
3. Finally, those that relate only to himself.
The certainty in which we must be that no god meddles in our affairs and that, as necessary
creatures of Nature, like plants and animals, we are here because it would be impossible for us not to
be—this unshakable certainty, it is clear enough, at one stroke erases the first group of duties, those,
I wish to say, toward the divinity to which we erroneously believe ourselves beholden; and with them
vanish all religious crimes, all those comprehended under the indefinite names of impiety, sacrilege,
blasphemy, atheism, etc., all those, in brief, which Athens so unjustly punished in Alcibiades, and
France in the unfortunate Labarre. If there is anything extravagant in this world it is to see men, in
whom only shallowness of mind and poverty of ideas give rise to a notion of god and to what this god
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com   • p. 100-
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
TOP • TOC • 
3
• 
4
MARQUIS DE SADE • PHILOSOPHY IN THE BEDROOM • DIGITIZATION BY SUPERVERT 32C INC. •  supervert.com  • p. 100-
expects of them, nevertheless wish to determine what pleases and what angers their imagination's
ridiculous phantom. It would hence not be merely to tolerate indifferently each of the cults that I
should like to see us limit ourselves; I should like there to be perfect freedom to deride them all; I
should like men, gathered in no matter what temple to invoke the eternal who wears their image, to
be seen as so many comics in a theater, at whose antics everyone may go to laugh. Regarded in
any other light, religions become serious, and then important once again; they will soon stir up and
patronize opinions, and no sooner will people fall to disputing over religions than some will be beaten
into favoring religions.
12
Equality once wrecked by the preference or protection tendered one of them,
the government will soon disappear, and out of the reconstituted theocracy the aristocracy will be
reborn in a trice. I cannot repeat it to you too often: no more gods, Frenchmen, no more gods, lest
under their fatal influence you wish to be plunged back into all the horrors of despotism; but it is only
by jeering that you will destroy them; all the dangers they bring in their wake will instantly be revived
en masse if you pamper or ascribe any consequence to them. Carried away by anger, you overthrow
their idols? Not for a minute; have a bit of sport with them, and they will crumble to bits; once
withered, the opinion will collapse of its own accord.
I trust I have said enough to make plain that no laws ought to be decreed against religious crimes,
for that which offends an illusion offends nothing, and it would be the height of inconsistency to
punish those who outrage or who despise a creed or a cult whose priority to all others is established
by no evidence whatsoever. No, that would necessarily be to exhibit a partiality and, consequently, to
influence the scales of equality, that foremost law of your new government.
We move on to the second class of man's duties, those which bind him to his fellows; this is of all the
classes the most extensive.
Excessively vague upon man's relations with his brothers, Christian morals propose bases so filled
with sophistries that we are completely unable to accept them, since, if one is pleased to erect
principles, one ought scrupulously to guard against founding them upon sophistries. This absurd
morality tells us to love our neighbor as ourselves. Assuredly, nothing would be more sublime were it
ever possible for what is false to be beautiful. The point is not at all to love one's brethren as oneself,
since that is in defiance of all the laws of Nature, and since hers is the sole voice which must direct all
the actions in our life; it is only a question of loving others as brothers, as friends given us by Nature,
and with whom we should be able to live much better in a republican State, wherein the
disappearance of distances must necessarily tighten the bonds.
12
Each nation declares its religion the best of all and relies, to persuade one of it, upon an endless number of proofs not only in
disagreement with one another, but nearly all contradictory. In our profound ignorance, what is the one which may please god, supposing
now that there is a god? We should, if we are wise, either protect them all and equally, or proscribe them all in the same way; well, to
proscribe them is certainly the surer, since we have the moral assurance that all are mummeries, no one of which can be more pleasing
than another to a god who does not exist.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested