asp net pdf viewer control c# : Break pdf into multiple documents software Library cloud windows asp.net .net class PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics102-part1730

Figure 28.22This graph of
KE
rel
versus velocity shows how kinetic energy approaches infinity as velocity approaches the speed of light. It is thus not possible for an object
having mass to reach the speed of light. Also shown is
KE
class
, the classical kinetic energy, which is similar to relativistic kinetic energy at low velocities. Note that much
more energy is required to reach high velocities than predicted classically.
Example 28.8Comparing Kinetic Energy: Relativistic Energy Versus Classical Kinetic Energy
An electron has a velocity
v=0.990c
. (a) Calculate the kinetic energy in MeV of the electron. (b) Compare this with the classical value for
kinetic energy at this velocity. (The mass of an electron is
9.11×10
−31
kg
.)
Strategy
The expression for relativistic kinetic energy is always correct, but for (a) it must be used since the velocity is highly relativistic (close to
c
). First,
we will calculate the relativistic factor
γ
, and then use it to determine the relativistic kinetic energy. For (b), we will calculate the classical kinetic
energy (which would be close to the relativistic value if
v
were less than a few percent of
c
) and see that it is not the same.
Solution for (a)
1. Identify the knowns.
v=0.990c
;
m=9.11×10
−31
kg
2. Identify the unknown.
KE
rel
3. Choose the appropriate equation.
KE
rel
=
γ−1
mc
2
4. Plug the knowns into the equation.
First calculate
γ
. We will carry extra digits because this is an intermediate calculation.
(28.57)
γ =
1
1−
v
2
c
2
=
1
1−
(0.990c)
2
c
2
=
1
1−(0.990)
2
= 7.0888
Next, we use this value to calculate the kinetic energy.
(28.58)
KE
rel
= (γ−1)mc
2
= (7.0888−1)(9.11×10
–31
kg)(3.00×10
8
m/s)
2
= 4.99×10
–13
J
5. Convert units.
(28.59)
KE
rel
= (4.99×10
–13
J)
1 MeV
1.60×10
–13
J
= 3.12 MeV
Solution for (b)
1. List the knowns.
v=0.990c
;
m=9.11×10
−31
kg
2. List the unknown.
KE
class
3. Choose the appropriate equation.
KE
class
=
1
2
mv
2
4. Plug the knowns into the equation.
CHAPTER 28 | SPECIAL RELATIVITY Y 1019
Break pdf into multiple documents - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
break apart a pdf in reader; split pdf files
Break pdf into multiple documents - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break pdf into multiple pages; pdf link to specific page
(28.60)
KE
class
=
1
2
mv
2
=
1
2
(9.00×10
–31
kg)(0.990)
2
(3.00×10
8
m/s)
2
= 4.02×10
–14
J
5. Convert units.
(28.61)
KE
class
= 4.02×10
–14
J
1 MeV
1.60×10
–13
J
= 0.251 MeV
Discussion
As might be expected, since the velocity is 99.0% of the speed of light, the classical kinetic energy is significantly off from the correct relativistic
value. Note also that the classical value is much smaller than the relativistic value. In fact,
KE
rel
/KE
class
=12.4
here. This is some indication
of how difficult it is to get a mass moving close to the speed of light. Much more energy is required than predicted classically. Some people
interpret this extra energy as going into increasing the mass of the system, but, as discussed inRelativistic Momentum, this cannot be verified
unambiguously. What is certain is that ever-increasing amounts of energy are needed to get the velocity of a mass a little closer to that of light.
An energy of 3 MeV is a very small amount for an electron, and it can be achieved with present-day particle accelerators. SLAC, for example,
can accelerate electrons to over
50×10
9
eV=50,000 MeV
.
Is there any point in getting
v
a little closer to c than 99.0% or 99.9%? The answer is yes. We learn a great deal by doing this. The energy that
goes into a high-velocity mass can be converted to any other form, including into entirely new masses. (SeeFigure 28.23.) Most of what we
know about the substructure of matter and the collection of exotic short-lived particles in nature has been learned this way. Particles are
accelerated to extremely relativistic energies and made to collide with other particles, producing totally new species of particles. Patterns in the
characteristics of these previously unknown particles hint at a basic substructure for all matter. These particles and some of their characteristics
will be covered inParticle Physics.
Figure 28.23The Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, near Batavia, Illinois, was a subatomic particle collider that accelerated protons and antiprotons to attain
energies up to 1 Tev (a trillion electronvolts). The circular ponds near the rings were built to dissipate waste heat. This accelerator was shut down in September 2011.
(credit: Fermilab, Reidar Hahn)
Relativistic Energy and Momentum
We know classically that kinetic energy and momentum are related to each other, since
(28.62)
KE
class
=
p
2
2m
=
(mv)
2
2m
=
1
2
mv
2
.
Relativistically, we can obtain a relationship between energy and momentum by algebraically manipulating their definitions. This produces
(28.63)
E
2
=(pc)
2
+(mc
2
)
2
,
where
E
is the relativistic total energy and
p
is the relativistic momentum. This relationship between relativistic energy and relativistic momentum is
more complicated than the classical, but we can gain some interesting new insights by examining it. First, total energy is related to momentum and
rest mass. At rest, momentum is zero, and the equation gives the total energy to be the rest energy
mc
2
(so this equation is consistent with the
discussion of rest energy above). However, as the mass is accelerated, its momentum
p
increases, thus increasing the total energy. At sufficiently
high velocities, the rest energy term
(mc
2
)
2
becomes negligible compared with the momentum term
(pc)
2
; thus,
E=pc
at extremely relativistic
velocities.
If we consider momentum
p
to be distinct from mass, we can determine the implications of the equation
E
2
=(pc)
2
+(mc
2
)
2
,
for a particle that
has no mass. If we take
m
to be zero in this equation, then
E=pc
, or
p=E/c
. Massless particles have this momentum. There are several
massless particles found in nature, including photons (these are quanta of electromagnetic radiation). Another implication is that a massless particle
must travel at speed
c
and only at speed
c
. While it is beyond the scope of this text to examine the relationship in the equation
E
2
=(pc)
2
+(mc
2
)
2
,
in detail, we can see that the relationship has important implications in special relativity.
1020 CHAPTER 28 | SPECIAL RELATIVITY
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class.
pdf splitter; acrobat split pdf into multiple files
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Offer PDF page break inserting function. PDF document editor library control, RasterEdge XDoc.PDF, offers easy to add & insert an (empty) page into an existing
break pdf file into multiple files; break a pdf password
classical velocity addition:
first postulate of special relativity:
inertial frame of reference:
length contraction:
Michelson-Morley experiment:
proper length:
proper time:
relativistic Doppler effects:
Problem-Solving Strategies for Relativity
1. Examine the situation to determine that it is necessary to use relativity. Relativistic effects are related to
γ=
1
1−
v
2
c
2
, the quantitative
relativistic factor. If
γ
is very close to 1, then relativistic effects are small and differ very little from the usually easier classical calculations.
2. Identify exactly what needs to be determined in the problem (identify the unknowns).
3. Make a list of what is given or can be inferred from the problem as stated (identify the knowns).Look in particular for information on relative
velocity
v
.
4. Make certain you understand the conceptual aspects of the problem before making any calculations.Decide, for example, which observer
sees time dilated or length contracted before plugging into equations. If you have thought about who sees what, who is moving with the
event being observed, who sees proper time, and so on, you will find it much easier to determine if your calculation is reasonable.
5. Determine the primary type of calculation to be done to find the unknowns identified above.You will find the section summary helpful in
determining whether a length contraction, relativistic kinetic energy, or some other concept is involved.
6. Do not round off during the calculation.As noted in the text, you must often perform your calculations to many digits to see the desired
effect. You may round off at the very end of the problem, but do not use a rounded number in a subsequent calculation.
7. Check the answer to see if it is reasonable: Does it make sense?This may be more difficult for relativity, since we do not encounter it
directly. But you can look for velocities greater than
c
or relativistic effects that are in the wrong direction (such as a time contraction where
a dilation was expected).
Check Your Understanding
A photon decays into an electron-positron pair. What is the kinetic energy of the electron if its speed is
0.992c
?
Solution
(28.64)
KE
rel
= (γ−1)mc
2
=
1
1−
v
2
c
2
−1
mc
2
=
1
1−
(0.992c)
2
c
2
−1
(9.11×10
−31
kg)(3.00×10
8
m/s)
2
=5.67×10
−13
J
Glossary
the method of adding velocities when
v<<c
; velocities add like regular numbers in one-dimensional motion:
u=v+u
, where
v
is the velocity between two observers,
u
is the velocity of an object relative to one observer, and
u
is the velocity
relative to the other observer
the idea that the laws of physics are the same and can be stated in their simplest form in all inertial frames of
reference
a reference frame in which a body at rest remains at rest and a body in motion moves at a constant speed in a
straight line unless acted on by an outside force
L
, the shortening of the measured length of an object moving relative to the observer’s frame:
L=L
0
1−
v
2
c
2
=
L
0
γ
an investigation performed in 1887 that proved that the speed of light in a vacuum is the same in all frames of
reference from which it is viewed
L
0
; the distance between two points measured by an observer who is at rest relative to both of the points; Earth-bound observers
measure proper length when measuring the distance between two points that are stationary relative to the Earth
Δt
0
. the time measured by an observer at rest relative to the event being observed:
Δt=
Δt
0
1−
v
2
c
2
=γΔt
0
, where
γ=
1
1−
v
2
c
2
a change in wavelength of radiation that is moving relative to the observer; the wavelength of the radiation is longer
(called a red shift) than that emitted by the source when the source moves away from the observer and shorter (called a blue shift) when the
source moves toward the observer; the shifted wavelength is described by the equation
λ
obs
s
1+
u
c
1−
u
c
where
λ
obs
is the observed wavelength,
λ
s
is the source wavelength, and
u
is the velocity of the source to the observer
CHAPTER 28 | SPECIAL RELATIVITY Y 1021
relativistic kinetic energy:
relativistic momentum:
relativistic velocity addition:
relativity:
rest energy:
rest mass:
second postulate of special relativity:
special relativity:
time dilation:
total energy:
twin paradox:
the kinetic energy of an object moving at relativistic speeds:
KE
rel
=
γ−1
mc
2
, where
γ=
1
1−
v
2
c
2
p
, the momentum of an object moving at relativistic velocity;
p=γmu
, where
m
is the rest mass of the object,
u
is
its velocity relative to an observer, and the relativistic factor
γ=
1
1−
u
2
c
2
the method of adding velocities of an object moving at a relativistic speed:
u=
v+u
1+
vu
c
2
, where
v
is the relative
velocity between two observers,
u
is the velocity of an object relative to one observer, and
u
is the velocity relative to the other observer
the study of how different observers measure the same event
the energy stored in an object at rest:
E
0
=mc
2
the mass of an object as measured by a person at rest relative to the object
the idea that the speed of light
c
is a constant, independent of the relative motion of the source and
observer
the theory that, in an inertial frame of reference, the motion of an object is relative to the frame from which it is viewed or
measured
the phenomenon of time passing slower to an observer who is moving relative to another observer
defined as
E=γmc
2
, where
γ=
1
1−
v
2
c
2
this asks why a twin traveling at a relativistic speed away and then back towards the Earth ages less than the Earth-bound twin.
The premise to the paradox is faulty because the traveling twin is accelerating, and special relativity does not apply to accelerating frames of
reference
Section Summary
28.1Einstein’s Postulates
• Relativity is the study of how different observers measure the same event.
• Modern relativity is divided into two parts. Special relativity deals with observers who are in uniform (unaccelerated) motion, whereas general
relativity includes accelerated relative motion and gravity. Modern relativity is correct in all circumstances and, in the limit of low velocity and
weak gravitation, gives the same predictions as classical relativity.
• An inertial frame of reference is a reference frame in which a body at rest remains at rest and a body in motion moves at a constant speed in a
straight line unless acted on by an outside force.
• Modern relativity is based on Einstein’s two postulates. The first postulate of special relativity is the idea that the laws of physics are the same
and can be stated in their simplest form in all inertial frames of reference. The second postulate of special relativity is the idea that the speed of
light
c
is a constant, independent of the relative motion of the source and observer.
• The Michelson-Morley experiment demonstrated that the speed of light in a vacuum is independent of the motion of the Earth about the Sun.
28.2Simultaneity And Time Dilation
• Two events are defined to be simultaneous if an observer measures them as occurring at the same time. They are not necessarily simultaneous
to all observers—simultaneity is not absolute.
• Time dilation is the phenomenon of time passing slower for an observer who is moving relative to another observer.
• Observers moving at a relative velocity
v
do not measure the same elapsed time for an event. Proper time
Δt
0
is the time measured by an
observer at rest relative to the event being observed. Proper time is related to the time
Δt
measured by an Earth-bound observer by the
equation
Δt=
Δt
0
1−
v
2
c
2
=γΔt
0
,
where
γ=
1
1−
v
2
c
2
.
• The equation relating proper time and time measured by an Earth-bound observer implies that relative velocity cannot exceed the speed of light.
1022 CHAPTER 28 | SPECIAL RELATIVITY
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
• The twin paradox asks why a twin traveling at a relativistic speed away and then back towards the Earth ages less than the Earth-bound twin.
The premise to the paradox is faulty because the traveling twin is accelerating. Special relativity does not apply to accelerating frames of
reference.
• Time dilation is usually negligible at low relative velocities, but it does occur, and it has been verified by experiment.
28.3Length Contraction
• All observers agree upon relative speed.
• Distance depends on an observer’s motion. Proper length
L
0
is the distance between two points measured by an observer who is at rest
relative to both of the points. Earth-bound observers measure proper length when measuring the distance between two points that are
stationary relative to the Earth.
• Length contraction
L
is the shortening of the measured length of an object moving relative to the observer’s frame:
L=L
0
1−
v
2
c
2
=
L
0
γ
.
28.4Relativistic Addition of Velocities
• With classical velocity addition, velocities add like regular numbers in one-dimensional motion:
u=v+u
, where
v
is the velocity between two
observers,
u
is the velocity of an object relative to one observer, and
u
is the velocity relative to the other observer.
• Velocities cannot add to be greater than the speed of light. Relativistic velocity addition describes the velocities of an object moving at a
relativistic speed:
u=
v+u
1+
vu
c
2
• An observer of electromagnetic radiation seesrelativistic Doppler effectsif the source of the radiation is moving relative to the observer. The
wavelength of the radiation is longer (called a red shift) than that emitted by the source when the source moves away from the observer and
shorter (called a blue shift) when the source moves toward the observer. The shifted wavelength is described by the equation
λ
obs
s
1+
u
c
1−
u
c
λ
obs
is the observed wavelength,
λ
s
is the source wavelength, and
u
is the relative velocity of the source to the observer.
28.5Relativistic Momentum
• The law of conservation of momentum is valid whenever the net external force is zero and for relativistic momentum. Relativistic momentum
p
is classical momentum multiplied by the relativistic factor
γ
.
p=γmu
, where
m
is the rest mass of the object,
u
is its velocity relative to an observer, and the relativistic factor
γ=
1
1−
u
2
c
2
.
• At low velocities, relativistic momentum is equivalent to classical momentum.
• Relativistic momentum approaches infinity as
u
approaches
c
. This implies that an object with mass cannot reach the speed of light.
• Relativistic momentum is conserved, just as classical momentum is conserved.
28.6Relativistic Energy
• Relativistic energy is conserved as long as we define it to include the possibility of mass changing to energy.
• Total Energy is defined as:
E=γmc
2
, where
γ=
1
1−
v
2
c
2
.
• Rest energy is
E
0
=mc
2
, meaning that mass is a form of energy. If energy is stored in an object, its mass increases. Mass can be destroyed
to release energy.
• We do not ordinarily notice the increase or decrease in mass of an object because the change in mass is so small for a large increase in
energy.
• The relativistic work-energy theorem is
W
net
=EE
0
=γmc
2
mc
2
=
γ−1
mc
2
.
• Relativistically,
W
net
=KE
rel
, where
KE
rel
is the relativistic kinetic energy.
• Relativistic kinetic energy is
KE
rel
=
γ−1
mc
2
, where
γ=
1
1−
v
2
c
2
. At low velocities, relativistic kinetic energy reduces to classical kinetic
energy.
• No object with mass can attain the speed of lightbecause an infinite amount of work and an infinite amount of energy input is required to
accelerate a mass to the speed of light.
• The equation
E
2
=(pc)
2
+(mc
2
)
2
relates the relativistic total energy
E
and the relativistic momentum
p
. At extremely high velocities, the
rest energy
mc
2
becomes negligible, and
E=pc
.
CHAPTER 28 | SPECIAL RELATIVITY Y 1023
Conceptual Questions
28.1Einstein’s Postulates
1.Which of Einstein’s postulates of special relativity includes a concept that does not fit with the ideas of classical physics? Explain.
2.Is Earth an inertial frame of reference? Is the Sun? Justify your response.
3.When you are flying in a commercial jet, it may appear to you that the airplane is stationary and the Earth is moving beneath you. Is this point of
view valid? Discuss briefly.
28.2Simultaneity And Time Dilation
4.Does motion affect the rate of a clock as measured by an observer moving with it? Does motion affect how an observer moving relative to a clock
measures its rate?
5.To whom does the elapsed time for a process seem to be longer, an observer moving relative to the process or an observer moving with the
process? Which observer measures proper time?
6.How could you travel far into the future without aging significantly? Could this method also allow you to travel into the past?
28.3Length Contraction
7.To whom does an object seem greater in length, an observer moving with the object or an observer moving relative to the object? Which observer
measures the object’s proper length?
8.Relativistic effects such as time dilation and length contraction are present for cars and airplanes. Why do these effects seem strange to us?
9.Suppose an astronaut is moving relative to the Earth at a significant fraction of the speed of light. (a) Does he observe the rate of his clocks to
have slowed? (b) What change in the rate of Earth-bound clocks does he see? (c) Does his ship seem to him to shorten? (d) What about the distance
between stars that lie on lines parallel to his motion? (e) Do he and an Earth-bound observer agree on his velocity relative to the Earth?
28.4Relativistic Addition of Velocities
10.Explain the meaning of the terms “red shift” and “blue shift” as they relate to the relativistic Doppler effect.
11.What happens to the relativistic Doppler effect when relative velocity is zero? Is this the expected result?
12.Is the relativistic Doppler effect consistent with the classical Doppler effect in the respect that
λ
obs
is larger for motion away?
13.All galaxies farther away than about
50×10
6
ly
exhibit a red shift in their emitted light that is proportional to distance, with those farther and
farther away having progressively greater red shifts. What does this imply, assuming that the only source of red shift is relative motion? (Hint: At
these large distances, it is space itself that is expanding, but the effect on light is the same.)
28.5Relativistic Momentum
14.How does modern relativity modify the law of conservation of momentum?
15.Is it possible for an external force to be acting on a system and relativistic momentum to be conserved? Explain.
28.6Relativistic Energy
16.How are the classical laws of conservation of energy and conservation of mass modified by modern relativity?
17.What happens to the mass of water in a pot when it cools, assuming no molecules escape or are added? Is this observable in practice? Explain.
18.Consider a thought experiment. You place an expanded balloon of air on weighing scales outside in the early morning. The balloon stays on the
scales and you are able to measure changes in its mass. Does the mass of the balloon change as the day progresses? Discuss the difficulties in
carrying out this experiment.
19.The mass of the fuel in a nuclear reactor decreases by an observable amount as it puts out energy. Is the same true for the coal and oxygen
combined in a conventional power plant? If so, is this observable in practice for the coal and oxygen? Explain.
20.We know that the velocity of an object with mass has an upper limit of
c
. Is there an upper limit on its momentum? Its energy? Explain.
21.Given the fact that light travels at
c
, can it have mass? Explain.
22.If you use an Earth-based telescope to project a laser beam onto the Moon, you can move the spot across the Moon’s surface at a velocity
greater than the speed of light. Does this violate modern relativity? (Note that light is being sent from the Earth to the Moon, not across the surface of
the Moon.)
1024 CHAPTER 28 | SPECIAL RELATIVITY
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Problems & Exercises
28.2Simultaneity And Time Dilation
1.(a) What is
γ
if
v=0.250c
? (b) If
v=0.500c
?
2.(a) What is
γ
if
v=0.100c
? (b) If
v=0.900c
?
3.Particles called
π
-mesons are produced by accelerator beams. If
these particles travel at
2.70×10
8
m/s
and live
2.60×10
−8
s
when
at rest relative to an observer, how long do they live as viewed in the
laboratory?
4.Suppose a particle called a kaon is created by cosmic radiation
striking the atmosphere. It moves by you at
0.980c
, and it lives
1.24×10
−8
s
when at rest relative to an observer. How long does it
live as you observe it?
5.A neutral
π
-meson is a particle that can be created by accelerator
beams. If one such particle lives
1.40×10
−16
s
as measured in the
laboratory, and
0.840×10
−16
s
when at rest relative to an observer,
what is its velocity relative to the laboratory?
6.A neutron lives 900 s when at rest relative to an observer. How fast is
the neutron moving relative to an observer who measures its life span
to be 2065 s?
7.If relativistic effects are to be less than 1%, then
γ
must be less than
1.01. At what relative velocity is
γ=1.01
?
8.If relativistic effects are to be less than 3%, then
γ
must be less than
1.03. At what relative velocity is
γ=1.03
?
9.(a) At what relative velocity is
γ=1.50
? (b) At what relative velocity
is
γ=100
?
10.(a) At what relative velocity is
γ=2.00
? (b) At what relative
velocity is
γ=10.0
?
11.Unreasonable Results
(a) Find the value of
γ
for the following situation. An Earth-bound
observer measures 23.9 h to have passed while signals from a high-
velocity space probe indicate that
24.0 h
have passed on board. (b)
What is unreasonable about this result? (c) Which assumptions are
unreasonable or inconsistent?
28.3Length Contraction
12.A spaceship, 200 m long as seen on board, moves by the Earth at
0.970c
. What is its length as measured by an Earth-bound observer?
13.How fast would a 6.0 m-long sports car have to be going past you in
order for it to appear only 5.5 m long?
14.(a) How far does the muon inExample 28.1travel according to the
Earth-bound observer? (b) How far does it travel as viewed by an
observer moving with it? Base your calculation on its velocity relative to
the Earth and the time it lives (proper time). (c) Verify that these two
distances are related through length contraction
γ=3.20
.
15.(a) How long would the muon inExample 28.1have lived as
observed on the Earth if its velocity was
0.0500c
? (b) How far would it
have traveled as observed on the Earth? (c) What distance is this in the
muon’s frame?
16.(a) How long does it take the astronaut inExample 28.2to travel
4.30 ly at
0.99944c
(as measured by the Earth-bound observer)? (b)
How long does it take according to the astronaut? (c) Verify that these
two times are related through time dilation with
γ=30.00
as given.
17.(a) How fast would an athlete need to be running for a 100-m race
to look 100 yd long? (b) Is the answer consistent with the fact that
relativistic effects are difficult to observe in ordinary circumstances?
Explain.
18.Unreasonable Results
(a) Find the value of
γ
for the following situation. An astronaut
measures the length of her spaceship to be 25.0 m, while an Earth-
bound observer measures it to be 100 m. (b) What is unreasonable
about this result? (c) Which assumptions are unreasonable or
inconsistent?
19.Unreasonable Results
A spaceship is heading directly toward the Earth at a velocity of
0.800c
. The astronaut on board claims that he can send a canister
toward the Earth at
1.20c
relative to the Earth. (a) Calculate the
velocity the canister must have relative to the spaceship. (b) What is
unreasonable about this result? (c) Which assumptions are
unreasonable or inconsistent?
28.4Relativistic Addition of Velocities
20.Suppose a spaceship heading straight towards the Earth at
0.750c
can shoot a canister at
0.500c
relative to the ship. (a) What
is the velocity of the canister relative to the Earth, if it is shot directly at
the Earth? (b) If it is shot directly away from the Earth?
21.Repeat the previous problem with the ship heading directly away
from the Earth.
22.If a spaceship is approaching the Earth at
0.100c
and a message
capsule is sent toward it at
0.100c
relative to the Earth, what is the
speed of the capsule relative to the ship?
23.(a) Suppose the speed of light were only
3000 m/s
. A jet fighter
moving toward a target on the ground at
800 m/s
shoots bullets, each
having a muzzle velocity of
1000 m/s
. What are the bullets’ velocity
relative to the target? (b) If the speed of light was this small, would you
observe relativistic effects in everyday life? Discuss.
24.If a galaxy moving away from the Earth has a speed of
1000 km/s
and emits
656 nm
light characteristic of hydrogen (the most common
element in the universe). (a) What wavelength would we observe on the
Earth? (b) What type of electromagnetic radiation is this? (c) Why is the
speed of the Earth in its orbit negligible here?
25.A space probe speeding towards the nearest star moves at
0.250c
and sends radio information at a broadcast frequency of 1.00
GHz. What frequency is received on the Earth?
26.If two spaceships are heading directly towards each other at
0.800c
, at what speed must a canister be shot from the first ship to
approach the other at
0.999c
as seen by the second ship?
27.Two planets are on a collision course, heading directly towards
each other at
0.250c
. A spaceship sent from one planet approaches
the second at
0.750c
as seen by the second planet. What is the
velocity of the ship relative to the first planet?
28.When a missile is shot from one spaceship towards another, it
leaves the first at
0.950c
and approaches the other at
0.750c
. What
is the relative velocity of the two ships?
29.What is the relative velocity of two spaceships if one fires a missile
at the other at
0.750c
and the other observes it to approach at
0.950c
?
30.Near the center of our galaxy, hydrogen gas is moving directly away
from us in its orbit about a black hole. We receive 1900 nm
electromagnetic radiation and know that it was 1875 nm when emitted
by the hydrogen gas. What is the speed of the gas?
CHAPTER 28 | SPECIAL RELATIVITY Y 1025
31.A highway patrol officer uses a device that measures the speed of
vehicles by bouncing radar off them and measuring the Doppler shift.
The outgoing radar has a frequency of 100 GHz and the returning echo
has a frequency 15.0 kHz higher. What is the velocity of the vehicle?
Note that there are two Doppler shifts in echoes. Be certain not to round
off until the end of the problem, because the effect is small.
32.Prove that for any relative velocity
v
between two observers, a
beam of light sent from one to the other will approach at speed
c
(provided that
v
is less than
c
, of course).
33.Show that for any relative velocity
v
between two observers, a
beam of light projected by one directly away from the other will move
away at the speed of light (provided that
v
is less than
c
, of course).
34.(a) All but the closest galaxies are receding from our own Milky Way
Galaxy. If a galaxy
12.0×10
9
ly
ly away is receding from us at 0.
0.900c
, at what velocity relative to us must we send an exploratory
probe to approach the other galaxy at
0.990c
, as measured from that
galaxy? (b) How long will it take the probe to reach the other galaxy as
measured from the Earth? You may assume that the velocity of the
other galaxy remains constant. (c) How long will it then take for a radio
signal to be beamed back? (All of this is possible in principle, but not
practical.)
28.5Relativistic Momentum
35.Find the momentum of a helium nucleus having a mass of
6.68×10
–27
kg
that is moving at
0.200c
.
36.What is the momentum of an electron traveling at
0.980c
?
37.(a) Find the momentum of a
1.00×10
9
kg
asteroid heading
towards the Earth at
30.0 km/s
. (b) Find the ratio of this momentum to
the classical momentum. (Hint: Use the approximation that
γ=1+(1/2)v
2
/c
2
at low velocities.)
38.(a) What is the momentum of a 2000 kg satellite orbiting at 4.00 km/
s? (b) Find the ratio of this momentum to the classical momentum.
(Hint: Use the approximation that
γ=1+(1/2)v
2
/c
2
at low
velocities.)
39.What is the velocity of an electron that has a momentum of
3.04×10
–21
kg⋅m/s
? Note that you must calculate the velocity to at
least four digits to see the difference from
c
.
40.Find the velocity of a proton that has a momentum of
4.48×–10
-19
kg⋅m/s.
41.(a) Calculate the speed of a
1.00-μg
particle of dust that has the
same momentum as a proton moving at
0.999c
. (b) What does the
small speed tell us about the mass of a proton compared to even a tiny
amount of macroscopic matter?
42.(a) Calculate
γ
for a proton that has a momentum of
1.00 kg⋅m/s.
(b) What is its speed? Such protons form a rare
component of cosmic radiation with uncertain origins.
28.6Relativistic Energy
43.What is the rest energy of an electron, given its mass is
9.11×10
−31
kg
? Give your answer in joules and MeV.
44.Find the rest energy in joules and MeV of a proton, given its mass is
1.67×10
−27
kg
.
45.If the rest energies of a proton and a neutron (the two constituents
of nuclei) are 938.3 and 939.6 MeV respectively, what is the difference
in their masses in kilograms?
46.The Big Bang that began the universe is estimated to have released
10
68
J
of energy. How many stars could half this energy create,
assuming the average star’s mass is
4.00×10
30
kg
?
47.A supernova explosion of a
2.00×10
31
kg
star produces
1.00×10
44
kg
of energy. (a) How many kilograms of mass are
converted to energy in the explosion? (b) What is the ratio
Δm/m
of
mass destroyed to the original mass of the star?
48.(a) Using data fromTable 7.1, calculate the mass converted to
energy by the fission of 1.00 kg of uranium. (b) What is the ratio of
mass destroyed to the original mass,
Δm/m
?
49.(a) Using data fromTable 7.1, calculate the amount of mass
converted to energy by the fusion of 1.00 kg of hydrogen. (b) What is
the ratio of mass destroyed to the original mass,
Δm/m
? (c) How
does this compare with
Δm/m
for the fission of 1.00 kg of uranium?
50.There is approximately
10
34
J
of energy available from fusion of
hydrogen in the world’s oceans. (a) If
10
33
J
of this energy were
utilized, what would be the decrease in mass of the oceans? (b) How
great a volume of water does this correspond to? (c) Comment on
whether this is a significant fraction of the total mass of the oceans.
51.A muon has a rest mass energy of 105.7 MeV, and it decays into an
electron and a massless particle. (a) If all the lost mass is converted
into the electron’s kinetic energy, find
γ
for the electron. (b) What is the
electron’s velocity?
52.A
π
-meson is a particle that decays into a muon and a massless
particle. The
π
-meson has a rest mass energy of 139.6 MeV, and the
muon has a rest mass energy of 105.7 MeV. Suppose the
π
-meson is
at rest and all of the missing mass goes into the muon’s kinetic energy.
How fast will the muon move?
53.(a) Calculate the relativistic kinetic energy of a 1000-kg car moving
at 30.0 m/s if the speed of light were only 45.0 m/s. (b) Find the ratio of
the relativistic kinetic energy to classical.
54.Alpha decay is nuclear decay in which a helium nucleus is emitted.
If the helium nucleus has a mass of
6.80×10
−27
kg
and is given 5.00
MeV of kinetic energy, what is its velocity?
55.(a) Beta decay is nuclear decay in which an electron is emitted. If
the electron is given 0.750 MeV of kinetic energy, what is its velocity?
(b) Comment on how the high velocity is consistent with the kinetic
energy as it compares to the rest mass energy of the electron.
56.A positron is an antimatter version of the electron, having exactly
the same mass. When a positron and an electron meet, they annihilate,
converting all of their mass into energy. (a) Find the energy released,
assuming negligible kinetic energy before the annihilation. (b) If this
energy is given to a proton in the form of kinetic energy, what is its
velocity? (c) If this energy is given to another electron in the form of
kinetic energy, what is its velocity?
57.What is the kinetic energy in MeV of a
π
-meson that lives
1.40×10
−16
s
as measured in the laboratory, and
0.840×10
−16
s
when at rest relative to an observer, given that its rest energy is 135
MeV?
58.Find the kinetic energy in MeV of a neutron with a measured life
span of 2065 s, given its rest energy is 939.6 MeV, and rest life span is
900s.
59.(a) Show that
(pc)
2
/(mc
2
)
2
=γ
2
−1
. This means that at large
velocities
pc>>mc
2
. (b) Is
Epc
when
γ=30.0
, as for the
astronaut discussed in the twin paradox?
60.One cosmic ray neutron has a velocity of
0.250c
relative to the
Earth. (a) What is the neutron’s total energy in MeV? (b) Find its
1026 CHAPTER 28 | SPECIAL RELATIVITY
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
momentum. (c) Is
Epc
in this situation? Discuss in terms of the
equation given in part (a) of the previous problem.
61.What is
γ
for a proton having a mass energy of 938.3 MeV
accelerated through an effective potential of 1.0 TV (teravolt) at
Fermilab outside Chicago?
62.(a) What is the effective accelerating potential for electrons at the
Stanford Linear Accelerator, if
γ=1.00×10
5
for them? (b) What is
their total energy (nearly the same as kinetic in this case) in GeV?
63.(a) Using data fromTable 7.1, find the mass destroyed when the
energy in a barrel of crude oil is released. (b) Given these barrels
contain 200 liters and assuming the density of crude oil is
750 kg/m
3
,
what is the ratio of mass destroyed to original mass,
Δm/m
?
64.(a) Calculate the energy released by the destruction of 1.00 kg of
mass. (b) How many kilograms could be lifted to a 10.0 km height by
this amount of energy?
65.A Van de Graaff accelerator utilizes a 50.0 MV potential difference
to accelerate charged particles such as protons. (a) What is the velocity
of a proton accelerated by such a potential? (b) An electron?
66.Suppose you use an average of
500 kW·h
of electric energy per
month in your home. (a) How long would 1.00 g of mass converted to
electric energy with an efficiency of 38.0% last you? (b) How many
homes could be supplied at the
500 kW·h
per month rate for one
year by the energy from the described mass conversion?
67.(a) A nuclear power plant converts energy from nuclear fission into
electricity with an efficiency of 35.0%. How much mass is destroyed in
one year to produce a continuous 1000 MW of electric power? (b) Do
you think it would be possible to observe this mass loss if the total mass
of the fuel is
10
4
kg
?
68.Nuclear-powered rockets were researched for some years before
safety concerns became paramount. (a) What fraction of a rocket’s
mass would have to be destroyed to get it into a low Earth orbit,
neglecting the decrease in gravity? (Assume an orbital altitude of 250
km, and calculate both the kinetic energy (classical) and the
gravitational potential energy needed.) (b) If the ship has a mass of
1.00×10
5
kg
(100 tons), what total yield nuclear explosion in tons of
TNT is needed?
69.The Sun produces energy at a rate of
4.00×10
26
W by the fusion
of hydrogen. (a) How many kilograms of hydrogen undergo fusion each
second? (b) If the Sun is 90.0% hydrogen and half of this can undergo
fusion before the Sun changes character, how long could it produce
energy at its current rate? (c) How many kilograms of mass is the Sun
losing per second? (d) What fraction of its mass will it have lost in the
time found in part (b)?
70.Unreasonable Results
A proton has a mass of
1.67×10
−27
kg
. A physicist measures the
proton’s total energy to be 50.0 MeV. (a) What is the proton’s kinetic
energy? (b) What is unreasonable about this result? (c) Which
assumptions are unreasonable or inconsistent?
71.Construct Your Own Problem
Consider a highly relativistic particle. Discuss what is meant by the term
“highly relativistic.” (Note that, in part, it means that the particle cannot
be massless.) Construct a problem in which you calculate the
wavelength of such a particle and show that it is very nearly the same
as the wavelength of a massless particle, such as a photon, with the
same energy. Among the things to be considered are the rest energy of
the particle (it should be a known particle) and its total energy, which
should be large compared to its rest energy.
72.Construct Your Own Problem
Consider an astronaut traveling to another star at a relativistic velocity.
Construct a problem in which you calculate the time for the trip as
observed on the Earth and as observed by the astronaut. Also calculate
the amount of mass that must be converted to energy to get the
astronaut and ship to the velocity travelled. Among the things to be
considered are the distance to the star, the velocity, and the mass of the
astronaut and ship. Unless your instructor directs you otherwise, do not
include any energy given to other masses, such as rocket propellants.
CHAPTER 28 | SPECIAL RELATIVITY Y 1027
1028 CHAPTER 28 | SPECIAL RELATIVITY
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested