asp net pdf viewer control c# : Break pdf password online SDK Library service wpf asp.net html dnn PHYS101_OpenStaxCollege_College-Physics104-part1732

molecules, it can do what visible light cannot. One of the beneficial aspects of UV is that it triggers the production of vitamin D in the skin, whereas
visible light has insufficient energy per photon to alter the molecules that trigger this production. Infantile jaundice is treated by exposing the baby to
UV (with eye protection), called phototherapy, the beneficial effects of which are thought to be related to its ability to help prevent the buildup of
potentially toxic bilirubin in the blood.
Example 29.3Photon Energy and Effects for UV
Short-wavelength UV is sometimes called vacuum UV, because it is strongly absorbed by air and must be studied in a vacuum. Calculate the
photon energy in eV for 100-nm vacuum UV, and estimate the number of molecules it could ionize or break apart.
Strategy
Using the equation
E=hf
and appropriate constants, we can find the photon energy and compare it with energy information inTable 29.1.
Solution
The energy of a photon is given by
(29.17)
E=hf=
hc
λ
.
Using
hc=1240 eV⋅nm,
we find that
(29.18)
E=
hc
λ
=
1240 eV⋅nm
100 nm
=12.4 eV.
Discussion
According toTable 29.1, this photon energy might be able to ionize an atom or molecule, and it is about what is needed to break up a tightly
bound molecule, since they are bound by approximately 10 eV. This photon energy could destroy about a dozen weakly bound molecules.
Because of its high photon energy, UV disrupts atoms and molecules it interacts with. One good consequence is that all but the longest-
wavelength UV is strongly absorbed and is easily blocked by sunglasses. In fact, most of the Sun’s UV is absorbed by a thin layer of ozone in the
upper atmosphere, protecting sensitive organisms on Earth. Damage to our ozone layer by the addition of such chemicals as CFC’s has reduced
this protection for us.
Visible Light
The range of photon energies forvisible lightfrom red to violet is 1.63 to 3.26 eV, respectively (left for this chapter’s Problems and Exercises to
verify). These energies are on the order of those between outer electron shells in atoms and molecules. This means that these photons can be
absorbed by atoms and molecules. Asinglephoton can actually stimulate the retina, for example, by altering a receptor molecule that then triggers a
nerve impulse. Photons can be absorbed or emitted only by atoms and molecules that have precisely the correct quantized energy step to do so. For
example, if a red photon of frequency
f
encounters a molecule that has an energy step,
ΔE,
equal to
hf,
then the photon can be absorbed.
Violet flowers absorb red and reflect violet; this implies there is no energy step between levels in the receptor molecule equal to the violet photon’s
energy, but there is an energy step for the red.
There are some noticeable differences in the characteristics of light between the two ends of the visible spectrum that are due to photon energies.
Red light has insufficient photon energy to expose most black-and-white film, and it is thus used to illuminate darkrooms where such film is
developed. Since violet light has a higher photon energy, dyes that absorb violet tend to fade more quickly than those that do not. (SeeFigure
29.15.) Take a look at some faded color posters in a storefront some time, and you will notice that the blues and violets are the last to fade. This is
because other dyes, such as red and green dyes, absorb blue and violet photons, the higher energies of which break up their weakly bound
molecules. (Complex molecules such as those in dyes and DNA tend to be weakly bound.) Blue and violet dyes reflect those colors and, therefore,
do not absorb these more energetic photons, thus suffering less molecular damage.
CHAPTER 29 | INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM PHYSICS S 1039
Break pdf password online - Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application
split pdf by bookmark; acrobat separate pdf pages
Break pdf password online - VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Splitter Control to Disassemble PDF Document
break up pdf file; pdf split and merge
Figure 29.15Why do the reds, yellows, and greens fade before the blues and violets when exposed to the Sun, as with this poster? The answer is related to photon energy.
(credit: Deb Collins, Flickr)
Transparent materials, such as some glasses, do not absorb any visible light, because there is no energy step in the atoms or molecules that could
absorb the light. Since individual photons interact with individual atoms, it is nearly impossible to have two photons absorbed simultaneously to reach
a large energy step. Because of its lower photon energy, visible light can sometimes pass through many kilometers of a substance, while higher
frequencies like UV, x ray, and
γ
rays are absorbed, because they have sufficient photon energy to ionize the material.
Example 29.4How Many Photons per Second Does a Typical Light Bulb Produce?
Assuming that 10.0% of a 100-W light bulb’s energy output is in the visible range (typical for incandescent bulbs) with an average wavelength of
580 nm, calculate the number of visible photons emitted per second.
Strategy
Power is energy per unit time, and so if we can find the energy per photon, we can determine the number of photons per second. This will best
be done in joules, since power is given in watts, which are joules per second.
Solution
The power in visible light production is 10.0% of 100 W, or 10.0 J/s. The energy of the average visible photon is found by substituting the given
average wavelength into the formula
(29.19)
E=
hc
λ
.
This produces
(29.20)
E=
(6.63×10
–34
J⋅s)(3.00×10
8
m/s)
580×10
–9
m
=3.43×10
–19
J.
The number of visible photons per second is thus
(29.21)
photon/s=
10.0 J/s
3.43×10
–19
J/photon
=2.92×10
19
photon/s.
Discussion
This incredible number of photons per second is verification that individual photons are insignificant in ordinary human experience. It is also a
verification of the correspondence principle—on the macroscopic scale, quantization becomes essentially continuous or classical. Finally, there
are so many photons emitted by a 100-W lightbulb that it can be seen by the unaided eye many kilometers away.
Lower-Energy Photons
Infrared radiation (IR)has even lower photon energies than visible light and cannot significantly alter atoms and molecules. IR can be absorbed and
emitted by atoms and molecules, particularly between closely spaced states. IR is extremely strongly absorbed by water, for example, because water
molecules have many states separated by energies on the order of
10
–5
eV
to
10
–2
eV,
well within the IR and microwave energy ranges. This is
why in the IR range, skin is almost jet black, with an emissivity near 1—there are many states in water molecules in the skin that can absorb a large
range of IR photon energies. Not all molecules have this property. Air, for example, is nearly transparent to many IR frequencies.
1040 CHAPTER 29 | INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Success"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
break apart a pdf file; pdf separate pages
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. FileType.IMG_JPEG); switch (result) { case ConvertResult. NO_ERROR: Console.WriteLine("Success"); break; case ConvertResult
break pdf into single pages; cannot select text in pdf
Microwavesare the highest frequencies that can be produced by electronic circuits, although they are also produced naturally. Thus microwaves are
similar to IR but do not extend to as high frequencies. There are states in water and other molecules that have the same frequency and energy as
microwaves, typically about
10
–5
eV.
This is one reason why food absorbs microwaves more strongly than many other materials, making
microwave ovens an efficient way of putting energy directly into food.
Photon energies for both IR and microwaves are so low that huge numbers of photons are involved in any significant energy transfer by IR or
microwaves (such as warming yourself with a heat lamp or cooking pizza in the microwave). Visible light, IR, microwaves, and all lower frequencies
cannot produce ionization with single photons and do not ordinarily have the hazards of higher frequencies. When visible, IR, or microwave radiation
ishazardous, such as the inducement of cataracts by microwaves, the hazard is due to huge numbers of photons acting together (not to an
accumulation of photons, such as sterilization by weak UV). The negative effects of visible, IR, or microwave radiation can be thermal effects, which
could be produced by any heat source. But one difference is that at very high intensity, strong electric and magnetic fields can be produced by
photons acting together. Such electromagnetic fields (EMF) can actually ionize materials.
Misconception Alert: High-Voltage Power Lines
Although some people think that living near high-voltage power lines is hazardous to one’s health, ongoing studies of the transient field effects
produced by these lines show their strengths to be insufficient to cause damage. Demographic studies also fail to show significant correlation of
ill effects with high-voltage power lines. The American Physical Society issued a report over 10 years ago on power-line fields, which concluded
that the scientific literature and reviews of panels show no consistent, significant link between cancer and power-line fields. They also felt that the
“diversion of resources to eliminate a threat which has no persuasive scientific basis is disturbing.”
It is virtually impossible to detect individual photons having frequencies below microwave frequencies, because of their low photon energy. But the
photons are there. A continuous EM wave can be modeled as photons. At low frequencies, EM waves are generally treated as time- and position-
varying electric and magnetic fields with no discernible quantization. This is another example of the correspondence principle in situations involving
huge numbers of photons.
PhET Explorations: Color Vision
Make a whole rainbow by mixing red, green, and blue light. Change the wavelength of a monochromatic beam or filter white light. View the light
as a solid beam, or see the individual photons.
Figure 29.16Color Vision (http://cnx.org/content/m42563/1.5/color-vision_en.jar)
29.4Photon Momentum
Measuring Photon Momentum
The quantum of EM radiation we call aphotonhas properties analogous to those of particles we can see, such as grains of sand. A photon interacts
as a unit in collisions or when absorbed, rather than as an extensive wave. Massive quanta, like electrons, also act like macroscopic
particles—something we expect, because they are the smallest units of matter. Particles carry momentum as well as energy. Despite photons having
no mass, there has long been evidence that EM radiation carries momentum. (Maxwell and others who studied EM waves predicted that they would
carry momentum.) It is now a well-established fact that photonsdohave momentum. In fact, photon momentum is suggested by the photoelectric
effect, where photons knock electrons out of a substance.Figure 29.17shows macroscopic evidence of photon momentum.
CHAPTER 29 | INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM PHYSICS S 1041
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET source code. Offer PDF page break inserting function.
can't cut and paste from pdf; break a pdf apart
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
reader split pdf; cannot select text in pdf file
Figure 29.17The tails of the Hale-Bopp comet point away from the Sun, evidence that light has momentum. Dust emanating from the body of the comet forms this tail.
Particles of dust are pushed away from the Sun by light reflecting from them. The blue ionized gas tail is also produced by photons interacting with atoms in the comet
material. (credit: Geoff Chester, U.S. Navy, via Wikimedia Commons)
Figure 29.17shows a comet with two prominent tails. What most people do not know about the tails is that they always pointawayfrom the Sun
rather than trailing behind the comet (like the tail of Bo Peep’s sheep). Comet tails are composed of gases and dust evaporated from the body of the
comet and ionized gas. The dust particles recoil away from the Sun when photons scatter from them. Evidently, photons carry momentum in the
direction of their motion (away from the Sun), and some of this momentum is transferred to dust particles in collisions. Gas atoms and molecules in
the blue tail are most affected by other particles of radiation, such as protons and electrons emanating from the Sun, rather than by the momentum of
photons.
Connections: Conservation of Momentum
Not only is momentum conserved in all realms of physics, but all types of particles are found to have momentum. We expect particles with mass
to have momentum, but now we see that massless particles including photons also carry momentum.
Momentum is conserved in quantum mechanics just as it is in relativity and classical physics. Some of the earliest direct experimental evidence of
this came from scattering of x-ray photons by electrons in substances, named Compton scattering after the American physicist Arthur H. Compton
(1892–1962). Around 1923, Compton observed that x rays scattered from materials had a decreased energy and correctly analyzed this as being due
to the scattering of photons from electrons. This phenomenon could be handled as a collision between two particles—a photon and an electron at
rest in the material. Energy and momentum are conserved in the collision. (SeeFigure 29.18) He won a Nobel Prize in 1929 for the discovery of this
scattering, now called theCompton effect, because it helped prove thatphoton momentumis given by
(29.22)
p=
h
λ
,
where
h
is Planck’s constant and
λ
is the photon wavelength. (Note that relativistic momentum given as
p=γmu
is valid only for particles having
mass.)
1042 CHAPTER 29 | INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
For VB.NET online guide, please refer to Query & device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod
split pdf into multiple files; break pdf into smaller files
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
Online C# Guide for XImage.Twain Installation, Deployment RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod
break up pdf into individual pages; pdf insert page break
Figure 29.18The Compton effect is the name given to the scattering of a photon by an electron. Energy and momentum are conserved, resulting in a reduction of both for the
scattered photon. Studying this effect, Compton verified that photons have momentum.
We can see that photon momentum is small, since
p=h/λ
and
h
is very small. It is for this reason that we do not ordinarily observe photon
momentum. Our mirrors do not recoil when light reflects from them (except perhaps in cartoons). Compton saw the effects of photon momentum
because he was observing x rays, which have a small wavelength and a relatively large momentum, interacting with the lightest of particles, the
electron.
Example 29.5Electron and Photon Momentum Compared
(a) Calculate the momentum of a visible photon that has a wavelength of 500 nm. (b) Find the velocity of an electron having the same
momentum. (c) What is the energy of the electron, and how does it compare with the energy of the photon?
Strategy
Finding the photon momentum is a straightforward application of its definition:
p=
h
λ
. If we find the photon momentum is small, then we can
assume that an electron with the same momentum will be nonrelativistic, making it easy to find its velocity and kinetic energy from the classical
formulas.
Solution for (a)
Photon momentum is given by the equation:
(29.23)
p=
h
λ
.
Entering the given photon wavelength yields
(29.24)
p=
6.63×10
–34
J⋅s
500×10
–9
m
=1.33×10
–27
kg⋅m/s.
Solution for (b)
Since this momentum is indeed small, we will use the classical expression
p=mv
to find the velocity of an electron with this momentum.
Solving for
v
and using the known value for the mass of an electron gives
(29.25)
v=
p
m
=
1.33×10
–27
kg⋅m/s
9.11×10
–31
kg
=1460 m/s≈1460 m/s.
Solution for (c)
The electron has kinetic energy, which is classically given by
(29.26)
KE
e
=
1
2
mv
2
.
Thus,
(29.27)
KE
e
=
1
2
(9.11×10
–3
kg)(1455 m/s)
2
=9.64×10
–25
J.
Converting this to eV by multiplying by
(1 eV)/(1.602×10
–19
J)
yields
(29.28)
KE
e
=6.02×10
–6
eV.
The photon energy
E
is
(29.29)
E=
hc
λ
=
1240 eV⋅nm
500 nm
=2.48 eV,
CHAPTER 29 | INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM PHYSICS S 1043
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
are a VB.NET developer, you may see online tutorial for frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
acrobat split pdf bookmark; pdf print error no pages selected
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. if (device.Compression != TwainCompressionMode.Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
break pdf into separate pages; break apart pdf pages
which is about five orders of magnitude greater.
Discussion
Photon momentum is indeed small. Even if we have huge numbers of them, the total momentum they carry is small. An electron with the same
momentum has a 1460 m/s velocity, which is clearly nonrelativistic. A more massive particle with the same momentum would have an even
smaller velocity. This is borne out by the fact that it takes far less energy to give an electron the same momentum as a photon. But on a
quantum-mechanical scale, especially for high-energy photons interacting with small masses, photon momentum is significant. Even on a large
scale, photon momentum can have an effect if there are enough of them and if there is nothing to prevent the slow recoil of matter. Comet tails
are one example, but there are also proposals to build space sails that use huge low-mass mirrors (made of aluminized Mylar) to reflect sunlight.
In the vacuum of space, the mirrors would gradually recoil and could actually take spacecraft from place to place in the solar system. (See
Figure 29.19.)
Figure 29.19(a) Space sails have been proposed that use the momentum of sunlight reflecting from gigantic low-mass sails to propel spacecraft about the solar system. A
Russian test model of this (the Cosmos 1) was launched in 2005, but did not make it into orbit due to a rocket failure. (b) A U.S. version of this, labeled LightSail-1, is
scheduled for trial launches in the first part of this decade. It will have a 40-m
2
sail. (credit: Kim Newton/NASA)
Relativistic Photon Momentum
There is a relationship between photon momentum
p
and photon energy
E
that is consistent with the relation given previously for the relativistic
total energy of a particle as
E
2
=(pc)
2
+(mc)
2
. We know
m
is zero for a photon, but
p
is not, so that
E
2
=(pc)
2
+(mc)
2
becomes
(29.30)
E=pc,
or
(29.31)
p=
E
c
(photons).
To check the validity of this relation, note that
E=hc/λ
for a photon. Substituting this into
p=E/c
yields
(29.32)
p=(hc/λ)/c=
h
λ
,
as determined experimentally and discussed above. Thus,
p=E/c
is equivalent to Compton’s result
p=h/λ
. For a further verification of the
relationship between photon energy and momentum, seeExample 29.6.
Photon Detectors
Almost all detection systems talked about thus far—eyes, photographic plates, photomultiplier tubes in microscopes, and CCD cameras—rely on
particle-like properties of photons interacting with a sensitive area. A change is caused and either the change is cascaded or zillions of points are
recorded to form an image we detect. These detectors are used in biomedical imaging systems, and there is ongoing research into improving the
efficiency of receiving photons, particularly by cooling detection systems and reducing thermal effects.
Example 29.6Photon Energy and Momentum
Show that
p=E/c
for the photon considered in theExample 29.5.
Strategy
We will take the energy
E
found inExample 29.5, divide it by the speed of light, and see if the same momentum is obtained as before.
Solution
Given that the energy of the photon is 2.48 eV and converting this to joules, we get
(29.33)
p=
E
c
=
(2.48 eV)(1.60×10
–19
J/eV)
3.00×10
8
m/s
=1.33×10
–27
kg⋅m/s.
1044 CHAPTER 29 | INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Discussion
This value for momentum is the same as found before (note that unrounded values are used in all calculations to avoid even small rounding
errors), an expected verification of the relationship
p=E/c
. This also means the relationship between energy, momentum, and mass given by
E
2
=(pc)
2
+(mc)
2
applies to both matter and photons. Once again, note that
p
is not zero, even when
m
is.
Problem-Solving Suggestion
Note that the forms of the constants
h=4.14×10
–15
eV⋅s
and
hc=1240 eV⋅nm
may be particularly useful for this section’s Problems
and Exercises.
29.5The Particle-Wave Duality
We have long known that EM radiation is a wave, capable of interference and diffraction. We now see that light can be modeled as photons, which
are massless particles. This may seem contradictory, since we ordinarily deal with large objects that never act like both wave and particle. An ocean
wave, for example, looks nothing like a rock. To understand small-scale phenomena, we make analogies with the large-scale phenomena we observe
directly. When we say something behaves like a wave, we mean it shows interference effects analogous to those seen in overlapping water waves.
(SeeFigure 29.20.) Two examples of waves are sound and EM radiation. When we say something behaves like a particle, we mean that it interacts
as a discrete unit with no interference effects. Examples of particles include electrons, atoms, and photons of EM radiation. How do we talk about a
phenomenon that acts like both a particle and a wave?
Figure 29.20(a) The interference pattern for light through a double slit is a wave property understood by analogy to water waves. (b) The properties of photons having
quantized energy and momentum and acting as a concentrated unit are understood by analogy to macroscopic particles.
There is no doubt that EM radiation interferes and has the properties of wavelength and frequency. There is also no doubt that it behaves as
particles—photons with discrete energy. We call this twofold nature theparticle-wave duality, meaning that EM radiation has both particle and wave
properties. This so-called duality is simply a term for properties of the photon analogous to phenomena we can observe directly, on a macroscopic
scale. If this term seems strange, it is because we do not ordinarily observe details on the quantum level directly, and our observations yield either
particleorwavelike properties, but never both simultaneously.
Since we have a particle-wave duality for photons, and since we have seen connections between photons and matter in that both have momentum, it
is reasonable to ask whether there is a particle-wave duality for matter as well. If the EM radiation we once thought to be a pure wave has particle
properties, is it possible that matter has wave properties? The answer is yes. The consequences are tremendous, as we will begin to see in the next
section.
PhET Explorations: Quantum Wave Interference
When do photons, electrons, and atoms behave like particles and when do they behave like waves? Watch waves spread out and interfere as
they pass through a double slit, then get detected on a screen as tiny dots. Use quantum detectors to explore how measurements change the
waves and the patterns they produce on the screen.
Figure 29.21Quantum Wave Interference (http://cnx.org/content/m42573/1.3/quantum-wave-interference_en.jar)
CHAPTER 29 | INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM PHYSICS S 1045
29.6The Wave Nature of Matter
De Broglie Wavelength
In 1923 a French physics graduate student named Prince Louis-Victor de Broglie (1892–1987) made a radical proposal based on the hope that
nature is symmetric. If EM radiation has both particle and wave properties, then nature would be symmetric if matter also had both particle and wave
properties. If what we once thought of as an unequivocal wave (EM radiation) is also a particle, then what we think of as an unequivocal particle
(matter) may also be a wave. De Broglie’s suggestion, made as part of his doctoral thesis, was so radical that it was greeted with some skepticism. A
copy of his thesis was sent to Einstein, who said it was not only probably correct, but that it might be of fundamental importance. With the support of
Einstein and a few other prominent physicists, de Broglie was awarded his doctorate.
De Broglie took both relativity and quantum mechanics into account to develop the proposal thatall particles have a wavelength, given by
(29.34)
λ=
h
p
(matter and photons),
where
h
is Planck’s constant and
p
is momentum. This is defined to be thede Broglie wavelength. (Note that we already have this for photons,
from the equation
p=h/λ
.) The hallmark of a wave is interference. If matter is a wave, then it must exhibit constructive and destructive
interference. Why isn’t this ordinarily observed? The answer is that in order to see significant interference effects, a wave must interact with an object
about the same size as its wavelength. Since
h
is very small,
λ
is also small, especially for macroscopic objects. A 3-kg bowling ball moving at 10
m/s, for example, has
(29.35)
λ=h/p=(6.63×10
–34
J·s)/[(3 kg)(10 m/s)]=2×10
–35
m.
This means that to see its wave characteristics, the bowling ball would have to interact with something about
10
–35
m
in size—far smaller than
anything known. When waves interact with objects much larger than their wavelength, they show negligible interference effects and move in straight
lines (such as light rays in geometric optics). To get easily observed interference effects from particles of matter, the longest wavelength and hence
smallest mass possible would be useful. Therefore, this effect was first observed with electrons.
American physicists Clinton J. Davisson and Lester H. Germer in 1925 and, independently, British physicist G. P. Thomson (son of J. J. Thomson,
discoverer of the electron) in 1926 scattered electrons from crystals and found diffraction patterns. These patterns are exactly consistent with
interference of electrons having the de Broglie wavelength and are somewhat analogous to light interacting with a diffraction grating. (SeeFigure
29.22.)
Connections: Waves
All microscopic particles, whether massless, like photons, or having mass, like electrons, have wave properties. The relationship between
momentum and wavelength is fundamental for all particles.
De Broglie’s proposal of a wave nature for all particles initiated a remarkably productive era in which the foundations for quantum mechanics were
laid. In 1926, the Austrian physicist Erwin Schrödinger (1887–1961) published four papers in which the wave nature of particles was treated explicitly
with wave equations. At the same time, many others began important work. Among them was German physicist Werner Heisenberg (1901–1976)
who, among many other contributions to quantum mechanics, formulated a mathematical treatment of the wave nature of matter that used matrices
rather than wave equations. We will deal with some specifics in later sections, but it is worth noting that de Broglie’s work was a watershed for the
development of quantum mechanics. De Broglie was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1929 for his vision, as were Davisson and G. P. Thomson in 1937
for their experimental verification of de Broglie’s hypothesis.
Figure 29.22This diffraction pattern was obtained for electrons diffracted by crystalline silicon. Bright regions are those of constructive interference, while dark regions are
those of destructive interference. (credit: Ndthe, Wikimedia Commons)
1046 CHAPTER 29 | INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Example 29.7Electron Wavelength versus Velocity and Energy
For an electron having a de Broglie wavelength of 0.167 nm (appropriate for interacting with crystal lattice structures that are about this size): (a)
Calculate the electron’s velocity, assuming it is nonrelativistic. (b) Calculate the electron’s kinetic energy in eV.
Strategy
For part (a), since the de Broglie wavelength is given, the electron’s velocity can be obtained from
λ=h/p
by using the nonrelativistic formula
for momentum,
p=mv.
For part (b), once
v
is obtained (and it has been verified that
v
is nonrelativistic), the classical kinetic energy is
simply
(1/2)mv
2
.
Solution for (a)
Substituting the nonrelativistic formula for momentum (
p=mv
) into the de Broglie wavelength gives
(29.36)
λ=
h
p
=
h
mv
.
Solving for
v
gives
(29.37)
v=
h
.
Substituting known values yields
(29.38)
v=
6.63×10
–34
J⋅s
(9.11×10
–31
kg)(0.167×10
–9
m)
=4.36×10
6
m/s.
Solution for (b)
While fast compared with a car, this electron’s speed is not highly relativistic, and so we can comfortably use the classical formula to find the
electron’s kinetic energy and convert it to eV as requested.
(29.39)
KE =
1
2
mv
2
=
1
2
(9.11×10
–31
kg)(4.36×10
6
m/s)
2
= (86.4×10
–18
J)
1 eV
1.602×10
–19
J
= 54.0 eV
Discussion
This low energy means that these 0.167-nm electrons could be obtained by accelerating them through a 54.0-V electrostatic potential, an easy
task. The results also confirm the assumption that the electrons are nonrelativistic, since their velocity is just over 1% of the speed of light and
the kinetic energy is about 0.01% of the rest energy of an electron (0.511 MeV). If the electrons had turned out to be relativistic, we would have
had to use more involved calculations employing relativistic formulas.
Electron Microscopes
One consequence or use of the wave nature of matter is found in the electron microscope. As we have discussed, there is a limit to the detail
observed with any probe having a wavelength. Resolution, or observable detail, is limited to about one wavelength. Since a potential of only 54 V can
produce electrons with sub-nanometer wavelengths, it is easy to get electrons with much smaller wavelengths than those of visible light (hundreds of
nanometers). Electron microscopes can, thus, be constructed to detect much smaller details than optical microscopes. (SeeFigure 29.23.)
There are basically two types of electron microscopes. The transmission electron microscope (TEM) accelerates electrons that are emitted from a hot
filament (the cathode). The beam is broadened and then passes through the sample. A magnetic lens focuses the beam image onto a fluorescent
screen, a photographic plate, or (most probably) a CCD (light sensitive camera), from which it is transferred to a computer. The TEM is similar to the
optical microscope, but it requires a thin sample examined in a vacuum. However it can resolve details as small as 0.1 nm (
10
−10
m
), providing
magnifications of 100 million times the size of the original object. The TEM has allowed us to see individual atoms and structure of cell nuclei.
The scanning electron microscope (SEM) provides images by using secondary electrons produced by the primary beam interacting with the surface
of the sample (seeFigure 29.23). The SEM also uses magnetic lenses to focus the beam onto the sample. However, it moves the beam around
electrically to “scan” the sample in thexandydirections. A CCD detector is used to process the data for each electron position, producing images
like the one at the beginning of this chapter. The SEM has the advantage of not requiring a thin sample and of providing a 3-D view. However, its
resolution is about ten times less than a TEM.
CHAPTER 29 | INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM PHYSICS S 1047
Figure 29.23Schematic of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) (a) used to observe small details, such as those seen in this image of a tooth of aHimipristis, a type of
shark (b). (credit: Dallas Krentzel, Flickr)
Electrons were the first particles with mass to be directly confirmed to have the wavelength proposed by de Broglie. Subsequently, protons, helium
nuclei, neutrons, and many others have been observed to exhibit interference when they interact with objects having sizes similar to their de Broglie
wavelength. The de Broglie wavelength for massless particles was well established in the 1920s for photons, and it has since been observed that all
massless particles have a de Broglie wavelength
λ=h/p.
The wave nature of all particles is a universal characteristic of nature. We shall see in
following sections that implications of the de Broglie wavelength include the quantization of energy in atoms and molecules, and an alteration of our
basic view of nature on the microscopic scale. The next section, for example, shows that there are limits to the precision with which we may make
predictions, regardless of how hard we try. There are even limits to the precision with which we may measure an object’s location or energy.
Making Connections: A Submicroscopic Diffraction Grating
The wave nature of matter allows it to exhibit all the characteristics of other, more familiar, waves. Diffraction gratings, for example, produce
diffraction patterns for light that depend on grating spacing and the wavelength of the light. This effect, as with most wave phenomena, is most
pronounced when the wave interacts with objects having a size similar to its wavelength. For gratings, this is the spacing between multiple slits.)
When electrons interact with a system having a spacing similar to the electron wavelength, they show the same types of interference patterns as
light does for diffraction gratings, as shown at top left inFigure 29.24.
Atoms are spaced at regular intervals in a crystal as parallel planes, as shown in the bottom part ofFigure 29.24. The spacings between these
planes act like the openings in a diffraction grating. At certain incident angles, the paths of electrons scattering from successive planes differ by
one wavelength and, thus, interfere constructively. At other angles, the path length differences are not an integral wavelength, and there is partial
to total destructive interference. This type of scattering from a large crystal with well-defined lattice planes can produce dramatic interference
patterns. It is calledBragg reflection, for the father-and-son team who first explored and analyzed it in some detail. The expanded view also
shows the path-length differences and indicates how these depend on incident angle
θ
in a manner similar to the diffraction patterns for x rays
reflecting from a crystal.
1048 CHAPTER 29 | INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM PHYSICS
This content is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11406/1.7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested